OBITUARTIES from the heart of the South Island

Timaru Cemetery - Nov. 2009

Star 5 January 1905, Page 3
Timaru, January 5  Mr Edward Acton, of Pleasant Point, one of the oldest South Canterbury settlers, died last night, after a lingering illness, aged seventy-one. Deceased took an active part in public life for many years, and was greatly esteemed for his many sterling qualities.

Star 20 June 1892, Page 3
Timaru, June 20. Mr Robert Allan, an old colonist, died this morning at the age of sixty-three. He was a partner of the late firm, Allan and Stumbles, railway and harbour works contractors, and had previously been in business as a mason and quarryman at Dunedin.

Timaru Herald, 23 May 1916, Page 11 Mr W.G. Allen
On Sunday morning at Rathmore Street, Timaru, the death occurred of Mr W.G. Allen, at the age of 50 years. The late Mr Alien, who was born in England, arrived at an early age in New Zealand by the Charlotte Jane in the fifties. He first settled in Christchurch and for some time was engaged in carrying the mails between Christchurch and Timaru. Later on he entered the hotel business in Timaru and was for some years proprietor proprietor of the Royal and late of the old Commercial Hotel. He relinquished hotel-keeping and entered the employ of Mr W. Evans of Timaru, with whom he remained until his retirement into private life 38 years ago. In 1857 he married Miss E. Toombs of Christchurch who pre-deceased him 13 years ago. For many years Mr Allen was blind. He leaves a family of four sons, one of whom is Mr P.G. Allen of Timaru, the well known seed merchant and florist.

Evening Post, 10 July 1929, Page 13 J. F. ARNOLD, EX-M.P.
The death is announced from Timaru of James Frederick Arnold, aged 70. The late Mr. Arnold was first elected to the House of Representatives as one of the members for Dunedin in 1899 and was re-elected in 1902. Mr. Arnold was born in Guernsey in 1859, and in 1804 he came to New Zealand with his parents. He began work in a boot manufactory, remaining at the trade for eight years. In 1882 he removed to Dunedin and was employed by Sargood, Son, and Ewen, with which firm he remained until he entered Parliament. As an advocate for bootmakers he became known as the "bootmakers' lawyer," and in 1899 was elected president of the Bootmakers' Union. Mr. Arnold interested himself actively in technical and primary education. For six years he was a member of the Mornington Borough Council and in 1901 successfully piloted through Parliament a Bill to enable that council to acquire the property of the Mornington Tramway Company. He was also a member of a Parliamentary party which visited the Cook Islands to familiarise themselves with the needs of the group. Mr. Arnold was an Oddfellow and also a member of the Masonic Order. Of late years Mr. Arnold has resided in Timaru, where he held the position of Inspector of Labour.

Timaru Herald 23 June 1948 - Death
AUSTIN - On June 22, 1948, at his residence, King Street, Temuka, George Frederick, beloved husband of Matilda Austin, in his 74th year. Private interment. (S. Erwod)

North Otago Times 22 April 1911, Page 2
In our obituary notices to-day is recorded the death of Mr Adam Baillie, who some 24 years ago left Oamaru for Temuka. Mr Baillie came to Oamaru in 1867, and was on Totara in 1868, at the time when a disastrous flood swept a number of people away. He followed the calling of a saddler in this district for many years, and at one time had a business at Ngapara. He was a prominent mason, and in 1874 and 1875 was W.M. of the Waitaki Lodge. He left Oamaru in 1885, but during the time he resided here was a much respected resident.

Star 5 October 1907, Page 5
Timaru, October 5. Major Bamfield, who for twenty-two years was secretary of the South Canterbury Education Board, but retired two years ago on superannuation, died last night. Deceased was a native of Falmouth, and was educated for the Army. In 1857 he served with the 72nd Highlanders in India, under General Roberts, taking part in the capture of Kotah and numerous other battles, putting in twenty-three years active service. He came to New Zealand in 1875, first going into business in Christchurch, and then coming to Timaru as secretary of the Education and High School Boards.

Evening Post, 25 August 1937, Page 12 MR. ROBERT BELL
Ashburton, This Day. The death is announced in London of Mr. Robert Bell, chairman of directors and principal proprietor of the "Ashburton Guardian," managing director of the "Timaru Post," and president of the Press Congress of the world. The late Mr. Bell was born in Timaru in 1888 and was educated there and in Ashburton. He joined the "Ashburton Guardian" in 1903, and remained with that newspaper, serving on the literary as well as the commercial staff, until February, 1916. He became manager of the "Guardian" in 1908, and a director in 1911. He joined the New Zealand Expeditionary Force as n.c.o. in April, 1916, and served in France with the Canterbury Regiment, being seriously wounded in February, 1917. From 1918 to March 1922, he was advertising manager of the "Dominion," and he was managing director of the "Ashburton Guardian" and the "Timaru Post" since April, 1922. He was also a director of the Grey Valley Collieries, Ltd. Mr. Bell was president of the Ashburton High School Old Pupils' Association (1913-14), deputy chairman of the Ashburton Shakespeare' Club (1911--16), a member of the New Zealand "Round Table" Group, a member of the Dominion executive of the New. Zealand Returned Soldiers' Association (1919-25), and Canterbury provincial president (1923-25), representative of the rank and file of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on the New, Zealand Canteen and Regimental Fund Trust Board, president of the South Canterbury Chamber of Commerce (1926-27), a member of the executive of the New Zealand Newspaper Proprietors' Association (1927--30). He was one of the New Zealand delegates to the fourth Imperial Press Conference in London in 1930.

Ashburton Guardian, 15 June 1894, Page 2
The pioneers of Canterbury who settled here in the early days, when the country was nought but tussock and stone, and who have spent their lifetime in the service of the colony, are one by one passing away, and all too soon we shall find that those who have made our province what it is are no more. To-day we regretfully chronicle the death of two who were numbered amongst the early Canterbury settlers —Mr T. H. Anson and Mr John Bilton. Mr Anson has ever been most assiduous in promoting the public interest as a member of various public bodies, and his death will be a great lose, more especially in the Courtenay district where he resided. His death was comparatively sudden, his illness being less than a week's duration. Last Friday he attended a special meeting of the North Canterbury Education Board, from which he had to retire owing to illness occasioned through a chill he had caught when coming in from the country. The cold turned to pleurisy, of which disease he died at 8.30 p.m. yesterday. Mr John Bilton, died at Timaru on Thursday after a long illness. His age was sixty-four. Deceased came out in the Sir George Seymour as selected teacher of the church schools in the early settlement, and was the first Organist at St Michael's He was subsequently a master at Christ's College and a private tutor. In 1866 he settled in Timaru in business, with which he combined the profession of music. He was of a retiring disposition, well liked and respected for his amiability. He leaves a widow and ten children all grown up.

Otago Witness 29 October 1902, Page 56
The death of Mr G. Bird, one of the old settlers of Waimate, is announced. Mr Bird came out to the colony in the ship Ballock Myle [sic Ballochmyle] in 1874, and ever since he had lived in the Waimate district, where he has a wide circle of friends.

Evening Post, 19 February 1942, Page 9 MR JOHN BLACK
There passed away at Eastbourne recently Mr. John Black, J.P. Born at Sunderland, England, in 1865, he came to New Zealand in 1884 in the sailing ship Canterbury and commenced farming six years later at Oxford. In 1900 he bought a sheep run at Takitu, Waimate, and sold out twelve years later. During this period he served on the Hospital Board, the Timaru High School Board, and the Harbour Board, and as Mayor of Waimate. He was also a lieutenant in the Army Motor Reserve. He retired from public life in 1915, when he removed to Blenheim, and where he purchased the Leatharn sheep station. In 1929 he settled in Eastbourne, and was custodian of the borough tennis courts for thirteen years. Mr. Black was a student of medicine, for he came of a family which included eleven doctors. He was twice married. There were four children by the first marriage. His second wife and their daughter Hazel survive him.

The Press 7 November 1929 Obit.
A Canterbury pioneer of nearly eighty years' standing, Mr. John Blacker, died at his residence, Tuesday night at the age of 84 years. Mr Blacker was born in Tiverton, Devonshire, England, in 1845, and came to New Zealand at the age of six years with his parents, who first settled in Christchurch. Many of the main roads in the City to-day were formed out of the swamp under the direction of Mr Blacker, who later took up farming in the vicinity of Doyleston. He married Miss Jessie Doyle, of Leeston.

Evening Post
, 26 December 1942, Page 6
Mr. A. C. Blake, a well-known educationist, died in Wellington yesterday morning after a brief illness. Mr. Blake, who was born in Bangalore, India, in 1862, was the eldest son of the late Rev. Alexander Blake, M.A., Presbyterian' minister, and grandson of the late Rev. Benjamin Rice, of Bangalore, who for fifty years was a missionary in Mysore. The late Mr. A. C. Blake was educated at Otago Boys' High School and Canterbury College. For sixty years his life was devoted to education. From 1880 to 1928 he served in the teaching profession at the Sydenham, Waimate D.H.S., Timaru Main, Mount Cook, Te Aro, and Lyall Bay Schools, being headmaster of Lyall Bay School j for 19 years. At various periods he was a member of the Dominion executive of the New Zealand Educational Institute and a president of the Wellington branch of that body. After his retirement from the teaching profession he was for twelve years a member of the Wellington Education Board and of the Technical College Board of Governors, and for five years a member of the Victoria College Council; and he was also a member of the Educational Broadcasting Advisory Committee. While in Timaru he was a past master of St. John's Masonic Lodge and an officer of District Grand Lodge. Mr. Blake always took an active interest in the work of the Presbyterian Church and was a member of St. Giles Church, Kilbirnie, for over thirty years. In his younger days. Mr. Blake played senior cricket and Rugby football in South Canterbury and he always maintained a keen interest in Rugby. He was a veteran bowler, having played for 40 years, and was a member of the Hataitai Bowling Club for over 25 years. , In 1898 Mr. Blake married Miss Emma Vale Rowley, daughter of the late Mr. T. G. Rowley, of Timaru. He is survived by his wife, his daughter, Mrs. James Stokes, of Wellington, his son. Second Lieutenant G. C. Blake, of Palmerston North, and four grandchildren. The late Mr. E. M. Blake F.R.1.8.A., Wellington, was a brother. The funeral will leave the residence, 15 Crawford Road. Kilbirnie, et 10.30 a.m. on Monday.

Timaru Herald, 11 February 1907, Page 6 CHARLES BOURN
The news of the death of Mr Charles Bourn, which, is announced this morning, will be received with regret by a large number of people in 'South Canterbury, amongst whom the deceased was a familiar figure and a- popular acquaintance some years ago. Me was one of the pioneers of North Canterbury, and was occupied in farming there for many years. He then bought a farm in the Hunter district, South Canterbury, and held this for some years, and giving up this property he engaged in business in Timaru. When he relinquished this, owing to advancing years, and retired to live among older friends near Christchurch, business people of Timaru and farmers of the surrounding districts, showed their respect for him by entertaining him at a large farewell gathering. He was a most cheerful optimist, a most good-natured man, and he made himself popular wherever he went. He bad several sons, one of them, Mr Arthur Bourn, is auctioneer for Messrs Guinness and LeCren of Timaru. The funeral takes place at Timaru to-morrow afternoon.

Timaru Herald, 1 March 1913, Page 2 Mr. BUTCHERS
People of this district will regret to hear of the demise of the late Mr E. Butchers, the oldest resident of Fairview; Mr Butchers, who was 72 years of age, had been in ill-health for the past eight months. He was born in Kent, and as a young man went to America for a short time, after which he came over to New Zealand in the ship "Canterbury" in 1864. He worked at Longbeach for over eighteen months, later shifting to the West Coast. In 1868 he arrived in Timaru, where he purchased land. For a time he was contracting for the late Mr Double (Timaru), between Timaru and Waimate. He eventually settled down at Fairview where he worked with Mr Tregenza, the two doing a considerable amount of the early fencing in that district. Both had farms adjoining one another. In 1874 the deceased was married to Miss Lawrence, of England. Mrs Butchers died about six years ago. From this period Mr Butchers commenced fruit-growing in a small way, and now the orchard is one of the largest and most favourably known in the district. The deceased leaves three sons, two of whom are married, and one married daughter. The funeral leaves his late residence at Fairview to-morrow, at a quarter to two, for the Timaru Cemetery.

Timaru Herald, 19 February 1919, Page 9 Mr SEARBY BUXTON
Mr Searby Buxton, who passed away at his residence, Allenton, Ashburton, on Monday in his 87th year, was very well known throughout South Canterbury, being one of 'the early pioneers in, the district. He came to New Zealand fifty-two years ago and settled first at Springston, where he commenced farming, and later removed to West Melton. He subsequently settled on Rangitata Island, where he was engaged in farming pursuits for over thirteen years. The late Mr Buxton then went to Totara Valley, and during recent years retired in Ashburton. Mr Buxton was one of the most prominent men in his district. He opposed the late Hon. W. Rolleston in the parliamentary elections for the Gladstone district and after being elected held the seat for several years. He took an active interest in all public matters, and was a prominent member and local preacher in the Presbyterian and Wesleyan churches in the several districts in which he resided during his lifetime. The deceased leaves four sons and three daughters to, mourn their loss, his wife having pre-deceased him by four and a half years. His sons are Mr J Buxton, Muline, West Australia; Mr T. Buxton, grain merchant, Timaru, Mr R. Buxton, manager of the Vacuum Oil Co., Timaru: and Mr F. Buxton, of Messrs Buxton and Thomas, Ashburton. His daughters Miss M Buxton, Allenton, Ashburton; Mrs J. Smith, late of Wanganui and now of Auckland: and Mrs E. Undrill, of Geraldine.

Evening Post, 3 September 1938, Page 11
Timaru, September 2. The death occurred on Thursday of Constable Daniel Joseph Callanan, who had been in charge of the Geraldine Police" Station for more than 20 years. Constable Callanan, who was in his fifty-eighth year, took a keen interest in all sport; and two of his sons were Rugby representative players. He joined the force in Dunedin, and was later stationed in Invercargill, Queenstown, and Nightcaps.

Ashburton Guardian, 5 August 1912, Page 6
Mr James Baird Chisholm, an old colonist, and brother of Mr R. Chisholm, who was manager of the Bank of New' Zealand at Timaru, died at Kaiapoi on Friday night. He leaves two sons. One of Mr Chisholm's sisters was the wife of Mr Horton, of the original firm of Wilson and Horton, Auckland.  

Ashburton Guardian, 24 November 1915, Page 5 MR RICHARD HENRY CLARKE
Another of the old identities of Timaru's pioneer days has passed away in the person or Mr R. H. Clarke, who died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs Chas. Brown, Ashburton, on Saturday morning. Mr Clarke left Cornwall, England, for New Zealand with his wife and family, in October, 1863 in the ship, Tiptree, arriving at Lyttelton three months later and came on direct to Timaru in the steamer City of Dunedin, and from the open roadstead were brought ashore in surf boats Timaru, was only just beginning in those days, the hardships were great, and food was scarce and very dear, but those early settlers were a noble band of workers, who toiled long and arduously to make a home for themselves and their families. After some time Mr Clarke got a position in a store owned by Messrs Cain and LeCren, which afterwards became Miles, Archer and Co.'s business, where he worked himself' up to be head storeman, and was universally respected by all who did business with the firm. He remained in the firm's employ for 32 years, when the business was wound up. He then entered into business on his own account as; a grocer, which he worked for eight years, and then had to retire owing to ill-health. Mr Clarke leaves a family of four daughters- and one son, the daughters being Mrs H. B. Courtis, of Dunedin, Mrs G. Watts, and Mrs A.R. Rule, of Timaru, and Mrs Charles Brown, of Ashburton, and the son. Dr. R. E. Clarke, of Birmingham, England. His wife predeceased him by 10½ years.

North Otago Times, 20 September 1898, Page 1 Obit.
At 3.30 a.m. on Tuesday, the 13th of September, 1898, Mr Thomas Cleary died at his late residence, Waimate ; and by his death the working men of New Zealand have lost from their ranks a man as truly respected and trusted by the employer as he was honored and looked upon as a model for the emulation by his fellow-workers in this vale of tears. True and loving to his wife and family, honest and faithful to his employers, and at all times ready to aid in the trouble of his follow working men, then surely Thomas Cleary was one of those whom we can ill afford to lose, and one whom we cannot permit to bid us a last farewell without placing on record a small tribute to the memory of one for whom everybody that came in contact with had nothing but good to say. The late Mr Cleary was born in Ballingarry, County Tipperary, Ireland, in the year 1861, and at the age of 18 left his native land for New Zealand, arriving in this colony in the year 1879. Shortly after his arrival he obtained employment from the late Mr Conlin, of Ngapara. It was during his stay in the Ngipara district that the writer had the extreme pleasure of making the acquaintance of young Cleary, and on leaving him on that occasion I, like many others since, had reasons to acknowledge my depth of gratitude to our departed friend for the kind, genuine hospitality and practical assistance I received at his hands. Shortly after this Mr Cleary came to Waimate, and was at once employed by Mr Thomas Middleton, for whom he worked five years. During the time he was in the employ of Mr Middleton some thousands of pounds of that gentleman's money passed through his hands, and in no instance, said Middleton, talking of deceased to me the other day, had he the slightest reason to doubt the honesty of Thomas Cleary ...After leaving the employ of Mr Middleton, he was engaged by Mr John Dooley, for whom he worked seven years for Mr Dooloy leaving Waimate, and his brother, Mr P. Dooley, taking over the business, his services were retained, and here he continued to work up to within a few weeks of his demise. During the seventeen years Mr Cleary resided in Waimate his good acts, charitable nature, neighborly friendship, and unostentatious bearing won for him the admiration of all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. ...

Ashburton Guardian, 16 October 1916, Page 4 MR W. H. COLLINS
The news of the sudden death of Mr W. H. Collins on Saturday afternoon was received with very deep regret by a very large circle of friends in Ashburton and in the County. The deceased was confined to his bed on Tuesday last, having contracted pneumonia, which resulted in his death. The late Mr Collins was born in Wendrun, Cornwall, England, in 1846. After leaving school he learned the engineering trade at Redruth. At the age of 19 years he sailed for New Zealand in the ship Glenmark and on his arrival at Timaru he followed his profession. In a short time a boom in gold-mining took place on the West Coast, and Mr Collins, with his brother, carried their swags over the ranges to Ross, where they stayed for three years. Mr Collins then returned to Timaru, and commenced business as a sawmiller in Waimate and Timaru districts, both on his own account and later with partners. He arrived in Ashburton 38 years ago to take charge of a timber business owned by Mr Hayes of Waimate. The business was afterwards transferred to Mr McCallum, timber merchant and ironmonger, and Mr Collins later acquired it...

Timaru Herald, 17 October 1916, Page 2 MR .W. H. COLLINS
Very deep regret was felt throughout Ashburton on Saturday, when the death of Mr W. H. Collins, a prominent resident, was announced, after a brief illness. Ho was born in Wendrun, Cornwall, England, in 1846, and having learned engineering at Redruth, set out for New Zealand at the age of 19 years in the ship Glenmark. He landed at Timaru, and was engaged here engineering for a short time, when he left for the Otago goldfields. When the West Coast mining boom commenced he, with his brother, tramped from Otago over the ranges to Ross, carrying his swag, returning at the end of three years. Having an extensive knowledge of sawmill machinery, he commenced business in Waimate and Timaru. Mr Collins represented the Ashburton district on the Education Board, Christchurch, for a number of years. He was also a valued member of the Technical School Board, High School Board, and Patriotic Committee, being one of the trustees of the Wounded Soldiers' Fund. He was Mayor of Ashburton from 1900 to 1902, and was a borough councillor for a number of years previous to becoming Mayor. He leaves a wife, three sons, and three daughters, one of his sons having been killed in action in France in July last. One of the daughters is Mrs Herbert Holdgate, of Timaru.

New Zealand Tablet, 21 June 1900, Page 15
Mr. THOMAS CORKERY, GERALDINE.
Many people in this district (says the Temuka Leader) will hear with regret of the death of Mr. Thomas Corkery, who was widely known both in North and South Canterbury, and especially in Geraldine, where he had resided off and on for the past 25 years. The deceased was present at the last Geraldine live stock sale apparently in his usual state of health, and last Saturday he went to Christchurch to undergo an operation as he was suffering from an abscess in the ear. The operation, it appears, was unsuccessful, for the relatives of the deceased were shocked at receiving a telegram from Christchurch informing them of his death on June 12. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs. E. Burke and family in their trouble. The deceased was very popular with all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. The late Mr. Corkery was a brother of Mrs. E. Burke. R.I.P.

Colonist, 26 May 1906, Page 4 James Field Crawford (1815 -1906) [b. Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire, England]
Oamaru, May 25. Captain J. F. Crawford, aged 91, died yesterday. He came to the Colony in 1868, and was three years manager of the old Christchurch Brewery Company. Subsequently he was Harbormaster at Timaru, where he built the first breakwater. He was also Mayor. He settled in this district thirty years ago, being the first wharf master here; He entered the railway Service, and received the Appointment of stationmaster at Hampden in the seventies.

Taranaki Herald, 26 May 1906, p 5
Captain J. F. Crawford, aged 90, died at Oamaru on Thursday. He came to the colony in 1868. He was for three years manager of the old Christchurch Brewery Company, and subsequently harbourmaster at Timaru, where he built the first breakwater. He was also Mayor of Timaru. He settled in Oamaru thirty years ago, being first wharf master there. He entered the railway service and held an appointment as stationmaster at Hampden in the seventies.

Evening Post, 27 November 1945, Page 8
The death has occurred in Wanganui of Mr. Ivan Davidson, of Timaru, who lived for many years in Wellington. On leaving school, Mr. Davidson joined the staff of Murray, Roberts, and Co., Ltd., and he served with this firm for 48 years, being appointed Wanganui manager in 1925. Mr. Davidson was a former chairman of the Wanganui Wool Brokers' Association and the Manawatu and West Coast Live Stock Auctioneers' Association. He saw active service in the South African War. For some years while in Wellington he was an active member of the Star Boating Club. His wife predeceased him two years ago. Mrs. R. C. Millward, New Plymouth, is a daughter.

Timaru Herald, 25 January 1909, Page 6 MR JOHN DEAN
One of the old identities of South Canterbury, who occupied a place of honour in the leading car in the jubilee procession on the 14th inst., as one of the oldest, Mr John Dean, died at Geraldine on Thursday, just a week after the celebration. It was observed when he was in Timaru that he looked very aged and frail. The deceased arrived at Lyttelton in 1851 and came to Timaru in 1852, under engagement to Mr G. joining his brother Mr Joseph Dean, who came down in 1851. After working on the Levels for four or five years the brothers went sheen farming on their own account in North Canterbury for some years, and then returning to South Canterbury they settled John at Geraldine, Joseph at Woodbury. The deceased was a quiet unassuming man, well thought of by all who knew him. He leaves a widow, five sons and two daughters.

Bush Advocate, 11 September 1905, Page 5
Wellington, this day. Rev. Wm. John Dean, Primitive Methodist Minister, who had been stationed in various parts of the colony, including Auckland, Invercargill, Timaru, and Geraldine, aged 80. He arrived in the colony in 1867.
 

Otago Witness 4 December 1901, Page 21 Obit.
New Zealand Tablet, 5 December 1901, Page 15
Timaru papers record the death of an old identity in the person of Mr Thos. Dillon Deceased had resided in Timaru for 33 years and was widely known. He came to the colony from America, landing at Port Chalmers, and was for some years engaged it driving sheep from Otago to the Mackenzie Country. He was in in 59th year.

Timaru Herald, 2 December 1916, Page 15 Mr ROBERT DONN
On Thursday morning there passed away at his residence, Hunt Street, Timaru, one of the pioneers of South Canterbury in the person of Mr Robert Donn at the age of 80 years. The late Mr Donn, who was a native of' Caithness-shire, Scotland, followed in his early days farming arid fishing pursuits. He arrived in Lyttelton by the ship Indiana in 1857. Shortly after his arrival he drove a conveyance from Christchurch to Timaru, and he was probably one of the first persons in New Zealand to undertake this journey. For some time he was engaged in stock droving in the Mackenzie Country and Central Otago. Later on he joined the surveying staff of Mr S. Hewlings (the first Mayor of Timaru), and assisted to lay out the town of Timaru, which at that time was practically a wilderness. He carried out a similar work at Oamaru and Waimate, and then took up farming. His first farm was in the Woodlands and was located where the Timaru Girls' High School now stands. Later on, Mr Donn took up a farm at Temuka, which he worked for some time, and then returned to Timaru in 1882, where he remained until his death. The late Mr Donn was an enthusiastic Oddfellow, having been for 50 years a member of the Order. He was for some years an elder of Trinity Church, Timaru, and he was also a member of the Timaru Scottish, Society being for some years treasurer. In 1863 Mr Donn married Miss Jessie Craigie. Eleven children were born of the marriage, six sons and five daughters, all of whom are living. He is survived by his widow, his children, 29 grandchildren, and several grandchildren.

Timaru Herald, 5 June 1909, Page 6
News has been received of the death of Mr J. F. Douglas, of Darling Downs, New South Wales. The deceased was the son and successor of the original owner of Waihao Downs station, for some years chairman of the Waimate County Council and president of the Waimate A. and P. Association, and for a short time a resident of Timaru selling Waihao Downs to Mr Richards. He was a very popular man in the Waimate county and borough, and the news of his death has been received with great regret. He leaves a widow and two daughters.

Timaru Herald, 1 July 1909, Page 2 John Fleming Douglas
Mr R.H. Rhodes, chairman of the Waimate County Council said Our late chairman was a New Zealander, and obtained his earlier education in Oamaru, subsequently going Home to finish his education in Glasgow, where, in view of his future career as a farmer he underwent a course of training in veterinary science. To what, use he put this knowledge afterwards many of his farmer friends can testify, the Waihao Downs becoming a recognised hospital for stock, where advice, and help were willingly giver gratuitously. In 1892, Mr Douglas came out and took charge of the Waihao Downs for his father. He married a daughter of the late Mr John Rankin, and the great hospitality and kindness of Mr and Mrs Douglas gave the Waihao Downs a permanent place in the hearts of their many friends, my own amongst others. Mr Douglas was elected a member for the Waihao Riding in 1898, and shortly afterwards became chairman, which office he held until he severed his connection with the Council some four years after wards. Some of the present members will remember him in this capacity. He was a keen and active member of the Waimate A. and P. Society's Committee, also a regular exhibitor of horses and Border Leicesters, of which he was a prominent breeder in this district. He was also chairman of the local Farmers' Union and did good service in promoting the of the farming community. He was also mainly, instrumental in obtaining and maintaining the public school, and telephone service at Waihao Downs, and for years ran the public mail coach at own expense between Waimate and Waihao Downs.

Timaru Herald, 29 December 1898, Page 2
Mr J. F. Douglas, of Waiho Downs, was the victim of a nasty accident on Saturday last. He was riding his bicycle with a long rope in his hands when, the end of the rope became entangled around the chain, with the result that Mr Douglas was thrown heavily on the road and his right arm broken above the elbow. Dr Barclay attended to the injury

Press, 14 May 1894, Page 2 THE LATE MR W. DU MOULIN.
We have to record the death of Mr William du Moulin, a well-known and respected resident of Rangiora, who had attained over the age of three score and ten. In 1823 at seven years of age, the deceased gentleman went out to Sydney with his father, who was surgeon to one of the regiments. As he grew up Mr du Moulin visited the many goldfields, and after a varied experience he came to Canterbury in 1853. Becoming acquainted with Mr Alfred Cox that gentleman engaged Mr du Moulin to select land for him. He left Christchurch with a bullock dray, and after seven weeks crossing the Plains he name to Geraldine and selected the Raukapuka station, of which he became manager. Mr du Moulin was also afterwards manager at Racecourse Hill station, and subsequently Lochinvar. Whilst at this station there was a severe snow storm, which snowed all hands in for three months. He became manager of St. Helen's in Amuri district, and in 1871 retired to a less active life in Rangiora, where, with his wife, daughter and two sons, who lament his death. Mr du Moulin was a man of considerable intelligence and shrewdness and generally respected by all who knew him.

Press, 7 February 1920, Page 8 MR JOB EARL in his 89th year
Sixty-eight years ago, Mr Job Earl, who was then a young man of 20, arrived in Melbourne from his native place in the County of Wexford, Ireland, attracted to the goldfields, and later on he came to New Zealand, and at Gabriel's Gully, at the Coromandel, and on the Nelson gold fields he continued his search for gold. In the district between Nelson and the West Coast he, took up contracts, but fifty years ago he bought land at Kakahu, near Geraldine, and entered upon farming pursuits. In their latest home, Mr and Mrs Earl brought up their family, and won the esteem of all their neighbours. About three years ago Mr Earl lost his wife, whom he married in Victoria. This week he himself passed away at his Kakahu residence. He leaves three sons, Messrs William, R., and J. Earl, and eight daughters—Mesdames J. Kennedy, P. Lysaght, C. Lysaght, A. Lysaght, F. Charles, T. Charles, H. McShane, and P. O'Connor.

Observer, 21 February 1920, Page 10
In the year 1852 there landed at Melbourne amongst the searchers for gold, a young Irishman from County Wexford, Mr. Job Earl, who was then twenty years of age, and during his residence in Victoria was married. Some time later he came to New Zealand, and was attracted in turn to Gabriel's Gully, to the Coromandel, and to the Nelson goldfields. Fifty years ago he visited South Canterbury, and bought land at Kakahu, near Geraldine, and, utilising the knowledge he had gained in his earlier days, he became a successful farmer. Mrs. Earl predeceased her husband by about three years, and within the past few days Mr. Earl has joined the great majority while in his eighty-ninth year. He has left three sons and eight daughters.

North Otago Times, 18 April 1917, Page 2
Christchurch. April 17. The Rev. P. W. Fairclough, a well known Methodist minister, died tonight. He went into a private hospital on Saturday to undergo an operation for gall stones, The operation was very successful, and Mr Fairclough promised to make n good recovery; but to-day he was seized with heart failure which resulted in death. The Rev. P. W. Fairclough, F.R.A.S., came to New Zealand from Victoria when a boy, followed gold-mining of the West Coast for some years, and became a member of the, Methodist Church at Stafford, eight miles from Hokitika, where he was then mining. When about seventeen years of age he to preach in that mining town. After some years of study he was duly received into the ministry, and in 1874 went to his which was Timaru. He had thus been forty-three years in the active work of the ministry, and intended retiring at the end of the present year. ...He leaves a widow, one daughter and three sons.

Taranaki Herald, 31 August 1904, Page 4
Timaru, August 30. A cable from Sydney advises the death of Father L. Fauvel, parish priest at Temuka for about 25 years. He was previously a missionary in Fiji for ten years, till his health broke down under hardships and hard fare. He built the fine stone church at Temuka and another at Pleasant Point, and established convent schools in both places under the Josephine nuns. He was very greatly respected at Temuka. He had been in failing health for some time, and was visiting Australia to recuperate. He was a native of Normandy, France, and 71 years of age.

Taranaki Herald, 4 August 1908, Page 7
A Wellington telegram announces that the Hon. Henry Feldwick, M.L.C., died there last evening. The deceased legislator had taken part in the political life of New Zealand almost continuously since 1878. In that year he was elected to the House of Representatives as member for Invercargill. He again represented this constituency from 1882 to 1884. In 1892 he was called to the Legislative Council by the Seddon Ministry. Mr Feldwick was born at Norwood, Surrey, England, in 1844. He arrived in Canterbury with his parents in 1858 and for a time was occupied with them in farming at Kaiapoi. He then became engaged in journalism, and was on the staffs of the Lyttelton Times, Timaru Herald, and Canterbury Times. In 1876 he removed to Invercargill, becoming part proprietor of the Southland Daily News. For twenty-two years Mr Feldwick was in the volunteer forces. In 1900 he received the V.D. In 1903 he retired with the rank of colonel.

Evening Post, 28 January 1944, Page 3
The death has occurred in Hamilton, of Mr. Albert Ernest Firman, aged 69. Mr. Firman was born in Christchurch and joined the Railway Department as a youth. He became stationmaster at Nelson and he retired when he was stationmaster at Timaru. Mr. Firman served with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in, the Great War, rising to the rank of captain. He served for a considerable period with the Army of Occupation in Germany. Mr. Firman was a member of the Masonic Lodge. Before going to Hamilton he lived at Lower Hutt. Mr. Firman is survived by his wife and a family of three, Mr. J. Firman, of Oamaru, Mrs. L. Styles, of Te Horo, and Mrs B. H. Wood, of Hamilton.

Colonist, 8 June 1904, Page 3
Timaru, June 7, Mr G. G. Fitzgerald died in the Hospital here this morning, aged 70. He was well-known in journalistic circles, and was editor of the Timaru "Herald" since 1885. He was at one time member for Westland, and in the early days occupied the position of Warden and Magistrate at Hokitika. He was a brother of the late Controller-General.

New Zealand Tablet, 3 November 1904, Page 19
MR. MICHAEL FITZGERALD, Timaru October 31. Mr. Michael Fitzgerald, one of the old Canterbury pioneers, passed away at his residence, Church street, on Thursday last, after a long illness, in his 64th year. He died fortified by all the Rites of Holy Church, of which he had always been a practical and devoted member. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, and was one of the largest that has left our parish church for many years, many friends being present from as far north as Geraldine and as far south as Waimate, the representative attendance showing the esteem and respect in which the deceased was held. He was one of the founders of the Hibernian Society in this district, and despite the threatening state of the weather the members turned out some 80 strong, and marched before the hearse, the officers acting as pall-bearers. Mr. Fitzgerald was a native of the parish of Cullen, County Cork, Ireland, and left the Old Land for the Colonies in 1858. He first visited the goldfields and then spent some time in Christchurch and Geraldine, and finally settled in Timaru, starting business as a nurseryman. He did most of the forestry work for the Mackenzie county Council, and other South Canterbury public bodies, in fact the future forests of this district were planted under his direction. He always evinced the keenest interest in parish matters and was for many years a member of the Catholic school committee. He leaves a widow, two sons, and four daughters to mourn their loss , also two brothers, Mr. M. Fitzgerald, J.P., Arowhenua, and Mr. W. Fitzgerald, Dirrah Farm, Pleasant Point Road.— R.I.P.

Grey River Argus, 22 September 1911, Page 6 OBITUARY. F. R. FLATMAN.
Timaru. Sept. 21. F. R. Flatman, ex-M.H.R. for Geraldine, died to-day. He was a very old settler in the district, arriving in 1862. He was sawmilling and storekeeping from 1865 to 1892, subsequently farming, and represented Geraldine in four Parliaments. He served on most of the local bodies including the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works and the Timaru Harbour Board.

Evening Post, 22 September 1911, Page 7
The late Mr. F. R. Flatman, ex-member of the House of Representative for Geraldine, whose death was reported yesterday, was a native of Suffolk, England, and was educated at High School House, Oulton. He came out to New Zealand in 1862 as a passenger in the ship Mary Ann, for Lyttelton. In South Canterbury Mr Flatman, after storekeeping and sawmilling, went farming. For nineteen years he was a member of the South Canterbury Board of Works, and for eight years served on the Timaru Harbour Board. He belonged to the first Geraldine Lodge, of Freemasons. He defeated Mr. A. E. G. Rhodes for the Pareora seat in Parliament in 1893. In 1896 the name of the electorate was altered to Geraldine, when Mr. Flatman again beat Mr. Rhodes. He was returned in 1899 and in 1902, but was beaten on the second ballot in 1908 by Mr. Nosworthy. In 1906 he was Deputy-Chairman of Committee in the House.

Otago Witness, 27 November 1907, Page 33
Mrs Flatman, wife of the member for Geraldine, is recovering from the severe operation she underwent last week. Mr Flatman is still in Geraldine, and may not be able to return to the House before the close of the session. 

Press, 22 September 1911, Page 8
The late Mr Flatman resided at "Summerlea," about four miles from Geraldine, where he had a farm of close on 1000 acres. He was born in the county of Suffolk, England, in 1843, educated at High House School, Oulton, and was brought up to farming on his father's farm, where he remained till he left for New Zealand in 1862, when he came out by the "Mary Ann" to Lyttelton. Shortly after his arrival he went to South Canterbury, and was on Mr Cox's station for some months.

Timaru Herald, 22 September 1911, Page 2
Mr F R. FLATMAN. In the northern side of South Canterbury no man has been more widely known, more respected for his straightforward character or better liked for his genial disposition than Mr Frederick Robert Flatman, therefore the news of his death circulated yesterday was received with very great regret, lessoned somewhat perhaps by the knowledge that he had been seriously ill for some time past. Latterly his health had become more and more unsatisfactory; on Tuesday an attack of general paralysis hastened the end, which occurred at 11.45 a.m. yesterday, at the house of his son, at his farm at Woodbury.
    Mr Flatman had led a busy and useful life in the district. A native of Suffolk, born in 1843, brought up on his father's farm, he came to New Zealand in 1862, a youth of 19, and began his colonial experience on Sir Alfred Cox's Rankapaka station. At that time Geraldine scarcely existed as a town. The fine bush which then covered the northern face of the downs was almost wholly preserved by the owners, and Pleasant Valley, on the opposite side of the downs, was the busier place and contained more inhabitants. Alter spending a year or two at Rauknpaka. Mr Flatman opened a small store in Geraldine, but a few months later entered into partnership with Mr Robt. Taylor in a sawmilling venture at Woodbury. The Woodbury bush was then a magnificent block of timber, and Messrs Taylor and Flatman's steam sawmill situated at the eastern end of it hummed and whirred for many years; a village was planned, laid out, and occupied by the mill hands; Messrs Taylor and Flatman added a store, the provincial Government provided a school and mail, Mr John Mundell a coach service, and Woodbury was given a place on the map thanks mainly to the business initiated by Messrs Taylor and Flatman, and later competed in by other sawmillers. From the profits of sawmilling the firm bought land and carried on farming also, until the bush was worked out, and the partnership was dissolved in 1892. Mr Flatman then devoted himself to his farm when at home. For many years previous to that date he had been a member of various local bodies, including that sub-provincial Council, the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works, whose substantially built office still bears its original title, though devoted now to various Government departments, opposite Ballantyne's. He was for many years a member of the Harbour Board, and longer still a member of the Geraldine Road Board. On relinquishing the sawmilling business, Mr Flatman had more time to spare for public duties, and his wide acquaintance with local affairs and with the people of the district, and the respect in which he was held for his business capacity, integrity and bonhomnne, suggested to his friends that he would make a good Member of the House of Representatives for his electorate (then called Pareora). He consented to stand and was elected in 1893, defeating Mr A. E. G. Rhodes. He was returned again in 1896, 1899, 1902 and 1905, and in 1908 was defeated by Mr Nosworthy. Mr Flatman was a useful member of House Committees, and served on several Royal Commissions, and was appointed on one or more since he ceased to be a Member of the House. As a Member he was a supporter of No-License legislation, and this question was made much of in some of the elections for Geraldine Of late years, until recently when his health began to fail, he resided in Geraldine, and became a member of the Borough Council and Mayor of the Borough. Only a week or two ago Mr Flatman was elected a member of the Geraldine County Council in a contest with another old settler and well-known public man, in succession to the late Mr Alex. Kelman.
    The late Mr Flatman was a popular man among his neighbours, as he was always genial and kindly, and Flatman was in this respect a particularly good help meet. Both were noted for their hospitality in the days when hospitality was the rule in upcountry places. His widow, son and daughter (Mrs Williams, Ashburton), will have the sincere sympathy of a very wide circle of friends, made through nearly half a century's residence in the Geraldine-Woodbury district.

AN APPRECIATION. Mr John Mundell, who was a very old friend of the late Mr Flatman. Mr Flatman was a man who hold strong opinions on the subject of right and wrong; he was a devout churchman, and always did what ho believed to be right no matter at what cost. For instance he becaame an ardent prohibitionist, and no sooner was he convinced that this was the right thing than he closed the hotel which he had at that time at Woodbury. He was a good business man, but never pushed a bargain so as to get the last penny for himself. He believed in the principle of live and let live, and acted up to it. In politics, too, he had a very desirable trait in that he never entertained bitterness towards an opponent. Taken all through, the late Mr Flatman was a man in the best sense of theword, and his death would mean a distinct loss to the district

Auckland Star, 1 October 1928, Page 10
MR. HUGO FRIEDLANDER. The death occurred to-day at his residence, Remuera, of Mr. Hugo Friedlander, well known in business and horse-racing circles. Mr. Friedlander arrived in New Zealand from Kolmar, in Prussia, as a lad in 1869, and was employed with a firm of grain merchants in Temuka, who recognising his ability in a few months started him in a branch business at Ashburton. Some years later he took over this business in conjunction with his brothers, Rudolph and Mav, and it became one of the largest grain agencies in New Zealand. Early in the 'seventies Mr. Friedlander met with an accident through a sack of wheat bursting and causing a stack to slip. Prior to that time he was one of the smartest amateur horsemen in the district, and always had a great love for horses. Among the horses he raced successfully were.: —Gladisla, Kamo, Rose Shield, Cyrus, Ropa, Kelburn, Gladstone, Kilmarnock, and Ardenvhor (who won the New Zealand Cup in 1916). One of Mr. Friedlander's horses, The Lover, was successful at the Pakuranga Hunt Club meeting on Saturday. For many years Mr. Friedlander was & member of the Lyttelton Harbour Board

Grey River Argus 12 July 1911, Page 6
Timaru July 1. A pioneer farmer, named Michael Gabaney, of Arowhenua, died to-day aged 75 years. He was a native of Derbyshire and came to New Zealand 58 years ago. He worked for Rhodes at the Levels for some years. He was the first to drive a horse team to the Mackenzie Country and first to put a plough into the Levels plain. He brought up a very large family.

Evening Post, 29 November 1941, Page 11
Timaru, November 28. After a serious illness, the death occurred today of Mr. T. B. Garrick, a prominent sheep farmer of Totara Valley. A bachelor, the late Mr: Garrick was elected to the Levels County Council in 1904 and had been chairman since 1924. He was elected to the Timaru Harbour Board in 1919 and was chairman from 1935 to 1937. He was a member of No. 15 District Highways Council since its inception and a director of the Canterbury Farmers' Cooperative Association Limited for a great many years.

Grey River Argus, 9 July 1912, Page 6
Timaru, July 8. Mr T. Gildman, for 30 years accountant to the New Zealand, Loan Co., and who retired on pension two years ago, died suddenly yesterday.

Press, 18 December 1923, Page 11
MR. M. J. GODBY. The death occurred in London on Friday of Mr Michael John Godby, a former resident of Timaru and father of Mr M. H. Godby, of Christchurch. The late Mr Godby, who came to New Zealand in the seventies and practised as a solicitor in Timaru till 1887, had been resident in London for the past twenty years. He was 74 years of age and is survived by two sons and three daughters: Mr M. H. Godby (Christchurch), Flying Officer Robert Godby (Umbala, India), Mrs P. R. Croft (Ware, Hertfordshire), Mrs W.G. Sharrock (Lytham, Lancashire), and Miss Joan Godby (London).

Ashburton Guardian, 11 May 1909, Page 1
Timaru, May 10. Mr John Goldie, senior, a highly respected farmer, of Totara Valley, died on Sunday, aged eighty-one. He had been twenty years m the district, and was a valued member of the A. and P. Association and an elder of the church.

Grey River Argus 14 October 1911, Page 6
Timaru. Oct. 13. John E. Goodwin, one of the earliest farmers of the Fairlie District, who has taken much interest in the progress of the town and the conveniences of the townspeople and a member of the Timaru Harbour Board died to-day, aged 56.

Timaru Herald, 5 April 1916, Page 4 MR A. P. GRANT
Yesterday morning there passed peacefully away at his residence, Elisabeth Street, Archibald Peacock Grant, in his seventy-fifth year. The late Mr Grant came to New Zealand about 1862, and first settled in Blenheim. After some time he went to Hakataramea, and finally settled in Duntroon, most of his time being devoted to the pastoral industry. He was a well-built robust man, and was a typical stamp of the early pioneer. Apart from school committees, he did not take active part in public affairs, he being of a quiet and retiring nature. Some seven years ago he came to Timaru, and made his home in Elizabeth Street. His son, the late Major Grant, was one of the first New Zealanders killed at the war. Mr Grant leaves a widow and three sons. W. S. Grant, of Grant and Seaton, Timaru, Archie Grant, of Melbourne. P. E. Grant, now in Egypt, and five daughters, Mrs H. Bonn, Port Chalmers, Mrs W. Quirk, Excelsior Hotel, Timaru, Mrs C Henchcliff, Duntroon and two daughters unmarried, to mourn their loss.

North Otago Times, 18 December 1914, Page 4
One of Timaru's most valued citizens has passed away in person of Mr. William Gunn, who died on Wednesday afternoon after an illness extending over six weeks. Mr Gunn was widely known New Zealand, and his demise at the age of 61 years will be deeply, deplored. Born in 1850 at Helmsdale, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, the late Mr Gunn came to New Zealand as a young man to an elder brother in Dunedin. He learnt his business as a chemist in the north of Scotland and in Edinburgh. From Dunedin Mr Gunn came on to Timaru and started business here as a chemist, buying out a Mr Thomson, whose shop adjoined the Theatre Royal buildings. Some years later Mr Gunn went to America to study dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania and there he obtained his degree as doctor of dental surgery. On returning to Timaru he practised his profession for some years until his eldest son, Dr. W.A. Gunn, dental surgeon, returning from America and took over the practice. On retiring Mr. Gunn went to Australia for an extended holiday, after which he returned here and has since lived in retirement. Always taking a keen interest in sport the late Mr Gunn will be missed by several sports bodies in South Canterbury, notably the South Canterbury Jockey Club, The Timaru Bowling Club, Timaru Golf Club and the South Canterbury Caledonian Society. The last named institution he helped found and was president of it for some years... Mr Gunn was a live member of the Timaru Bowling Club and was one of the original members of the Timaru Golf Club. For a time he served on the Timaru Borough Council. He was the proprietor of the Timaru Theatre Royal as well as of Olympia. Besides these two big buildings Mr Gunn had some other property and was one of the biggest rate payers in Timaru.
Dr. W. A. Gunn, dentist, Timaru
Dr Gordon Gunn, dentist, of Watford, England
Mr Jack Gun, of Queensland
Dr. Elizabeth Gunn, of Wellington
and Missses Nellie and Alice Gunn.

Timaru Herald, 19 June 1916, Page 3 MR JOHN HAMILTON
An old resident of Timaru, one who did much useful work here, died at Wanganui last week. This was Mr John Hamilton, who had attained the advanced age of 83 years. The deceased came to Timaru over 40 years ago, and was a member of the firm of Hamilton and Olivers, builders. He had to do with a number of the biggest buildings in Timaru, after which he became Clerk of Works to the Timaru Harbour Board, and superintended much of the first break-water construction work. Mr Hamilton was a staunch Presbyterian, being a member of Trinity Church, and he also took a, very real interest in local and Dominion politics. He was a man whom to know was to respect, and when he left here for Wanganui, he left behind him a lot of friends. [A family of one son (Mr J. M. Hamilton, who is now at the front) and three daughters are left to mourn their loss. Cable advice was received on. Saturday that Sergeant J. H. Hamilton (son of  the above) was killed in action on June 5th. The deceased leaves a widow and an infant daughter a few days old.]

The Press 5 April 1924
The late Mr. A.G. Hart died at the age of 52 years on Thursday night. Mr hart was one of the most successful farmers in Canterbury. He was born and bred at Winchester and in his youth was an enthusiastic footballer. For some time he was chairman of the Timaru branch of the farmers' Union, and was last year's president of the Timaru A. and P. Association. A fortnight ago he was taken ill and died of pneumonia.
The chairman of the Association, Mr C.L. Orbell, said that personally he had known Mr Hart for twenty years, ever since he had been a farmer at Rosewill.

Evening Post, 12 May 1944, Page 6
MR. W. HARTE, Napier, This Day. The death has occurred of Mr. W. Harte, Clerk of the Court at Napier, aged 59. Mr. Harte was born at Winchester, South Canterbury. He served at Dannevirke, Balclutha, Timaru, Christchurch, Oamaru, Masterton, Wanganui, and other places. He was a former president of the South Canterbury Rugby Union.

Poverty Bay Herald, 30 November 1911, Page 3
Timaru, last night. News has been received of the death m Sydney, after an operation, of Mr Jas. Hay, M.A., L.L.B., solicitor, of Timaru. He was expected home next Saturday from a trip to the Old County. His age was 50. He was a son of John Hay, one of the pioneer Hays, who finally settled on a farm near Temuka in 1866. Deceased was born m Christchurch, and taken to his father's station at Lake Tekapo, as an infant. His mother was the first lady born beyond Burkes Pass. Deceased had a brilliant school and University career, and was admitted to the Bar in 1883. He was a member of the University Senate -since 1888, and became prominent at the Bar in connection with Thos. Hall trials. He married in 1897 a daughter of the late H. J. LeCren. He had no children.

Timaru Herald, 9 March 1899, Page 3
Yesterday we published a telegram announcing the death of a well known and esteemed figure m South Canterbury, Mr Alpheus Hayes, of Centrewood, Waimate. His family received news on Tuesday by the Vancouver mail that his death occurred on January 3rd, in St. Mary's Hospital, Dawson City, Canada, the cause of death being typhoid fever. The late Mr Hayes was born in Halifax, m the year 1847, his parents being descendants of the old Acadians. He was educated m his own city m the commercial and normal schools, and afterwards went to Montreal to study for the ministry, but owing to ill-health he left Canada and crossed over to Scotland where he spent some years studying at Greenock and Glasgow. He left Glasgow m 1871, and came to New Zealand in the Patrick Henderson liner the Wild Deer. He was first employed at the Rangitata bridge, where his knowledge of the timber trade soon put him into a good position, and he was frequently sent to the Waimate bush to obtain timber. Seeing an opening at Waimate he went there at the end of 1871 and at once commenced bush work, and steadily prospered till the year 1878 when the bush fires gave him a serious check. Nothing daunted, however, and with that pluck, business ability, and perseverance that were his characteristics, he kept the business going, and as the Waimate bush was practically ruined, he opened mills at Mabel Bush in Southland, and set up branches of his business at Timaru and Ashburton, still keeping the Waimate bush going. At this time he built the brigantine Lady Mabel, which with a schooner he employed in running timber from the south to his various branches. Later on Mr Hayes sold out of the timber business and embarked m farming and station pursuits, and was during his last few years engaged on his runs at Centrewood, Waimate, and Normanvale, Hakateramea. On the 31st March last year Mr Hayes left Waimate for a trip to Klondyke, and was expected to return in May, but it was fated otherwise. One of his party was present at his death, and a minister of the Wesleyan Church, who was also present, writes confirming the sad news. Mr Hayes was a Justice of the Peace, had been a member of the Borough and County Councils and High School Board, and was chairman of the Timaru Harbour Board when he left the colony. Flags were flying at half-mast at Waimate and Timaru yesterday, and the family have the sympathy of the district with them in their bereavement.

New Zealand Tablet, 14 January 1898, Page 19
We regret to have to announce the death of Mr. John Hennessy, which took place at the Timaru Hospital on the l9th of Decr. The late Mr. Hennessy was a native of Youghal, Co. Cork, and arrived in New Zealand by the ship Northumberland about twenty years ago. During that time he resided in the Timaru district, principally at Fairlie Creek, and was well known and highly respected by all classes in these places. He was of a quiet and unassuming disposition ; a staunch and patriotic Irishman, and a devoted member of the Church, to which he was always most generous, giving a bright example to the younger generation in these respects. During his illness, which only lasted a few weeks, he was constantly visited by the Rev. Fathers Lewis and Tubman, and received all the consolation of the Church of which he was such an exemplary member. He leaves two sisters to mourn his loss, both being married — Mrs. Kersey, and Mrs. Moynihan, the popular hostess of the Club Hotel, Shannon, Manawatu, for whom much sympathy is expressed by a large circle of Friends, and in which we sincerely join. Mr. Hennessy was 50 years of age, and the cause of death was dropsy of the heart, there being no hope of his recovery from the commencement of his illness. — R.I.P.

New Zealand Tablet, 27 July 1899, Page 19
An old and respected resident of Ashburton, in the person of Mr. John Henry, passed away on the evening of the 19th inst. Mr. Henry was a native of Coupar Angus, Scotland, where he was born 57 years ago. He arrived in New Zealand in 1863. He resided for a time after his arrival in Christchurch, and then in Geraldine. Later on he took a farm at Woodbury, and was at the same time curator of the Temuka domain. In 1885 he became proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, which he kept for about eight years. About three years ago he retired from business and settled down in private life. The funeral took place on Friday. The cortege (says the Mail) left deceased's late residence at about half-past ten for the Church of the Holy Name, where the appropriate service was held, the church being well filled, not withstanding that snow was falling thickly when the service began. After Mass the coffin was carried from the church to the hearse, and the procession proceeded on its mournful way to the cemetery, between forty and fifty vehicles following the hearse. The deceased was laid in a grave beside his late wife, son, and daughter, the Very Rev. Canon O'Donnell conducting the funeral service. — R.I.P.

Timaru Herald, 8 November 1912, Page 2 MR B. D. HIBBARD.
Timaru has lost another old identity by the death of Mr Benjamin D. Hibbard, late secretary to the Timaru Gas Company, at, the ripe age of 79. Mr Hibbard was a native of London, and came to New Zealand in 1856. He had some experience of storekeeping on one of the Otago goldfields, and then came to Timaru and carried on store-keeping here for some years. In. 1892 he was appointed secretary to the Timaru Gas Company, and filled that position until ailing health compelled him to relinquish it some months ago. Mr Hibbard was an energetic man when young and in his maturity, and was a volunteer when, in Otago, and a member of the Borough Council of Timaru after coming here. He was a well read man with a taste for the fine arts also, and was extremely well liked with those who were intimate with him.

Star 24 November 1899, Page 3
Mr Jacob Hill, one of the oldest residents of Timaru, died in Dunedin Hospital on Wednesday. Mr Hill arrived in Lyttelton in 1859, in the Zealandia. He was for several years a member of the Timaru Harbour Board and Borough Council, and for three years was Mayor of the borough. He leaves a widow, three sons and five daughters.

Timaru Herald, 29 January 1909, Page 5 MR JOHN HITCH, SENR.
An old identity of Timaru, Mr John Hitch, passed away yesterday at the age of 72. Mr Hitch arrived at Lyttelton in the Zealandia in 1858, and after working at his trade in Christchurch for a time he caught the gold fever, and took part in the rush to Gabriel's Gully in 1861. Returning thence he started in business in Kaiapoi, but presently removed to Timaru, and became, it is understood, the first tinsmith in the infant town. At the time of the big fire of 1868, Mr Hitch had a shop somewhere about where Ballantynes now are, and was one of those burned out. He did not at once re-establish his business, but went farming at Otipua or Pighunting Creek as it was then called. He then returned to Timaru and to metal working again, and after carrying on for some years transferred the business to his son, who has pursued it since. The deceased resumed farming, this time in the Raincliff district, and finally retired from active life and came to live in Timaru seven or eight years ago. He leaves one son and seven daughters, all married except two daughter's.

Timaru Herald, 20 September 1920, Page 8 W. B. HOLE
Mr William Bruton Hole, whose death was recorded on Saturday, was the only son of Mr John Hole. The deceased, who was 40 years of age, was born in England, and was two years old when he arrived in New Zealand with his parents. He was educated at the Timaru Main and the Timaru Boys' High Schools, and had since been resident here, except for a period when he was serving his country in the South African War. He married in 1910 the eldest daughter of the late Mr Walter Beckingham and Mrs Beckingham. He leaves his wife and three children to mourn their loss

Ashburton Guardian, 27 May 1914, Page 4
Timaru, May 26. Mr William Barker Howell died tonight, aged 72. Deceased for many years was engaged in farming at Totara Valley, Pleasant Point. He came to Timaru in 1894. He took a great, interest in educational and church matters.

Grey River Argus 29 May 1914, Page 5
Timaru, May 28. An old identity, W.B. Hawell, [sic] aged 72, has passed away. He came out in 1864 and has taken a prominent part in the administration of education, primary and secondary, and was familiarly spoken of as "The Father of Timaru High School." The funeral to-day was largely attended, representatives of the Borough Council, Education Board, Farmers' Cooperative Association, (of which deceased was an original founder and director) being amongst those present.

Timaru Herald, 30 April 1908, Page 5 JOHN E. JONES
Much regret was expressed in Timaru yesterday when it became known that Mr John Rainsley Jones had died suddenly. Mr Jones was verger of St. Mary's Anglican Church and while engaged in his duties there yesterday morning was seized with a fit. The deceased, who was a married man but had not family, had formerly been in the British Army, was also for many years captain of the Timaru Fire Brigade and was a prominent mason, holding office in St. John's Lodge. The flag at the Hall was lowered yesterday to halfmast as a mark of respect; and a Masonic funeral will be accorded the late brother on Saturday.

Timaru Herald, 31 October 1917, Page 5 JAMES P. KALAUGHER
There passed away at his residence, Geraldine, yesterday, one of. the oldest inhabitants of the district, James P. Kalaugher, who was born at Drumshannon, Ireland, on March 12th, 1836. He arrived in South Canterbury in 1859, having previously seen service in the Royal Navy. For a time he worked on the Levels run, and then he entered the employ of the late Mr Alfred Cox of Geraldine. In 1866 he married Miss B. O'Reilly. He was one of the oldest Oddfellows in South Canterbury. In addition to his widow he leaves one son, Mr J.. P. Kalaugher, agricultural inspector at Auckland, and two daughters, Mrs Clements of Auckland, and Mrs Gilliam of Temuka. Until some six weeks ago he lived an active life and his familiar face will be much missed by those who frequent the Geraldine saleyards, and by many others, for be was widely known and highly esteemed.

Ashburton Guardian, 21 January 1910, Page 3
Timaru, January 20. Mr Peter Keddie, who was well known in commercial circles in Otago and Canterbury, died suddenly this evening. He had until lately beer Inspector of Factories, but he retiree owing to failing health.

Otago Daily Times 21 June 1919, Page 10
On Saturday there passed away at Hilton, a South Canterbury pioneer in the person of Mr John Kelland. Mr Kelland was born in Devonshire in 1840. He came to New Zealand by the ship British Empire in 1864, landing at Lyttelton. He first went on to a station in the Ashburton district, now known as the Springfield estate, and remained there for two years. From Ashburton he went to Timaru, and spent some time on his late father's' farm at Gleniti. Subsequently he bought a farm at Kakahu. He was there during the flood of 1868, and eventually sold out to his brother William. From Kakahu Mr Kelland went to Smithfield, where he remained for seven years, after which he acquired a sheep and grain-growing farm at Temuka known as Puke Mara, and remained there till failing health compelled him to go to Timaru and retire. He also owned the Woodside estate at Geraldine at one time. Mr Kelland was for 23 years a member of the Geraldine Road Board, and in 1893 was chairman of that body. He was at one time a director of the Canterbury Farmers' Co-operative Association, a member of the Timaru Harbour Board of the Winchester and Hilton School Committee, and for many years was a vestryman of the Geraldine Anglican Church. He married Miss Poole, of Devonshire, who predeceased him four years ago. He leaves a grown up family of six daughters and two sons. 

Timaru Herald, 9 June 1911, Page 2 MR ALEXANDER KELMAN
Yesterday morning the death occurred at his residence, Annfield Farm, Geraldine, of Mr Alexander Kelman, one of the oldest and best known residents of Geraldine, and whose age' was close upon four-score years. For some time past ho had been in failing health, but his death came quite unexpectedly to most of his friends. Deceased was a native of Aberdeenshire, where he worked as a plasterer. He came to New Zealand, in 1864, and for a short time was employed by the late Alex. Wilson on the farm now occupied by Mr De Renzy at Winchester, and was probably the first to put a plough into the country between Waihi Crossing and Geraldine. He soon acquired a piece of laud a little nearer Geraldine, and by industry and thrift ho became possessed of a considerable property in the district. In the seventies he occupied' a. seat on the Geraldine Road Board,, and at the time of his death he was a member of the Geraldine County Council. He was regarded as a shrewd, hard-working and careful man. He leaves a widow, and five sons and three daughters, one of the latter being Mrs C. Hewson, of Belfield. Of his sons, Mr J. Kelman lives at Seadown, and Mr A. Kelman at Lowcliffe, near Ashburton. The remainder of the family reside in Geraldine. The sympathy of a large circle of friends will be with the family in their bereavement. The funeral will take place on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Geraldine.

Star 27 April 1907, Page 5
Mr P. Kippenberger, the well-known in Christchurch solicitor, died last evening. He was a native of Bavaria, having been born at Kindenheim in 1858. He was educated at Timaru, and was For some time employed in the "Timaru Herald" Office. He was articled to Mr J. White, Crown Prosecutor, at Timaru, when twenty years of age, and later joined Messrs Joynt and Perceval as common-law clerk. After passing his examinations with honours he was admitted to the bar in 1883. Four years later he joined Mr W. Acton-Adams, with whom he remained till 1900, when the firm was dissolved. Since then the practice has been carried on by Mr Kippenberger alone. He had been German Consul for Canterbury since 1895. Mr Kippenberger has left a widow and several children.

Timaru Herald, 31 August 1914, Page 9 C.B. KNIGHT.
The hand of death has removed from our midst another well-known citizen of Timaru, in Mr Cuthbert Bernard Knight. The deceased was the second son of the late John Cuthbert Knight, one of the early pioneers of South Canterbury. He was born at Timaru in 1871, his parents at that time residing in a house where the Assembly Rooms now stand. Educated at the Timaru Main School, he joined the firm of Quelch and Co., ironmongers, and from there removed to Ashburton, where he joined the firm of David Thomas and Go auctioneers. This firm he left a few years later for a better position with H. Matson and Co.. of Christchurch later joining the firm of Common, Skelton and Co., Gisborne. It was here that his health began to fail him and he returned to Timaru in 1906, obtaining a responsible position with Dalgety and Co.. with whom he served till the time of his death. Mr Knight has been in very bad health for the last five months and he passed away peacefully on Thursday night at the age of 43 years. Although he took no active part in public affairs he always had the interests of his native town at heart. Quiet unassuming in his manner, and courteous and kind to all, he was much respected by all who knew him. He leaves an aged mother, a wife, and several brothers and sisters to mourn their loss.

Timaru Herald, 18 February 1910, Page 6 JOHN CUTHBERT KNIGHT
Another human link between Timaru of the old days and of the present was broken yesterday, by the death of Mr John Cuthbert Knight at the age of 71. The deceased (born at Birkenhead, Lancashire on 9th June, 1839), came to South Canterbury in 1859 per ship Tornado to Auckland, and then down the coast to join his brother Harry Alfonso Knight, who had taken up a sheep run near the Cave, which he called Cannington, after their old homestead near Bridgewater, in Somerset. After a time they disposed of the run, Mr H. A. Knight returned to England, and Mr J. C. Knight joined Mr Cramond in running a line of Cobb's coaches, north and south from Timaru, Mr Knight attending to the Timaru office. Old identities will remember the busy stables on Beswick street —then no street except on paper. When the opening of the railways destroyed the coaching business Mr Knight went into business as a commission agent. This he relinquished some years ago on account of advancing years, and growing physical infirmities, since when he has led a quiet and retired life, occasionally filling a gap usefully in times of pressure of clerical work on the wharf. He leaves a widow and family of four sons and seven daughters to mourn his loss.

Press, 25 November 1918, Page 9
Mr J. H. Lane, who died in the Temuka pneumonia hospital on Thursday, spent a considerable period of his life in the gold mining industry at Klondyke, Australia, the West Coast and in Central Otago. He retired a few years ago, settling in Timaru, and on purchasing a portion of the Greenhayes estate, settled in Temuka. He leaves a widow and two children. [Lane, John Henry died aged 44, Murray St., Temuka m. Isabella Cunningham in 1902. Son Charles died June 15 1917, aged 14. Isabella died in 1965 in Wellington. All buried in Temuka.]

Evening Post, 2 April 1931, Page 10 MR. JOHN LANE
The death is announced by the Press Association from Ashburton of Mr. John Lane, of Messrs. Lane, Walker, and Rudkin, proprietors of the Ashburton Woollen Mills, and formerly one of the owners of the Timaru mills, at the age of 81. The late Mr. John Lane was one of the principals of the firm of Lane, Walker, and Rudkin, woollen and hosiery manufacturers, of Ashburton and Christchurch. Mr. Lane came from Scotland to New Zealand with his wife and family in. 1881, making the voyage in the old sailing ship Nelson. He soon obtained employment with the Dunedin firm of Boss and Glendining, proprietors of the Roslyn Woollen Mills, as wool classer and wool buyer. In the nineties he joined with five others in the purchase of the Timaru Woollen Mills, which were very successfully operated. At the end of the partnership period of ten years Mr. Lane, with one of his partners, Mr. Pringle Walker, retired from the Timaru concern and acquired the Ashburton Woollen Mill. This property has been considerably enlarged, and its operations were extended by an amalgamation with Rudkin's hosiery factory in Christchurch. For a long period Mr. Lane was a familiar figure at wool sales in various parts of the Dominion, but it is some years since he retired from active participation in business. He was a staunch member and office bearer of the Presbyterian Church, in the affairs of which he was an ardent worker and generous supporter. He was one of the founders of St. Andrew's (Presbyterian) College in Christchurch, and for a period was a member of the Board of Governors of that institution. He was twice married, and is survived by his widow, six sons, and one daughter. Mr. A. B. Lane, manager of the Press Association, Wellington, is his second son.

Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser 8 September 1896, Page 2
Star 5 September 1896, Page 7
Press
, 5 September 1896, Page 7 MR E. C. LATTER
Our readers will regret to see the announcement of the death of another of our pioneer settlers in the person of Mr E. C. Latter, after an illness which really dates from the sudden death of his wife about two yean since. He was devotedly attached to her and if he possibly could help it never went anywhere without her. He was born at Wicken, near London, in December, 1829. After spending some time in a merchant's office in London he resolved to come to New Zealand, and took his passage in the Travancore, arriving in Lyttelton in 1851, when he was 22 years of age. After a short stay there he joined the late Mr Innes in a run south of Timaru. About this time he and Mr George Rhodes were the first to drive sheep from the northern to the southern parte of the province, and as an illustration of the difficulties then encountered, Mr Latter has said, that it was no unusual thing to be camped on the banks of a flooded river for upwards of a week crossing sheep. After spending a few years as a sheep farmer Mr Latter bought section at the foot of the hills, the place now in the occupation of Mr Charles Clark, where he established a dairy farm and worked a quarry on the hillside. Bringing the stone into town was then a difficult process, many a load having to be thrown into holes before the road could be made passable. About 1862 he sold his farm and went to Akaroa, where he commenced business as a merchant. Shortly afterwards Mr Latter purchased from the representative of Mr Robinson, the first Resident Magistrate here, the property known locally as Wagstarfs Hotel (sec. 39). The original building had been burned down while in the occupation of Mr John Watson, Mr Robinson's successor as local magistrate, and on the beautiful site now occupied by the new home of Mr E. E. Lelievre, Mr Latter erected the building so long known as his home, and where most of his children were born. When Mr Latter first arrived in Akaroa the outlet for its magnificent timber was uncertain and spasmodic. To him belongs the credit of organising a commercial system of putting in the market the then almost interminable supplies of totara and white and black pine, To place these timbers in the markets of the colony it was of .course necessary that vessels should be ready to carry them, and, at once noting this fact, Mr Latter had bottoms constructed from the native bush to carry what was then so much, wanted sawn timber for building purposes. One of his first ventures was the Foam, built in Red House Bay from the timber of the hills above, followed by the topsail schooner Breeze, at Duvauchelle's Bay, and finally by anticipating by over thirty years the idea of steam communication round the Peninsula, the s s. Wainui was built at the Head of the Bay for the trade between Lyttelton, Akaroa, and Timaru. In 1873 he removed from Akaroa to Barry's Bay, then covered with magnificent timber. He started a large sawmill, before which the virgin forest quickly disappeared. In 1882 Mr Latter was appointed District Commissioner for the Property Tax, which he held until the office was centralised in Wellington. We next see him in the position of managing, for Messrs Miles and. Co., the Australian Land Company. About 1886 he was appointed Official Assignee in Bankruptcy, a position he resigned to take the Managing Trusteeship of the estate of the late Mr R. H. Rhodes, which he held up to the time of his death. He was of a most generous and charitable disposition and a loyal, true-hearted friend. During the time he was resident on the Peninsula he held the position of Chairman of the Akaroa County Council and Chairman of the Lake Ellesmere Trust to the time of the expiry of the Trust. He was for many years a Justice of the Peace. We could not close this notice without bearing testimony to the energy and generosity which he always displayed in church work. He was a good musician and used his skill for the benefit of the church, for, during the whole of his sojourn on the Peninsula, he acted as organist in the churches as well as Church Warden. At Barry's Bay he made quite a revival, for taking into consideration the sparsity of the population of the district he raised a large congregation where there had previously been no place of worship. He was a member of the Synod, and took great interest in its proceeding; During the time of his residence at Fendalton he continued to work unceasingly for the benefit of his Church, being organist and Church Warden. He leaves a family of five sons and five daughters to mourn his loss. His eldest son, Mr Robert Latter, lives in his father's late residence at Barry's Bay. Two of his daughters are married, one to Mr Arthur Templer, now of Auckland, and one to Mr Robert Inwood, of Southbridge.

[Edward Circuit Latter, died age 66. In 1854 he married Mary Elizabeth Grundy]
[Robert Heaton
Rhodes married Sophia Circuit LATTER , a daughter of Robert Latter, in Lyttelton in 1858. Sophia St. and Latter St. in Timaru named after her. Latter St. was one of the original Rhodes Town Streets surveyed by Edwin Lough. Robert H. Rhodes was Edward's brother-in-law. Robert Latter died 25 January 1865 in Oamaru]

North Otago Times, 26 January 1865, Page 2
On the 25th inst, in the house of his son-in-law, at Oamaru, Mr Robert Latter, J.P., of Lyttelton, in the 73rd years of his age.

Children of Mary Elizabeth and Edward Circuit LATTER
1855 Latter Elizabeth Martha
1857 Latter Robert Mary
1859 Latter Edward Samuel
1861 Latter Francis
1863 Latter Sophia Mary Christina married Arthur Templer in 1888
1865 Latter Arthur
1865 Latter Charles
1867 Latter Edith Mary married Augustus Robert Inwood in 1889
1870 Latter Ernest Clifford
1873 Latter Kate Mary Elizabeth
1881 Latter Margaret
1881 Latter Emma]

North Otago Times, 9 January 1908, Page 1
The Timaru Herald of yesterday, referring to this sad event, writes "Quite a shock was caused among the Timaru friends of Mr W. Lawson, he well-known auctioneer of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, when the news went round on Monday evening that he was suffering from an acute attack of pneumonia and was not likely to recover. As au active and popular member of the S.C.J.C, and, Caledonian Society, he will also be missed, and doubtless the esteem in which he was held among the farming community will bring many of them from far and near to attend the funeral to-morrow. The deceased was a native of Oamaru, and joined the staff of the Loan Company in that town an junior clerk, working his way up to the post of auctioneer at Timaru, which he had filled very capably for eight or ten years. Mr Lawson was well known in Oamaru, where as a lad he joined the staff of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company. Mrs Lawson, with her four children, was absent at Invercargill, and Mr Lawson, temporarily lodging at the Empire Hotel, fell ill there on Saturday. Mrs Lawson was sent for, and returned on Monday evening.

Feilding Star, 15 April 1902, Page 2
News was received in Feilding on Thursday of the death of Mr Frederic Le Cren, of Timaru (father-in-law of Mr Blundell manager of the Feilding branch of the Bank of New Zealand) who, (reports the Press) held the position of manager there of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company from April 1876, to December last, when he resigned owing to ill-health. Mr Le Cren, who was 67 at the time of his death, was educated at the Blue Coast School, London, and after some time spent in Melin the days of the diggings, came to Lyttelton in the early days. His brother, the late Mr H. J. Le Cren, had arrived in Lyttelton prior to the arrival of the first four ships, and acted as agent for the owners of the historic vessels who had chartered them to the Canterbury Association. He established himself in business in Lyttelton when Mr Frederic Le Cren came from Australia; Subsequently Mr F. Le Cren took over the management of the ferry over the Heathcote, which was then the only means by which the earlier settlers could cross on their way to Christchurch, and was afterwards appointed Postmaster at Lyttelton. He again took over the ferry, and married whilst at Heathcote, Miss Mills. In 1855 Mr H. Le Cren removed to Timaru and entered into business as a merchant and general agent. Subsequently, about 1864 Mr F. Le Cren also went to South Canterbury, and became a partner in the firm of Cain, Munro and Co. On the dissolution of the partnership he carried on a part of the business and then sold out. On H. Le Cren going Home Mr F. Le Cren acted as his agent, and took an active part in the formation of the Timaru Landing and Shipping Company. In 1875 he became the Timaru manager of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, and at the time of his retirement he was the senior manager in Australasia, having held that post for twenty-six years. He was a director of the Timaru Gas Company, and of the Timaru Building Society, and was elected a member of the first Town Council. On Timaru being proclaimed a Borough he was elected a member of the first Municipal Council. He was also a member of the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works, the Harbour Board and the Hospital Board. During his term of office as a member of the latter the present Hospital building was erected, and one of the wards was named after him. Mr Le Cren leaves a widow, six sons and two daughters.

Evening Post, 21 May 1895, Page 2
Timaru, 20th May. Mr. H. J. Le Cren, one of the pioneer merchants of Timaru, died this afternoon, aged 68 years.

Star 21 May 1895, Page 2
Mr Henry John Le Cren, one of the earliest settlers in Canterbury, died yesterday afternoon at his residence. Craighead, Timaru, aged sixty-eight. Mr Le Cren bad been ailing for some time, but his end came suddenly and unexpectedly. Mr Le Cren will be well remembered by some of the oldest settlers of Lyttelton and Christchurch, and by the " Pilgrims " as having arrived in the colony in advance of them to represent the owners of the "first four ships." A native of London, he learned the routine and the habits of business in the office of Messrs Frubling, Goschen and Co., where he was fellow-clerk with the ex-Chancellor of the Exchequer. He came out to the colony in the Barbara Gordon, to act as agent for the first ships despatched to Port Cooper, and then, with Mr Longdon, carried on in Lyttelton for many years a general merchant's business. Mr Le Cren afterwards established a branch business in Timaru, erecting the first store in the township, and himself remaining in Lyttelton. The late Captain Cain managed the Timaru store.  The business was sold to Messrs Miles and Co. about 1867, and Mr Le Cren went to London. While there he joined Mr G. G. Russell, in the firm of Russell and Le Cren as colonial merchants, who were represented in the colony by Messrs Russell, Ritchie and Co. Twelve or thirteen years ago, both the Home and colonial businesses were sold to the National Mortgage and Agency Company, and Mr Le Cren came out to New Zealand. He erected a large residence at Craighead, the grounds and gardens of which are one of the show places of Timaru, and, except for an occasional trip Home, resided there until his death. The deceased gentleman was always most highly respected as an upright businessman. He leaves three sons and four daughters, all of whom are grown up.

Timaru Herald 23 June 1948 - Funeral
LEIGH - The friends of the late Edward Leo Leigh are respectfully informed that his Funeral will leave the Church of the Sacred Heart this day Wednesday, June 23, at 2. p. for the Timaru cemetery. requiem mass 7 a.m. (C.H. Barrie)

Star 26 April 1899, Page 1
Mr T. W. Leslie, land and estate agent, Timaru, died very suddenly from heart disease on Monday evening, at the age of fifty five. The deceased had been many years in the district, engaged in farming pursuits, and latterly had acted as a commission agent.

Star 16 April 1894, Page 1
Mr Lovegrove, an old South Canterbury settler, formerly of Makikihi, and later of Hilton, died on Saturday morning at Timaru. The deceased was a brother of Dr Lovegrove, of Timaru, and was widely known as a breeder and judge of stock.

Press, 11 March 1927, Page 18
In the death on Wednesday of Mr Robert Macaulay at his residence, "Beach Farm," Milford, South Canterbury lost one of its most popular and respected citizens. After some months of illness his death was not unexpected, and when ho died he was 111 his seventyfirst year. The late Mr Macaulay came to New Zealand over forty years ago, commencing farm worked with Darroch Bros, at Waikari, and after a year or two came to Milford an a tenant to the late Colonel Hayhurst. He bought the farm seventeen years ago, and took a keen interest in local affairs, being the chairman of the Milford School for a number of years. For many years he was a member of the Temuka Caledonian Society, holding office as president., and afterwards- as patron, until the time of his death. He was especially interested in pipe music and dancing, and was a judge for over twenty years for Caledonian Societies in South Canterbury. Seventeen years ago he was appointed a member of the Canterbury Land Board, which position ho held until his death. He was a P.M. of Lodge St. George, trustee of the Temuka Pipe Band, a member of the Temuka and Geraldine A. and P. Associations, and also a member of the South Orari River Board and Temuka Road Board, until these bodies became merged into the Geraldine County Council, when he became a county councillor. He leaves a widow, four sons, and four daughters, two of the latter being Mrs J. R. Edgar (Seadown), and Mrs A. Bisdee (Clandeboye). He is also survived by two brothers, Mr J. Macaulay (Albury) and Mr A. Macaulay (Upper Waitohi), and a sister, Mrs J. Dick (Timaru).

Timaru Herald, 13 April 1918, Page 11 MR PATRICK MCCARTHY
Another old and highly respected resident of South Canterbury, in the person of Mr .P. McCarthy, farmer, of Bluecliffs, passed away at the public hospital, Timaru, after a very short illness, on March 21st. Born in County Kerry, Ireland, in 1853 the deceased, landed here 45 years ago in the ship "The Star of India." He was married in Timaru three years later and lived at Bluecliffs until the time of his death. For 26 years he was road ganger to the Waimate County Council, after which he followed farming pursuits. Deceased was a popular man and a keen sport. He was a judge of National music and dancing for many years at the Caledonian sports in Timaru and Waimate. His genial manner and uprightness of character earned for him a very large circle of friends amongst the farming community in and around St. Andrews. The funeral cortege, which left the residence of Mr F. McTague, Otipua, was a very large one. The deceased leaves a widow; and a family of five boys and six girls. The married daughters are. Mrs M. Rooney, Adair, Mrs F. McTague, Otipua, Mrs Wm. Rex, Wellington, and Mrs L. Robinson, Hakataramea. The married sons are Messrs P. and J. McCarthy, of Havelock North'. The single members of the family are Miss E. J. McCarthy, on the staff of the Public Hospital, Timaru, Quartermaster R. J. V. and Private R. L. McCarthy, who are at present on active service with the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, and Mr M. McCarthy, of Bluecliffs.

Star 30 December 1898, Page 3
Timaru, Dec. 30. Mr Daniel McGuinness is dead, aged sixty. He was for many years a popular hotelkeeper here, and retired from business a few years back.

Star 2 September 1897, Page 1
Mr J. C. MACINTYRE. The many friends of Mr J. C. Macintyre, station-master at Lyttelton, will regret to hear of his death, which occurred at Lyttelton early yesterday morning. Mr Macintyre had been in ill-health for sometime, and had been confined to his room, but it was thought that he was improving until yesterday, when he became worse, and gradually sank. The deceased gentleman joined the railway service in 1878, and occupied many positions of trust on the Dunedin section, including that of chief clerk at Oamaru. Subsequently he became relieving-officer, and then station master at Kaiapoi and Timaru. From the latter place he was removed to Lyttelton in June of last year. During the fifteen months he was stationed at Lyttelton he made a wide circle of friends by his courteous and genial disposition, and when the news of his death became known yesterday the flags on the shipping and business places were all lowered to half-mast. While he was stationmaster at Kaiapoi the deceased was so popular that when he left a handsome clock and other articles were presented to him. At the Kaiapoi station yesterday a flag is flown at half-mast. Our Timaru correspondent says that the news of Mr Macintyre's death reached Timaru yesterday morning by private telegram, and occasioned great regret. Mr Macintyre had been station-master at Timaru before being transferred to Lyttelton, and he was universally liked and respected. He suffered a long and severe illness before leaving Timaru. The widow of the deceased is a daughter of Mr E. H. Lough, Town Clerk, at Timaru.

Press, 16 November 1915, Page 5
Mr Alexander MACKENZIE. The death occurred at his residence, Riverford. Geraldine on Sunday, of Mr Alexander Mackenzie, who was an esteemed resident of the district. Born in the parish of Urray in the county of Ross in 1838, he was, as a young man, engaged in agricultural pursuits in his native country. In 1863 he arrived at Lyttelton in the ship Brothers Pride, under engagement to the late Mr Angus, Macdonald, and proceeded to Geraldine. Later on he took, up land between Geraldine and Winchester, and he farmed his several properties until 12 years ago, when his son, Mr Colin Mackenzie, took them over. The late Mr Alexander Mackenzie took no part in public life, but was a staunch and liberal supporter of the Presbyterian Church, and it was his generosity that made it possible to build the Presbyterian Hall at Geraldine. Mr Mackenzie leaves three sons and a daughter Colonel Mackenzie, of Stover, Geraldine; the Rev. J. Mackenzie, of Toorak, Melbourne, formerly of St. Andrew's Church, Christchurch; Mr Colin Mackenzie, of Riverford, Geraldine, and Mrs Mitchell, of Gisborne.

Ashburton Guardian, 23 July 1912, Page 6
Gore, July 22. Mr David M. McKenzie, 35 years of age, who had been employed in the Postal Department for nearly 20 years, died on Sunday morning from inflammation, of the longs. He was at one time in the Timaru and Dunedin post offices.

Timaru Herald, 24 August 1886, Page 3
We learn from a private letter received by a friend in Timaru that Mr D. McKenzie, who for many years past has been a resident of Geraldine, and was publicly known as the genial and courteous Secretary to the Geraldine Racing Club, died at Geraldine about 3 a.m. on Sunday last. The deceased gentleman had been ailing for months past, and though he took a special trip to Dunedin some weeks ago to seek the best medical advice, he by it but put off the end for a few hours. His death was, therefore, not entirely unexpected, but now it has occurred his many friends feel and regret his loss very keenly. The late Mr McKenzie and family arrived from the sister shores of Australia some twenty-four years ago, and cast in his lot with the early settlers at Timaru. He very soon entered into partnership with the late Mr P. D. McRae, and the firm quickly established itself as one of the best then in Timaru. As contractors and builders the late Messrs McRae and McKenzie built the Government Landing Service, and the Stables in Beswick street, which one time presented such an animated scene in the "good old coaching days " when Cobb and Co. ruled the road. Besides the buildings mentioned the late firm put up several others, which are lasting monuments to this day of the genuine kind of work then turned out. Desiring a change, and the Raukapuka Bush being at that time much talked about, Mr McKenzie shifted his home to Geraldine ; erected sawmills in the bush named, and soon had many men working for him. The timber trade in time declining in prosperity, he, but a few years ago, gave up the business and commenced practising as an architect, his practical knowledge as a master builder standing him in good stead. He found plenty of opportunity for work, and designed and successfully superintended the erection of many buildings, among which might be mentioned a new and handsome block of shops for Mr Lawson, of Geraldine, and a drillshed for the Geraldine Rifle Volunteers, both of which have just left the contractors' hands. In addition to his architect's duties, Mr McKenzie also found time to carry out the work of secretary to the club named,-and it is due to his energy, combined with the assistance of a good committee, that the club mainly owes its present proud position in sporting circles in the colony. In conclusion, we may add that the deepest sympathy is felt for Mrs McKenzie and her family in their bereavement.  

New Zealand Tablet, 16 February 1894, Page 19
The following is taken from the Geraldine Guardian, Thursday, February 8. The funeral of the late Mr Peter Henry McShane took place on Tuesday, the procession leaving his late residence, Geraldine Flat, at 9. a.m. The funeral was held in the forenoon, and not at the usual conventional hour, we understand, at the express wish of the deceased. Strange to say, only about a week before his death the matter of funerals was being discussed in his family circle and deceased then said that his death his wish was to be buried in the same manner and same time as was the custom in the country where he was born. This wish his relatives have dutifully carried out. The funeral procession arrived at Geraldine about 1015 a.m., and was one of the largest ever seen in the district. The cortege comprised about 80 conveyances, and a large number of people followed on foot on the street. The pall-bearers were W. Earl, E. Burke. M. Burke, J McQuilkin, J McQuillen, and Neil O'Boyle. On arrival at St Mary Roman Catholic Church the coffin was carried in, and High Mass for the Dead was celebrated, the Rev Father Hyland of Ashburton officiating, assisted by the Rev Father O'Donnell (Ashburton) the Rev. Fathers Fauvel and Malone (Temuka), and Rev Father Bower, (Geraldine). The clergy walked at the head of the funeral procession to the cemetery, where the Rev Father Bowers read the burial service at the grave. I may mention as one who has known the deceased for a great number of years and heard him tell a good many aneodotes of his colonial life, that he left his native place (County Antrim) in the year of 1859 and came out to Melbourne. For some years he followed cattle dealing, and made several visits to New Zealand for that purpose. He was also for a time on the West Coast gold diggings. Then he married and settled down in Halswell in 1871 He only remained there a few years, till he finally cast in his lot with many more of his own countrymen in South Canterbury the place where he died. As a farmer few were his equal and as a Catholic the Church will lose in him one of its strongest supporters. He was always ready and willing to help any charitable purpose' He was a good husband and kind father. His untimely death has cast a gloom over the district. He leaves a widow and six children (the eldest is married), all well provided for, to mourn his loss.

New Zealand Tablet, 31 October 1901, Page 19
The many friends in Wellington and elsewhere in the Colony of Constable John Madden, of Pleasant Point, will hear with regret of his death which occurred in the early part of last week at the comparatively early age of 53 years. Deceased had been for a number of years Rationed at Clyde Quay, Wellington, and was a transferred to Pleasant Point in 189 C. lie was a native of the South of Ireland, and when a young man engaged in farming In 1880 he joined the armed constabulary, and took part in Major Gudgeon's expedition to Parihaka and the arrest of Te Whiti. In 1883 he joined the police, and his career since then gained the approval and esteem of his superiors. He leaves a widow and 11 children, most of whom are grown up. One boy is a student at St. Patrick's College, having been a successful scholarship winner from the Timaru Marist Brothers' School.— R.I.P.

Ashburton Guardian, 13 March 1911, Page 3
Mr John Manchester died at Waimate on Sunday aged 77. The deceased gentleman, who was the father of Mr G. Manchester, of Ashburton, was for many years Mayor of Waimate, and the representative of that district on the Timaru Harbour Board for upwards of twenty-five years. Mr Manchester took a deep and intelligent interest in local government and was a highly respected member of the community; he was born in Leicestershire, England, in 1833. In 1859 he arrived in Timaru by the ship Strathallan, and passed a few years on a sheep station in South Canterbury. In 1863 Mr Manchester and his partners started business in Waimate as general storekeepers and merchants. Mr Manchester served on the Waimate County Council and on the Road Board that preceded it, for over thirty years, and was chairman of these bodies for a considerable time. He was also a member of the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works, the first local body in South Canterbury. He was a member of the Timaru High School Board of Governors, and a governor of the Waimate School Board. Mr Manchester was one of the founders of the Methodist Church in Waimate, and held every office that a layman could hold in connection therewith. In addition to being frequently a member of the New Zealand Methodist Conference. Mr Manchester was a representative of the general Conference of Australasia. In 1867 Mr. Manchester married a daughter of the late Mr James Thomas Pain, of Queensland, and leaves a family of two sons and two daughters.

North Otago Times 14 March 1911, Page 2
He was born in Leicester in 1833, and arrived in Timaru in 1859 in the ship Strathallan. He spent some years on a sheep station, and, with the late Mr G. W. Goldsmith, entered business pursuits in 1863 in the then small township of Waimate. The business grew to large dimensions, and is now one of the largest in the town. Mr Manchester served on the Waimate County Council and on the Road Board that preceded it, for over thirty years, and was chairman of these bodies for a considerable time. He was also a member of the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works, the first local body in South Canterbury. For several years he represented a portion of the Waimate County Council on the Timaru Harbor Board, and was also a member of the Timaru High School Board of Governors, and a Governor of the Waimate High School Board, he was one of the founders of the Methodist Church of Waimate and held every office that a layman could hold in connection therewith. In addition to frequently being a member of the New Zealand Methodist Conference Mr Manchester was a representative at the General Conference of Australasia. The deceased was the first Mayor of Waimate, which position he held with intermissions till 1908. For fifteen years he held the position of Waimate representative on the Timaru Harbor Board. On his retirement from the position of Mayor in 1908 a large and representative public meeting bore testimony to the esteem in which he was held; but in every position he, has held he has been looked up to as a conscientious help to all he had dealings with. His connection with the Wesleyan community in Waimate has been one of great advantage to the church, in whose interests he, worked diligently and faithfully, and his removal will sunder n tie that has been over a beneficial one. In whichever light the services of Mr Manchester to Waimate may be viewed the general feeling must be that a public benefactor has fallen out of the ranks of its foremost men. His advice was always looked upon as reliable, and he has departed leaving a void that will be hard to fill.

Timaru Herald, 19 June 1916, Page 3 Mr JOHN MEE
Still another link with the early days of Timaru was broken on Saturday night, when Mr John Mee, the well known merchant of Strathallan Street, died. Mr Mee arrived in New Zealand in 1863 with his brother, Mr George Mee. Soon after his arrival, he joined the firm of Miles and Co., in Christchurch, and was shortly afterwards appointed to represent them in Timaru. Later, he bought; out the extensive wool, grain, and seed business of Miles and Co., which he carried on successfully. He was well-known throughout South Canterbury as a business man, and his happy disposition made him well liked. In his younger days he took an active interest in various athletic pursuits of which ho was very fond. His wife died some years ago, hut he leaves a grown-up family of sons and daughters, the eldest son being Mr J. P. T. Mee of Levels.

Press, 21 August 1918, Page 10 Mr Richard MEREDITH.
There passed away at Waimate yesterday, Mr Richard Meredith, in his 76th year. The late Mr Meredith was born in Tullow, County Carlow, Ireland, in January, 1843, and was educated to follow the teaching profession. He came to New Zealand in the ship Accrington, landing at Lyttelton on September 9th, 1863. In the same month he commenced teaching, which he continued for three years at Woodend, eleven years at Fernside, and 11 years at Cust. In 1867 he married Miss Louisa Willis, daughter of the late Mr James Willis, proprietor of the "Canterbury Standard," one of the early newspapers of the province. In 1888 Mr Meredith gave up teaching, and engaged in farming, which he carried on successfully at North Moeraki, Darfield and Waihaorunga. The farm at Waihaorunga, some four years ago, was sold to the Government for settlement purposes, and is now known as the Tara Settlement. The deceased gentleman had since lived in retirement at his town residence, Park Villa, Waimate. In the year 1999 Mr Meredith successfully contested the Ashley seat, and represented-that electorate in Parliament for twelve consecutive years; during which time he was appointed to the chairmanship of the M to Z Public Petitions Committee, and other important offices. Ho was a member of the Canterbury Land Board for eleven years, a member of the North Canterbury Education Board for six years, and; chairman of the Board for one year. He was also an active member of the Farmers' Union, Technical School Committee, A. and P. Association. Timaru High School Board, and and been a J.P. for 25 years. Mr Meredith was an active supporter of the Methodist Church, and served on its various committees of management, and for over fifty years was a valued local preacher, not only of that church, but willingly gave his time and assistance to other churches requiring it, regardless of personal inconvenience and long journeys frequently into the back-blocks. He was always a liberal supporter of benevolent institutions, and was for eleven years president of the Waimate branch of the British and Foreign Bible Society. He was a prominent Orangeman, and was Right Worshipful Grandmaster of the Orange Institution for the Dominion for two separate terms. Mr and Mrs Meredith celebrated their golden wedding at Park Villa on Easter Monday of last year, when there was a large re-union of the members of the family, and a few very old friends. The whole function passed off under very happy conditions. The deceased gentleman is survived by a widow, four sons, Messrs R. Meredith (Waipukurau), E. J. Meredith H. H. Meredith (Waikakihi), and G. S. Meredith (Waimate): four daughters, Mrs Hitchens (Waimate), Mrs Black (Waimate), Mrs G.R. Robertson (Christchurch), and Mrs P. Meyers (Geraldine), and 22 grandchildren. One child died in infancy, and a third daughter, Mrs W. Bridgman. of Hastings, died some seven years ago. In mourning their loss the widow and family will have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends.

Timaru Herald, 7 May 1907, Page 4
Mr Henry Middleton, an old resident of Waimate, and proprietor of the Royal Hotel, was found dead in bed by his daughter, Mrs Henderson, on Sunday morning. He had been ailing for about three years with heart trouble, and his death was therefore not unexpected. Deceased was born at Tipperary in 1843, and followed the trade of a blacksmith. He came to New Zealand in 1861, and had a shop in Kaiapoi till an accident to his hand led him to take over a hotel there. He sold out three years later and bought the Royal Hotel, which he had run till lately, when he handed over control to his son-in-law. Mr Middleton was well liked, and his death removes one of the old landmarks. The town flags are flying halfmast out of respect to his memory.

Ashburton Guardian, 21 February 1912, Page 4
Mr John Millichamp, of Tinwald, an old and greatly respected resident of the district died at his home last night, the cause being diabetes. The fact that death was unexpected makes the event more sad. The late Mr Millichamp, who was 66 years, of age, was born in Herefordshire, England, and as a young man migrated to New Zealand, arriving here 41 years ago; He spent some time in Christchurch, Timaru and Temuka, but for the last thirty years' of his life he resided in the Ashburton district. Mr Millichamp lived a useful life and was popular among; his large circle of acquaintances. At the time of his death he was, with his sons, owner of an extensive nursery at Tinwald. Though he did not take a prominent part in public life, for the past few years he had been a member of the Tinwald Domain Board. He leaves a widow and three sons and one daughter, all residents of the district.

Timaru Herald, 3 August 1909, Page 5
A man named John Minnis, well known in the Pleasant Point district, a lobourer, died suddenly yesterdays at Mr J. Medlicott's farm, where, he was employed. Deceased was 63 years of age, a native of Pendnen, Penzance, Cornwall, and he had been living in and about Pleasant Point for the last thirty years.

Ashburton Guardian, 21 February 1912, Page 4 Death
Millichamp —On February 20th, at his residence, Carter's Terrace, Tinwald, John, beloved husband of Eliza Emma Millichamp ; aged 65 years.

Press, 13 January 1910, Page 9 Mr. James MOFFAT
Mr Jas. Moffatt, an old identity of Mackenzie Country, died at Fairlie on Sunday, aged 74. He came to New Zealand about 40 years ago, and after shepherding at Mt. Somers for some time and then farming at Kakahu for a while, he went into the Mackenzie Country, and was employed for many years on Haldon station.

Timaru Herald, 15 October 1919, Page 4 Mr Hugh MONAHAN
An old and highly, respected resident of Temuka; Mr Hugh Monahan, died last Thursday, after an illness which had incapacitated him for three months. Mr Monahan was a native of Kiiburnie, Scotland. In 1878 he married and came out to New Zealand, landing in Otago. Five years later he came to Temuka, and has resided there ever since for a time he carried on rope making, and then took to general contracting, making a specialty, of asphalt work; footpaths, etc. He laid down about forty tennis courts, and asphalted the bicycle track of Temuka, Geraldine, and Timaru. Another of his jobs was the excavation of clay for thesite of the C.F.C. A. woolstores at Timaru. He was a total abstainer and an active worker in the temperance cause. He was for a time a member of the Temuka Borough Council; and was a keen member of the Temuka Bowling Club. He leaves a widow, two sons and four daughters; two sons lost their lives at the war. The funeral on Friday was attended by many old friends arid many tokens of sympathy were received by the family.

Ashburton Guardian, 11 January 1897, Page 3
The Timaru Herald has the following obituary notice of the late Mr I. L. Morris, of Pleasant Point, (Uncle of Mrs Rudolph Friedlander, of this town), who died on Saturday afternoon from an apoplectic seizure. The late Mr I. L. Morris was born at Samotaohin, in the province of Posen, Germany, about 1825. He arrived in Victoria in the early fifties and found himself first at Ballarat, and then at Bendigo diggings where he made many friends as a storekeeper. After the gold rushes he went back to Germany, and married. He then came to this colony, and entered into partnership with the late Mr Julius Mendelson at Pleasant Valley, which partnership existed until the death of Mr Mendelson. Prior to the death of his partner the firm commenced business at Pleasant Point, Altogether Mr Morris has been a resident of the Pleasant Point district between twenty five and thirty years. He was distinguished for honesty of purpose and probity in all business matters, and was noted for his good nature and philanthropy. He always took the deepest interest at in the social and civic welfare of the district. He was an one time a member of the Timaru Harbour Board, and until the time of his death was a member of the Pareora Licensing Committee and the Timaru Milling Company, besides being a member of most of the other local bodies. Those who have been identified with him in the many concerns of his active life bear testimony to his geniality of manner, his shrewd business ability, and his broadmindedness in all matters of moment. Last January he was the recipient of a handsome present from the members of the Jewish Synagogue in Timaru, in recognition of his able and willing services as lay reader for his denomination. Of whatsoever he was interested in he was a staunch supporter financially and otherwise, and his familiar figure will be missed by a large circle of friends in the Pleasant Point district for many years to come. He leaves widow and family of grown up sons and daughters to mourn his loss. In many ways too numerous to mention he will be sadly missed in South Canterbury.

Evening Post, 26 May 1936, Page 11 MR. R. B. MORRIS
The death of Mr. Richard Brabazon Morris, formerly secretary of the Post and Telegraph Department, occurred in Wellington on Saturday. Mr. Morris, who was 75 years of age, retired from the Public Service in 1923, after 48 years connection with the Postal Department, which he joined as a cadet in 1875. The ability he displayed insured his rapid rise in official life. He filled many positions, including those of Assistant Postmaster, Christchurch, Inspector of Savings Banks, Inspector of Post Offices, Chief Postmaster, Christchurch, Chief Inspector, and First Assistant Secretary. In 1920, Mr. Morris attended the Postal Conference at Madrid as the New Zealand representative. He was appointed permanent head of the Postal Department in 1920, and three years later he retired on superannuation. He subsequently took up land in the Timaru district, and, assisted by his sons, engaged in farming. In recent years he has lived in retirement at Wadestown. Mr. Morris leaves a widow, three daughters, Mrs. Harold Beck (Christchurch), Mrs. Phillip Brandon, of Wadestown, Mrs. Kenneth Hall, and two sons,. Messrs. R. B. and J. B. Morris, both at present in England. Mr. W. R. Morris, Wadestown, and Mr. C. D. Morris, Christchurch, are brothers. The funeral, which was private, took place yesterday. The Rev. J. E. Ashley-Jones officiated.

Timaru Herald, 12 September 1916, Page 4 MR R. MORRISON, SENR
There passed away at his residence, Geraldine, on Sunday night, one of the oldest residents of the district, Mr Robert Morrison senr. Born, at Ballywater, County Down, Ireland, in 1837, he caught, the gold fever while a young he came to Geraldine, where in 1867. Having been engaged gold digging in Australia for some years, he then came to New Zealand, and opened a store on the Dunstan diggings', Otago and later on he moved to the West Coast and engaged in storekeeping between Hokitiki and the Gray. From there he came to Geraldine where in 1867, the year before the big flood, of which he used frequently to speak, he established the business now known as that of Morrison Brothers, general storekeepers and merchants, and oh the site now occupied. Mr R. Morrison senr. retired from business twenty three years ago. His wife, predeceased him sixteen years ago. The deceased leaves three sons—Mr Robert who now conducts the J. Morrison, retired, and Mr W. Morrison, who is farming at Cambridge, in the Waikato and three daughters—Mrs W. Thomas, of Taumarunui; Mrs W. Dawson, of Wellington; and Miss Morrison, who attended her father to the end. The late Mr R. Morrison was a good business man, and he was much esteemed for his uprightness. The funeral takes place this afternoon.

Timaru Herald, 13 September 1917, Page 11 MR JOHN MURDOCH
Mr John Murdoch, whose death is announced this morning, at the age of 84, had been in business here as a timber merchant since 1881. He was a native of Ayrshire, and came to New Zealand a young man, and first settled in Invercargill. He was brought up as a mechanical engineer, and during his residence of thirty-three years in Southland he was prominently connected -with flour and timber milling. Ho had one of the first sawmills in the province, and at one time had six mills running, He also started and ran for five years one of the first flour mills. Mr Murdoch sold all life mills in Southland and removed to Dunedin where he built a large sawmill, working it in connection with another on Stewart Island. In 1881 he established a branch in Timaru, which was managed by the late Mr James Ord. Mr Murdoch himself came to Timaru some years ago, and made his Home in Latter Street, where he has since lived a quiet retired life.

Timaru Herald, 12 May 1919, Page 5 MR LOUIS NEVILLE b. 1852
The funeral took place on Friday, last at Timaru, of Mr Louis Neville, who passed away on Wednesday. Mr Neville, who was the younger son of the late Mr Ralph Neville-Grenville, of Butleigh Court, Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England, was born in England in 1852. In 1877, Mr Neville arrived in Otago, where he remained for some time. During his residence in Otago he took a prominent part in rowing and football, and was a member of the first Rugby team which toured New Zealand. Later on Mr Neville went to Lyttelton, where he was engineer to the Lyttelton Harbour Board during the time of the construction of the Lyttelton where he afterwards Mr Neville returned to England, and was engaged as one of the engineers on the construction of the Forth bridge, and later on took up the position of permanent engineer on the Oxford canal. His health compelled him to relinquish his profession as a civil engineer, and at the end of 1916 Mr Neville returned to New Zealand, coming to Timaru. Mr Neville intended to return to England but war conditions prevented him, and, he remained in Timaru until his death. Mr Neville took a keen and active interest in art, and his paintings have been favourably and widely known throughout Canterbury for the past 40 years. During his stay in Timaru he produced many bright pictures of scenes about the Bay, and a number of Alpine views, which were much admired for the excellence of their drawing and the clearness of their colouring. In February 1879, Mr Neville married Miss Ada Isabel Rouse, daughter of the late Dr. J.T. Rouse, of Lyttelton, by whom he is survived and who is in England, and by a son and a daughter, both of whom saw service at the front.  [He does have a small headstone at the Timaru Cemetery] [in 2013 did not find any of his paintings in the major NZ art galleries]

Louis arrived in NZ on the 4th Jan. 1917. Jack is William John Cotterill of Timaru Company.

The Grand Ball and Supper at Butleigh Court
At the Court which stately trees enclose,
Where oak, with ash and elm, luxuriant grows;
Where taste reigned and eloquence abound,
And flowers and shrubs profusely deck the ground
Where Grenville dwells, a long -respected name,
And long distinguished too for wealth and fame;
While patriotic worth and deeds combine,
And form a dignity to grace the line.

Press, 28 May 1919, Page 7
Mr John Nixon, a well-known Canterbury farmer, died at his residence, "Tullynacree," Riccarton road, on May 23rd, in his 79th year. Mr Nixon was born in County Down, Ireland, and came to New Zealand in 1864, a few years Inter taking up land at Fairlie, South Canterbury. He retired in 1904, and resided in Riccarton until the time of his death. He leaves a widow, five sons, and six daughters.

Otago Witness 18 December 1901, Page 45
One of the old identities of Waimate, Mr Nicholas O'Brien, died in Timaru on the 9th inst. The deceased gentleman was a native of Castle Dennot parish, County Kildare, Ireland He arrived in Auckland about 40 years ago, and in 1862 came to South Canterbury. He was never married. Deceased was for some years a member of the Waimate County Council, and a supporter of the Waimate Caledonian Society from its commencement.

Press, 11 March 1914, Page 7 MR M C. ORBELL.
The death is reported of Mr Macleod Clement Orbell, at his residence, Cashel street West, in his seventy-sixth year. Mr Orbell was born in Essex, England, and came out to New Zealand in 1849 in the ship Mariner, landing at Port Chalmers with his parents. The family was one of the first to settle in Otago, and he began pastoral life, at Waikouaiti, in 1849. In 1860 Mr Orbell took up a run in that district, and carried it on until 1888, when the country was divided by the Government and disposed of under the small grazing run system. Mr Orbell then came to Canterbury, where he leased the Raukapuka Estate, which had been the property at different times of Messrs Cox, Tancred, and Postlethwaite. He then devoted himself to sheepfarming and general agriculture, purchasing another farm about five miles from Geraldine. He was elected first Mayor of Waikouaiti in 1866 and a member of the Otago Provincial Council for the same electorate and was a member of the first Executive Council of Sir Julius Vogel—then Mr Vogel. Mr Orbell was gazetted as a Justice of the Peace in 1870, and thrice elected president of the Geraldine Farmers' Club. He married, in 1863, a daughter of Colonel Bamford, of the 73rd Regiment, and leaves a large family. The Rev. W. H. Orbell, of Papanui, is one of his sons. The late Mr Orbell was for a considerable period a prominent member and supporter of St. Michael's Church, and for some years, during Bishop Averill's regime as vicar, he held office as vestryman.

Star 24 January 1900, Page 3
MR JOSHUA PAGE. Canterbury has lost another of her early settlers by the death of Mr Joshua Page, who died to-day, after a long illness. Mr Page who was born at Thurlby, in Lincolnshire, in 1826, has been a resident in Canterbury for upwards of forty years. Brought up in England to agricultural pursuits, he went out to Australia in 1851, and shortly afterwards came to New Zealand in the schooner Mary Thompson. He was one of the first livery stable-keepers in Christchurch, succeeding Messrs Idle and Skelton, at the White Hart stables. He afterwards built stables in Cashel Street, which he worked successfully for many years. Disposing of these, he proceeded to Timaru, were for fifteen years he was recognised as a most successful practical farmer. Mr Page, who had been a member of the Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association from its inception, was a been judge of stock, both as regarded cattle and horses, and his services as a judge were in constant requisition, and were highly appreciated. Whilst living in Timaru, he became one of the promoters of the Farmers' Co-operative Association there. He was chairman for several years. Mr Page was frequently requisitioned to stand for Parliament, but invariably decline. He was married in 1862 to a sister, of the late Mr J. Gapes, ex-Mayor of Christchurch, and leaves one son and one daughter.

Timaru Herald, 30 August 1916, Page 3 Mr Chas. PALLISER.
the death at his home in Wellington, of Mr Charles Palliser elder brother of Mr Frank Palliser of Timaru, and a former resident of this town. Mr Charles Palliser was engaged in building here and erected some of the larger buildings of the early eight. He then, with Mr T.R. Jones, carried out several contracts for the construction of the concrete breakwater, and Messrs Palliser and Jones also built the North Mole (now- the Marine Parade). They then went to Napier and constructed the breakwater there. Subsequently Mr Palliser, settled in Wellington, and bought properties and engaged in building there acquiring a handsome competence. In the last of his trips to Europe, five or six years ago, he contracted a serious illness in Norway, which he was unable to completely shake off and has finally caused his decease, at the age of seventy. He leaves a widow (sister of Messrs John and Edwin Kelland, and of Mrs. Alex Pringle), four sons and three daughters, whose sorrow will be shared by many old friends in Timaru and the surrounding district.

Timaru Herald, 18 September 1886, Page 3
Mr John Paterson died on Thursday morning at his residence, Springfield, near Temuka, at the age of forty years. By his death South Canterbury has lost another representative of her oldest families. A native of the colony, though comparatively a young man, Mr Paterson had long unobtrusively used his influence for the welfare of the whole district. His father, the late Alexander Paterson, was one of the pioneer settlers of Nelson, he having landed there upwards of forty years ago. There several of his children, including him who has just died, were born. Twenty years ago Mr A. Paterson, with his family, removed to South Canterbury, and for a time occupied a house in Timaru, on whose site the Old Bank Hotel now stands. Soon after coming south, Mr Paterson took up a station in the Mackenzie Country, and shortly afterwards acquired two farms in the Temuka district, one at Winchester, one nearer Temuka town. Mr Alex. Paterson was also the first sheep inspector for South Canterbury, and for some years fulfilled the onerous duties attendant on that office with earnestness and success. At his death, some fifteen years ago, his sons took charge of his estates. Mr James Paterson assuming the care of the Winchester farm, Mr John, that of the Springfield estate. Since arriving at years of manhood, the subject of this notice has always evinced a deep interest m the welfare of the district in which his lot was cast. Chiefly to him Temuka is indebted for her splendid domain and park. He also worked hard and successfully on behalf of the local Pastoral and Agricultural Society, and was sparing neither of time nor money in aiding any enterprise likely to benefit the neighbourhood. Personally, Mr John Pater son was a man whom to know was to esteem. Naturally of a retiring disposition, his name did not often come prominently before the public, but m the circle of his intimate friends few were more highly appreciated or thoroughly loved than he. When any good was to be done, or any charity to be bestowed, none was more ready to answer the call than John Paterson. His genial presence and firm friendship will long be missed m and around Temuka. Mr Paterson's death was rather sudden. So late as Monday last he was out, but he was then suffering from a severe cold caught some days previously. The disorder rapidly assumed a serious phase, and about nine o'clock yesterday morning ho expired. The funeral will take place on Monday next.

Ashburton Guardian, 11 March 1913, Page 6
Timaru, March 10. George Pearson, bookseller and fancy goods dealer, died suddenly to-day at the age of 74. In the early sixties he was engaged in the small vessels coasting trade.

North Otago Times 11 March 1913, Page 4 DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT.
Timaru, March 10. Obituary. Mr George Pearson died suddenly to-day, aged 74. He was a stationer and fancy goods dealer, and was well known in the coastal trade from Port Chalmers to Timaru and to Taieri and Port Molyneaux for some years from 1860. Originally a ship's carpenter he settled here in that line in 1866. He had been ailing for four years, partly the result of a fall, but was about up till this morning. He leaves a widow and two sons (one a contractor here), one in G. and T. Young's Dunedin and three daughters.

Timaru Herald, 20 October 1899, Page 4
The late Mr William Penrose, whose funeral took place yesterday afternoon, had been about 27 years in the colony, arriving in Lyttelton in the ship Ballochmile [sic -Ballochmyle] in 1872. He lived about eleven years in Christchurch, and then came to Timaru to manage a branch of their boot and shoe trade for Toomer Bros.- After managing the shop for some month, Mr Penrose purchased the business, and carried it on his own account until, about three years ago, failing health compelled him to retire from it, and the business has since been carried on by two of his sons, Messrs R. and E. Penrose. The eldest son has long been established in a successful drapery business here, with branches in Akaroa and Oamaru. The deceased was of a retiring disposition, and took little part in public affairs, though he was elected and at one term as a Borough Councillor. He was a prominent member of the Baptist Church whilst it existed as an independent organisation in Timaru, and usually conducted the services when the minister was absent. Mr Penrose suffered long from an extremely painful complaint, but bore his sufferings with exemplary patience. He leaves a widow besides the three sons above mentioned, to mourn their loss. Deceased being a member of the Druids Lodge, a number of the brethren attended the funeral and there was a large following of other friends of the family.

The Mercury Tuesday 7 August 1917 Page 6
Old Southern cricketers and more especially old High School boys of the early sixties will be sorry to hear of the death at Timaru, New Zealand on Saturday of Mr Cecil Thomas Henry Perry. He was the third son of the late Mr Arthur Perry, solicitor and Clerk of the Peace at Hobart and was born at Secheron, Battery Point about the year 1846, his mother being the eldest daughter of the late Sir John Swan of Beaulieu. Mr Perry was educated at old High School in the Domain, now the University. He early displayed great proficiency as a cricketer being a first-class batsman and one of the earliest round-arm bowlers, and played when quite a lad against the first All England Eleven, besides representing the South against the North. About 1870 Mr Perry who had taken his father's profession left Tasmania for New Zealand and settled in Timaru, where he resided ever since. He was articled to the firm of Allport and Roberts, of Stone-buildings, Hobart. Age 71 years.

Timaru Herald, 5 March 1919, Page 11 MR T. C. PLANTE
From Melbourne the death is reported of Mr Thomas Crowley Plante, after a long illness, at the age of 76 years. He was born, in England, and in the early sixties he came to New Zealand, settling at Temuka, where for some years he was in partnership with, the late Mr Job Brown, as general storekeepers, at Temuka and Geraldine. He afterwards removed to Timaru, and, with Mr Geo. Gabites, carried on a drapery business. The late Mr Plante then went to Melbourne, where, in partnership with one of his sons, he represented a leading firm of hide and leather merchants. He was married to a sister of the late Mr J. S. Guthrie, formerly editor of "The Press." and his sons are Dr Guthrie Plante. Mr C. C. Plante. of Plante and Henty, solicitors, Collins Street; Mr P. S. Plante, who was a partner with his father in business; and Mr H. Plante, of Tongala.

The Press 21 Oct. 1929 Mr J.C.M. Polaschek [Joseph Cyril Methody Polaschek] [Amelia Mary Polaschek]
Mr Joseph C.M. Polaschek, who died at his residence, 357 Wilson's road, Christchurch, recently at the age of 65 years, was one of the early residents of Temuka. He was a native of the old Austrian Empire. His father took up some sections on the south bank of the Tautamakahu Creek, in what is now known as Temuka East, and on one of them built a sod house. Mr Polaschek, sen., was a soldier in the Russian Army; Mr Joseph Polaschek found work with Dr. John Shaw Hayes, and subsequently in the Temuka 'Leader' office, where with another lad, John McAuliffe, he assisted in setting and publishing the "Leader",: On the death of his mother he married Miss Amelia Bartos, of Waimate. An adopted brother Willie was lost in the Great War.

Josef Polaschek age 35
Theresa Polaschek age 29
Josef Polaschek age 10
Event Type: Immigration
Event Date: 26 Apr 1874
Event Place: Canterbury, New Zealand
Nationality: Germany
Occupation: Agril Laborer
Ship Name: Rakaia 6th June 1874
for Timaru

Name: POLASCHEK, WILLIAM
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canterbury Regiment, N.Z.E.F.
Unit Text: "G" Coy. 1st Bn.
Age: 36
Date of Death: 12/10/1917
Service No: 14144
Additional information: Brother of Joseph Polaschek, of 14, Byron St., Sydenham, Christchurch. Native of Temuka, Canterbury.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead Grave/Memorial Reference: 3. Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Press, 15 November 1917, Page 5
Private W. Polaschek (killed) was a brother of Mr J. Polaschek, 14 Byron street, Sydenham. He was born in Temuka, in June, 1881, and educated at St. Joseph's Convent School, where he was a great favourite at the school's annual entertainments. He enlisted in Christchurch with the 14th Reinforcements, and was killed in the assault on Ridge Hill on October 12th, being exactly twelve months in the firing-line.

New Zealand Tablet, 13 August 1897, Page 16 MARRIAGE.
Polaschek — Bartos — At St. Patrick's Church, Waimate, on August 3rd, 1897, by the Rev. Father Regnault, Joseph Polaschek, of Temuka, to Amelia Mary Bartos, eldest daughter of Mr. John Bartos, of Waimate.

New Zealand Tablet, 13 October 1898, Page 17 BIRTH.
POLASCHEK.— On September 30th, at Waimate, the wife of Joseph Polaschek, of Arowhenua, of a son. Both doing well.

New Zealand Tablet, 15 February 1900, Page 17 BIRTH.
Polaschek.— At Temuka, on February 11, the wife of J. C. M Polaschek of a son. Both doing well.

Star 4 April 1902, Page 1
MR JAMES WILCOCKS PYE. The news of the death of Mr James Wilcocks Pye at Geraldine yesterday was received with much regret by the public, and as a mark of respect for the deceased all business places in the town were closed, while flags were hoisted half-mast on every flag-pole. About six months ago the late Mr Pye underwent a very serious operation at Dr Hayes's private hospital, Temuka, for cancer. The operation was apparently successful for the local treatment of the disease at the time, and every hope was entertained for the recovery of the patient. The disease, however, must have had a firm hold of the' system, for a month or two after the operation it. Was reported that cancer had, broken out again in another part of his body, and since then he gradually sank until yesterday he passed away quietly. Mr Pye was born in Devonshire, England in 1861, and came with his parents to New Zealand in the s.s. Atrato to Port Chalmers and thence to Timaru. His father, Mr John Pye was one of the earliest settlers in the township, and was for many years gardener to Mr C. G. Tripp, of the Orari Gorge Station, afterwards going into business on his own account as nurseryman and seedsman at Geraldine, and a few years ago retired. The deceased commenced as a clerk in the Geraldine Road Board office, and was afterwards in the service of Messrs Morrison and Dunlop for seven years, and then for three, years with Mr N. Dunlop. In 1887 he started for himself in a small way, and his busines rapidly increased until in a few years he had a very large connection and a big drapery and fancy goods emporium known as Commerce House employing twenty hands. As well as being successful in business Mr Pye took a deep interest in the welfare of the town, and was instrumental in bringing about many improvements the Domain. He was chairman of the Geraldine Town Board and Domain Board for a number of years, and had been an Oddfellow for about a quarter of a century, having joined the Order when quite a lad at Geraldine. He passed through all the chairs of the Order, and was a member of the Grand Lodge in virtue of his position as District. Deputy Grand Master for South Canterbury. At the last Grand Lodge session he had been made Grand Warden, which office held till the time of his death. He was also a Freemason for nineteen, years, and had held the office of Senior Warden in the Geraldine Southern Star Lodge, S.C. He always took a great interest in outdoor sports and was president, of the local Cycling Club, and had held office in several other athletic clubs' in the town. He was also vice-president of the local Floral, and Horticultural Society, of which he was the original promoter about sixteen years ago. The late Mr Pye was married in Geraldine in 1882 to a daughter of the late Mr John Shannon, of Rakaia, and leaves a widow and grown-up son. He had been a Justice of the Peace since 1895.

New Zealand Tablet, 21 November 1901, Page 20
We deeply regret to announce the death of an old and highly respected resident of Temuka in the person of Mr. Michael Quinn. We learn that the sad event took place at his residence in Temuka on Tuesday night, when the respected pioneer passed peaceably away. Deceased had been in failing health for the past two years and was assiduously attended by the local clergy and died fortified by the consoling rites of the Catholic Church. The late Mr. Quinn was a native of Galway County, Ireland, and while still a young man, came to New Zealand about 40 years ago. He subsequently settled in Temuka and while conducting the Star Hotel, begun to interest himself extensively in farming pursuits and ultimately became the proprietor of one of the finest properties in the district. Mr. Quinn was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him, on account of his many sterling qualities and his marked business capacity, and he occupied seats on all the local public bodies. Some two years ago his once robust health began to fall and since that tune it has been very variable. Towards the close of last week he returned from a visit to Christchurch. He was shortly afterwards attacked by the illness to which he succumbed. Deceased leaves a widow and two sons and three daughters to mourn their loss, and to them we tender our deepest sympathy. — RIP.  

Timaru Herald, 25 June 1914, Page 5 AN OLD ORARI SETTLER.
Mr James Rennie, a very old resident of South Canterbury, died at Orari yesterday after a short illness, at the age of 76. The late Mr Rennie was born in Perth, Scotland, and came to New Zealand in 1859. He landed at Lyttelton, and his first move after arrival was to Rangiora. Later he removed to Geraldine and from there to Winchester, but finally took up his residence at Orari, where he lived a quiet retired life till the time of his death. At one time he conducted a carrying business between Winchester and Geraldine, but he has been chiefly known as an owner of stud horses. One of his daughters was drowned in the wreck of the Penguin, but he is survived by his wife, two daughters (Mrs T. Evans of Wellington and Mrs D. Guthrie of Timaru), and two sons, Andrew, who resides at Oamaru, and James, who resides at Ashburton. The funeral will leave Orari for the Temuka cemetery at 1.30 p.m. sharp to-day.

Star 29 April 1908, Page 3
Timaru. April 29. John Rainsley-Jones, verger at St Mary's Church for many years, and captain of the Fire Brigade for some years, died suddenly this morning. He was engaged with, his duties at the church, when he was seized with a fit. He rallied, but died while walking home.

Evening Post, 27 December 1939, Page 9 MR. S. G. RAYMOND, K.C.
Christchurch, This Day
The death has occurred in London of Mr. Samuel George Raymond, K.C. Mr. Raymond was born in Maryborough, Victoria, a son of Mr. Francis B. Raymond, and was educated at Grenville College, Ballarat. He was admitted to the New Zealand Bar in 1883 and practised in Timaru till 1910 and then in Christchurch. He became a King's Counsel in 1913 and was Crown Prosecutor in Christchurch from 1914 till 1920, when he retired. Mr. Raymond was chairman of the War Pensions Appeal Board in 1924 and 1925, and a member of the New Zealand delegation at the International Copyright Conference in Rome in 1928, and at the International Conference for the Revision of the Red Cross Convention in Geneva in 1929. He also represented New Zealand at a conference on the operation of Dominion legislation and merchant shipping legislation in 1929. He served on the Timaru High School Board of Governors in 1890 and on the Board of Governors of Canterbury College from 1917 to 1919. He married in 1896 Miss Frances Barklie, daughter of the Rev. J. K. Barklie, and there was one daughter of the marriage.

Ashburton Guardian, 9 February 1920, Page 4
A very well-known figure in Christchurch, .Mr H. T. Rosindale, had a sudden seizure on Saturday morning at about 11 o'clock when leaving his residence, 13 Gloucester Street. He had been suffering from heart disease. The late Mr Rosindale came to New Zealand 47 or 48 years ago, and first started farming on his own account in the Longbeach district, Ashburton. He was for many years representative of Mr W. F. Somerville, who held an estate at Westerfield, also in the Ashburton County. He was also farm supervisor for Mr John Holmes, who built a portion of the Canterbury railways, and owned land in the Rakaia-Methven district. Later Mr Rosindale bought the Claremont estate, near Timaru. He lived there for some time, but finally sold the larger portion of the estate to the Government. About five years ago he came to Christchurch. He was a well known land valuer, whose advice was widely sought. He leaves a widow and a daughter.

Timaru Herald, 12 September 1916, Page 4 MR ARCHIBALD H. RUSSELL
An old identity and highly respected citizen of Temuka passed away on Sunday morning, in the person of Mr Archibald Hendry Russell. Mr Russell was born in 1837, in the Island of Rum, Western Hebrides, Scotland. He arrived in New Zealand in 1861, and was one of the first workmen on the Lyttelton breakwater. Later lie joined the clerical staff of the New Zealand Railways, and was transferred to the Survey Department in South Canterbury. In 1880 he started a coal and store business in Temuka, ad with the help of his daughter, Miss M. Russell, has carried on the business successfully up to the time of his death. For many years he was an active worker in the Presbyterian Church, and was also a member of the school committee The late Mr Russell had the advancement of Temuka keenly at heart, and will be sadly missed. He leaves three sons and three daughters. The Mr W. Russell, is in the Telegraph Department at Christchurch.

North Otago Times 15 April 1903, Page 3
Information was received in Oamaru yesterday that Mr Gideon Rutherford, well known in this district, had died at Castle Rock, Pleasant Point, near Timaru, on Monday, the 13th instant. Mr Rutherford had suffered from ill health for some time past, but no fatal result was entertained. The deceased gentleman came from Victoria some years ago, and purchased the late Mr Bromley's property at Kakanui, where the family have resided, Mr Rutherford, however, purchased the larger property, of Castle Rock some years ago, and has mostly resided there, while he also retains the proprietorship of a large station property at Lake Connewarre, near Geelong. He was a prominent breeder of sheep, and was admitted to he an excellent judge, as he must have been, as he had spent the whole of his life on stations. Mr Rutherford was prominent member of the Baptist community, and to him the Oamaru church is largely indebted for the means that enabled it to secure the hire building in which the services are held here. We understand it is the intention to bring the remains to Oamaru for burial.

North Otago Times 26 January 1915, Page 1
The death is announced at Timaru of Mr James Scott, M.A., who died on Sunday morning after a lingering illness of some mouths, Mr Scott was born in Banffshire, N.B. in 1835, and was educated at King's College, Aberdeen, where he graduated M.A. in 1850. He emigrated to Victoria in 1863, and for some years was Greek master at the Scotch College, Melbourne. He came to New Zealand in the early seventies and became headmaster of the Hokitika Academy till 1875. At the request of some old West Coast friends who had settled here (among them Archdeacon Harper and Mr E. Evans) Mr Scott applied for the position of headmaster of the Timaru Public School (at that time the only public school in the town) and obtained the appointment, which he held till 1885. He then resigned and returned to England, where he spent a few years. Returning to New Zealand in 1889 he was appointed headmaster of Morven school and remained there for a few years, and then took occasional scholastic duties till 1903, when he retired from the service, and has resided during most of the intervening time in Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 30 November 1901, Page 3
We regret to have to record a fatal accident which happened to Mr Richard Sharp, a farmer in the Kakahu district. Mr Sharp, it appears, was driving along the Waitohi road in the direction of Temuka on Tuesday afternoon when the wheel of his trap got into a rut, and his horse swerving quickly the wheel" buckled, the spokes being broken off at the hub. Mr Sharp was thrown out on to his head, and' was picked up shortly after the occurrence by Mr Swaney. Mr Swaney drove him home, and medical aid was summoned. He was quite conscious at first, and was able to give an account of the occurrence, but during the evening he lapsed into unconsciousness, and yesterday morning he died. The deceased was an old settler, having occupied his present farm for upwards of 30 years. He was much esteemed for many amiable qualities. He was a witness of the 1868 flood, the effects of which were very noticeable in the locality in which he resided, and he was justly credited with having by his resourceful action on that occasion saved the lives not only of himself but of his wife, and some neighbouring settlers, all of whom he placed in a secure position on a platform built from the body of a bullock waggon and lashed to the top rails of a stockyard. The late Mr Sharp was a native of England. He was, we believe, a seaman in the Royal Navy in his youth, and was a man much esteemed by those who knew him. He leaves a wife, one son and three daughters. The funeral takes place at the Temuka cemetery on Monday afternoon.

Evening Post, 21 July 1944, Page 6
Christchurch, July 21. The death has occurred of Mr. Denis Joseph Shea, for the last 25 years general manager of the Canterbury Frozen Meat Company, Limited. Born in South Canterbury, Mr. Shea commenced his career in the stock and station business in Timaru by joining the branch there in 1907. He subsequently became accountant at the company's head office in Christchurch, and succeeded Mr. N. L. MacBeth as general manager. He was recognised as an authority on the frozen meat industry throughput the Dominion. Mr. Shea was appointed Czechoslovak Vice-Consul for the South Island in 1935 and later President Benes appointed him Consul. He took a notable stand when the Germans established a protectorate in Czechoslovakia in March, 1939. A special emissary was sent by the German Consul-General in New Zealand, Mr. Ernst Ramm, to demand the surrender of the consular archives held by Mr. Shea. Mr. Shea refused to hand over the papers, and they are still retained. Mr. Shea was honorary president of the Association of Czechoslovaks in New Zealand, a member of the Nurse Maude District Nursing Trust Board, the Christchurch Golf Club, Canterbury Jockey Club, and an executive member of the South Island Freezing Companies Association. He is survived by two daughters and a son.

Star 31 July 1899, Page 1
Mr Andrew Sherratt, for many years a member of the Timaru Borough Council, and Mayor for two terms, died on Saturday morning, aged fifty-nine. Mr Sherratt came to the colony in 1863, and for a year or two was a contractor in Lyttelton. He removed to Timaru in 1867, and settled there.

Timaru Herald, 7 January 1897, Page 2
The announcement of the death of Mr William Sibbald, of Sawdon station, Burkes Pass, Mackenzie Country, is made this morning. Mr Sibbald died on Tuesday, aged 65, having been ill for a week after bursting a blood vessel, and finally succumbing to dropsy on the lungs. The deceased gentleman came to Otago from Victoria, at the rush of 1862, and about 1867 arrived in Timaru, and was, if we remember rightly, the first to take up Lilybank Station, Mackenzie Country. After being some time there he moved to Rustic Place, and on the purchase by him of Sawdon the buildings, etc., on the former were removed and absorbed in the latter. The late Mr Sibbald was a successful breeder of all sorts of horses, the brand W.S. at the present time appearing on horses all over the colony. His special and very successful line was tram horses, of sturdy constitution, medium build, and almost up to any draught. Mr Sibbald was a native of Dundee, and though he was never prominent in public life of any sort, his hospitality was well known m Mackenzie. His funeral will take place to-day at Burkes Pass.

Star 8 July 1892, Page 3
Mr W. H. Simms, aged 58. We have to record the death of an old and esteemed Colonist, in the person of Mr W. H. Simms, of this city, who died between 9 and 10 a.m. to-day, after a short illness, in which influenza and pleurisy were the leading ailments. The latter malady at the last extended to his heart, and proved fatal. He was attended in his last illness by Drs Ovenden and Meares. Mr Simms was a colonist of about thirty years' standing, and has officiated as German Consul since the death of Sir J. von Haast. He was formerly a resident of Timaru, and, in conjunction with Mr Spencer Percival, was owner of the Albury Run in that district. During his residence in Timaru he represented that district in the Provincial Council, but resigned on leaving there to reside in Christchurch, where he has made hosts of friends by his genial manner and musical ability. He was always foremost in promoting anything for the advancement of classical music, and was a prominent member of the Christchurch Liedertafel, the members of which have gracefully postponed their Herren abend out of respect to his memory. Mr Simms met with a heavy blow in the loss of a son a few years ago while on a voyage to Queensland, and he can hardly be said to have recovered from it. He was able to be in town on Monday, but complained then of being unwell, and went home to bed, from which he did not rise again. He leaves a widow, two sons, and one daughter to mourn his loss. The flags at the German Consulate and at several business houses in town were lowered to half-mast to-day, as soon as the news of his death was known.

Timaru Herald, 31 January 1910, Page 2 MR ALEX. SINCLAIR
The many friends of Mr Alex. Sinclair, of Timaru, will learn with regret of his death, which took place on Saturday, at his home in Sophia street. Deceased had been unwell for some months past. He was a builder, by profession, and did a considerable amount of work in this district. A good tradesman, he was also a shrewd business man, and was the owner of some valuable property. For some years past he had lived retired. Mr Sinclair came to New Zealand, in his teens, having been born at Caithness, Scotland. He worked as a carpenter in different parte of North and South Canterbury, and also on the West Coast, before settling down in Timaru. When things were very dull here, years ago, he went over to Melbourne and worked at his calling there, and when things improved here, he returned. He was a great enthusiast in the matter of Highland music and dancing and was one of the founders of the South Canterbury Caledonian Society. He was also the first dancer at its sports gathering, and for a good many years he judged the music and dancing at the new year sports gatherings. Deceased was a staunch churchman, being a prominent member of Chalmers Church. In the early days he took an active interest in volunteering. He was married to a daughter of the late Mr J. Carter, of Makikihi, by whom he is survived. The funeral takes place this afternoon.

Star 28 July 1908, Page 3
Mr W. U. SLACK. The death occurred at Palmerston North on Sunday of Mr William Upton Slack, an early colonist, who was well known in Canterbury for very many years. Mr Slack did much valuable work in connection with local government in South Canterbury. He took an active interest in the work of the Church of England, and was one of the earliest of a number of conscientious workers in South Canterbury. He was born at Dune's Hill, near Cockermouth, in Cumberland, in 1832. His father was a Manchester man, and lived at Upton House, Ardwick, one of the suburbs of Manchester, and his mother was a daughter of the vicar of Bridenith. His early days at Home he devoted to the Army, and he was given a commission in the 4th Lancashire Light Infantry. During his service in the regiment, it trained for two years at Aldershot and the following two years at Portsmouth. In 1858 he resigned his commission and came out to New Zealand. He settled in the Mackenzie Country, where he had a sheep run. After leaving the Mackenzie Country, he settled down at "Woodside," about seven miles from Geraldine, where he lived for twenty seven years. He was obliged to sell this property, and the family left South Canterbury and settled at Palmerston North. Mr Slack was one of the first members of the Board of Works at Timaru, which was known in those days as the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works. He was a member of the Education Board, and was for many years a member and chairman of the Geraldine Road Board. During his residence at "Woodside," his services, and those of Mrs Slack, were given freely to anything that helped the advancement of church work. He was a keen lover of all forms of sport. He was also a successful breeder of Romney sheep and draught horses, and won many prizes at the Timaru shows. In 1865 he married Miss Charlotte Cooper, and had a family of five daughters and four sons. One daughter married Mr F. Hamilton, of Redcliffs, another married Mr A. Temple, of Geraldine, and a third Mr C. R. Hewit, of Palmerston North. There are fourteen grandchildren. His sons are Messrs Slack Brothers, the well-known breeders of purebred stock.

William Upton Slack (1832-1908)
He was born in Cumberland, England and came out to NZ in 1858. He arrived in South Canterbury in 1863 and purchased a considerable area of swamp and flax land at the foot of Waitohi Hill, Pleasant Valley and named the property Woodside. He lived there for 27 years. On the List of freeholders of NZ, 1882, he was a farmer at Pleasant Valley and owned 2,314 acres, valued at $24,200. He ran pedigree short horn cattle, Romney sheep, and was a successful breeder of Romney sheep and draught horses and won many prizes at the Timaru Shows. He married Charlotte Sarah Cooper of Creek Station at Francis Jollie's Peel Forest homestead on 8th Feb. 1865. He played a major part in local government and was known as a man who got things done. He took an active interest in the work of the Church of England. He was also a JP, a member of the South Canterbury Board of Education, the Timaru and Gladstone Board of Works, the Geraldine road Board and the Peel Forest Road Board. He was keen on sports. Had five daughters and four sons. In the 1880s the family moved to Palmerston North. One daughter married A. Temple of Geraldine. His four sons became farmers in the Palmerston North district. Mr Slack died on 26 July 1908 and his obituary was printed in the Christchurch Star on 28 July 1908.

Evening Post, 29 February 1932, Page 9 [Francis Smith]
The death occurred on Saturday last of Mr. Frank Smith, late of Timaru and Christchurch, in his eighty-fourth year. Arriving in New Zealand in 1860, he took up his residence in Christchurch, joining the staff of Messrs. A. J. White and Co., and later he was with Messrs. Hobday and Jobberns, and Messrs. J. Ballantyne and Co., who, in 1893, appointed him manager of their Timaru: business. In 1897 he was appointed drapery manager o£ the South Canterbury Farmers' Co-op. Stores. Retiring in 1920, he spent the remaining years of his life in Christchurch and Wellington. The late Mr. Smith married Miss Lydia Philpott, of St. Albans, [in 1867] whose death occurred in November last [age 85], and leaves the following family: Mrs. A. H. Thompson, Christchurch; Mrs. J. Gardiner, Queenstown; Mrs. F. Shallard, Riversdale; Mr. S. W. Smith and Mrs. Ray Dale, Timaru; Mr. C. F. Smith and Mrs. H. B. Cooper, Wellington; Mr. P. C. Smith, Dannevirke; Mr. K. P. Smith, Wairoa; and Mrs. G. Robinson, Auckland; also twenty-nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. The late Mr. Smith in his early years took a great interest in municipal and school affairs, and also in horticulture, and for many years was president of the Star Football Club, Timaru. He was always a fervent worker in the cause of Methodism.

[Alice Lydia b. 1867 m. Arthur Harloe THOMPSON in 1893]
[Emily Maud Smith b. 1871 m. Frederick William SHALLARD in 1902]
[Charles Francis William Smith b. 1873]
[May Crosbie Smith b. 1876 m. Harry Basil COOPER in 1911]
[Ethel Adeline Smith b. 1876 m. George ROBINSON in 1907]
[Kate Mildred Smith b. 1878 m. Allan Raybutt DALE in 1902]
[Sydney Webster Smith b. 1881
[Percy Clearance Smith b. 1885]
[Keneth Philip Smith b. 1888]

Timaru Herald, 5 September 1916, Page 9 Mr ISAAC SMITH
The late Mr Isaac Smith, who died at Temuka on Sunday morning, was born at Sandown, Isle of Wight, in 1853. He came to New Zealand in the Blairgowrie in 1875. and reached Timaru by surf-boat. Arrived at Temuka, he lived for a while with his sister, Mrs H. Voyce. He was employed by the railway as a platelayer until three years before his death. While in this employment he helped to form the railway between Temuka and Timaru. He had been connected with the Temuka Presbyterian Sunday School for 38 years, and was superintendent for 35 years before his death. He was a diligent worker for the Sunday School, and his loss will, be felt keenly. He was a. member also of the School Committee and the Presbyterian Church. He leaves four sons and five daughters to mourn their loss. He was very popular with all with whom he came in contact, and his death is keenly felt by a large number of friends.

Star 3 January 1899, Page 3
Timaru, Jan. 3. Mr W. Smith, who has been for thirty five years in the postal and telegraph service, died this morning, aged forty-eight. He was employed for most of the term at 'Temuka and Timaru, and was a respected officer. He leaves a widow and five children.

Evening Post, 6 November 1940, Page 9
Auckland, This Day The death has occurred of Mr. J. R. Snedden, well known in the Labour movement throughout New Zealand. Born in Scotland he worked on the railways there and later on the railways in South Australia. He settled at Timaru 20 years ago. He was secretary to several trade unions and also of the Labour Representation Committee. He retired to Auckland some years ago. Mr. Snedden leaves a wife and one son.

Evening Post, 1 November 1912, Page 2 Obit.
The late Sir William Jukes Steward, who died at Island Bay yesterday evening, was a native of Reading, Berkshire, England, where he was born in 1841. He was descended from a well-known Nonconformist family. His early education was obtained at King Edward VI. Grammar School, Ludlow, Shropshire. He arrived in Lyttelton in the ship Mersey on 26th September, 1862 and proceeded to Christchurch. Before he left England he had been interested in the then popular Volunteer movement.
...1879, when he left the district to reside at Waimate. In 1875 he was elected Mayor of Oamaru, and as such carried out a number of public improvements, not the least of which was the introduction of the water supply. Having purchased the Waimate Times, he left Otago in 1879, and once more became identified with Canterbury. ...  he entered the House for Waimate as a supporter of the Liberal Party, and continued to represent that district under different boundaries and varying names until his retirement at the last General Election. During all these years the late Sir William has been a conspicuous figure in the political history of the country. ..In 1873 Sir William married Miss Hannah Whiteford, daughter of the Rev. Caleb Whiteford, rector of Harford, Worcestershire, by whom he has a daughter and two sons. Of the literary side of his life, thirty years were spent in journalism, he having owned and edited successively the North Otago Times, the Waimate Times, and the Ashburton Guardian and Ashburton Mail....Outside the House he was equally active, and in addition to municipal affairs he added educational duties as a member of the South Canterbury Education Board and the Ashburton and Waimate High School Boards. A man of cultured tastes and kindly sympathies.

Timaru Herald, 8 April 1910, Page 6 MR AND MRS JAS. SULLIVAN
By a somewhat unusual concurrence of circumstances the family of Mr and Mrs James Sullivan, very old settlers of the Levels district, were given reason to mourn the death of both parents within a few hours of each other, Mrs Sullivan dying on Tuesday afternoon, and Mr Sullivan early on Wednesday morning. The aged couple— Mrs Sullivan was 68, Mr Sullivan 74 came to Canterbury in 1862, and after spending a short time on Otago diggings they settled on farms in the Levels district. Mr Sullivan was a member of the Levels Road Board before the separation of the road district as a county, and subsequently was for some years a member of the Timaru Harbour Board. He at one time owned and conducted the Royal Hotel, Timaru, after which he took up another farm on the Levels, which later on was acquired by the State to form the Papaka settlement. Mr and Mrs Sullivan keeping the homestead as their home. Mr Sullivan had not had good health for some years, and had also lost his sight, while Mrs Sullivan had enjoyed pretty good health till near her last days. They were both of quiet retiring disposition, but very hospitable and well liked by their neighbours. They leave one son and three daughters. The funeral takes place this afternoon at the Timaru Cemetery, about 3 p.m., a Requiem Mass being held at Pleasant Point at 9.30 a.m.

Otago Witness 15 April 1903, Page 50
Captain Sutter, a very old Timaruite, died on Monday night. He had been ill for some time. He was closely identified with the progress of Timaru. He was an ex-member of the House of Representatives, Harbour Board, Borough Council (Mayor for some years), and chairman of the Gas Company. He was 84 years of age.

Ashburton Guardian, 18 June 1901, Page 2
We hate to record that Mr W. H. Tait passed away last evening about eight o'clock, at the Hospital. He had been gradually sinking for some weeks, but it was not expected that his end would be so sudden, Mr Tait was a man of exceptional parts. He was a good artist, and some of his paintings have received very favorable mention from the art critics. He was no mean carpenter, although self taught, and there were few things he could not turn his hand to. He was a very reserved man, and even the few friends he made in Invercargill, Timaru, and Ashburton, where he has resided of late years, are unaware whether he had any relations in this colony. It is, however, understood that he has a sister living in Capetown. The funeral will leave the Hospital at 3.20 tomorrow afternoon.

Press, 12 June 1926, Page 4
Another old resident of the Temuka district passed away on Thursday, in the person of Mr William Tarrant, at the age of 62 years. The late Mr Tarrant was born in Ireland, and arrived in the Lady Jocelyn in 1879, landing at Lyttelton. he immediately came to South Canterbury, where he followed farming pursuits. Eventually he commenced contract ploughing for the late Mr E. Richardson, on the Albury Estate, before it was cut up. In 1883 he married Miss Jane Bennetts of County Meath, Ireland. Shortly afterwards he acquired a holding in the Green Hayes Estate, and then he leased a larger portion on the same estate. When the estate was cut up he purchased a block which he sold six years ago. He then acquired a portion of the Gladstone Estate at Winchester, which he farmed until his death. The late Mr Tarrant was a Justice of the Ponce, and before the war he was vice-president of the Caledonian Society and a member of the Milford School Committee. He was an enthusiastic believer in co-operative dairying, and took a prominent part in establishing the Temuka Co-operative Dairy Company. For some years past Mr Tarrant has not been in best of health, and about a fortnight, ago he became seriously ill, and was removed to the Timaru Hospital, passing quietly away on Thursday morning. He leaves a widow and daughters to mourn: their lost.

The Press Monday 14 April 1924 TAYLOR, Robert Ross,
Mr. Robert Ross Taylor, one of the oldest residents of Timaru, died at his residence, North street, on Saturday at the age 77 years. Mr Taylor left Aberdeen, where he was born at the age of 16, and arrived in Timaru in 1864. He commenced work in a store owned by Captain Sutter, his brother-in-law, and later went into partnership with the captain, the firm going under the name of Sutter, Taylor and Co. for many years, carrying on the business in premises where the shop of Messrs Porter and Dawson now stands. At a later date he entered into business on his own account as a wine and spirit and tea merchant, and made a success of his venture. He retired about 20 years ago. From his youth the late Mr Taylor was a keen sportsman, and his circle of friends included many sportsmen of the town and district. he was one of the founders of the Timaru Bowling Club and of the South Canterbury Jockey Club, in both of which he took a keen interest.

Evening Post, 4 March 1898, Page 5
Timaru, This Day. An old identity, Mr. Robert Taylor, died in the Hospital to-day, aged 87. He came from Hobart to Wellington early in the forties, and thence to Lyttelton before the first four ships. He was a builder, and helped to build early Wellington and Lyttelton. He was an old Freemason, and the father of Foresters here.

Timaru Herald, 4 March 1898, Page 3
Robert Taylor, better known to old residents of South Canterbury as "Bobby" Taylor, died at the Hospital yesterday morning, at the ripe age of 85. He was one of the pioneers of the colony in a wider sense than usual, as he took part in the establishment of three centres of settlement. He crossed from Tasmania to Wellington m the early forties, and, a builder and joiner by trade, he helped to build up the first wooden Wellington, which was founded in 1840. He next came down to Lyttelton to assist m preparing for the arrival of the pioneer immigrants to Canterbury, who arrived in December, 1850, and he remained there, following his trade and helping to build the first township on Port Cooper. He was a good and ingenious tradesman, and we learn that he was a general adviser or amateur practical architect m those days. In 1859 he removed to Timaru, m the early days of the town, but after the arrival of the Strathallan. He commenced business as builder, contractor, and undertaker, and many of the old structures m Timaru bear the marks of his tools. After some years he tried hotel keeping, in a small house in Beswick Street called the Square and Company (Mr Taylor was a Mason), but he was burned out of this in a fire which destroyed the original Ship Hotel and South Canterbury Times office. The building now occupied by Mr J. S. Bennett in Beswick Street then belonged to Mr Taylor, and was used as a workshop. It was scorched by the fire but escaped destruction, and this the deceased converted into a general dealer's shop. Later on he transferred his business to a shop in Grey Road, where he carried it on until increasing infirmity compelled him to relinquish it. The deceased was known to everybody in the parly days. He was respected for his uprightness, and extremely popular for his quaint humour. He was like Yorick, a fellow of infinite jest." He was one of the oldest Masons and Foresters in Canterbury, and the father of the Foresters' Lodge in Timaru, and both of these orders did their duty by him m his declining years. He leaves seven daughters, all married, many grand children and some greatgrand-children, most of them m South Canterbury, others at Christchurch and Lyttelton. The funeral takes place on Sunday, and there will no doubt be a very large attendance of the old identities of Timaru and its neighbourhood. Notice is given in another column requesting the brethren of St, John's Lodge to attend the funeral on Sunday, and it is expected that there will be a large attendance of the craft at the funeral of such an old and eminent brother. The deceased was one of the founders of Lodge Unanimity, Lyttelton, the first lodge in Canterbury, and of St. John's Lodge, Timaru.

Timaru Herald, 12 October 1916, Page 3 MR E. H. TEMPLER
The death occurred at Geraldine yesterday of Mr Edward Horace Templer, who had resided in South Canterbury for many years, and was well known throughout the district. He joined the staff of the Bank of New South Wales at Orange, N.S.W., and in course of time was transferred to New Zealand, and in 1876 he was manager of the Geraldine branch 'of the bank. He subsequently retired from the bank and engaged in farming, but of late years has acted as clerk to the: Mount Peel Road Board, and recently also as Clerk to the County Council. Mr Templer, who was in his 66th year, recently lost one son, killed in action, and two others are serving" at the. Front. He leaves a widow, three daughters and four sons.

Timaru Herald 15 June 1920, Page 7 MR P. E. THOREAU.
Yesterday morning, at Timaru, there passed away an old and highly respected resident of South Canterbury in the person of Mr Philip Edward Thoreau, in his seventy-ninth year. The late Mr Thoreau, who was born at St. Helen's, Jersey, arrived in New Zealand 54 years ago, landing at Auckland, where he joined the police force. He served in the police force there for a short time, until the Government retrenched the force, and Mr Thoreau was among those members who were retired. Then, about 44 years ago, he came to Timaru, and shortly after his arrival rejoined, the police and served with it for 25 years, most of which tune he spent in Timaru. On retiring from the police force Mr Thoreau bought a farm at Fairview, and he successfully farmed this till ho decided to live retired in Timaru, when he; handed the farm over to his sons. He was a man who could turn his hand to many things. He was a very successful horticulturist, took a keen interest in experimenting with plants and manures and in taxidermy, which he took up as a hobby in the early days, he excelled. Mr Thoreau held a lieutenant's commission in the Jersey Militia, and after ins retirement from the police was made a Justice, of the Peace. He took a keen interest in public matters, and despite his age was the first man in .Timaru to volunteer for service in the great war, but his age prevented his services being accepted. Ho also took a keen interest in returned soldiers, and for three years was custodian of the rooms of the Returned Soldiers' Association, his courteous manner and fidelity to duty earning for him the respect of all with whom ho came into contact. Mr Thoreau was pre-deceased by his wife twelve years ago, and is survived by four sons—Messrs A. Thoreau (Timaru), A. L. Thoreau (Pleasant Point), H. S. Thoreau (Albury), E. J. Thoreau (Palmerston North), and by one daughter, Mrs W. Read, Springbrook, Pareora.

Timaru Herald, 31 May 1897, Page 3
It is with much regret that we record to-day the death of Mr Edmund Tipping, who passed away at 3 a.m. on Saturday, at the age of 62, after a very short illness from inflammation of the lungs. He had been unwell some days before then, but he was about on Wednesday morning. The deceased had led a varied life, and "roughed it " a good deal when a young man. He left his native country, Ireland, in the early gold digging days for Victoria, and worked among the mines at Bendigo and elsewhere. He then, went to Tasmania, and was farming there for some years. In 1862 he came to New Zealand and joined his family who, had, in the meantime, come out and settled at the Cust, North Canterbury, and remained with them as a farmer till ten or twelve years ago, when he came to Timaru and joined Mr Whitcombe in a general commission agency. On Mr Whitcombe leaving Timaru, Mr Tipping became local agent for the Lyttelton Times and then and subsequently carried on business as a financial commission agent. The deceased was widely known, and extremely popular among his friends. Much regret was felt at the news of his sudden and serious illness and here is much genuine sorrow at his decease. The deceased has several relatives in different parts of .the colony and an unmarried sister was in attendance upon him during his last hours. The deceased on falling ill went to, the Old Bank, where Mr M. O'Meeghan made him as comfortable as possible until more serious measures were seen to be necessary, since when various friends assisted in securing that he should lack nothing. One of Mr Tipping's brothers arrived from Christchurch on Saturday, and took charge of the funeral arrangements, and another brother from the south in the evening. The funeral will leave the Old Bank Hotel at 2 30 p.m. to-day.

Star 6 September 1909, Page 3
Dunedin, September 6. Mr W. J. Tonkin, the well-known frozen meat and rabbit exporter, died suddenly of heart failure on Saturday night. He was also identified with the flax-milling industry, and was once a flour miller in Timaru.

Star 9 March 1903, Page 3
COLONEL R. TOSSWILL. The death is announced from England of Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. D. Tosswill. He was appointed Major in command of the Canterbury Battalion of Infantry in 1885, when the infantry companies were formed into an administrative battalion, and soon afterwards was raised to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. Previous ( to that he held a captaincy in the Christ's College Rifles. He was officer commanding the battalion until 1889, when he retired from the active list consequent on the disbandment of battalions throughout New Zealand. He had obtained a great deal of military knowledge and experience in the 99th Foot of the Imperial Army, and he brought all his knowledge to bear on Volunteering matters, and gave much practical assistance. He was a great favourite with the local Volunteers. During his residence in Canterbury he had a farm near Timaru, and another at Highfield, Kirwee. Colonel Tosswill went to England in 1901.

Ashburton Guardian, 2 November 1921, Page 4
Evening Post, 2 November 1921, Page 8
Timaru, November 1. The death is announced of Mr Jeremiah Matthew Twomey of Temuka. Mr Twomey, who was a native of County Kerry, Ireland, was born 15 August 1847. He spent some years in the service of the General Post Office in Cork, and arrived in the Dominion in 1874. The following year he joined the staff of the Wellington Tribune, and subsequently served on the Wellington Argus and Evening Post, also on Wanganui, Timaru, and Christchurch papers. In 1880 he purchased the Temuka Leader, and the following year started the Geraldine Guardian. He became proprietor of the "Temuka Leader" in 1881 and conducted that journal for many years. He was appointed to the Legislative Council from 1898 to 1905.

Ashburton Guardian, 7 February 1906, Page 3 Obit.
Timaru, Feb 7 Sergeant Warring, officer in charge of the police force here, died this morning. He caught a chill a fortnight ago, and complications ensued, ending in pneumonia, which caused death. Deceased, who was I looked upon as a most efficient officer, did police duty at Home and had been in the N.Z. force for over 20 years. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant in 1898 and was to have been farther promoted this year. He was born in Cornwall in 1851 and leaves a wife and nine children.

Otago Daily Times 5 April 1915, Page 7
The Timaru Herald reports the death of a well-known resident of that town—Mr D. G. Watson, at the age of 46 years. The late Mr Watson came out to New Zealand from Scotland, with his parents, who settled in Otago. Deceased's father was killed when at work in the Kaitangata coal mine, but his mother, is still alive. Deceased was widely known throughout South, Canterbury, especially among the farming community, with whom he was closely associated for many years, first as the Timaru representative of Messrs Reid and Gray, and of recent years as land agent for the National and Agency Company. A man of strict integrity, he was widely respected. He was one of the founders of the Kia Toa Bowling club, and his presence on the bowling green will be greatly missed. For the past two years he had been, president of the Kia Toa Bowling Club, and is a vice-president of the Sooth Canterbury Bowling Centre. He was one of the organisers of the Timaru Pipe Band and was its drum major for some time. He was also a very useful director of the Sooth Canterbury Caledonian Society. For sometime, too, Mr Watson served on the Timaru Borough Council: he belonged to both the Timaru Savage clubs, and was a prominent Mason, holding office at the time of his death in Lodge Caledonian. Deceased had a brother and two sisters, the brother being the Rev. Alexander Watson, a Presbyterian minister of Otago also leaves a widow and son.

Ashburton Guardian, 6 January 1920, Page 5
Mr George Watts, of North Street, Timaru, died last week. The deceased had been in his usual health in the early part of the week, but was .taken suddenly ill and passed away at noon on Friday. Mr Watts, who was born in England, had reached the age of 68 years. On coming to New Zealand he settled first at Ashburton. Later he went to Timaru, where he established a cordial factory and carried this on with success up to the time of his death. Of a quiet and retiring disposition, he took no part in public affairs, but he was a generous giver to deserving causes. Mr Watts was twice married, his second wife being Miss Clark, of Timaru, and he is survived by his widow and three children, all grown up.

Timaru Herald, 22 September 1915, Page 7 MR ROBERT WEBSTER
An old resident of the Timaru district, Mr Robert Webster, died at Washdyke yesterday. The late Mr Webster was born at St. Andrews, Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1839, and arrived at Port Chalmers in the ship Henrietta in 1860. He obtained employment in Dunedin and Oamaru as a gardener, and later followed the Gabriel's Gully and Dunstan rushes. After a period spent on the goldlfields he resumed gardening work in Southland. Subsequently he was employed by Mr B. Rhodes as gardener, and by the Hon. John Martin in Wellington. He came to Timaru in 1871, and was in the grocery business in 1577. when lie entered the furnishing trade in Barnard Street. Some years later he retired, but returned to active life again and kept a store at Washdyke until the time of his death. In 1872 the late Mr Webster married a Miss Cullmann, who died in 1887. By this marriage there, were three daughters: Mrs Foster of Ruapuna, Mrs Shields of Timaru, and Mrs Wilson of Washdyke. He remarried in 1890, his second wife being Mrs Shields of Timaru who predeceased him by eight years. By the second marriage there was no family. The late Mr Webster was a member of the Bank Street Methodist Church and was greatly respected by all who knew him.

Timaru Herald, 31 March 1913, Page 3 MR E. WILCE, WAIMATE
By the death of Mr Edwin Wilce, which occurred suddenly at his residence in High-street last Wednesday evening, Waimate loses one of its sturdy old settlers, a man whose robustness and activity made his service always sought after. He was born at St. Kew, Cornwall, in 1846, and came out to Lyttelton in the Star of China. Shipmates with him were the Inksters, another family prominent in Waimate to-day. Boat was taken immediately for Timaru, and coach thence to Waimate, which was reached on 6th or 7th August 38 years ago. The late Mr Wilce went at once to work on the late Mr Michael Studholme's estate in which service be remained for 25 years. Mr Wilce died suddenly being found lying on the floor of his room. Apparently he had been retiring to rest, and had fallen dead just as he was about to go into bed. A widow, six sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of a trend father. At the time of Mr Wilce death the widow was on a visit to married daughter, Mrs V. R. Wilson, in Christchurch.

Ashburton Guardian, 29 July 1918, Page 5
The death of Mr Henry Thomas Winter, aged 76, at Timaru yesterday, removes one of Ashburton's fast diminishing band of pioneers. The deceased was born in 1842 in Tasmania, where he received his education, which was finished in England. For some years he followed pastoral pursuits in Australia, and came to New Zealand in 1867 the ship South Australia, which was wrecked at Port Chalmers. After his arrival he took over management of Messrs Tancred run in Ashburton. In 1896 he was appointed manager of Balmoral, Braemar and Glenmore stations in the Mackenzie Country. These stations containing 170,000 acres were the property of the N.Z. Loan and M.A. Co. and were originally taken up in 1858 by Messrs Beswick, Cox and Hall. "Balmoral" is the second highest homestead in the colony and stands 2600 feet above sea level. For several years prior to his death Mr. Winter had been living in retirement at "Ringwould," Wai-iti Road, Timaru. He was married in 1869 to Miss Richardson, of Tasmania.

Press, 17 October 1927, Page 10 MR DAVID YOUNG
The death occurred early on Saturday morning of Mr David Young, owner and licensee of the Dominion Hotel. The late Mr. Young was born in St. Andrews, South Canterbury, in 1879, and after completing his education, Worked for his father in his grocery business in Fairlie and St. Andrews, later managing several stores in different parts of the province. Mr Young then went into the hotel business, and conducted hostelries in Dunedin, and Christchurch. The late Mr Young was keenly interested in sport of all kinds, but particularly in shooting and trotting, and was a well-known owner of trotters. For many years he was a steward of the Forbury Park Trotting Club, and while in Dunedin Was president of the Pipers' and Dancers' Association. 

Timaru Herald, 1 August 1914, Page 10 MR JACOB YOUNG
Death has removed another of Timaru's old identities this week in the of Mr Jacob Young. The deceased, a very quiet, unassuming man, was highly respected for his many sterling qualities, and he was liked by all who knew him. A baker and confectioner by trade, he built up an extensive business here from which he retired a few years ago owing to failing health. Mr Young was born in 1841 in Germany where he learned his trade. Before coming to New Zealand in 1862 he had two years' experience in London, and came out by the ship "African;" landing at Auckland. After remaining there for a month he went to Sydney where he stopped until 1864. Then he returned to New Zealand and settled at Christchurch for a shorrt time, after which he went over d the West Coast. From 1868 to 1878? he was in business at the Thames, and finally settled in Timaru in 1878. Mr Young was married in 1871 to .Miss Putney, of Chelmsford, England. His wife died in 1880, leaving one son and two daughters. Deceased was a man of a philanthropic disposition, one who was ever ready to help the poor, and he did a great deal of good in a quiet unostentatious way. The funeral will take place to-day.

South Canterbury NZGenWeb

When the sleep of death came o'er him,
Full of truth he passed away,
From the fond ones loved so dearly,
To the light of brighter day.