Washdyke War Memorial
South Canterbury, New Zealand

Washdyke War Memorial. Photo courtesy of Allen Glasson. Taken 2001.

To live in the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die.

In grateful memory of The Levels and Washdyke men who gave their lives in the great war.

1914 -1918
Breen, Timothy J.
Campbell, Peter
Divan, George
Gosling, Charles, W.
Mahoney, Gordon, R.
Turner, Wilfred M.
Weir, Francis

1940 - 1945
Clarke, David H.
Glenday, Lindsay D.
Glenday, Neil M.

R.S.A. poppy

This prominent granite memorial is located at the intersection State Highway 1 and the turn off to Pleasant Point, State Highway 8.

June 2005. In about 18 months the war monument at Washdyke, erected c.1920, will be moved from the middle of the busy Pleasant Point Highway/State Highway One intersection to a grassy section on the north west side of the main highway and this will make the intersection safer and safer for people on Anzac Day. About 45 to 55 people have turned up for the last three Anzac Days.

28 January 2009
The Washdyke War Memorial monument has to be shifted from the centre of the intersection to the roadside nearby, State Highway 1 and 8 realignment. The base of the structure contains a water tank full of concrete.

April 2010 photos taken by Margaret Todd. 


April 2010 photos taken by M.T. of the relocated war memorial at Washdyke, now on a landscaped grassed area beside SH1, slightly north of where it was on the junction of SH1 and SH8 to Pleasant Point. There are now traffic lights where it previously stood. There were three wreaths, one poppy and a bouquet of garden cut flowers. See the nor west fan cloud...it was warm when the photos were taken but due to change anytime and the weather was meant to come up rough.

Monumental movement effort
Timaru Herald 4 February 2010
It was a monumental task but the Washdyke war memorial made it safely to a new location. Contractors had an early start yesterday morning with crane and hands on site to move the monument from the centre of the intersection of State Highways 1 and 8 to its new home on the roadside nearby. The memorial was moved into its new position without a hitch, New Zealand Transport Agency project manager. Contractors drilled four holes through the base of the monument and placed metal rods before it was lifted by crane onto a truck and across the road. The crane then swung into operation again and lifted the monument into its new location where contractors set it in concrete. Washdyke Anzac committee chairman said he was pleased the move went smoothly. The monument's new location would be a lot better for Anzac Day wreath-laying services. More work on the monument is to be carried out, with bluestone steps to be replaced, recovered and raised to improve access.

   April 2010 photos taken by Margaret Todd. 

The Mahoney boys were sons of Richard Mahoney, a blacksmith of Albury, who moved to Washdyke in 1906 (Mahoney's Hill). L/Cpl. Gordon Richard Mahoney appears on the Washdyke Monument, but not Joseph, as his death occurred after the erection of that monument. Gordon Richard Mahoney was KIA at the battle of Ypres, Oct. 1917. Tpr.  Joseph Mahoney 7/2284 was a member of the Imperial Camel Corps, C.M.R., in the Middle East and from died TB contracted while on active service, 23 June at Timaru and is buried in Temuka. He was 25 years old and living at Seadown. The Mahoney boys were added to the Albury war memorial in 1995. 

Evening Post, 9 May 1918, Page 4
CANTERBURY DISTRICT. KILLED IN ACTION.
Howard, J. M., 52610, R.B. (Mrs. J. Howard, Timaru, w.), 21st April
Weir, F., 34762, R.B. (Mrs. W. Weir, Washdyke, m.), 21st April

Evening Post, 3 May 1918, Page 7
DIED OF WOUNDS. M'Aulay, A., 60969, C.I.R. (W. M'Aulay, Washdyke, b.);
Following Wounded, Admitted Hosp. Siegert, F. A., 7/120, Anzac Mounted (J. Siegert, Fairlie)
CANTERBURY DISTRICT. Seriously 111. Bain, W., 61021 -Fairlie
Still Seriously ill. M'Kinnon, W. J., 38297, St. Andrews
Removed from Seriously ill list. Cuthbert. R. A., 36803, Cpl., Timaru


April 2014

South Canterbury, New ZealandGenWeb Project

"... one never forgets the unshakable camaraderie and the memories that live with you forever, long after the guns are silenced."