New Zealand 1893 Women's suffrage petition online

The 1893 Women's Suffrage Petition led to New Zealand becoming the first self-governing nation where women won the right to vote, comprised 546 sheets of paper, all glued together to form one continuous roll, 274 metres long. It was presented to the House of Representatives in 1893; the actual number of signatures on the surviving petition is 23,853. Some places are under-represented as women may have signed smaller regional petitions which have not survived. There are 1312 signatories from South Canterbury, the majority from Timaru and Waimate. Missing are the Fairlie, Temuka, Pleasant Point and Geraldine names. Sheets 220 - 236 covers the Waimate names and sheets 270-276 covers the Timaru names. At the next election, two months later, on 28 November 1893, 65% of the women over 21 exercised their new right. Women did not gain the right to stand for Parliament until 1919. The roll is preserved at Archives NZ. The international significance of the document has been recognised by its inclusion on the UNESCO Memory of the World register of documentary heritage.

286 Stewart 	Annie 		Temuka 
287 Langridge 	A. 		Temuka 
287 Lynch 	Mrs E. 		Temuka 
201 Morrison 	Susie 		Geraldine 
270 Mahon 	Mary J. 	Geraldine
270 Shaw 	Margaret 	Geraldine 
270 Shaw 	Ellen Adela 	Geraldine 
282 Humphries 	H 		Cox Street Geraldine 
285 Quin 	Mary B. 	Geraldine 
285 Andrews 	K. A. 		Waitohi Flat Waitohi 
288 Kingston 	Mrs T. 		Geraldine 
270 Stewart 	Annie 		Pleasant Point 

The petition contained so many names and was so bulky that it had to be taken to the House of Representatives in a wheelbarrow.
 Kate Sheppard National Memorial Reserve, on Cambridge Terrace beside the River Avon, Christchurch. The Memorial, the work of sculptor Margriet Windhausen, comprises a 3.3m by 2.1m bronze bas-relief supported by a 5m pebbled wall. The camellia and white ribbons were symbols of the suffrage campaign. White camellias were given by the suffragists to male members of parliament who supported the cause. Unveiled 19th Sept. 1993.

Evening Post, 13 September 1893, Page 3
A deputation from the Wellington Women's Franchise League waited on the Hon. R. Oliver yesterday, and presented a congratulatory address, also a basket of white camellias (20) for presentation to each Legislative Councillor who voted in favour of the Women's Franchise. Each camellia had attached the name of the gentleman for whom it was intended, and was tied with white ribbon The Hon. Mr. Oliver received the deputation cordially, and in expressing his pleasure at the kindly recognition of the League, said he believed the politics of the colony would be very much improved when the women had a voice in the legislation.

Timaru Herald, 10 July 1893, Page 2
"We learn from the president of the Women's Franchise League that owing to the enthusiasm evinced it is expected that by petition to Parliament 30,000 women will this session demand enfranchisement immediately. Yesterday huge petitions, 776ft in length and containing 25,570 signatures, were forwarded from Christchurch to Sir John Hall by Mrs Sheppard, the franchise superintendent. If the moral force of this demonstration is not at once recognised by the Government, it is alleged that a position of a very determined character will be taken up which will cost the party in power dear."

Timaru Herald, 12 July 1893, Page 3 LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.
Mr Oliver presented a petition, signed by 25498 women, in favour of the franchise being granted to women. Petitioners also expressed the hope that they would be enabled to vote at the next General Election. The Colonial Secretary being to unwell to be present, the Council adjourned till next day.

The 1892 suffrage petition had over 17,000 names, including some from places missing on the 1893 petition. 593 names from South Canterbury with more names from Waimate than Timaru. 

366 204 PLEASANT POINT  MACKAY JESSIE
424 238 PLEASANT POINT 	SCOWEN M L
368 205 POINT 		GIBBS JANE 
381 211 TEMUKA 		ANDREWS K A
361 201 GERALDINE 	EVERY HENRIETTA
371 206 GERALDINE 	MAHAN SARA I
361 201 GERALDINE FLAT 	MAHAN ELLEN ADELA
209 120 TEMUKA 		EDWARDS A
381 211 TEMUKA 		ANDREWS K A
366 204 CLAREMONT 	CAMPBELL MARGARET 
368 205 KINGSDOWN 	ELLIS MARTHA 
398 221 MAKIKIHI 	RODGERS M
366 204 RAKAIA 		HARDY ELEANOR E 

341 187 TIMARU VOGELER MINNIE 
345 190 TIMARU GOWHER CAROLINE L 
360 200 TIMARU BLACKMORE NANCY 
360 200 TIMARU CALVERT ANNIE 
360 200 TIMARU HILLARY EMMA 
360 200 TIMARU VOGEL D 
360 200 TIMARU WILLIAMS ALICE M 
361 201 TIMARU COWAN JEANIE K 
361 201 TIMARU GILLESPIE MARGARET 
361 201 TIMARU HUGHES BESSIE 
361 201 TIMARU KARTON SARAH 
361 201 TIMARU KENNEDY ELIZABETH 
361 201 TIMARU SMALE MARY G 
361 201 TIMARU TONEYCLIFFE JANE 
361 201 TIMARU TONEYCLIFFE JULIE 
361 201 TIMARU TOSHACK JANET R 
361 201 TIMARU WAKE ADA E 
361 201 TIMARU WHITMARSH MARTHA A 
363 202 TIMARU ADAMS LETITIA 
362 202 TIMARU ALLSOP E A 
363 202 TIMARU ANDERSON A 
362 202 TIMARU BOOTHROYD M 
362 202 TIMARU BOULDEN ELLEN 
362 202 TIMARU BOYCE MAY 
363 202 TIMARU BROOKS LILIAN 
363 202 TIMARU BURGESS CATHERINE 
363 202 TIMARU CHAPMAN ANNIE 
362 202 TIMARU CLOUGH M A 
363 202 TIMARU COX ANNA 
362 202 TIMARU DEPKINS K E 
362 202 TIMARU DRISCOLL MARY 
362 202 TIMARU FADAN ELLEN 
362 202 TIMARU FALLAR S 
362 202 TIMARU FRANCIS NELLIE 
363 202 TIMARU FUSSELL ANNIE G 
363 202 TIMARU GIBBS JANE 
362 202 TIMARU GILLIES I R 
363 202 TIMARU GRANDI FRANCES 
362 202 TIMARU HALL H 
363 202 TIMARU HUBBARD GRACE 
362 202 TIMARU HUGHES SARAH 
363 202 TIMARU JOHNSON ADELAIDE 
362 202 TIMARU KENNEDY MARY ANN 
362 202 TIMARU KING ELLEN 
362 202 TIMARU LAMBERT L 
363 202 TIMARU LAWRY JANE MARIA 
362 202 TIMARU LISSAMAN H 
363 202 TIMARU MACKENZIE J H 
363 202 TIMARU MASSEY ELIZABETH 
362 202 TIMARU MCKAY JESSIE 
363 202 TIMARU MCKENZIE JOAN 
363 202 TIMARU MCKEOWN M 
363 202 TIMARU MCRAE B 
363 202 TIMARU MCRAE JANE 
362 202 TIMARU MURRAY M E 
363 202 TIMARU PADGET M 
362 202 TIMARU PARKER L 
363 202 TIMARU PENROSE L 
363 202 TIMARU MRS POWELL A 
362 202 TIMARU POWELL SARAH 
362 202 TIMARU RAWSTOM E 
362 202 TIMARU REID J M 
363 202 TIMARU RICE E 
363 202 TIMARU RINTOUL M J 
363 202 TIMARU ROWBOTHAM J 
363 202 TIMARU ROWE M A 
362 202 TIMARU RUSSELL G M 
362 202 TIMARU SAMMS M 
363 202 TIMARU SIBLY I 
363 202 TIMARU SIBLY U 
363 202 TIMARU SMITH SARAH 
362 202 TIMARU STERLING MAY 
362 202 TIMARU STEVENS MARY 
363 202 TIMARU STEWART I 
362 202 TIMARU TODD JANE M 
363 202 TIMARU TODD M S 
362 202 TIMARU TUBB J 
362 202 TIMARU WAUGH A J 
362 202 TIMARU WEBB MABEL 
365 203 TIMARU BEZZANT NORA ELLEN 
365 203 TIMARU BOWLES ROSIE 
365 203 TIMARU BURNESS ELIZABETH 
365 203 TIMARU CLARKSON CAROLINE 
365 203 TIMARU COCK ANN 
365 203 TIMARU EMMERSON ELLEN 
365 203 TIMARU EVANS ROSE 
365 203 TIMARU FAIRBOURN FRANCES 
365 203 TIMARU JOHNSON MATILDA 
365 203 TIMARU KIDD MARY 
365 203 TIMARU MUNRO MARY 
365 203 TIMARU PATTESON AMY 
365 203 TIMARU WHITELAW MAGGIE 
366 204 TIMARU BAMFIELD A M C 
366 204 TIMARU BAMFIELD ELIZABETH 
367 204 TIMARU BARKLEY SUSAN 
366 204 TIMARU BELL M 
366 204 TIMARU BILTON MAY 
366 204 TIMARU BILTON ELIZABETH 
366 204 TIMARU BOND HARRIET 
366 204 TIMARU BROOKER LILLA C 
367 204 TIMARU BRYDGES HANNAH 
366 204 TIMARU BUDD LILLIE 
367 204 TIMARU CAMPBELL EMMA G 
366 204 TIMARU CAMPBELL ELIZABETH 
366 204 TIMARU CLEMENTS A L RACHEL 
366 204 TIMARU CONDON ANNIE 
367 204 TIMARU CURRIE JANE 
367 204 TIMARU DAWSON M 
367 204 TIMARU DEPHOFF MARGARET 
367 204 TIMARU EMMERSON ELLEN L 
366 204 TIMARU FOSTER KATHERINE J 
366 204 TIMARU FUSSELL H 
367 204 TIMARU GOSHACH JANET B 
366 204 TIMARU HANKINS ADA E 
366 204 TIMARU HEALEY A H 
366 204 TIMARU HOPE LIZZIE 
366 204 TIMARU HUGHES ANNIE 
366 204 TIMARU HUGHES MARGARET J 
366 204 TIMARU IRVING MARY 
366 204 TIMARU IRWIN ANNA M 
366 204 TIMARU IRWIN ELIZABETH 
366 204 TIMARU IRWIN ELLLA I 
366 204 TIMARU IRWIN MARGARET 
366 204 TIMARU KANE MARY 
367 204 TIMARU KEENE AGNES 
367 204 TIMARU KEENE EMMA 
367 204 TIMARU LATIMER ELISANN 
367 204 TIMARU LAURIE MARGARET 
366 204 TIMARU LEWIS E 
366 204 TIMARU MAHON MARIE 
366 204 TIMARU MCLEAN AGNES 
366 204 TIMARU MCLEAN MARY 
366 204 TIMARU MILLER ELIZABETH 
366 204 TIMARU MONTGOMERY MARIA 
367 204 TIMARU MORGAN MARY JANE 
367 204 TIMARU OPIE JANE 
367 204 TIMARU OWENS ELIZABETH 
366 204 TIMARU PEACH CONSTANCE 
367 204 TIMARU PEARSON AGNES 
367 204 TIMARU PEARSON CHARLOTTE 
366 204 TIMARU PEARSON EMMA J A 
367 204 TIMARU PEEBLES LIZZIE 
366 204 TIMARU RIDELL MARY 
367 204 TIMARU SELWOOD MARY 
366 204 TIMARU THOMAS ALBINA 
367 204 TIMARU WARNER SARAH 
366 204 TIMARU WHITE MARY JANE 
366 204 TIMARU YOUNG NELLIE 
368 205 TIMARU BALLANTYNE C 
368 205 TIMARU MRS BEZZANT 
368 205 TIMARU BLACKWOOD F M 
369 205 TIMARU BROWN E E 
369 205 TIMARU MRS BROWN S A 
369 205 TIMARU BROWN JANE W 
368 205 TIMARU MRS BUNDESEN A 
368 205 TIMARU BUSSELL A S 
369 205 TIMARU CAYGILL F 
369 205 TIMARU CLARKE A 
368 205 TIMARU COE A H 
368 205 TIMARU ELLIS C 
369 205 TIMARU MRS FLEMING 
369 205 TIMARU FODEN P 
368 205 TIMARU GABITES P A G 
368 205 TIMARU GARDNER E M 
369 205 TIMARU GARDNER I 
368 205 TIMARU MRS GARDNER G W 
369 205 TIMARU GARDNER L 
368 205 TIMARU GARDNER I L 
369 205 TIMARU GRANGER A 
369 205 TIMARU GRANGER JANE 
369 205 TIMARU GRANGER JESSIE 
368 205 TIMARU GUILBERT ELLEN 
369 205 TIMARU GUILBERT NANCY AGNES 
368 205 TIMARU HALSTEAD A 
369 205 TIMARU HITCH IDA 
368 205 TIMARU MISS HOLDGATE 
368 205 TIMARU MRS HOLDGATE 
368 205 TIMARU HOLDGATE A 
368 205 TIMARU HOWE M A E 
368 205 TIMARU MRS JACKSON J 
369 205 TIMARU KOHN A F 
368 205 TIMARU KOHN S C 
368 205 TIMARU MACINTOSH C H 
369 205 TIMARU MACINTOSH CHRISTINA 
369 205 TIMARU MACINTOSH MARGARET 
369 205 TIMARU MANN JEAN 
369 205 TIMARU MCCAHON LILIAN 
369 205 TIMARU MCCLELLAND JANET E 
369 205 TIMARU MCILROY A 
368 205 TIMARU MCKNIGHT M 
368 205 TIMARU MCMEEKIN A 
368 205 TIMARU MRS MCMEEKIN S K 
369 205 TIMARU MOODY A C 
369 205 TIMARU MOODY ANNE 
369 205 TIMARU NAPIER I R 
369 205 TIMARU MRS PARKS 
369 205 TIMARU PARKS H 
368 205 TIMARU MRS PEARCE 
369 205 TIMARU SEALEY CHRISTINA 
368 205 TIMARU SIBLY A 
368 205 TIMARU SIBLY E G 
369 205 TIMARU SIBLY H M A 
369 205 TIMARU SILVERTON CAROLINE 
369 205 TIMARU SMELLIE N C 
368 205 TIMARU MRS TARGUSE S 
368 205 TIMARU WADCLIFFE L 
371 206 TIMARU ADAMS ADA 
372 206 TIMARU ALLPRESS EMMA 
372 206 TIMARU ARSCOTT HARRIET 
372 206 TIMARU AVISON ANN 
372 206 TIMARU AVISON MARTHA 
371 206 TIMARU BOWKER CAROLINE L 
372 206 TIMARU BURFORD ALICE E 
372 206 TIMARU MRS CALDWELL D J 
372 206 TIMARU CHRISTIE MARGARET 
372 206 TIMARU CLARKE ACHSAH R 
371 206 TIMARU CLITHEROE BESSIE 
372 206 TIMARU MRS CLOSE 
372 206 TIMARU MRS CONDLISH 
372 206 TIMARU MRS CONWAY 
372 206 TIMARU COURTIS E S 
372 206 TIMARU MRS CRAIGIE SARAH 
372 206 TIMARU DONN AGNES M 
372 206 TIMARU DONN SUSAN 
372 206 TIMARU MRS DONN JESSIE 
372 206 TIMARU DONN CHRISTINA C 
372 206 TIMARU DUNLOP MARGARET 
371 206 TIMARU ELLIOTT SARAH JANE 
371 206 TIMARU ELLIOTT MAGGIE 
371 206 TIMARU EVANS FANNIE M 
371 206 TIMARU EVANS ADDIE 
372 206 TIMARU MRS HALL BETTY 
371 206 TIMARU HAY BESSIE 
372 206 TIMARU HITCH MINNIE 
371 206 TIMARU HOLLOW LOUISA J 
371 206 TIMARU HOOPER EMMA 
372 206 TIMARU HOOPER NELLIE 
372 206 TIMARU MRS HORNE MARY 
371 206 TIMARU IRWIN CATHERINE 
371 206 TIMARU IRWIN LIZZIE 
371 206 TIMARU IRWIN MARY 
372 206 TIMARU MRS IRWIN S 
371 206 TIMARU JENKINS FRANCES S 
371 206 TIMARU JENKINS KATE 
372 206 TIMARU JONES EDITH 
371 206 TIMARU MRS LEWIS W 
371 206 TIMARU MAHON MAGGIE C 
372 206 TIMARU MARQUIS MARY 
372 206 TIMARU MILLIN CHRISTINA 
371 206 TIMARU NORTH KATEY 
371 206 TIMARU NORTH ROSINA 
371 206 TIMARU OGG E W 
372 206 TIMARU MRS RAWSTON (JNR) 
371 206 TIMARU MRS REILLY J 
371 206 TIMARU MRS REILLY W G 
372 206 TIMARU MRS ROONEY MARY 
372 206 TIMARU ROONEY MINNIE E 
372 206 TIMARU MRS SHEARS 
371 206 TIMARU SIMPSON KATE 
371 206 TIMARU SMITH HARRIET A 
371 206 TIMARU SMITH M C 
372 206 TIMARU MRS THOMSON MARY 
372 206 TIMARU WELSH JANE 
372 206 TIMARU YOUDALE ELIZA 
398 221 TIMARU DASH ANN 
398 221 TIMARU RICHARDS FANNY 
416 232 TIMARU CABOT ALICE M 
435 246 TIMARU HALL A

361 201 WASHDYKE BARTLETT SARAH 
361 201 WASHDYKE DAWE NORAH
361 201 WASHDYKE GARDNER ELLEN
361 201 WASHDYKE HAMILTON MARY
361 201 WASHDYKE IRVING ISABEL
361 201 WASHDYKE KEENE LYDIA 
361 201 WASHDYKE MCMURCHIE MARY
361 201 WASHDYKE MORGAN MAGGIE
361 201 WASHDYKE NICHOLLS ADELINE
361 201 WASHDYKE NICHOLLS ELIZABETH
361 201 WASHDYKE NICHOLLS HETTIE
361 201 WASHDYKE NICHOLLS JENNIE
361 201 WASHDYKE SELLARS ANNIE
361 201 WASHDYKE SMITH MARGARET
361 201 WASHDYKE STEVENSON ELIZABETH
361 201 WASHDYKE TONKIN ANNE
393 218 WAIMATE ?GISBINE MARY 
392 218 WAIMATE ADAMS E 
393 218 WAIMATE AKHURST L 
392 218 WAIMATE ARCHER CAROLINE 
392 218 WAIMATE AVERY ANNIE 
392 218 WAIMATE BATCHELOR MARY ANNE 
392 218 WAIMATE BATEMAN CAROLINE E 
393 218 WAIMATE BEATON MINNIE 
392 218 WAIMATE MRS BEESLY E 
393 218 WAIMATE BEGG MARION 
392 218 WAIMATE BITCHENER AGNES 
392 218 WAIMATE BITCHENER LOUISA 
393 218 WAIMATE BLACKMORE AMELIA G 
392 218 WAIMATE BOYCE E 
392 218 WAIMATE BUCHANAN AGNES 
392 218 WAIMATE CAMERON ELIZA 
393 218 WAIMATE CHAMPION ROSEANNA 
393 218 WAIMATE CHAMPION ROSEANNA 
392 218 WAIMATE CHEVERTON LOUISA 
392 218 WAIMATE CHEVITON LOUISE 
393 218 WAIMATE CLARKE MARIA 
392 218 WAIMATE CLEAR ELLEN 
393 218 WAIMATE FLA[H]ERTY ADA 
392 218 WAIMATE FOWERAKER HARRIETTE F 
392 218 WAIMATE GAITT DONALDNA 
393 218 WAIMATE GARDNER A 
392 218 WAIMATE GOLDSMITH E A 
392 218 WAIMATE GRAY N 
392 218 WAIMATE GUILFORD ANN 
392 218 WAIMATE HARRIS ELISABETH 
393 218 WAIMATE JACKSON ANNE 
392 218 WAIMATE JOHNSTONE MARY ANNA 
393 218 WAIMATE MANCHESTER E 
392 218 WAIMATE MAYFIELD E 
392 218 WAIMATE MCKEE A 
393 218 WAIMATE MELTON A 
393 218 WAIMATE MILLER J 
393 218 WAIMATE MITCHELL JESSIE 
393 218 WAIMATE MORRISON KATE 
392 218 WAIMATE MYER CATHERINE 
393 218 WAIMATE MYERS SOPHIE 
392 218 WAIMATE O'BRIEN ANNIE 
392 218 WAIMATE OBRIEN ANNIE 
392 218 WAIMATE PASCOE E 
392 218 WAIMATE MRS PETTIT 
393 218 WAIMATE SULLIVAN A 
392 218 WAIMATE SWAINE MINNIE 
393 218 WAIMATE SWANN MINNIE 
392 218 WAIMATE TAYLOR JUDITH 
392 218 WAIMATE TAYLOR L 
392 218 WAIMATE TILLIE MARY 
392 218 WAIMATE TREGONING MARY 
393 218 WAIMATE TURNER E L 
392 218 WAIMATE VIRTIE E Z 
392 218 WAIMATE WACHMANN MARY 
392 218 WAIMATE WALKER HANNAH 
393 218 WAIMATE WALTON J E 
392 218 WAIMATE MRS WATSON E G 
393 218 WAIMATE WYCHERLEY M J 
394 219 WAIMATE ALLEN J 
395 219 WAIMATE ARMOUR C 
394 219 WAIMATE BATEMAN NANCY 
394 219 WAIMATE BATEMAN MARY E 
394 219 WAIMATE BAXTER E 
394 219 WAIMATE BERRY ELLEN 
394 219 WAIMATE BISHOP MARY 
395 219 WAIMATE BOYD S I 
394 219 WAIMATE BUTCHER C A 
394 219 WAIMATE CLAYTON JANE 
395 219 WAIMATE COCHRANE M S 
394 219 WAIMATE CORDNER I 
394 219 WAIMATE CRONE JANE 
394 219 WAIMATE DASH S E 
394 219 WAIMATE DASH A E 
395 219 WAIMATE DELLOW SARAH 
395 219 WAIMATE DELLOW S A 
395 219 WAIMATE ELLIS M 
395 219 WAIMATE FERRITER CECILY 
394 219 WAIMATE FOX J 
394 219 WAIMATE GARDYNE T 
395 219 WAIMATE GRIFFIN ANNIE 
395 219 WAIMATE GRIFFIN LAURA 
395 219 WAIMATE HARDY M 
394 219 WAIMATE HART E 
394 219 WAIMATE HAWKINS INA 
395 219 WAIMATE HAZLETON A F 
394 219 WAIMATE HILL ELIZA 
394 219 WAIMATE HOLLAMBY E 
395 219 WAIMATE HUTT R 
394 219 WAIMATE JACKSON AGNES 
394 219 WAIMATE JACKSON EMMA 
394 219 WAIMATE JAMES MARY ANN 
395 219 WAIMATE KEAN JOHANNA 
394 219 WAIMATE LEWIS M 
394 219 WAIMATE LUCAS J C 
395 219 WAIMATE MARRIOTT E 
394 219 WAIMATE MEYER CATHERINE 
394 219 WAIMATE MILLS JANE 
395 219 WAIMATE MORRISON MARY 
395 219 WAIMATE OTTLEY ANNIE 
394 219 WAIMATE OTTLEY M E 
394 219 WAIMATE PINNELL E 
395 219 WAIMATE PRICE E J 
395 219 WAIMATE RANKIN MARION F 
394 219 WAIMATE REEVES ELIZABETH 
394 219 WAIMATE ROBERTS ELLEN 
395 219 WAIMATE RONALDSON EUPHEMIA 
394 219 WAIMATE RUSSELL SUSAN 
394 219 WAIMATE SMITH C 
394 219 WAIMATE SMITH E 
394 219 WAIMATE SMITH JOHANNA 
394 219 WAIMATE THOMAS MARY W 
395 219 WAIMATE TOFIELD ANNIE 
394 219 WAIMATE TREGONNING M A 
394 219 WAIMATE TURNER G 
394 219 WAIMATE WALSH M 
394 219 WAIMATE WANKLYN A 
394 219 WAIMATE WEIR BESSIE 
395 219 WAIMATE WILSON M J 
396 220 WAIMATE AGENT W 
396 220 WAIMATE AGENT J 
397 220 WAIMATE MRS ANSELL 
396 220 WAIMATE BANNERMANN J G 
397 220 WAIMATE BOYD L J 
396 220 WAIMATE BROKENSHIRE J 
396 220 WAIMATE BRUCE S C 
397 220 WAIMATE BURRELL E 
397 220 WAIMATE BUTCHER I S 
396 220 WAIMATE CALVERT E 
396 220 WAIMATE CLEGHORN A 
396 220 WAIMATE MRS COULBECK 
396 220 WAIMATE COUSINS A 
396 220 WAIMATE CRAWFORD M H 
397 220 WAIMATE DOWLE F P 
396 220 WAIMATE DUCKETT E 
396 220 WAIMATE DUNBAR G A 
397 220 WAIMATE ELY SARAH 
396 220 WAIMATE FERGUSSON J 
397 220 WAIMATE FOW SUSANNAH 
397 220 WAIMATE FULTON ANNIE 
397 220 WAIMATE HARRIS E M 
397 220 WAIMATE HOARE A 
397 220 WAIMATE HUNT A 
396 220 WAIMATE INKSTER F 
396 220 WAIMATE INKSTER S 
396 220 WAIMATE JOHNSTON E 
396 220 WAIMATE JOYCE E 
396 220 WAIMATE JOYCE M E 
396 220 WAIMATE KARSTEN C 
396 220 WAIMATE KENNARD E 
396 220 WAIMATE KENNARD S 
397 220 WAIMATE KNIGHT LOUISA 
396 220 WAIMATE MARSHALL E 
397 220 WAIMATE MAYFIELD E 
396 220 WAIMATE MCCULLOCH E 
397 220 WAIMATE MCGIMPSEY E 
396 220 WAIMATE MCGINN E A 
397 220 WAIMATE MELTON C 
396 220 WAIMATE MINES C M 
396 220 WAIMATE NELSON C 
396 220 WAIMATE OTTLEY L 
396 220 WAIMATE PECK M 
397 220 WAIMATE REVILL M 
397 220 WAIMATE ROGERS E 
397 220 WAIMATE RUMBLE J 
397 220 WAIMATE SAAFFE ANNIE 
396 220 WAIMATE SAUNDERS E 
396 220 WAIMATE SCHMITH L 
396 220 WAIMATE SOPER A 
396 220 WAIMATE SOPER N 
397 220 WAIMATE STRONG I J 
397 220 WAIMATE SUTHERLAND M 
397 220 WAIMATE TREGONING E C 
396 220 WAIMATE WERGES M 
396 220 WAIMATE WHEELER T A 
396 220 WAIMATE WHITE A 
396 220 WAIMATE WILLIAMS C 
396 220 WAIMATE WILLIAMS N 
397 220 WAIMATE WILLOUG[H]BY E 
396 220 WAIMATE WILSON E 
400 221 WAIMATE ANDERSON ISABELLA 
399 221 WAIMATE AUFFLEY ANN 
398 221 WAIMATE BATEMAN MARY ELIZABETH 
398 221 WAIMATE BISHOP MARY ANN 
398 221 WAIMATE BITCHENER ELIZABETH 
400 221 WAIMATE BRUCE A G 
398 221 WAIMATE BRYSON MARY LYDIA 
398 221 WAIMATE BUTCHER KATIE 
400 221 WAIMATE CAPSTICK M E 
398 221 WAIMATE CHAPMAN JANE 
400 221 WAIMATE COLSON MARION M 
400 221 WAIMATE CORDNER MARY 
398 221 WAIMATE DEANS ROSA 
400 221 WAIMATE DODD MARY 
400 221 WAIMATE DUFFIELD SUSAN 
398 221 WAIMATE FOW ELLEN 
398 221 WAIMATE FRAMPSTON HARRIET 
398 221 WAIMATE FRANKLIN CHARLOTTE 
398 221 WAIMATE GARRETT MARY ANN 
399 221 WAIMATE GORDON CHRISTINA 
398 221 WAIMATE GUY E 
398 221 WAIMATE HARDING E 
398 221 WAIMATE HARPER ELIZABETH 
398 221 WAIMATE HARRIS GEORGINA 
398 221 WAIMATE HAWKE ELIZABETH 
400 221 WAIMATE HUNT MARY 
398 221 WAIMATE INKSTER MARGARET 
398 221 WAIMATE KAYS ELIZABETH 
398 221 WAIMATE KENNEDY JESSIE 
398 221 WAIMATE KENT CATHERINE 
398 221 WAIMATE LOCK JANE 
400 221 WAIMATE MABERLY ELIZA 
398 221 WAIMATE MABERLY LYDIA 
400 221 WAIMATE MACKIE M D 
398 221 WAIMATE MANCHESTER EMILY 
400 221 WAIMATE MECKENZY ELIZA 
398 221 WAIMATE MISSEN JANE 
398 221 WAIMATE NICHOLAS ANN MARY 
398 221 WAIMATE NICOL EREANA 
400 221 WAIMATE PAGE MARGARET 
400 221 WAIMATE PHILIP ISABELLA 
398 221 WAIMATE RUBY JANE 
400 221 WAIMATE RUSSELL MARINA 
398 221 WAIMATE SHAW MARIA 
398 221 WAIMATE SINCLAIR MAGGIE 
398 221 WAIMATE SMITH JANNET 
400 221 WAIMATE SMITH MARY 
400 221 WAIMATE SPALDING MARY L 
398 221 WAIMATE ST GEORGE K 
398 221 WAIMATE STRONG CHRISTINA GILMOUR 
400 221 WAIMATE TOMLIM CHARLOTTE 
400 221 WAIMATE TREGONING CHRISTINA 
398 221 WAIMATE VERNON ANN ALICE BERTHA 
398 221 WAIMATE WAYMOUTH M 
399 221 WAIMATE WILCE E 
398 221 WAIMATE WILLIAMS EMMELINE 
459 262 WAIMATE ALLAN BELLA 
459 262 WAIMATE BAKER JESSIE 
460 262 WAIMATE BEAN CHARLOTTE JANE 
459 262 WAIMATE BERRY SARAH ANN 
460 262 WAIMATE BLACKMORE MINNIE 
460 262 WAIMATE BOYCE KLASINA 
459 262 WAIMATE MRS BRINKMAN 
459 262 WAIMATE BROADBENT ANN 
460 262 WAIMATE BUCKINGHAM C 
460 262 WAIMATE COCHRANE MAGGIE 
459 262 WAIMATE COTTEE SOPHIA 
459 262 WAIMATE DAVIS ANN 
459 262 WAIMATE EATHORNE CLARA 
460 262 WAIMATE EVANS ELIZABETH 
460 262 WAIMATE EVANS ANNIE 
460 262 WAIMATE EVANS SARA 
459 262 WAIMATE FAGAN JANE 
460 262 WAIMATE GASCOYNE J 
460 262 WAIMATE GASCOYNE E C 
459 262 WAIMATE GILKES ELIZABETH 
459 262 WAIMATE HAWKINS ELIZA 
459 262 WAIMATE HIORNS EMMA 
459 262 WAIMATE HORE ELIZABETH 
459 262 WAIMATE HOSKING EMILY 
459 262 WAIMATE JOHNS ELIZABETH 
459 262 WAIMATE JULIAN MARY 
459 262 WAIMATE JULIAN MARY S 
459 262 WAIMATE KAAN SARAH 
459 262 WAIMATE KENT ANNIE 
460 262 WAIMATE LACK ELIZABETH 
459 262 WAIMATE MRS MABERLY E 
459 262 WAIMATE MANCHESTER BELLE 
459 262 WAIMATE MANCHESTER M F 
459 262 WAIMATE MANCHESTER O M 
459 262 WAIMATE MCKENZIE ISABELLA 
459 262 WAIMATE MCKEOWN HARR[I]ET 
459 262 WAIMATE MCTAGGART CHRISTINA 
460 262 WAIMATE MENZIES JESSIE A 
460 262 WAIMATE MRS MYERS L 
460 262 WAIMATE NEWTON MARY ANN 
460 262 WAIMATE O'BRIEN A 
459 262 WAIMATE PARKER FRANCES E J 
460 262 WAIMATE PATTERSON A H 
460 262 WAIMATE PHILIP C 
460 262 WAIMATE RATLEY JANE 
459 262 WAIMATE RIND EMMA 
460 262 WAIMATE SHEARER MARY JANE 
459 262 WAIMATE SMALLEY J A 
460 262 WAIMATE MRS SMITH D 
459 262 WAIMATE SMITH MARY 
459 262 WAIMATE TAYLOR CHARLOTTE 
459 262 WAIMATE THOMSON MARTHA 
459 262 WAIMATE TREGONING M R 
459 262 WAIMATE URQ[U]HART JESSIE 
460 262 WAIMATE MRS VIGERS E M 
459 262 WAIMATE VINING EMMA 
459 262 WAIMATE WATT JANE 
459 262 WAIMATE WELSH ANNE 
460 262 WAIMATE WHITE FANNY 
460 262 WAIMATE WIECHMANN MARY 
459 262 WAIMATE WILLIAMS LOUISA ANN

Timaru Herald, 28 September 1893, Page 3
WOMEN'S FRANCHISE - History of the movement in New Zealand

Early in 1871 Sir Robert raised, the question of the admission of women to the electoral franchise. His advocacy was received with laughter and applause. After this the question cropped up at various meetings from time to time. Sir Robert spoke in favour of it in the Otago Provincial Council, and strongly urged it in the Press. It was not until 1878 that its parliamentary history commenced. In that year the subject was introduced by Dr Wallis, a member for Auckland, who moved " That in the opinion of this House the electoral disabilities of women should be entirely removed, and the same political rights and privileges should be granted to women as to men." The debate was adjourned, and when it came up again the motion was met by the previous question," and Dr Wallis was defeated by 44 to 8. The eight were Sir Robert Stout, Mr Bowen, Mr George, Mr Morris, Mr Bees, Mr Barth, and Drs Wallis and Henry, and the division was taken on the 15th August. Dr Wallis was persistent, and on the 16th September he moved to omit the word "male" clause 15 of the Government Electoral Bill of the day. His motion was lost by 36 to 26. In the following year Dr Wallis introduced a Bill for extending the franchise to women. This was read a first time, but went no further, and it was not till 1887 that Sir Julius Vogel introduced his Woman Suffrage Bill which was at last read a second time by 43 to 11. In committee clause 2 the operative clause was thrown out by 27 to 19. The Bill was not gone on with further, and was discharged. Three years later, on the 6th August, 1890, Sir John Hall proposed a resolution confirming the justice of granting the franchise to women which, after considerable discussion, was carried by a majority of 26 (Ayes 37, Noes 11). A Bill was thereupon introduced and read a first time, but owing to the late period of the session it, was not possible to proceed further with it. This brings us down to the present Parliament, in the first session of which (1891) Sir John Hall again introduced hit Bill. It was read a second time by 33 to 8 and passed the House of Representatives. In the Council it was read a first lime, but the second reading was negatived by a majority of two which included the two Maori members. Next year however, saw the reform figuring in a Government Bill — the Electoral Bill of Mr Ballance, which was passed after some opposition in the House by 43 to 26. It was also passed by the Council, but with amendments providing that women might be allowed to send their votes by post. Upon this question an irreconcilable difference of opinion arose between the two Houses, and the Bill was consequently wrecked, Sir John Hall also in that session introduced a Bill for conferring the franchise of women, which was not proceeded with. And now I come to the present session. Sir John Hall again introduced his Franchise Bill, and it was read a second time by 33 to 3, but as woman suffrage was included in the Government Electoral Bill Sir John's Bill was not pressed further. The only division on woman's suffrage in the passage of the Electoral bill through the House was on a motion by Mr Blake, and this was defeated by 83 to 12. The Bill passed both Houses, and received the Governor's assent on September 19.

Timaru Herald, 20 September 1893, Page 2 Editorial

All doubt with regard to the Electoral Bill has at length been removed. His Excellency the Governor assented to it yesterday morning, and it comes into operation at once. Henceforth the women of New Zealand have precisely the same franchise rights as the men have, but are not eligible as candidates for seats in Parliament. We observe that the Premier claims to have been sincere from the first in the desire which be expressed that the Bill should pass as it now stands. The Government have sent plenty of registration forms to the various Post Offices, and to the Registrars of Electors, and extra clerical assistance will be given for the purpose of facilitating the placing of women on the rolls. The women, now put on an equality with men with regard to the franchise, should begin by displaying at least as much alacrity and intelligence as the men in securing registration. There is no mystery about the matter, and no more trouble in getting registered than there is in exercising the franchise. We earnestly trust that there will be no holding back on the part of any who have the right to be registered. On this point something has already appeared in our columns, but the issues at stake are so large that we consider it adviseable to revert to the subject. We are the more strongly impelled to do so in consequence of statements and opinions which have come under our notice during the last few days. We gather that there are many women who have no intention of exercising the franchise, and therefore do not see the necessity of getting registered. In some instances we have heard the statements from their own lips, and in others the information has come to us at second hand, but from sources scarcely less trustworthy. Some of those whose present intention is to stand aloof think that women ought not to have the franchise, and regard that as a sufficient reason for not exercising the right now that the legislature has thrust it upon them. Others have in reality no opinions about the franchise, but dislike exceedingly the idea of going to a a polling-booth, and will therefore stop a away. These dissentients are of all classes, but include many of the more intelligent and better educated. With all seriousness we urge it upon them, as something which they owe to the country, that they reconsider the position They cannot shake themselves clear of their responsibility, and by abstaining from registering and voting they will inflict a great wrong on the community and may be the means of bringing about much mischief. An intelligent and educated woman who will not exercise the franchise, making her choice to the best of her ability, will simply be abandoning her duty, and she will commit the wrong with her eyes open.

Timaru Herald, 2 October 1893, Page 3
St Mary's

The following pastoral letter from the Bishop of Christchurch, was read by the Ven. Archdeacon Harper at both services at St Mary's Church yesterday - "To the woman of the Church of England in the Diocese of Christchurch: - Grace and peace be with you: A most important change in your relation to the State has been brought about by the passing of the Act for extending the franchise to the women of this colony, which seems to call for a few words of counsel from your Bishop. What is your duty under those now conditions? It may be that some of you, averse from interference in public matters, or for other reasons, will refrain front claiming and exercising the powers which have been conferred upon you, and I hear that comparatively few women have as yet enrolled. Now it is quite clear that unless the great majority of sensible intelligent Christian women of the colony qualify themselves to vote, the privilege of the female franchise will be exercised only by a small and fanatical selection of the community, or will serve only to put a few more votes at the disposal of the men. In either case the true and proper influence of women will be lost to the State. The completeness of humanity is found not the men alone, nor in the women alone, but in the two combined. Women are specially endowed. Their influence is moral and religious In the intuitive sense of righteousness, and in obedience to duty, they are superior to men. Hitherto this side of our nature has been moat imperfectly represented. Now is the time for womanhood to express itself. It is quite vain to ask whether women desire the franchise. You have it, and you must use it. The power is conferred upon you by God, not by man. In the interests of morality and pure religion, I urge upon you to claim and exercise your right of voting, soberly, fearlessly, and as in the sight of God."

Timaru Herald, 25 September 1893, Page 3
THE WOMEN'S FRANCHISE.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMARU HERALD. Sir, — This week the women of New Zealand learned that they had obtained the franchise, and now have a right to vote equally with men. This is fair. If we are to live under law and government, be punished for failing to keep the laws, and pay the taxes, it is only a matter of common justice that we should have a voice in choosing our representatives and law-makers, the men who direct the country in which our sons and daughters may find prosperity — or the reverse.
    But it is such a pity that just as we are feeling proud and happy about it, we should find ourselves in danger of being mispresented - as women - by some advanced young "leaders." In spite of what these enthusiastic young people say, women know they are quite unfit to fight "side by side" with men. The gospel of Work for Women, the is the new cry. Not only as mothers, nurses, housekeepers, and helpmates, but as lawyer doctors, engineers, surveyors, masons, police, scavengers, lamplighters, gravediggers and jacks-of-all trades. Of course it an advance into these interesting and earn positions it follows naturally that we must don the bifurcated garments. When we at a grubbing in trenches, or a scaling of ladder or even amputating limbs, or pleading in court for baby-slayers or swindlers, the knicker bockers will be the most suitable wear. Dignity would be sadly in the way of our success. In advocating two-legged apparel for the emancipated woman the advance is at least consistent. A woman in a skirt on a bicycle is very funny, and petticoate footballers and wrestlers are impossible people. Even the women who have spent great part of their lives in gymnasiums and on bicycles would make oh such miserable athletes!
    But, as fellow-workers with men should we be happier. Think of it, women. Even so far woman is pressing into places formerly occupied by man have made life harder for both men and woman! It has thrown hundreds of men out of work, lowered their wages, and made marriage almost an impossibility, and complicated the relation of the sexes to an extraordinary extent. What then will it when they join the lists of workers in all departments. Already, even in this country we hear of nothing but competition. Too many men for every post. The other day in Canterbury 76 men were applicants for a road board clerkship. Every day machinery and mechanical improvements are making men's labour superfluous. Out steamers employ less than half the men formerly employed in sailing vessels. In the harvest field, the reaper and binder hurrie the harvest to an end, making only a few weeks' work for anybody. So with the higher departments of work. Indeed, if such a thing occurred as women becoming co-labourers with their husbands and brothers in all the world's work, it is difficult to realise the chaos of complications which it would cause. Homes simply would be a thing of the past, and people's lives would be a thousand times more full of disenchantment than they are even now. The halo of hope would forever have disappeared from the palpitating and weary world.
    But I believe that though this woman's movement is doing much harm, it arose out of a need, and it will be modified and dignified, and freed from its extreme and unpractical advocates, as women themselves become more thoughtful. This is the very reason why many of us, though quite opposed to the woman's movement," believe in the enfranchisement of women. It will compel them to think on matters of general interest concerning the welfare of the state and the world, and in time widen their views and make them more noble. But let them cling fast to their womanhood, let them certainly choose the men who are to govern and represent them, as they did their champions in other days of chivalry, but they will make one vast mistake if they descend themselves into the arena.
    We working women have views, though we are not "leaders," as to the happiest state for women. They are directly opposed to the advanced school. We have a dream. I suppose, though we are not Olive Schreiners, we may have our humble dreams. It is that some happy day we shall be delivered from the burden of having to work except in the sacred circle of home. No linger toiling in offices, schools, factories and shops, all the posts in these public places being filled by men, well paid, and possessed of homes in which live contented and intelligent women, and happy children. Thousands of simple country homos scattered over the land, m which men and women live at peace, free from care and anxiety, and the cankering curse of striving for the fast diminishing prizes of the world, nay! even for the very smallest prize, a common livelihood. It is only a dream but could it be realised here, New Zealand would have solved the great pressing problem of the day. I am, etc. A WORKING WOMEN.  Reply from Another working women

Colonist, 14 March 1918, Page 7 W.C.T.U.

Timaru, March 13. The annual Dominion conference of the Women's Christian Temperance Union opens to-morrow and continue all next week. To-night the delegates were welcomed at a public meeting in the Lyceum Theatre. There was a large attendance, and Mrs Rule the Timaru president was in the chair. The Mayor (Mr J. Maling) the Rev. T. Jouglin, and Mr J. Craigie MP gave addresses of welcome. Mrs Don the Dominion president in acknowledging the welcome, said the W.C.T.U. was out to sweep the liquor interests away altogether. The present restrictions were insufficient. It was out also for equal rights with men.

Wanganui Herald, 13 May 1893, Page 2

The army of commercial travellers in New Zealand numbers a new recruit in the shape of a lady, who is now in Timaru. The local Herald states that she is doing good business as the representative of a Home firm of manufacturing chemists, and she "very evidently knows how to do it."

The white ribbon is the emblem of the WCTU
Women’s Christian Temperance Union 

Miss Jessie Mackay 

Star 27 July 1893, Page 3
Woman's Franchise — An excellently written article on this subject, from the pen of Miss Jessie Mackay, appears in this week's Canterbury Times. Opponents as well as supporters of woman's franchise will find much of interest in the article.

Southland Times 22 April 1896, Page 2
The readers, regular and casual, of newspapers throughout the colony have been within the last few days diverted, and then perhaps a little startled, by the report of a convention of certain enthusiastic political ladies at Christchurch, who have styled themselves the "National Council of Women," but are really delegates of local societies in the principal centres, which are by no means representative in character, but are mainly run by a few " new women " of the more advanced type. It would indeed be a very serious matter if the women of New Zealand as a body, or even any large proportion of them, approved the action of the so-called National Council, or endorsed all the resolutions passed, which embrace questions political, social and moral, and are mainly conspicuous for indifferent appreciation of the science of logic, and that jumping at conclusions which is characteristic of the sex. The Parliamentary tone was hardly dropped into at the outset. On the first day of session for instance, Miss Jessie Mackay recited an original poem entitled "The battle march of the women" and the enthusiasm with which it was received augurs ill for the unfortunate men against whom, of course, the battle is to be waged. Mrs H. W. Sheppard, who recently returned from England, gave an account of the objects of the International Council of Women, and said it was intended at a later stage that that convention should resolve itself into a National Council of the women of New Zealand. ODT

Timaru Herald, 18 August 1896, Page 2
The last fortnightly meeting of the Fairlie Mutual Improvement Society was the most successful yet held. The Rev. W. J. Comrie presided over a numerous attendance of both members and visitors. Mr J. Goodwin introduced the subject of " Old Age Pensions" in a carefully thought out speech. The discussion which followed was mostly favourable to the scheme, but the speakers fully recognised the difficulty of ways and means. A forcible, well written paper on Women in Parliament by Miss Jessie Mackay, provoked much trenchant, and a little humourous, criticism. The proposition that women should be admitted to Parliament was negatived by 17 votes to 4. 

Colonist, 1 June 1916, Page 4
An address urging the enfranchisement of women in Great Britain and throughout the Empire was drawn up by a committee of women in Christchurch, of which the convener was Mrs. K. W. Shepherd (ex-Franchise Superintendent) and the secretary (Miss Jessie Mackay). It has been signed by over one hundred prominent women of the Dominion—heads of important societies, leaders of social, philanthropic, religious or patriotic organisations, or women of attainment on professional, academic, artistic, or literary lines. This representative memorial has been courteously received and promised full consideration by Mr. Massey and Sir Joseph Ward, in view of their contemplated visit to London.

Evening Post, 20 July 1934, Page 13 OBITUARY MRS. LOVELL-SMITH [1847-1934]
Many women throughout New Zealand will, deeply regret the death of Mrs. Kate-Wilson Lovell-Smith, which occurred in Christchurch on Friday, at the age of 86 years. More than forty years ago Mrs. Lovell-Smith was in the forefront of the work for the enfranchisement of women. She was intensely interested and her work was recognised by the presentation, to her of the pen with which the Governor signed the Act. Mrs. Lovell-Smith was a member of the first National Council of Women established in this country, and was also an enthusiastic member of the W.C.T.U. Mrs. Lovell-Smith was twice married, her first husband being the late Mr. W. A. Shepherd [sic Walter Allen SHEPPARD], who died many years ago in England. Miss Jessie Mackay contributes a very fine tribute to Mrs Lovell-Smith's personal beauty of character.

Katherine W. Malcolm, age 24, married Walter A. Sheppard 21st July 1871, a prosperous grocer and a city councillor. They lived in Clyde Rd, Riccartion. Walter Sheppard died in Bath, England, on 24 July 1915. Katherine Wilson SHEPPARD married William Sidney Lovell-Smith 25 Aug. 1925.

Their only son, Douglas, was born in 8 Dec. 1880 died in March 16 1910 in Glasgow, electrical engineer for Siemens. Douglas Sheppard married 29 June 1908 in Edinburgh, to Miss Wilhelmina Sievwright, youngest daughter of the late Mr and Mrs Margaret Home Sievwright, of Gisborne, (19 March 1844 – 9 March 1905) who trained as a nurse under Florence Nightingale. Margaret, a friend of Kate's, was also a political activist, community leader in the North Island. Has a statue in Fitzherbert St. Gisborne unfortunately her surname was engraved in stone was misspelled. Engraved on the memorial is a quote What do women want? We want men to stand out of our sunshine, that is all. The memorial was originally a drinking fountain that stood in the middle of Peel Street, near the Gladstone Road intersection. Douglas was survived by Wilhelmina and one child, Margaret Isobel Sheppard, who died in 1930.  'Ever a friend to the friendless, and uncompromising upholder of all that is merciful, temperate and just'.

Kate was born in Liverpool c.1847. Her father, Andrew W. Malcolm, died in 1862 and in 1869 Kate came to NZ with her mother, two brothers and a sister. They arrived at Lyttelton in February 1869 on the Matoaka as cabin passengers. Another sister, Marie BEATH (d. 26 Jan. 1930), was already living in Christchurch. Kate led the campaign for votes for women, in a quiet and orderly manner. She was first editor of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) periodical “The White Ribbon.” She was the founding president of the National Council of Women (NCW) of NZ. Kate died at her home in Riccarton on 16th July 1934. She is buried at Addington Cemetery with her mother, Jemima Crawford Malcolm late of Dunfermline, SCT (died 27 June 1881, aged 59), a brother and a sister.


On display in the lobby of Parliament Buildings, Wellington, 2014

 South Canterbury NZGenWeb Project