REV. CLARENCE MULFORD RUPE

REV. CLARENCE MULFORD RUPE, pastor of the South Lima
Baptist Church, came to Lima in the fall of 1896 as pastor of the First
Baptist Church about four years, he went West, by the urgent advice of
physicians, seeking health for Mrs. Rupe.  He at once received a call th
Baptist Church in Greeley, Colorado, one of the stronger churches of
that State, and situated in one of its most beautiful and cultured young
cities.  During the first six months of residence in the new location,
the bright, useful life of Mrs. Rupe was brought to its close by an
acute attack of pneumonia, this event taking place February 9, 1901.
Aftre a successful pastorate of three years, family interests make it
desirable that he should return to the East, and in the summer of 1903
he came back to Lima, where a portion of his family were residing.
    The South Lima Baptist Church soon becoming pastorless and, being in
great need of careful management, Mr. Rupe, at the urgent solicitation
of a portion of its members and of the superintendent of missions of the
Ohio Baptist Convention, accepted the pastoral care of this church,
which still enjoys his labors and is prospering under his ripe
experience and well-directed efforts.  In October, 1904, he was happily
married to Mrs. Jennie L. Ballanger, of Indianapolis, Indiana, a
life-long friend well known and prominent in Christian work in that
city.
    Mr. Rupe was born in the village of Economy, Wayne County, Indiana,
March 25, 1846, being the eldest son of Rev. Henry B. Rupe, a local
lecturer of great popularity on temperance, slavery and education, a
preacher of local fame and a citizen honored by his county with public
office and other tokens of esteem.  The subject of this sketch received
his collegiate education at Denison University, and a thorough
theological training at Rochester, New York, in one of the finest of the
Baptist theological seminaries.
   Before coming to Lima Mr. Rupe held pastorates in Springfield,
Tiffin, McConnelsville, Le Roy, New York; and Franklin, Ohio.  The last
that at Franklin continued almost 11 years and was highly successful in
all respects, one of the notable achievements being the building of a
church edifice costing nearly $30,000.  Several sermons of Mr. Rupe have
been published and he has written frequently for the periodical press.

REV. FRANCIS J. HENRY

REV. FRANCIS J. HENRY, deceased, who was probably one
of the best beloved of all the priests who have served the Catholic
population of Lima, and who will long be recalled by the congregation of
St. Rose, which he served so faithfully, was born in County Derry,
Ireland, April 14, 1848, and died February 22, 1886.
    Father Henry received classical instruction in Ireland, was trained
in philosophy and theology at St. Vincent's, Westmoreland County,
Pennsylvania, and completed his course in the diocesan seminary.  He was
elevated to the priesthood on May 7, 1871, by the late Bishop Luers, in
St. Patrick's Church, Toledo, where he remained in charge until May 1,
1872, when he was sent to take charge at Brier Hill, which included the
missions of Mineral Ridge, Girard and Canfield.
   In June, 1876, Father Henry was transferred to Lima, where he
continued the beloved pastor of St. Rose until the close of the life
which was notably one of Christian achievement.  Ere more than in middle
life, however, the good father, through strenuous work, had impaired his
health, and in 1884 he visited his native land in the hope of
recuperating, but, in the two remaining years which were permitted him,
he never paused in his appointed work.  He passed away, as he would have
desired, in harness to the last, having twice celebrated mass on the day
preceding his death.
   The work Father Henry accomplished during his pastorate still stands
as a lasting monument to his memory.  The funeral was one of the largest
ever seen in Lima, every one seeming to wish to pay a last token of
respect.  Bishop Gilmour, who preached the funeral sermon paid an
eloquent tribute to the many virtues and earnest labors of one of whom
he spoke as one of the most successful priests of his diocese.

REV. ALFRED EDWARD MANNING

REV. ALFRED EDWARD MANNING, pastor of the church of
St. Rose, at Lima, is a man whose learning and piety make him a power in
the community, with exceptional gifts as an orator and spiritual leader,
he has also shown himself an able administrator and has looked well to
the material advancement of the parishes over which he has been called
to preside.  Father Manning was born September 1, 1856, in St. Patrick's
parish, Cleveland, Ohio, and is a son of Thomas and Jane E. (Murray)
Manning.
    Thomas Manning was born in Ireland but he left his native land at
the age of 14 years in order to enter the great machine shops at
Glasgow, Scotland.  There he was trained to be a skilled engineer and he
later enjoyed the distinction of being the engineer who handled the
engines of one of the first steamers which crossed the Atlantic ocean.
He settled first at Boston but later lived in Cleveland, where he
carried on an extensive manufacturing business during the remainder of
his active life.  For some years prior to his death he lived retired. He
reared a family of 13 children.
    Father Manning was educated in the parochial schools of St. John's
Cathedral, Cleveland, and in St. Mary's Seminary of the West, at
Cincinnati.  In September, 1874, he entered the Seminary of Our Lady of
Angels, Niagara Falls, New York.  After completing his classical course
he entered St. Mary's Seminary at Cleveland, in September, 1876, and
after five years' study of philosophy and theology was there ordained
priest by Rt. Rev. R. Gilmour, on July 2, 1881.  On July 7th of that
year he was appointed pastor of St. Mary's Church at Antwerp, Ohio, this
field including the missions of Cecil, Emerald, Junction Flat Rock,
Hicksville, Mark Centre and Delaware Bend.  When the spring of 1883 he
was transferred to St. Mary's at Clyde, he left behind him a remarkable
aggregation of substantial results.  He had enlarged and improved the
churches of Antwerp and Hicksville, paid the debts of the churches at
Delaware Bend and Junction, purchased and paid for a cemetery at Cecil,
organized the mission and purchased land for cemetery, church and
pastoral residence in Payne and had the church plastered and entirely
out of debt.
   Father Manning's success in his next field was a repetition of his
former accomplishments.  When he took charge of the church at Clyde, with
its mission at Green Spring, he found a debt of $2,000 at Clyde and one
of $900 at Green Spring.  By 1886 the latter was paid.  In the same year
the corner-store was laid for the beautiful Church of our Lady of Mount
Carmel, in Clyde, and by 1890 the church was frescoed and almost ready
for use, its cost over $10,000 being practically paid.  In February of
that year Father Manning was called to be pastor of St. Ann, at Fremont,
and here again blessings seemed to fall on parish and priest.
   Father Manning said his first mass in the Church of St. Rose, of
Lima, November 19, 1893.  He then promised his people to serve them
faithfully, and this promise he has kept in full measure.  He has not
only a powerful hold on the mass of his congregation but also on the
thinking men of this body, and has a quiet method of inspiring
enthusiasm which has brought about great material as well as spiritual
prosperity.  Personally he is beloved and reverenced. 

REV. CARL ACKERMAN, M. A., PH. D.

REV. CARL ACKERMAN, M. A., PH. D., pastor of Zion's
Evangelical Lutheran Church at Lima, and formerly president of Lima
College, was born September 12, 1858, on a farm near Wooster, Wayne
County, Ohio, and is a son of George Ackerman, for years a prominent
contractor here.
    Mr. Ackerman received his early education in the local country
schools, attended the Clyde High School and then spent some time at
Canaan Academy.  In 1875 he entered the Capital University at Columbus,
Ohio, where he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1879. He
engaged in teaching until 1881, when he entered the theological
department at the Capital University, where he was graduated in 1884.
He was married in October, 1884, to Mary Reese, a daughter of Rush Reese
a prominent farmer of Wayne County, Ohio.  For the following nine years
he served charges at Attica, Lithopolis, Fremont and Fostoria.  In 1893
he came to Lima to accept the presidency of Lima College, which had just
been organized.  Mr. Ackerman has given the weight of his name and the
fruits of his intellect to this institution ever since, continuing as
its president until 1897.  He remained dean of the faculty until 1903,
when he resigned, but continues to hold the chairs of mathematics and
mental science.  In 1888 his alma mater conferred on him the degree of
M. A., and in 1901 he was given the degree of Ph. D.
    During his long association with Lima College he has been repeatedly
offered positions of great honor in the church as the head of large and
important churches, but his heart has been in his work in Lima and here
he has felt it his duty to remain.  Since 1898 he has been the beloved
pastor of Zion's Evangelical Lutheran Church at Lima; he has previously
been pastor from April, 1895, to June, 1896.
   Mr. Ackerman has been a frequent contributor to religious and
educational journals and magazines, was chairman of a committee of four
appointed by the Joint Synod of Ohio for the preparation of a hymnal
with music for Lutheran Churches, and is at the present time actively
taking part in a movement for the publication of Luther's works in
English.  In 1903 he took part in the organization of the International
Lutheran Library Association and is one of its vice-presidents.

REV. FRANK  PHILIP BOSSART

REV. FRANK  PHILIP BOSSART, pastor of St. Paul's
Lutheran Church, came to Lima in the fall of 1899 to take up his present
charge.  He is a thoroughly educated churchman, having received his
academic education at Thiel College and his theological education at the
Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia.  His former pastorates
were in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Buffalo, New York, in both of which
cities he organized new congregations which have steadily grown in power
and influence.  The beautiful new St. John's Church, of Pittsburg,
costing $33,000, was built during his pastorate in that city, and the
Church of the Redeemer, of Buffalo, now having about 500 members, was
organized during the first years of his ministry in that city.  He is
known in the Church as a good preacher, an earnest worker, a successful
organizer and a pleasant gentleman.  During his ministry in Lima he has
at various times addressed the prominent fraternal organizations and is
known for his candor and firmness in dealing with public questions.  He
has served a term as president of the Luther League of Ohio, and is a
member of the topics committee of the Luther League of America, whose
duty it is to prepare subjects of study for  the young.  He has for
three years been secretary of the District Synod of Ohio, and has been
president for two years past of the Northern Conference of said synod.
Last fall he was called to Binghamton, New York, and for a time was
undecided, but his Lima congregation spoke in no uncertain terms and the
happy relation so long cherished between pastor and people still
continues.

REV. PAUL  HENRY  LAND

REV. PAUL  HENRY  LAND.  At Breslau, the largest and
most influential city of the eastern part of the German Empire, was born
the subject of our sketch, who is pastor of the German Reformed church
of Lima.  He went through the schools and colleges of his native city
and in 1887 emigrated to this country.  He first came to Cleveland,
Ohio, and continued his studies at Calvin College, and institution of
the Reformed Church.  In the year 1890 he graduated with honors and went
to Ursinus Seminary at Philadelphia, taking a course in theology.  After
graduating from the seminary he at once received a call from Zion's
Reformed Church in Baltimore, Maryland, which charge he served
acceptably for four years, beginning at the same time a post- graduate
course in the oriental languages at the Johns Hopkins University.  This
course he completed in 1897, having been appointed "Fellow by Courtesy"
in 1896 and holding this office for two consecutive years.  President
Gilman, now of Carnegie Institute; Prof. Paul Haupt, and Prof.
Gildersleeve, well known among educators, were then members of the
university faculty.  During these years Mr. Land also taught classes in
French, German and Hebrew at Dr. Deichman's famous gymnasium school at
Baltimore.
    In 1898 Mr. land accepted a unanimous call to the German Reformed
Church at Lima, Ohio, following his natural inclination to preach and to
teach, and this position he has occupied for the last seven and a half
years.

REV. ERVIN  E. YOUNG

REV. ERVIN  E. YOUNG.  In Fairfield County, Ohio, on a
farm near Bremen, was born the subject of our sketch, who is pastor of
Calvary Reformed Church.  His early education was received at country
schools.  At 16 years of age he entered the Ohio Central Normal College
at Pleasantville, Ohio, competing the normal course in 1889.  He
remained one year at this school as assistant instructor in algebra and
geography and then took up the study of the law.  He found the legal
profession distasteful, however, and turned to the ministry.  He entered
Heidelberg University at Tiffin, Ohio, in 1892, completing the classical
course in 1896 with his degree of Bachelor of Arts.  While attending
the university he paid his expenses by clerking in a shoe store.  In the
fall of 1896 he entered the theological department at Heidelberg and
upon finishing the course in 1899 he received his degree of Bachelor of
Divinity.  During his theological training, Mr. Young supplied the First
Reformed Church at Fremont, Ohio, the Lindsay charge at Lindsay, and the
First Reformed Church at Caruthers, Ohio.  During his vacations he
supplied the Grace Reformed Church at Lancaster, Ohio.
    After completing his seminary course he accepted a call from St.
John's Reformed Church at Germantown, Ohio, where he served until coming
to Lima, October 1, 1903.  Under his earnest ministry at Germantown the
congregation increased in membership from 200 to nearly 400, the church
was remodeled and repaired, and a new parsonage valued at $5,000 was
purchased.  He had found the church greatly in debt and left it in
possession of a bank account.  His labors in Lima have been similarly
rewarded and under his efficient and pleasant ministry his church has
taken in members from all parts of the city and the congregation has
been almost doubled.  During the last two years they have contributed
almost as much to benevolence as to the current expenses of the
congregation.

REV. GEORGE H. SIMS

REV. GEORGE H. SIMS, or the "marrying pastor," as he
is familiarly called in Lima, is the pastor of the South Side Church of
Christ.  He is the youngest child of Capt. John H. Sims, late of
Cleveland, Ohio, and his wife, formerly Sophronia O. Gillette, of
Newburg, Ohio.  For many years Captain Sims sailed out of Cleveland as a
lake navigator.  His interests were connected with this city from the
time it numbered a few hundred inhabitants until it was consolidated
with what was then Forest City.  At this time he removed to Royalton,
Ohio, and later to Spencer, Medina County, Ohio.  Here on January 9,
1860, on a farm in the Black River Bottoms, was born the subject of our
sketch.  His early education was received in the district school.  He
graduated later from the Hinckley High School and then attended the Ohio
Normal University at Ada to prepare himself for the work of teaching.
He taught school for several years until at the age of 28 he entered
upon his life work of the ministry.  At this time also he was married to
Cora E. Updike, daughter of the great evangelist, Rev. J. V. Updike.
Mrs. Sims traveled with her husband for several years as musical
director.  She is a very efficient helpmeet for Mr Sims.  Two boys, Fay
Updike and Kenneth J., are their only living children, a little
daughter, Iva Belle, having died in infancy.
    Mr. Sims' first meeting was held at Bluffton.  He then held a
pastorate at Edgerton, Ohio, for two years, enlarging the pastorate and
refitting the church.  From this place he was called to minister for the
First Church, of Fort Wayne, Indiana.  The membership was doubled at
this place, the debts paid off and a parsonage built, which was
afterward sold for $3,200 to help build the new church.  His ministry
here was very successful, but on account of ill health he resigned and
accepted a Western pastorate in Wichita, Kansas, remaining there four
years.  During his ministry at this place over 500 members were added to
his congregation and the church became the largest in numbers of this
denomination west of the Mississippi River. He was called to be State
evangelist and later became general evangelist under the national board,
with headquarters at Cincinnati, Ohio.  Although very successful, he left
this field and located at Tiffin, Ohio where he became pastor of a small
but wealthy congregation.
    On October 1, 1901, Mr. Sims came to Lima and has improved the
property of the South Side Church of Christ in many ways.  He is still
young and in the midst of usefulness.  He is now working to send a
missionary to foreign lands to be supported by his congregation.

REV. ISAAC  J.  SWANSON,  B. A., B. D.

REV. ISAAC  J.  SWANSON,  B. A., B. D.   Located in
Northern Scotland is Thurso, the little "town that is seated by the
sea."  This old town of Caithness, bristling with historic facts and
traditional fancies, was the birthplace and early home of Rev. Isaac J.
Swanson, pastor of the First Congregational Church of Lima.
   Throughout Scotland there is hardly a locality where a boy is not
within two of three miles of a school where he can get the necessary
preparation for college, and our little Scotch lad early pursued his
education in his native town at a noted academy for matriculation at a
Scottish university.  While still quite young, however, he came to
America, but not before something of the rugged strength of that stern
Northern clime had left its impress on his nature expressed in the
strong personality and sturdy simplicity and power that characterize the
man we know to-day.
    Mr. Swanson finished his college course in Montreal at McGill
University, the leading Canadian institution of learning whose degrees
are recognized by Oxford in England, Vienna in Austria and by Harvard
and Yale.  He excelled especially in Hebrew, and graduated with the
degree of Bachelor of arts.  A course in theology followed at the
Congregational College in Montreal, and here he won the special prize
offered for general excellence and was made valedictorian of his class.
Coming to the United States, he completed his theological education at
Chicago, graduating with the foremost members of his class and receiving
the degree of Bachelor of Divinity.  While in Chicago, besides pursuing
his own studies, he taught English to the foreign classes at the
seminary.  His first charge was at Odell, Illinois, where he remained
about three years, meeting with notable success.  During his pastorate
there he ws a member of the State Home Missionary Board and moderator of
the local conference.  On leaving Odell he was presented with a gold
watch and highly complimentary resolutions from his church and
congregation.
   In 1895 Mr. Swanson received a call from Lima, which he accepted, and
he preached his first sermon in the First Congregational Church of this
city on the first Sunday in the year 1896.  His 10 years of ministry
here have been marked by a steady increase of membership, over 240
having been added and a decrease in the church debt by $5,000 until at
present the debt is so small as to be a scarcely perceptible burden on
the shoulders of the congregation. As a preacher and pastor he easily
takes front rank and his church fills a prominent place in the religious
life of the city.  Mr. Swanson has been twice honored by being chosen
moderator of the Toledo Conference, and he was sent as a delegate to the
National Triennial Council for the Congregational Churches in the United
States.
    Going abroad in 1903, he toured extensively in his native country
and England, besides taking a short trip through France.  The story of
these travels has been told in a number of illustrated lectures.  He has
been very active in the Y. M. C. A. work of the city and his labors in
the Sunday School Training Class have been markedly successful.  His
influence and happy method of instruction resulted in the largest
graduating class, that of 1905.  This class present him with a very
handsome set of books in token of their regard and of their appreciation
of his services.  His appointment as secretary of the Sunday School
Teachers' Training Association of Allen County, and as president of the
Pastors' Union of Lima, attest to the prominence his labors have one him
and are a well-deserved acknowledgment of his learning and sterling
religious character, as well as the high esteem in which he is held by
his clerical co-workers.   He is generally regarded as one of the ablest
ministers in the city of Lima, possessing the highest regard of the
public generally, and the confidence and love of his own congregation.

REV. CARL ACKERMAN, M. A., PH. D.

REV. CARL ACKERMAN, M. A., PH. D., pastor of Zion's
Evangelical Lutheran Church at Lima, and formerly president of Lima
College, was born September 12, 1858, on a farm near Wooster, Wayne
County, Ohio, and is a son of George Ackerman, for years a prominent
contractor here.
    Mr. Ackerman received his early education in the local country
schools, attended the Clyde High School and then spent some time at
Canaan Academy.  In 1875 he entered the Capital University at Columbus,
Ohio, where he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1879. He
engaged in teaching until 1881, when he entered the theological
department at the Capital University, where he was graduated in 1884.
He was married in October, 1884, to Mary Reese, a daughter of Rush Reese
a prominent farmer of Wayne County, Ohio.  For the following nine years
he served charges at Attica, Lithopolis, Fremont and Fostoria.  In 1893
he came to Lima to accept the presidency of Lima College, which had just
been organized.  Mr. Ackerman has given the weight of his name and the
fruits of his intellect to this institution ever since, continuing as
its president until 1897.  He remained dean of the faculty until 1903,
when he resigned, but continues to hold the chairs of mathematics and
mental science.  In 1888 his alma mater conferred on him the degree of
M. A., and in 1901 he was given the degree of Ph. D.
    During his long association with Lima College he has been repeatedly
offered positions of great honor in the church as the head of large and
important churches, but his heart has been in his work in Lima and here
he has felt it his duty to remain.  Since 1898 he has been the beloved
pastor of Zion's Evangelical Lutheran Church at Lima; he has previously
been pastor from April, 1895, to June, 1896.
   Mr. Ackerman has been a frequent contributor to religious and
educational journals and magazines, was chairman of a committee of four
appointed by the Joint Synod of Ohio for the preparation of a hymnal
with music for Lutheran Churches, and is at the present time actively
taking part in a movement for the publication of Luther's works in
English.  In 1903 he took part in the organization of the International
Lutheran Library Association and is one of its vice-presidents.