Clermont County Genealogical Society

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIERS

WHO HAVE RESIDED IN CLERMONT COUNTY

by Leonard W Smith

This will be the first of a series of articles concerning Revolutionary War Veterans who at one time lived in Clermont County. The material is this article has been adapted and/or transcribed from an issue of the Clermont Sun dated May 22, 1901.

In 1840 according to the government pension rolls, there were in Clermont County still living sixteen Revolutionary War Pensioners, one of whom was a veteran's widow. They were:

John Bunn and Nathaniel Reeves of Batavia; Oakey Vanosdol of Tate; John Dennis, Major Hugh Molloy, and Barton Lowe of Monroe; Nehemiah Ward and James Arthur of Pierce; Thomas Manning, John Wheeler, Christian Placard, and Zebulon Applegate of Ohio; William Cowen of Stonelick; James Carter of Wayne; and John Hair and Sarah Stoner of Jackson.

Batavia

JOHN HULICK was the founder and ancestor of the noted family of that name in Clermont, and gallantly served throughout the Revolutionary War in the New Jersey Line and lived in Sussex County in that State. After the War if 1812 he came to Batavia Township with all his children, but John and Cornelius, who remained and died in the East.

Those who came were James, who married Rebecca Weaver, and died November21, 1875, aged 88; Abraham who died February, 1871, aged 82; Mary, married to Thomas Tate, and died in 1880; Jane, married to James Gest; Sallie, married to Charles Robinson; Martha, twice married and lived in Illinois, and Lot, who died June 3,1878, aged 79. James was the father of Mrs. George R. Wageman and John W., Abraham, William W., Erastus and James Hulick, so well known as leading farmers. Lot married Rhoda, a daughter of Ezekiel and Phoebe Gest Dimmitt, and children were Martha, Jane, Ezekiel, Mary, George W., the ex-Congressman and well-known lawyer; Elizabeth, Amanda, and Keziah.

The old veteran John Hulick died in the 1840s, and at the great Harrison-Whig political meeting in the "Tippecanoe and Tyler, Too campaign of 1840 in Batavia on the lot where is now the residence of Judge JohnS. Parrott, this Revolutionary War Hero rode in a carriage in the procession with several other surviving comrades of the stirring times of 1776.

JAMES ARTHUR was the progenitor of the family of that name in Clermont and grandfather of the old Prosecuting Attorney, William Arthur. In 1805 his daughter, Mary, married Hugh Ferguson, an officer in the war of 1812 and father of Hon. James Ferguson, County Auditor from 1835-1837 and later editor of The Clermont Sun between 1838-1839. Veteran Arthur lived on the Winlock survey, No. 1771, but in later years moved to Ohio Township in what is now Pierce.

NATHANIEL REEVES lived on the Gray survey, No., 1116, and died between 1840 and 1850. His name was found on the government pension roll in the former year. Some of his descendants were still living in the Amelia vicinity in 1901.

PETER HARDEN, who was in the New Jersey line and at the battles of Trenton and Monmouth, settled at the dawn of the nineteenth century on what was known as the Davidson farm. Peter Harden was the father of John, Joshua, Andrew, William, Daniel, Jane, Sarah, and Lydia. Peter Harden's son, John, married Mary Dole, and was the father of the late Orlando Hopkins Harden, six years County Commissioner.

ANDREW APPLE was two years in the Pennsylvania infantry line and came to the Northwest Territory in 1797. A little later he settled near Olive Branch on a tract of 2,100 acres. He was the ancestor of the Clermont County Apple family and died in 1817. He raise eleven children and gave each 150 acres. His youngest son, Daniel, born in 1794, died on the old homestead in 1871. Of the latter's two sons, John Wesley married a daughter of Jeremiah Cleveland, an uncle of President Grover Cleveland. The descendants of the Revolutionary Apple have intermarried with scores upon scores of old Clermont families.

MIAMI

OTHNIEL LOOKER. as of 1901 was the only Ohio governor who ever lived in Clermont County. He was a private in the New York line and was born near Albany, New York. He was in Washington's army at the time of Benedict Arnold's treason and belonged to Washington's body guard. He was a carpenter and housejoiner by occupation and lived in poverty. He came to Cincinnati in 1792 and built some of the first frame houses there. He was elected to the Lower House of the Ohio General Assembly in 1807,1808, and 1809. In 1810 he was chosen to the Ohio State Senate and reelected in 1812 and 1814. In the Twelfth General Assembly he was made Speaker of the Senate. While serving as speaker he became Governor in March, 1814 in the place of Return Jonathan Meigs, who resigned the governorship to become the Postmaster General of our country under Presidents Madison and Monroe. As there was no Lieutenant Governor under the Ohio Constitution of 1802, the Speaker of the Senate succeeded to the office of Governor. He served as Governor until after the election in October, 1814, at which time he was a candidate to succeed himself, but he was defeated by General Thomas Worthington of Chillicothe.

Governor Looker was the only Ohio governor who served in the Revolution. When Colonel Thomas Paxton settled in this township with his six sons-in-law, about 1796-1797, he met the carpenter, Looker, then a poor, hard-working man in Cincinnati. Colonel Paxton got Looker to come out to the Paxton settlement and put up their new buildings. Governor Looker lived in Miami Township over three years near Loveland and expected to live there until he died. However, since log houses were generally the only type of home to be constructed in Miami Township, and there was a lively building of frame structures in Cincinnati, he moved back to Cincinnati. He then became a big factor in Hamilton County politics. Looker was also the only house carpenter to become Ohio's governor. He died in poverty at a ripe old age. His son, Addison C. Looker, was a representative in the General Assembly from 1822-1824. As of 1901 some of Othniel Looker's descendants still lived near Chillicothe.


 
 

BIRTHS
Birth Records
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Early Clermont Co. Births 1856-1857
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First Presbyterian Churches of Monroe
At Nicholsville & Bantam
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Baptisms of Children
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Anderson Township Births 1906-1907
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Old Bethel Church Baptisms
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Old Bethel Church Baptisms 1894-1908
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Early Births 1856
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MARRIAGES
Early Marriages 1800 - 1808
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 Marriage Book 13 1874-1876
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Goshen M. E. Church
Marriage

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DEATHS
Funerals Conducted by Rev. Hezekiah Hill 1862-1908
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The Old Village Graveyard

Deaths of Residents Over 75 in 1875

Infirmary Discharges That Mention a Burial Place

Death Dates from I.O.O.F. Lodge #313

Early Clermont Deaths from The Ohio Sun
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Obituaries From the Clermont Sun 1890-1891

Early Deaths from Clermont Sun 1855
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More Deaths 1857-1859
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Stirling & Moore Funeral Records 1888
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1880 Mortality Census
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Census
Goshen 1875 Quadrennial Census
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Quadrennial Census, Batavia, 1847

Quadrennial Census, Batavia, 1855

History
Incidents in The Early History of Clermont County
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Stonelick Historical Notes
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Vacation of a Road in
Union Township

Brown and Clermont County Families Mentioned
in the 1880 Clinton County History
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Day Book For Clarke & Frambes Mills 1838
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Immigration
Early Naturalizations from Common Pleas Minutes
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Citizenship Papers 1844-1900
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Names of New Found Naturalization Applicants
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Military
Veterans in Various Cemeterys
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Revolutionary War Soldiers

Clermont Courier Ads November 18, 1863
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Mexican War Veterans
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Revolutionary War Veterans
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Post Office
Post Marks of Clermont County
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Clermont Postmasters 1800 - 1930
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Early Unclaimed Letters

More Unclaimed Letters Unclaimed Letters 1855
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Bible Records
Manning Bible
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Banister Bible

Bible Records of James McKinnie 1830

Bible Records Index Volume Two

Bible Records Index Volume Three
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Churches
Old Bethel Church and Cemetery

History of Old Bethel Church 1868

Calvary Church and Cemetery Washington Twp
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Edenton Church 1861

Places

Perin Mills in 1863
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Goshen- Land Of Milk and Honey

First Settlers of Jackson Township

Legal Voters of Goshen Township 1855

Batavia in1847
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Poll Book Goshen Township 1853
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1840 Account Book, Laurel Ohio

Edenton School # 4 Pupils

Pensions

Pensions 1890

More Pensions 1890
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Other
Indentures 1825 - 1831

Index To General Store Account Book 1816-1819

Vital Statistics From An Old Record Book

Items from Clermont Courier 1836
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Clermont Pensioners 1883

Ohio Pioneers That Moved to Texas

Persons on the Petit Jury 1880

Jails and Sheriffs
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Items From Early Clermont Courier 1852
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Meeting of Patriarchs 1882
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Surrender Records From Childrens Home
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Gazetteer 1882
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Potpourri

Articles From The Clermont Sun 1889
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River Boatmen
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Sale of Delinquent Lands
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