odney Burk Letter to the Forest-Area Historical Society.

 

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1930 Chevorlette delivery truck
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Original

June 27, 1996.

To the Forest-Area Historical Society,

While attending high school in the early 1930's, I worked at the new Clover Farm Store which was owned and operated by Mike Weiss. The green and cream painted store was located on the southeast corner of Patterson and Lima streets in a building formerly occupied by Curtin & Monce clother store. A few years later Bob and Irene (Burk) Thompson opened a restaurant in this room. A parking lot now occupies that space.

Mr. Weiss built a delivery van using a Chevrolet Pickup with an enclosed cabinet in which to haul the groceries to be delivered. He painted the van to match the store - green and cream. Customers wanting groceries delivered would call in their orders in the morning for an afternoon delivery, without added charge. I was assigned to be the first "delivery boy" for the store. I wore a tan jacket and a special cap when delivering groceries.

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Kroger Grocery Baking Co.
L.C. Harman, Mgr.

One of the store's competitors was Krogers, located across Lima street about where the Post Office is now located. Weekend sales promotions were designed to compete with Krogers. One of the common items often promoted was Shredded Wheat which sold regularly for 11c a box. On sale, the price was only 10c - not much of a discount but in those days people walked across the street to save that penny!

Many food items were sold in bulk. It was necessary to grind and sack coffee by the pound, weigh and sack sugar, slice the cheese, weight the dried fruit, and the cold meats. Two grades of coffee were sold costing about 3c difference. It was ground when sold. The aroma was a great selling point. The lowere priced coffee was sold in green sacks; the highte 19c grade coffee came in red sacks! It was always a challenge, when slicing cheese, to see how close to a pound we could cut off.

Many customers from the farms traded eggs for groceries. That meant we had to check and count the eggs coming in and credit the customer with the total amount to be applied to their grocery account.

Mr. Weiss sold the store to Ralph Hissong. After I graduated from High School, I worked in Marion at the Kroger Co. Master store on S. Main street where I not only sold groceries, I also trimmed the windows and made all the cardboard signs. THis was in the days of the "NRA" which limited the number of hours we could work in a week. Cleona Tuorray (Class of 1931) also worked at that store.

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