Bailey S. Harrell
News Article & Obituaries

submitted by Sue Mullins
7/8/07


Go to:
CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR April 6, 1899
COMMERCIAL TRIBUNE July 9, 1899, Page 5, Col. 1
CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR July 10, 1899, Page 5, Col. 3
CINTI ENQUIRER JULY 10, 1899, PAGE 10, COL. 8
CINTI POST JULY 10, 1899

Also see: Baily S. Harrell's Bible



CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR
April 6, 1899 (Thursday), Page 5, Col. 4
NINETY-YEAR OLD MAN
KNOCKED DOWN BY TRAIN

Bailey Harrell ninety years of age. The oldest resident of Cleves, had a narrow escape from being instantly killed Tuesday evening. He started out on an errand and was compelled to cross the Big Four tracks in that village and did not hear the approach of a freight train. The cars struck him knocking him down, but he only received a few slight bruises.

COMMERCIAL TRIBUNE
July 9, 1899, Page 5, Col. 1
CITY NEWS
Bailey S. Harrell , a pioneer of this county, died yesterday at his home in Cleves, aged 90 years.

CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR
July 10, 1899, Page 5, Col. 3
PASSING OF A PIONEER
Bailey S. Harrell Expires in Cleves at the Home of His Son.
Bailey S. Harrell, a pioneer resident of this county, died at the home of his son in Cleves Saturday evening as a result of injuries sustained several months ago.  On April 4 Mr. Harrell was struck by a
freight train at a street crossing in Cleves and almost miraculously escaped a horrible and instant death.  He was thrown some distance and was injured internally. Though he was ninety years old he possessed wonderful vitality and succeeded in staying the cruel hand of death for several months.  Bailey S. Harrell was born in an old fort near the mouth of the Big Miami river on April 17, 1809.  His residence is scarcely five miles from the spot where he first saw the light of day.  His father and mother were both natives of Virginia and settled near North Bend, O., in 1800.  In 1843 Mr. Harrell engaged in the flatboating business, and when this was supplemented by the invention of the steamboat, he engaged in merchandising in Cairo, Ill., where he spent nearly thirty years.  Most of Mr. Harrell’s goods at the time were purchased from wholesale merchants of Cincinnati.  Mr. Gideon Burton, another pioneer resident of Hamilton county, well remembers Harrell as one of his customers when he was engageed in the wholesale silk business at Pearl and Walnut streets.  Mr. Burton since then has entered the insurance field with his son, Capt. William T. Burton.  In his younger days Harrell was the village school teacher, and ex-President Harrison was among those whom the deceased pioneer taught.  For the last ten years of his life Mr. Harrell was a correspondent for several newspapers, but always refused remuneration for his articles because, as he stated, his reward consisted in the pleasure he received in writing them.  He was twice married and died a widower, closing the last year of his eventful life at the home of his son, Walter Harrell, who conducts a furniture establishment at Cleves.  From his boyhood days Mr. Harrell had always been a church member and a patron of the Sunday school.  He became a member of the Presbyterian church six years ago and sang in the choir up to the time of his illness.  His funeral will take place Tuesday.

CINTI ENQUIRER
JULY 10, 1899, PAGE 10, COL. 8
TAUGHT Ex-President Harrison
When That Statesman Was a Barefooted Boy.
Death of Bailey Harrell, Who Fought Indians Under “Old Tippecanoe”
 -A Remarkable Career.


Bailey Harrell, one of the most celebrated pioneers in Hamilton County, died Saturday evening at the home of his son, Walter Harrell, in Cleves, after a lingering illness of two months.  Mr. Harrell was 90 years old at the time of his death, and having been born in Cleves, could tell many interesting stories of the early days in this section of the country when the hostile Indians reigned supreme.

Up to the time of his death he was the only man living who had seen and known John Cleves Symmes, who originally owned the entire area of Hamilton County and adjacent territory.

In his time he made 18 trips to New Orleans from Cincinnati on log rafts and walked back, as there were no railroads or steamboats at the time.

In his young days Harrell was a school-teacher, and ex-President Benjamin Harrison received his early training at the hands of the deceased pioneer.

Many residents of this section of the country often journeyed to Cleves and listened to the many interesting tales and thrilling experiences that he would relate, as his faculties and mind were clear as a
bell to the last.

The deceased leaves five children to mourn his loss.  The residents of the community in which he lived had all learned to love the genial and kind old pioneer, and the entire village of Cleves is in mourning over his loss.  His funeral will take place this afternoon at 2 O’clock, and five old pioneer  friends will act as pallbearers.
FOUGHT THE INDIANS
By his demise we also lost one of the hardy pioneers who went through the arduous campaigns of General William Henry Harrison, ‘Old Tippecanoe.’

Bailey F. [S.] Harrell was born in an old fort near the mouth of the Great Miami River, which was used to protect the white settlers from the attacks of hostile Indians, in 1809.  His father and mother were both natives of Virginia, and settled near North Bend, Ohio, in 1800.  Bailey was the second oldest of a family of 13 children, four of whom are still living.  Three years ago there were eight children living and their aggregate age was 632 years, averaging over 79 years each.  In 1842 Harrell engaged in the flatboating business, which was afterward supplemented by the intervention of the steamboat.  He later on engaged in merchandising in Cairo, Ill., where he spent nearly 30 years.

Afterward, returning to Cleves, he engaged in business for 10 years, in this time losing and regaining large fortunes.  He was of a very cheerful and happy disposition, and had a keen sense of wit, always having a good joke up his sleeve.  He always, up to the time of his death, associated with young people in spite of his advanced age, as he often said that ‘the old folks were too slow for him.’  He was twice married and died a widower, closing the last year of his eventful life at the home of his son, Walter Harrell, in Cleves village.
WAS A GOOD SINGER
He was a member of the Presbyterian Church where he sang in the choir up to the time of his illness, possessing a rich bass voice.

“He also was a Mason and belonged to a private club in Cleves named the ‘Lost Tribe of Israel.’  At his request this small club will act as pallbearers at his funeral to-day.”

CINTI POST
JULY 10, 1899
TAUGHT HARRISON
The funeral of Bailey S. Howell [Harrell], who died at the home of his son in Cleves Saturday, took place Monday.

Bailey S. Howell [Harrell] was one of the best known residents of Cleves.  He was born in an old fort which stood near the mouth of the Big Miami River, in 1809, and flat-boated upon the Ohio and Mississippi for years. He taught school in his younger days, and ex-President Harrison was one of his pupils.  He was twice married and died a widower.  He was a member of the Cleves Presbyterian Church choir, and was noted for his clear, rich bass voice.  He was a prominent Mason.  The members of the  ‘Lost Tribe of Israel,’ a local social club will act as pallbearers.”


Also see: Baily S. Harrell's Bible


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