James Patterson


JAMES PATTERSON
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JAMES PATTERSON, was born in the year 1800, near Eldersville, Washington Co., Penn. The father and mother, James and Sarah (Given) Patterson, were both natives of Ireland, of Scotch descent. Mr. Patterson's early life was spent upon the paternal farm in Pennsylvania, where he was given ample opportunity for attending for attending the common schools. About 1832 he and his brother John came to Cross Creek township, Brooke Co., W. Va., locating upon the land now occupied by the widow and other heirs. He remained single until 1852, at which time he was united in marriage to Miss Jane McWha, a native of Pennsylvania, but of Scotch-Irish descent. Mr. Patterson always made his farm his home and chirf care, but after his marriage he branched out into other business, having been employed in 1853 and 1854 to building a portion of the Pan-handle railroad, he having a contract to build some three miles of road, which was completed in this time. Was also one of the incoprators and directors of the Jefferson Iron mill of Steubenville, Ohio. While still living upon his father's farm, and before engaging in farming for himself, Mr. Patterson was extensively interested in flat-boating on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, having made about twelve round trips to New Orleans. Before his marriage he was made justice of the peace, which office he held for four years with great credit to himself. He was always prominently identified with every movement for the improvement of educational facilities, and the highways system. His life was crowded with usefulmess and at the time of his death, in 1876 no man in the county was more thoroughly respected and trusted than James Patterson. Mr. Patterson was brought up in the Methodist Episcopal church, and all his life was a strong supporter of this church. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Patterson: John N., deceased, and Robert P. The wife still survives, and having completed her life work, now lives in peaceful retirement upon the fine farm which her husband left.





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