William Shanley


WILLIAM SHANLEY
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WILLIAM SHANLEY, a native of Ireland was born in Dublin in the year 1809. He commenced reading medicine at the early age of sixteen, studying two years in "Erin's Isle." Being full of Irish patriotism, he was disgusted with his people doing homage to a foreign king. In that city on one occasion, when the whole metropolis was illuminated in honor of King William the Fourth, he could no longer restrain expressing his sentiments. While looking on at the performance, he said to some one near him: "How foolish the Irish people are to lavish their money on a foreign king." The soldiers overheard his remark, and by them it was considered treason. One started after him with sword drawn. Recognizing the dangerous situation he was in, he ran with full speed to the Castle, closely pursued by the dragoon. As he reached the spot, he turned suddenly in an entry just as the fellow struck for his head, the sword barely missing him, and was broken by striking the corner of one of the massive stone walls, and thus our subject escaped unhurt. He kept concealed for several days and then started for America, landing in New York harbor on the 28th day of May 1828. He engaged in paper making in Springfield, N. J., where he remained four or five years. On the 28th of January, 1834, he was married to Miss Phoebe H. Clark. In the fall of 1835 he migrated west, where he devoted the most of his spare moments to the reading of medicine. Moving to Steubenville, he worked a short time in the paper mill and carried on the manufacture of paper for about three years, still devoting some attention to medicine. In 1839 he attended a term at a medical college. He then removed to Fairview to practice medicine in 1840 remaining there about seven years. Along in 1844 he engaged in the fire brick business in connection with his profession. In 1847 he settled in New Cumberland, where he continued to practice medicine until failing health, from a fall received while on duty, compelled him to retire. He died in 1889.





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