Mrs. Elizabeth McRoberts, The Last Pittsfield Pioneer
Submitted by Nancy

Mrs. Elizabeth McRoberts died at her home in Pittsfield Township Sunday, on January 26, 1896, aged ninety-two years, five months and three days. The funeral was held at the residence Tuesday noon. Rev. Biechlie, pastor of the M.E. church at Pittsfield, officiating, interment taking place in the Centre cemetery.

Elizabeth Waite was born in Shoreham, Addison Co. VT, on August 23, 1803. She was married to Peter McRoberts in Sunbury, Rutland Co. VT. On December 18, 1828. On the 31st day of October 1831, they started for OH in a two-horse covered wagon. Their eldest child being two years old that day and the youngest a babe in arms. After six weeks of continuous traveling, they reached Madison Township, Richland Co. OH. In the following February they came to Pittsfield Township. Here they resided until 1837, during which time the home where Mrs. McRoberts died was built.

In 1837 they removed to Wellington. Here Mrs. McRoberts engaged in the mercantile business until 1843, when they returned to Pittsfield and took up residence in their old home. In 1847 Mr. McRoberts died, leaving the widow and seven sons, the latter of whom ranged in age from the eldest who was seventeen and the youngest who was one year old. At the time of her death Mrs. McRoberts had been a resident of Lorain County sixty-four years and of Pittsfield Township fifty-eight years and lived in the same house fifty-three years.

Five of her sons survive her, two sons being accidentally killed while in the discharge of their duties as freight conductors on the Lake Shore Road. She also leaves twenty-three grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren, all of whom live in Lorain County and all but one being present at the funeral, six grandchildren acting as pall bearers.

Mrs. McRoberts was the last one of the noble band of pioneers who were heads of families when Pittsfield Township was first organized, they being the twelfth family to locate here.

Mrs. McRoberts was known and loved from one end of the township to the other and all of Pittsfield mourns that her mission on earth is finished, but her memory will ever be revered by all who knew her.

Source: Feb. 8, 1896 issue of the Lorain County Reporter, from the Oberlin Owl.