Atkinson Family

OGS Logo small


Bottom This Page
Family Research in Monroe County ...
by
Catherine Foreaker Fedorchak
(20 Aug 1918 - 14 Oct 1994)
7590 West 85th Avenue
Crown Point, Indiana 46307

Newspaper Column Appearing
in
"The Spirit of Democracy"
Woodsfield, Ohio
2 Mar 1972

Table of Contents


ATKINSON FAMILY - 1st Installment

There were four Revolutionary Soldiers in the ATKINSON FAMILY, Cornelius, and his three sons, Charles, James, and William. Cornelius Atkinson never lived in Monroe Co. but his sons were among the very early settlers here.

Cornelius served as First Lt. in the First Co. of 2nd Batt. of the Northumberland Co. Associators and enlisted Jan. 14, 1776. (See PA Archives, 3rd Series, Vol. 22, pp. 245, 338, 711, 797). James and Charles, his sons, served along with him. They had careers as frontiersmen patterned after that of their father, and for 20 years after the Revolution they were frequently engaged in military service against the Indians or otherwise in defense of their country. Later in the Revolution another brother, William Atkinson, enlisted in the Pa. Militia as a member of Robinson's Rangers (PA Archives, 3rd Series, Vol. 23, p. 196).

In the last years of the Revolution, Cornelius and his older sons were enrolled in the Cumberland Co. Pa. Militia and presumably returned to that county to live about 1781. From there they lived at various other places including Greene Co., PA and near Wheeling, and about the end of the 18th century, Charles and James moved to what is now Monroe Co. near Sunfish Creek. They were soon joined by their brothers William, Isaac, and Mitchell, and their sister Mary. Cornelius Atkinson remained in Pennsylvania with several of his other children. Cornelius was born in 1732, probably in Ireland, and died in 1815 in Dauphin Co. PA. His wife was Mary Cross, whom he married in 1758 in Northumberland.

In the 1820 census for Monroe Co. we find listings for families headed by James, Sr. and Jr., Charles, Sr. and Jr., Stephen, William and Isaac, and another Cornelius. The Jr. designation does not necessarily mean a son of a father of the same name, but simply means a younger man of the same name as an older one.

I have information on this family in my book, Monroe Co., Ohio Records, Vol. II, page 60, 61, and also the pension application of Charles Atkinson on page 97. Charles was born in 1760 and James in 1762. Since publishing that book, I have also found information in the court records to indicate that additional heirs of Charles may have been Elijah and Abel Atkinson.

Journal 2, June term, 1835 (Court of Common Pleas) indicates that Elias Conger and wife sued Elizabeth Atkinson, Elijah Atkinson, Abel Atkinson et. al. The Elizabeth in this record is the widow of Charles, and her maiden name was Stephens. Elias Conger was married to Margaret Atkinson, a dau. of Charles. The suit was brought to prove whether the purported will of Charles Atkinson was true. Page 131 of the same Journal 2 indicates that the court found the will to be valid. The court records also show that Elizabeth, the widow, had declined to act as executor of the will, and the court appointed John Watson. He was married to Rebecca, another dau. of Charles and Elizabeth Atkinson. Perhaps he was a brother of David Watson who was possibly married to a Duvall - see the column on Conrad Duvall.

Also at the June term of court, 1835, Elizabeth Atkinson appeared and proved to the satisfaction of the court that Charles Atkinson, late a Revolutionary pensioner, had died 25 April 1834, leaving her, the said Elizabeth, his widow.

The Court records show that an Abel Atkinson died by 1843 - (Record Book 6, page 170 - April term, 1843). Also in May 1844, it was noted in this paper that Martin Troy was appointed administrator de bonis non of Abel Atkinson. This indicates that there had been a previous administrator or executor of Abel's estate, who for some reason, had not finished the job. Then in October 1844, a notice appeared in the paper advertising that land from Abel's estate was to be sold subject to the dower estate of Mary Mays. Other records show that she had married David Mays by 8 June 1844, and that she had a daughter, Matilda Atkinson.

A check of the 1830 census reveals no family headed by an Abel Atkinson. However, there was one for a William Atkinson, aged 20/30 with a wife of the same age, and one female under 5. Charles Atkinson was supposed to have had a son named William who died Mar. 31, 1832. Since Abel also seems to have had only one daughter, it could be that his name was William Able Atkinson. However, to be certain, one should check out the 1840 census too.

Note: Typed, by Richard E. Henthorn, from the article by Mrs. Fedorchak that was published in, Family Research in Monroe County, Ohio, Volume I.

(to be continued)

###
Table of Contents
Family Research in Monroe County ...
by
Catherine Foreaker Fedorchak
(20 Aug 1918 - 14 Oct 1994)
7590 West 85th Avenue
Crown Point, Indiana 46307

Newspaper Column Appearing
in
"The Spirit of Democracy"
Woodsfield, Ohio
(Thursday, 9 March 1972)

ATKINSON FAMILY - 2nd Installment

Joe Bachman found these Atkinsons in the 1830 census - all in Salem Township. James (he was the son of Cornelius) and aged 60/70, his wife was 50/60, and he had the following in his family: 1 female 20/30; 1 female 15/20; and 1 male and 1 female 10/15; and 1 female under 10.

Charles (son of Cornelius) was also aged 60/70, with a wife 50/60, and in his family were: 1 female and 2 males 2-/30, and 1 female 15/20.

There was the William whom I mentioned in last week's column - aged 20/30 and two Cornelius Atkinson families. Obviously these were grandsons of the Rev. Soldier of the same name, but at this writing I do not know who their fathers were. One Cornelius lived in Clarington and he was 30/40, his wife 20/30 and he had two sons and 1 daughter under 5 years of age. The other Cornelius lived in Salem Township, and both he and his wife were 20/30, and they had 1 son and 1 daughter under 5 and 2 sons 5/10. One of these was the son of James, and he was supposed to be Cornelius B. Atkinson. He married Nancy Henthorne and died in 1879 in Morris Co. Kansas. The other one must have died by July 1847, as this paper carried a notice that Joseph Mason was appointed administrator of the estate of Cornelius Atkinson.

There were two more families headed by men named James Atkinson. One was 30/40, as was his wife, with 1 son and 1 dau. 5/10; and 1 son 15/20. The other was also 30/40, as was his wife, and they had 6 children: 1 son 20/30; 1 son 10/15; 1 son and 2 daus. 5/10 and 1 son and 1 dau. under 5.

One James Atkinson died prior to 1845, as the court records show that John Adams, administrator of that estate, sued the heirs in order to complete a contract made by that James in his lifetime. Heirs of this James, according to the court records, were Daniel Wire as guardian of infant defendant Wm. Lippencott, Humphrey Lloyd, Mary Atkinson, Margaret Smith and Jeremiah Smith, her husband, Keziah McCoy and James McCoy, her husband. This court entry may have concerned the Revolutionary Soldier, James Atkinson, but if so, then some of the material in my book Monroe Co. Ohio Records, Vol. II, page 62, concerning that family is in error. The use over and over of the same given names in these early families, and the fact that only heads of families were listed in census schedules prior to 1850 make the task of identifying all these different James' and Charles' families difficult.

Another James Atkinson had died by August 1848. He was married to a lady named Sara, and by Aug. 1848, she had married a man by the name of Brookover. The heirs of this James, included among others not named, Charles Atkinson of Washington Co. Ohio, and Jane Skipton and her husband James, whose place of residence was unknown to the complainant in the suit. The suit concerning a mortgage that James Atkinson and his wife, Sara, had taken out on lots 44, 45 and 48 in Clarington. In the 1850 census, Family #98, Salem Township, there is a listing John Brookover, age 60, born in Pa. and his wife, Sarah, 58, also born in Pa.

To further muddy the waters, another 1830 family headed by a Charles Atkinson. It really presents a problem - maybe it was Monroe Co.'s first commune. In it there are listed three males 30/40, 2 females 30/40, 2 males 10/15, 2 females 5/10 and 1 male and 2 females under 5. It would take someone with more E.S.P. than I possess to even venture a guess as to how all those persons could be grouped into families, since the 5 adults all fall into the same category.

If you are hunting for a Thomas Atkinson, you can find him in the 1830 census too - both he and his wife were 20/30 and they had one male under 5.

Mitchell Atkinson, the youngest son of the Rev. Soldier, Cornelius, is family No. 237 in Seneca Township in 1850. At that time he was 67 years of age, and born in Pa. (circa 1783). His wife was Margaret, and she was 58, and included in their family was Elizabeth aged 24 and Jane aged 23 and James aged 20. Mitchell Atkinson does not seem to be listed in the Monroe Co. 1830 census, at least in Salem Township. However Record Book 4, Court of Common Pleas, indicates that Margaret Dement sued Mitchell Atkinson for breach of promise. I have never had time to check on that to see if she was putting more into his attitude toward her than he had intended, or if he threw her over for a better prospect.

Appearance Docket No. 5 in 1851 shows that a William Atkinson brought suit against John Atkinson, Matthew Atkinson, Penelope Atkinson, Harriett Atkinson, Mary Ann Atkinson and Washington Atkinson. In the 1850 census all these defendants appear to be children of a widow, Elizabeth Atkinson, in Family No. 211 in Salem Township. John and Matthew were 21 and 20 respectively in 1850, and they could conceivably be children of the Thomas who appears in the 1830 census, or perhaps of one of the Corneliuses. With the scarcity of Monroe Co. records , one just has to add everything together, so the best bet, if this is your family, would be to follow up on these references to the court journals, and also check the 1840 census. Miss Penelope Atkinson (probably the one mentioned above) married Mr. Samuel Boughner 13 July 1856. The back files of this paper also show that a Samuel S. Atkinson mar. Emadelia Hartline 24 May 1856.

If someone is trying to sort out all these Atkinsons, I would be glad to hear from him. The late Rose Abersold Dietrich took great pride in her Atkinson ancestry, she was a descendant of Nancy Atkinson (dau. of James the Rev. Soldier) and William Ross, and she belonged to the Dau. of Amer. Revolution, Dau. of Amer. Colonists, and Dau. of Colonial Wars, all on this Atkinson line.

She once sent me some information on Stephen Atkinson - he was the son of the Rev. Soldier, Charles. Stephen is in the 1830 census, aged 40/50, 1 female 20/30, 1 male 10/15, 1 male and 1 female 5/10 and 1 male under 5. Stephen's 2nd wife was Elizabeth Ross, and they had 15 children. Mrs. Louisa Webb, wife of Dr. W.G. Webb was the 8th child, and she died Mar. 4, 1913. She was survived by one sister, Mrs. Martha Beard of Belmont and one brother, John Atkinson of Barnesville. Her surviving children were: Mrs. Frances Suppes, Charles Webb, Martha Webb and Dr. Wm. Webb.

Note: Typed, by Richard E. Henthorn, from the article by Mrs. Fedorchak that was published in, Family Research in Monroe County, Ohio, Volume I.

-0-
Table of Contents
Family Research in Monroe County ...
by
Catherine Foreaker Fedorchak
(20 Aug 1918 - 14 Oct 1994)
647 Moraine Road
Chesterton, Indiana 46304

Newspaper Column Appearing
in
"The Spirit of Democracy"
Woodsfield, Ohio
3 September 1974

WILLIAM ATKINSON - 1st Installment

WILLIAM ATKINSON, mentioned in last week's column was the son of Revolutionary Soldier, Cornelius Atkinson, and anyone stemming from this family would be eligible for membership in First Families of Ohio. William Atkinson was born about 1762 and died after the 1840 census, and before 1848. His wife was Mary McCoy who was born in 1769. Mrs. M. James Hennen, Jr., 519 Fourth Ave., Waynesburg, Pa. is a descendant of this family. According to her research William and Mary McCoy Atkinson were parents of nine children:

  1. Cornelius Atkinson, 1788-1847, who married Mary Johnson (as indicatred in Hardesty's History in last week's column)
  2. Elizabeth Atkinson, 1790-1849, married Reuben Sturgeon
  3. James Atkinson, married Sarah Atkinson
  4. Jane Atkinson, married James Skipton
  5. Charles Atkinson, 1796-1880, married 1st Jane Templeton, 2nd Theda Patterson, and 3rd ______ Henthorn
  6. Maria Atkinson, married, John Smith
  7. Rebecca Atkinson, married Eli Anderson - Mrs. Hennen descends through this Rebecca
  8. William Atkinson, Jr. 1806-1832, married Maria Baldwin
  9. Thomas Atkinson, 1809-1840, married Elizabeth Brown

The above information appears to be correct by Appearance Docket No. 8, page 496 - Court of Common Pleas - suit filed June 10, 1848: Johnston L. Jones vs. Charles Atkinson, Elizabeth Sturgeon, Jane Skipton and James her husband, Maria Smith, Rebecca Anderson and Eli her husband, Susannah Atkinson, Hannah Atkinson and Oliver Atkinson children of Cornelius Atkinson deceased, Abigail Atkinson, Mary Atkinson, and Julia Atkinson, children of Wm. Atkinson deceased, and John Atkinson, Matthew Atkinson, Marion Atkinson, Penelope Atkinson, Washington Atkinson, Harriett Atkinson, and Sara Brookover and George her husband.

As I have said before, genealogy in Monroe Co. does not come in "instant records" but you have to add bits and pieces together to come up with anything. The appearance docket does not specifically name all the defendants as heirs of William Atkinson (1762 - c. 1840/48) but the information fits in with what we know of this family.

Child No. (1) -- Cornelius Atkinson - 1788-1847 was deceased, and his three children, Susannah, Hannah, and Oliver were named in his stead. This also matches up with the information in Hardesty's History given in last week's column, on Oliver Atkinson.

Child No. (2) -- Elizabeth Sturgeon 1790-1849 - married Reuben Sturgeon. The fact that Reuben is not listed as a defendant indicates that he was also deceased by the date of this suit, and I have some additional information on this name, Hardesty's History indicates that Reuben Sturgeon was an early settler along Sunfish Creek. He is shown in the 1820 census, and in the 1830 census in Salem Township, he is indicated as being between 40/50 and his wife (Elizabeth Atkinson) as being between 30/40 which also adds up to her birth date in 1790. Included in the family were 1 male 10/15, one male 15/20, also 1 female 15/20 and 1 female 20/30. These ages would indicate that the Sturgeons were married circa 1810, and it is my opinion that Sturgeon was originally from Greene Co., Pa. but I have not proven that contention.

Reuben Sturgeon died before Sept. 1832, as his will was proven at court at that term. William Atkinson was a witness (probably the Wm. Jr. 1806-1832). The other witness was Sarah Lane, who [was] indicated as living in Ohio Co., Va. and the probate was delayed until her affidavit could be obtained. It is sometimes difficult to read this old writing, and since she lived in Ohio Co., Va., her name could have also been Sarah Zane, rather than Lane.

There is an old tombstone in the Clarington Cemetery and all I could make out of it was Robert Sturgeon, departed this life Jan. 22, 1829, in the 13th year of his age, so he was probably a son of Elizabeth and Reuben Sturgeon.

Another son of Reuben and Elizabeth Atkinson Sturgeon was probably the Vincent Sturgeon, aged 32 in the 1850 census (born circa 1818 and probably the son aged 10/15 in the 1830 census). Vincent is Family No. 243/243 in the census taken 11 Sept. 1850 in Salem Township, and he gave his birthplace as Ohio. His wife was Synda Ann, and he had living in his family, Wm. 5, Maria 4, Reuben 2, and an Elizabeth Sturgeon, aged 50, who was born in Pa. The next family No. 244 is for Samuel Landers, aged 36, with a wife Mary, aged 38 (born 1812), and children Reuben 16, Elizabeth 11, and John and Margaret both 6 years of age.

Since Mrs. Hennen believed that Elizabeth Atkinson Sturgeon died in 1849, then perhaps the Elizabeth aged 50 was an unmarried woman. Here the pieces begin to be unsuited for the puzzle. If Elizabeth Atkinson Sturgeon died in 1849, she obviously could not be in the 1850 census taken in Sept. 1850. If she was born in 1790, and had lived to the 1850 census, she would have been a little difficult to expect her to have been a mother at the age of 10 and to have been the mother of the 50 year old Elizabeth who does show up in the 1850 census. So this is an area which needs some work on it yet. Perhaps the Elizabeth in the census was an Aunt of Vincent, and could have been a sister of Reuben Sturgeon, or perhaps Reuben Sturgeon was married twice, and this Elizabeth in the 1850 census was a child of the first marriage and 1/2 sister to Vincent.

At any rate, Vincent Sturgeon died by May 23, 1860, as it is noted in the back files of The Spirit of Democracy that Sidney Sturgeon was named administrator of his estate in the paper of that date.

Note: Typed, by Richard E. Henthorn, from the article by Mrs. Fedorchak that was published in, Family Research in Monroe County, Ohio, Volume II, Part I.

To be continued.

******
Table of Contents
Family Research in Monroe County ...
by
Catherine Foreaker Fedorchak
(20 Aug 1918 - 14 Oct 1994)
647 Moraine Road
Chesterton, Indiana 46304

Newspaper Column Appearing
in
"The Spirit of Democracy"
Woodsfield, Ohio
9 September 1974

WILLIAM ATKINSON (and Reuben Sturgeon) - 2nd Installment

Vincent Sturgeon (son of Reuben and Elizabeth Atkinson Sturgeon) had several children who can be found in the 1860 census living with James Edwards, Family No. 848 in Salem Township - that census was taken July 19, 1860. The children were:

  1. William Sturgeon, aged 16
  2. Jane Sturgeon, aged 14
  3. Reuben Sturgeon, aged 12
  4. Robert Sturgeon, aged 10
  5. James Sturgeon, aged 7

We can now narrow the interval of Vincent's death to the probable period of 1853-1860.

One could wonder what happened to Vincent's wife, Sidney, so another trip to the records in the Court of Common Pleas helped there too. There is an old book, which was not named nor dated, I found an entry to this effect: "Sidney Thomas et al vs. Elisabeth Sturgeon - it appearing that the said Sidney Sturgeon, since the commencement of this suit, has intermarried with David Thomas, the Court orders that said David Thomas be made a party to this case. It is ordered that the parties commit no waste on the premises or real estate, the title to which is in controversy, until the final hearing, and this case is continued." So this particular book was a Court Journal, and it was probably dated about 1859-60, as a check of the 1860 census reveals this listing - Family No. 710 DAVID THOMAS, aged 39, Sydina, age 33, with 6 children surnamed Thomas, as well as the following children surnamed STERGON (sic) -

  1. Wm., aged 16
  2. Mariah J., aged 14
  3. Reuben, aged 11
  4. Robert, aged 9
  5. James, aged 7
  6. Charles, aged 2/12.

Obviously these are the same children also shown as living in the James Edwards family. What explanation can one have for that except possibly that James Edwards may have been the maternal grandfather of the children.

Another interesting clue is contained in the child, Charles Stergon, aged 2 months in July 1860 - that would place his birth as possibly May, 1860, and if his father was Vincent Sturgeon, counting back nine months, one could possibly arrive at a deathdate for Vincent as between Aug. 1859 and the date Sidney is shown as his administrator, May 23, 1860.

The back files of this paper further lend credence to that period for his death, as the issue of Nov. 16, 1859 shows that David Thomas and Sidney Sturgeon , all of Salem Township were married on the 3rd inst. So it looks as if Sidney may have married Thomas while pregnant with the posthumous child of Vincent Sturgeon.

The SPIRIT of July 1863 also shows that the Sheriff finally sold some property in S.31, T.3, R.3 in the case of Sidney Sturgeon et al, vs. Elizabeth Sturgeon of about 40 acres. The Elizabeth in his case is probably the same Elizabeth shown in the 1850 census in the family of Vincent, however, I could not find her in the 1860 census either under Sturgeon or Stergon. It appears that another trip to the Court House would be in order to try to run down all entries pertaining to the case of Sidney Sturgeon vs. Elizabeth Sturgeon et al. It appears to be that the property in question must have been Reuben Sturgeon's property, rather than Vincent's property, as any property Vincent may have had would have gone (without a will) to his wife, Sidney, and their children. The property Reuben had (and he had a will) probably went to his children who were probably Vincent and Elizabeth, and after Vincent's death, his widow, Sidney, wanted her husband's share for her children's upkeep.

The 1830 census for Reuben Sturgeon indicated that he had one female in his family aged 20/30 born 1800-1810, and one aged 15/20 (born 1810-1815). The other female could be the MARY LANDERS whom I mentioned last week. According to the 1850 census, Salem Township, she was 38, born 1812, so that fits, and she had children named Reuben & Elizabeth, probably after her parents Reuben and Elizabeth Sturgeon. The ages of her children, with (sic, were?) Reuben Lander, 16 in 1850, or born in 1834, indicate that she may have been married about 1833.

The Court of Common Pleas records show that a MARY STURGEON, Spinster, was indicted for arson at the March term, 1832. She was accused of being under the influence of the Devil, and burning the barns and houses of Thomas Smart and Asael Booth. There was a jury trial, and she was found "not guilty." So it seems that Monroe Co. may have had its share of "witch hunts."

William Sturgeon, (probably son of Vincent and Sidney Sturgeon) is shown as 18 years of age, and a member of Capt. Warren Hollister's company in the back files of The SPIRIT under the date of September, 1861. Perhaps he applied for a pension in later life, and more information on the Sturgeon family could be obtained in that file.

Note: Typed, by Richard E. Henthorn, from the article by Mrs. Fedorchak that was published in, Family Research in Monroe County, Ohio, Volume II, Part I.

(To Be Continued)

******
Table of Contents
Family Research in Monroe County ...
by
Catherine Foreaker Fedorchak
(20 Aug 1918 - 14 Oct 1994)
647 Moraine Road
Chesterton, Indiana 46304

Newspaper Column Appearing
in
"The Spirit of Democracy"
Woodsfield, Ohio
16 September 1974

WILLIAM ATKINSON - 3rd Installment

I have found two other pieces of information which tie in with this family. In Appearance Docket No. 5, page 469 is a record of a "suit in chancery" brought March 31, 1841 by William Atkinson vs. John Atkinson, Matthew Atkinson, Penelope Atkinson, Harriett Atkinson, Marion Atkinson, and Washington Atkinson. The dictionary defines this as "process of litigation in a court of equity." William Atkinson Sr. (who died after 1840 and before 1848) is probably the complainant here, as Wm. Jr. is supposed to have died in 1832. After analyzing all the information available to me, I believe this suit was brought by William Sr. against his grandchildren who were the children of his deceased son, Thomas Atkinson.

The other piece of information is contained in Appearance Docket No. 8, page 243 - State of Ohio vs. Elisabeth Sturgeon and Sally Smith, June term, 1847, citation to show cause why they do not take out letters of administration on the estate of Wm. Atkinson. Served on defendant Sturgeon, defendant Smith not found, June 8, 1847.

I believe that, according to the prevailing law widows were allowed the first chance to administer the estates of their deceased husbands, when there was no will. After that children living in the State of Ohio were allowed to administer the estate. This particular suit then, is an attempt by the court to get someone to administer the estate of Wm. Atkinson and we can now narrow his death date to between March 31, 1841 and June 8, 1847, based on the information in these two suits. Probably his wife was deceased by 1847, or else someplace in one of the Journals it will be possible to find a note that she had refused the job, however, I could not find her in the 1850 Monroe Co. census. Several of his sons were already deceased by 1847, so that left two daughters to do the job. Mrs. Hennen has said that one of the daughters was a MARIA who married John Smith, but his court record indicates that such a daughter was called SALLY Smith, another instance of pieces not fitting the puzzle.

In the first installment in this series on Wm. Atkinson, Mrs. Hennen's material indicates that Charles Atkinson (5) and Jane Skipton (4) were children of William Atkinson, Sr., and the information given in Appearance Docket No. 8, page 496, (see 1st installment) also seems to bear that.

However, in the Aug. 19 1848 edition of this paper, I found this notice: Johnston L. Jones, vs. Charles Atkinson et al - said Charles Atkinson, who is a resident of Washington Co., Ohio, and Jane Skipton and James Skipton, her husband, whose place of residence is unknown, will take notice that the said Jones, on the 10th day of July 1848, filed a bill against them and others, the heirs and widow of JAMES Atkinson, deceased, the object of which bill is to foreclose on a mortgage given by James Atkinson, deceased in this lifetime conjointly with Sara Atkinson, who was then his wife, and who by a subsequent marriage, is now Sarah Brookover, Lots 44, 45, and 48 in Clarington."

We can find Sara Brookover in the 1850 census - Salem Township, No. 83, taken September 6, 1850, at which time she was 56, born in Pa. and her husband, George Brookover was only 40. Included in this household is a male named, Marion, aged 14.

Obviously the suit mentioned in the paper of Aug. 19, 1848, and shown in Appearance Docket 8, page 496 are the same, at least both mention being filed June 10, 1848 - but the Appearance Docket is purported to be heirs of William Atkinson, and the notice in the paper indicates that Charles Atkinson and Jane Skipton could have been heirs of James Atkinson. The only way obviously to deal with this tangled mess is to chart these families, and include every scrap of information you can find.

James Skipton is not in the 1850 Monroe Co., census, perhaps he lived in Washington Co., O. He was in the 1830 census in Salem Township though, and at that time he was 20/30, with two males under 5, and 1 female 5/10, and Jane appears to have been 20/30.

Again if Johnston L. Jones was suing to recover on a mortgage given by James and Sara Atkinson, and James died, then his quarrel would be with Sara, who later became wife of George Brookover, and her children of the marriage to James Atkinson. If Jane Skipton and Charles Atkinson are also defendants in that case, it would seem logical that they were defendants because they were also children of James, as they would have no equity in the case because they were siblings of James Atkinson. Perhaps Johnston L. Jones was also confused by the various relationships among the Atkinsons, and didn't know precisely who should be named in this suit to recover his mortgage.

Appearance Docket No. 8, page 496, also lists John, Matthew, MARION, Penelope, Washington, and Harriett Atkinson. They can be identified by the 1850 census, Family No. 211 in Salem Township, living with their mother, Elisabeth. They are the children of Thomas Atkinson (1809-1840) who married Elizabeth Brown, however in the census, John is 21, Matthew is 20, MARY ANN (female) is 17 - the Appearance Docket gives her as Marion where one would assume it was a male; Penelope was 14, Washington was 11, and Harriet was 9.

The back files of this paper indicate that Penelope Atkinson married Samuel Boughner on July 13, 1856.

Note: Typed, by Richard E. Henthorn, from the article by Mrs. Fedorchak that was published in, Family Research in Monroe County, Ohio, Volume II, Part I.

******
Table of Contents
Top This Page




Extracted by: Richard Henthorn
Posted: 31 Mar 2011
Revised: 19 Mar 2013