Chamber's Scrapbook

The following is a partial transcription of a notebook that was kept by the Great Great Aunt of Pam Brown. Her name was Mary Gassett Talent Chambers. She was born in 1843 in Virginia and died in 1940 in Oregon. During her life she lived in Virginia, Tennessee, Missouri and Oregon. She moved to Oregon shortly after the Civil War. She was married to Henry Chambers who was the brother of Judge William Chambers of Ohio.

Thanks goes to:
Pam Brown
P.O. Box 93
Sweet Home, OR 97386

I've tried to include only those with some kind of reference to Noble Co. or those with unclear reference as to location. Dates were not listed or further reference to exact source.


The Ada Chambers Concert

The Ada Chambers concert in the Caldwell M. E. church, under the auspices of the Epworth League, last Thursday evening, was attended by a vast audience, composed largely of the former friends and acquaintances of Miss Chambers (who was born and spent her younger girlhood days at his place) who had assembled to hear this noted and now famous singer. The audience was overjoyed with her singing, and as an appreciation of her pleasing efforts arose en masse to their feet as she appeared for the last number of the program and stood for one full minute. Miss Chambers was considerably affected at this token of love and esteem from her friends but it did not embarrass her in the least as she sang beautifully “The Nightingale Song.:
Rev S. F. Ross did not utter a misnomer when he publicly named Miss Chambers the “Buckeye Nightingale.”
The participants of the concert were for the most part Caldwell products, Miss Chambers being a daughter of Judge and Mrs. William Chambers, now residents of Marietta; Frank B. Amos, violinist, son of John M. Amos, of Cambridge; and Miss Mame McKee, of Caldwell, pianist. The others were Mrs. Cora Ewalt and Miss Hazel Harris, accompanists, of Cambridge.
Her in Caldwell we all knew Miss Chambers as she was when she was a mere child; now we know her as a brilliant, powerful, effective, and wonderful singer--”Buckeye Nightingale.” In our vocabulary there are not adequate means of expression to permit us to present the deep feeling of pleasure and gratitude of having listened to her beautiful, charming, rich and powerful
voice and to have again shaken hands with this sweet, mild, modest girl whom we knew in her tenderest years and whom no amount of training, fame and honor can spoil. Miss Chambers, after each of her numbers was encored repeatedly and gracefully responded, each selection brining out the wonderful sweetness of the artist’s voice. In New York City, as well as other cities, Miss Chamber’s beautiful, rich and highly cultivated soprano voice has won her a large measure of fame. By
diligent study in conservatories in the metropolis she has cultivated her naturally excellent voice to a wonderful degree, and her singing here was a rare treat to her Caldwell admirers. She will continue their studies under Prince Herbert and will
later go to far off Italy to complete her work. Mr. Frank B Amos, whom we knew in his “babyhood” days, is quite a
violinist and he sprang a great surprise on his Caldwell friends by his skill in handling the violin. He did excellent execution on his instrument and the audience frequently recalled; he played well, brining out the emotional quality of the different compositions.
Miss Mame McKee charmed the audience by her adeptness and skill upon the piano and her voluntaries were loudly applauded so great was the appreciation of her auditors. The accompanying by Mrs. Cora Ewalt and Miss Hazel Harris was superb. All the productions by Miss Chambers and Mr. Amos were difficult to follow, and the accompanists deserve much praise for the sympathetic, careful manner in which they seconded each of the performers.To the Participants of the concert, especially Miss Chambers and Mr. Amos, THE LEADER wishes to extend its warmest congratulations for their well
earned success and development, and most sincerely hopes that they will each often give us the pleasure of listening to them.
From a financial standpoint the first number of the lecture course under the management of the Epworth League was a great success, and was one to make Caldwell feel proud of her “stars.”

*****

JURIST LAID AWAY

The funeral services of the late Judge William Chambers were held at the home of his son-in-law, Grant Turnbaugh, on North 11th Street, Friday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. Edwin A. Jester read the scripture lessons, led in prayer and spoke
beautifully. He was followed briefly by Rev. Dr. Milligan in an address of power and earnestness. Appropriate hymns were sung by Mrs. J. B. Jones and Rev. Mr. Jester, with Miss Harris at the piano. The floral tributes were very beautiful and profuse and the occasion was throughout one of deep solemnity. Judge Chambers was a lovable man and was sincerely respected by all who knew him. A large delegation from Caldwell came on the morning train among them Attorneys D.S. Spriggs, J.M. McGinnis, L.B. Frazier, Prosecuting Attorney Smith, Hugh Neuhart, Judge Wheeler, J.R. Keenan, John W. Robinson, Mr.
Atkinson and others.The active pall bearers were the following members of the Cambridge bar: F.L. Rosemond, David Okey, James Joyce, A.L. Stevens, H.W. Luccock, John P. Turner, J.B. Ferguson, and G.D. Dugan and the honorary pall bears from the Caldwell bar were W.H. Smith, J.R. Keenan, D.S. Spriggs, J.M. McGinnis, L.B. Fraizer, and Hugh Neuhart. The pall bearers, active and honorary, and many others accompanied the family to Northwood cemetery where the interment was made by the side of his daughter, Mrs. Turnbaugh. Mrs. Chambers was accompanied by two of her brothers, her son Brook and
daughter Ada. Many other old friends and Neighbors attended and manifested their sympathy and respect for the deceased jurist.

*****


FUNERAL OF MRS. TURNBAUGH

The impressive funeral services over the remains of the late Mrs. Grant Turnbaugh, held at the residence on North 11th Street, Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock were attended by a large number of sorrowing friends gathered together to pay a last tribute to one loved in life for her many admirable traits of character. The services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. Edwin A. Jester, of the M.E. church, assisted by Rev. G. O. Miller, pastor of the Second U.N. Church and appropriate hymns, favorites of the deceased, were rendered by part of the M.E. church choir as follows: Johy Bryn Jones, Joe Jones, Mrs. Johy Bryn Jones, Mrs. Wm. C. Suitt and Mrs. Moorhead. The floral tributes were very numerous and beautiful. The pall bearers were Mssrs. Dr. U. C. Purdum, J.G. Neilley, F. L. Nyce, E.W. Mathews, Jr., T.E. Amos, C.R. Potter, Will M. Sherrard, and D.R. Burr.
The interment was made in Northwood Cemetery. Among those present at the services from out of the city were the mother,
Mrs. Wm. Chambers, whose double bereavement, the death of both daughter and husband within such a short time calls forth the sympathy of all her friends in this city; the sister, Miss Ada Chambers, of New York City; brother H.B. Chambers of Marietta, Messrs. I.B. and O.W. Phillips and Miss Lou Phillips, of Marietta; Mrs. Harry Wilson and J.B. Anderson, of Zanesville; Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Phillips of Newark; Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Spence of Columbus; Mrs. John Gibson, James Gibson and Mrs. Kate Kellar, of Mt Ephraim.

*****

Musical Prodigy.

After a long and difficult struggle, Miss Ada Chambers, of Cambridge, Ohio, is in the fair way to accomplish her ambition, for the traditional fairy god-parents have appeared to her. Mr. And Mrs. Charles Bond of Boston, who “discovered” Geraldine Farrer and defrayed the expenses of her musical education abroad, have come to the aid of Miss Chambers and have
offered to her five years’ training in music in Berline, Paris, and Milan. It was Baroness von Rhyner who discovered Miss Chambers. The baroness brought the girl to the attention of the Bonds, and so interested did they become that they offered to defray all her expenses for five years in the hope that they may add to the musical world another star such as Miss Farrer
became through their help. Those who have heard Miss chambers sing say she will some day be the equal of the greatest signers of the day.The above is from the Cincinnati Times Star and the lady referred to tin the article is a daughter of Judge Chambers of Ohio now deceased. She is also a cousin of Judge W. H. Chenvront of this place.

*****

The protracted meeting at the M. E. Church is progressing finely. Large
audiences and splendid interests are reported. Rev. Archer is preaching
some very strong sermons and much good is sure to result from his untiring
efforts. Those who have not attended the meeting are the losers.

*****

MRS. GRANT TURNBAUGH

Mrs. Della Chambers Turnbaugh, wife of Grant Turnbaugh, died at the Zanesville City hospital this morning, near midnight, where she was taken Monday, January 8th, after a consultation of physicians. She had been seriously ill with fever for some weeks and serious and dangerous complications supervened that baffled the skill of the physicians who agreed that an operation alone gave any assurance of saving her life. Accordingly she was removed to the hospital and put under the most careful treatment, and though she seemed to improve never reached the condition where an operation, other than for temporary relief, could be ventured in safety. The change for the worse come on Monday when her husband, who had returned home for a brief time, hastened to her side and was followed on the next train by Chas. S. Turnbaugh, Esq., Miss Anna Turnbaugh and Mrs. E. E. Scott, who took with them her little daughter, whom she seemed to recognize.In the early part of Monday night she became unconscious and gradually sank till the midnight hour when she passed away, aged 30 years.She was the oldest daughter of Judge Wm. H. Chambers and Mrs. Chambers, formerly of Cambridge, now residing in Marietta. She was born in Caldwell, Nobel county, and came with her parents to Cambridge, where she was united in marriage with Grant Turnbaugh September, 1901.To them were born two children, a son Russell Chambers, June 22, 1903, who died February 8, 1904, and a daughter, Martha Elizabeth, born August 24, 1904.Mrs. Turnbaugh was a very intelligent, loveable woman, always bright and
cheerful and her magnificent courage and hopefulness were never more thoroughly displayed than during her last illness. From a young girl she was a devoted Christian, a member of the Cambridge M. E. church. The body was brought to the home in Cambridge Tuesday afternoon, accompanied by the husband and relatives.Funeral Arrangements will be made an announced later.

*****

Miss Chambers Will Be Here in Caldwell and Cambridge

The concert to be given at the Market Street Baptists Church Friday evening, December 27, by Miss Ada Chambers promises to be the musical treat of the season> Miss Chambers will give a pleasing program of selections from the old composers and the recent composers. The program will be arranged in groups of songs and will be very attractive.

Miss chambers will be assisted by Prof. Alexander Hull, the talented vocalist, who will appear on the program. Miss Mary Conrade will act as accompanist. All need no introduction to Zanesville audiences.Miss Chambers will give three concerts in this vicinity before her return to New York City as follows: Caldwell Thursday evening, Zanesville, Friday evening and Cambridge Saturday evening. Miss Conrade will act as accompanist at all three concerts. This will be the farewell appearance of Miss Chambers in this section of the state before her departure for several years' study in Europe. The concert here is given under the auspices of the Ladies' Aid society of the Market Street Baptist Church.

*****

FUNERALS OF JUDGE CHAMBERS AND MRS. GRANT TURNBAUGH

The funeral of Mrs. Grant Turnbaugh will be conducted at the residence on North 11th Street, Thursday at 2 o’clock afternoon.The body of Judge Chambers will be brought to Cambridge Thursday at 9:15, morning, placed in a receiving vault until Friday morning, when it will be taken to the home of Grant Turnbaugh where services will be held at 10 o’clock. Rev. Edwin A. Jester will conduct both services. Interments in Northwood Cemetery.

*****

OBITUARY.

Hon. William Chambers, who died Tuesday night, January 16th, 1906, was born in Calvert county, Maryland, March 11th, 1842. He attended the public schools in Maryland and when a youth, came to Monroe county, Ohio, where he worked on a farm and went to school during the winter season till 1860 when he returned to Maryland and was a student in West River academy. He engaged in teaching as was regarded an excellent instructor. While thus engaged he began the study of law under the instruction of James E. Jones, Esq., and was admitted to the bar as a lawyer in Noble county in 1869. In 1871 he located for the practice of his profession in Caldwell and was elected the first mayor of the village and held the office four years. He was elected prosecuting attorney of Noble county in 1876 and filled the office with acceptance, being a vigorous and very discreet official. In 1892 he was elected Jude of the Common Pleas court of the sub-division composed of Muskingum , Morgan, Guernsey and Noble counties, and served two consecutive terms. He removed from Caldwell to Cambridge where they made their home until after the expiration of his second term, when his health failing, the family removed to Marietta where their home has since been. Judge Chambers was an intense student, a good lawyer, an honest man. Few men had more unbounded confidence of all classes of people than he. Staunch in principle, clear in perception, decided in character, and honest in purposed, firm yet kindly, he deserved the esteem in which he was held as a judge. October 25th, 1870, he was united in marriage with Miss Martha Phillips, daughter of the pioneer M. E. preacher, Rev. Jeremiah Phillips. To them
were born four children namely: Alfred P., Della, wife of Grant Turnbaugh, now deceased, Henry B. and Ada.
The death of the eminent father and the oldest daughter, occurring so near the same time, is an exceedingly sad affliction to the family and calls forth the tenderest sympathy of all the neighbors and friends who knew and loved them.

*****

ADA CHAMBERS FORGING AHEAD
Former Zanesville Church Singer Winning Applause in Pennsylvania

Concerning Miss Ada Chambers, well known in this city, the York, Pa., Dispatch has the following: The ovation of the evening came to Ada Chambers, soprano, in her solo, “From Thy Love as a Father.” With head thrown well back she rippled
smoothly along over the lighter lines without the slightest quaver in so far as her voice was concerned, but close observers, those who knew what was to follow felt by a sort of psychological suggestion that she was concentrating every atom of nervous energy for the supreme effort, and then it came. Poising herself with supreme vocal balance for just an instant, she gave a
metaphorical spring, in which every fiber of force in her body was brought into play, and soared gracefully over the top most “bar,” commonly called “high C.” It was a magnificent effort in which she gave all she had to her art and her audience, and almost as one person the latter broke out into enthusiastic and prolonged applause. A Patti or an Albani never received
more spontaneous tribute. Later, in “Ye Mountains, Ye Perpetual Hills,” she dominated the chorus from a higher vocal terrace than they could reach, the notes ever rising true and sweet and clear. If this be but her third appearance in oratorio her future is full of promise.

*****

Elsie, the 14 year old daughter of Mr,. And Mrs. J. H. Morton, died on Sunday, July the 22. She was buried in the cemetery at Summerville on Monday, at which place other members of her family have been buried.

*****

FATHER AND DAUGHTER JUDGE WILL IAM CHAMBERS.

Caldwell and the whole of Noble county were shocked almost beyond measure last Wednesday when the announcement reached his old home and the homes of his almost innumerable number of friends that Judge William Chambers, of
Marietta, had died in the Athens insane asylum, in which institution he was an inmate, about midnight of the night previous. What makes his death the sadder is the fact that it occurred within twenty-four hours after that of his daughter Della Chambers Turnbaugh, of Cambridge, who died in the Zanesville city hospital on Monday night of last week.The death of Judge Chambers removes on of the most widely known former residents of Caldwell and Nobel county and one of the best known public men
of the Fifteenth Ohio Congressional district. The news of his death was not only a great shock in the scenes of his days of younger manhood, but to his legion of friends scattered of the whole of Southeastern Ohio, as well, and sympathy is extended by all to the members of his family who are doubly bereaved at this time. The death of Judge Chambers also removes one of the brightest stars Nobel county every possessed; his mind was one of the clearest and far reaching and he was a man of no ordinary ability until overtaken by a disease that gradually crept over his intellect and wormed its way about him until his reason was destroyed and later terminated in his death. William Chambers was born on a farm in Calvert county, Maryland, in 1842.
His father William Chambers, was a sea-faring man in early life, but in 1853 he moved to a farm in Monroe County, Ohio, where the son worked and went to school during the winter season till 1860 when he returned to Maryland and was a student in West River academy. He engaged in teaching and was regarded as an excellent instructor. While thus engaged he began the study of law under the instruction of James E. Jones. In 1871 he was admitted to the bar in Caldwell, where the following year he became the first mayor of the village, holding the office four years. In 1875 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Noble county on the Republican ticket for one term, having declined a renomination. He was a man of extensive and varied information and thoroughly versed in the law. In 1891 his district chose him as judge of common please court for the four counties of Muskingum, Guernsey, Morgan, and Noble. After ten years service on the bench he retired very much broken in health. For the last two years he had been an invalid in the hospital at Athens. He removed from Caldwell to Cambridge where they made their home until after the expiration of his second term, when his health failing, the family removed to Marietta where their home has since been.During his practice of the law, he had as partners, Judge D. S. Gibbs, Judge J. M. McGinnis, of Caldwell, respectively and Judge E. E. Evans of Zanesville, Ohio.He was married in 1870 to Martha A., daughter of Rev. Jeremiah Phillips, of the Pittsburg Conference, to whom four children were born, of whom three, together with his widow survive., Dr. A. P. Chambers of Kansas City, Miss Ada Chambers of New York, and H. B. Chambers of Marietta.
The funeral services of Judge Chambers were held at the home of his son-in-law, Grant Turnbaugh, at Cambridge, Friday morning at 10 o’clock, to which place the remains were taken Thursday morning.Rev. Edwin A. Jester read the scripture lesson, lead in prayer and spoke beautifully. He was followed briefly by Rev. Dr. Milligan in an address of power and earnestness. Appropriate hymns were sung by Mrs. J. B. Jones and Rev. Jester, with Miss Harris at the piano. The floral tributes were very beautiful and profuse and the occasion was throughout one of deep solemnity.The Guernsey county bar held a meeting Wednesday evening and made arrangements to attend the funeral. An invitation was extended to the Noble
county bar to also attend, which was accepted, and six honorary pall bearers, Judge J. M. McGinnis, D. S. Spriggs, L. B. Frazier, W. H. Smith, J. R. Keenan, and H. F. Neubart, were appointed. Others from Caldwell attending the funeral were Probate Judge L. W. Wheeler, J.W. Robinson, B.F. Atkinson, and H. W. George. A joint committee was appointed to draft
resolutions to be spread upon the court journals of both Guernsey and Noble counties. The active pall bearers were the following members of the Cambridge bar; E.L. Rosemond, David Okey, James Joyce, A.L. Stevens, H.W. Luccock, John P. Turner, J. B. Ferguson, and G.D. Dugan.The pall bearers active and honorary, and many others accompanied the family to Northwood cemetery where the interment was made by the side of his daughter Mrs. Turnbaugh who was buried the day previous.Mrs. Chambers was accompanied by two of her brothers, her son Brook and daughter, Ada. Many other old friends and neighbors attended and manifested their sympathy and respect for the deceased jurist, than whom there never
was a better judge. Able, honest, fearless, a lover of justice, hating wrongs, despising shams, the champion of the weak against the strong, but always with the limits that the law’s rules lay down--he was such a judge as the people love and the lawyers respect.

*****
MRS. GRANT TURNBAUGH

As noted in THE LEADER last week, the death of Mrs. Grant Turnbaugh, of Cambridge, occurred at the Zanesville city hospital about midnight Monday night, January 15th, following a week of the most intense suffering. The deceased had been ill for the two weeks previous to her death and was taken to the city hospital on January 8th. Her condition after her arrival at the
hospital had been very grave and several times during the week her death had been expected. However, Sunday she rallied to a certain extent and some slight hopes were entertained for her recovery. After a relapse suffered Monday, the end came Monday night.Mrs. Turnbaugh was a daughter of Judge and Mrs. William Chambers, of Marietta, formerly of Caldwell and Cambridge. She was born in Caldwell, Noble county, where her parents resided at that time and was about thirty years of age at the time of her death. She was married some four years ago to Grant Turnbaugh, of Cambridge, a prominent shoe merchant of that place, to which union were born two children, a son Russel Chambers, June 22, 1903, who died February 8th, 1904, and a daughter, Martha Elizabeth, born August 24, 1904, and since her marriage had made her home in Cambridge. In social
circles in that city she was very prominent and was beloved by all who knew her for her sweet and gracious manner and many loveable qualities.Mrs. Turnbaugh is survived by her husband and one daughter, her mother, Mrs. Chambers, and one sister, Miss Ada Chambers, and two brothers, Dr. A. P. Chambers of Kansas City, and H.B. Chambers of Marietta.
The news of the death of Mrs. Turnbaugh came as a great shock to her legions of friends and former acquaintances in Noble, Washington, and Guernsey counties, in all of which places she was well known. The sympathy of many of the residents of the Fifteenth congressional district will be extended to the bereaved members of Mrs. Turnbaugh’s family, they being well
known all over the district through the prominence of Judge Chambers, who sat on the common pleas bench in this section at one time and the fame of Miss Ada Chambers, who has sung in a large number of the towns of the district.Mrs. Turnbaugh had been seriously ill with fever for some weeks and serious and dangerous complications supervened that baffled the skill of the
physicians, who agreed that an operation alone gave any assurance of saving her life. Accordingly she was removed to the Zanesville hospital and put under the most careful treatment, and , though she seemed to improve, never reached the condition where an operation, other than for temporary relief could be ventured safely.Mrs. Turnbaugh was a very intelligent, loveable woman, always bright and cheerful and her magnificent courage and hopefulness were never more thoroughly displayed than during her last illness, From a young girl she was a devoted Christian member of the M. E. church.The last sad services and honors to the dead were performed over the remains of the late Mrs. Della Turnbaugh, Thursday afternoon, in the presence of a large gathering of sorrowing and sympathizing friends.The services were in charge of Rev. E. A. Jester of the M. E. church, who in beautiful language, paid a touching tribute to the virtues of the deceased.Sweet and appropriate music was rendered by the M. E. choir. The very many floral tributes were especially beautiful and bore mute testimony to the high esteem in which Mrs. Turnbaugh was held by her friends.And so closed the last earthly rites over one who in life endeared herself to all by her loving ways. A long procession of carriages followed the remains to Northwood cemetery, where they laid her to rest.
Among those present at the funeral services of Mrs. Turnbaugh from out of Cambridge were her mother, Mrs. Wm Chambers, whose double bereavement, the death of both daughter and husband within such a short time, calls for the sympathy of all her friends; the sister; Miss Ada Chambers of New York city; brother H. B. Chambers, of Marietta; I. B. and O. W. Phillips and Miss Lou Phillips of Marietta; Mrs. Harry Wilson and J. B. Anderson, of Zanesville; Mr. And Mrs. A. R. Phillips, of Neward; Mr. And Mrs. J. R. Spence of Columbus; Mrs. John Gibson, James Gibson and Kate Keller of Mt. Ephraim.

*****

The committee here fore appointed to prepare and present to the bar memorial commemorative of the public services of the late William Chambers, a former judge of the Court of Common Pleas of this judicial district, respectfully submit the following memorial and resolution:William Chambers, who died Tuesday night, January 16, 1906, was born in Calvert county, Maryland, March 11, 1842. His early educational advantages were limited to the common schools afforded by the sparsely settled country of his boyhood days, and while yet a youth, he came to Monroe county, Ohio, where he worked on a farm and attended school during the winter months until 1860; when he returned to Maryland and was a student in West River Academy. After leaving the academy he engaged in teaching, and while thus engaged he began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in Noble county in 1869. In 1871 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Noble county, and filled
the office with credit, being a vigorous and discreet official. In the spring of 1892 he was elected Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for the sub-division composed of Guernsey, Noble, Muskingum and Morgan counties, and served two consecutive terms.This brief outline cannot adequately portray the real life and character of Judge Chambers. Back of all was the vital, controlling force that made and shaped his career; the living , aspiring man with a purpose and mission in life to accomplish. While a mere youth, struggling in poverty to acquire an education and qualify himself for the realities of life he formed the determination to become a lawyer, and to be a leader in that profession, which was the inspiration that moved him and which he followed with untiring zeal and labor. He had so far mastered the studies of the public schools that he became an efficient teacher at an early age, and thus acquired means to further prosecute his studies. He industriously economized every spare moment in pursuing the study of law, and saved with seeming parsimony all his earnings to further the one great purpose of a professional life; and although among strangers, while comparatively young, he prosecuted his profession indomitable will and energy and industry, fixed upon one high purpose, to which he controlled the untoward circumstances surround his
youth, acquired an education and fitted himself for the practice of his profession; and it was that same purpose and will that directed and controlled all the energies of his Life.As a lawyer he was careful, patient and painstaking in the preparation of
his cases, and able in their presentation. He came to the trial of his cases fully prepared, and was seldom taken by surprise. He was always, proper, frank and candid with the court and thereby gained respect and confidence. He was indeed in all the essential elements there of a most capable lawyer. He was kind and courteous to his fellow member of the bar, and indeed to everyone. Although courage under all conditions was one of his pre-eminent characteristics, it was his ability, fairness, and kind and gentlemanly demeanor that won him the respect and confidence of the people.During the ten years that he served on the bench, Judge Chambers was uniformly courteous to the members of the bar, and all others who had business in the court and he won the respect of everyone. He was a diligent student, and his knowledge of the law of cases was remarkable. His xcellent memory an close reading enabled him readily to find a precedent for almost any case. He was brief in his address, and confined himself closely to the questions at issue and as a result few of his instructions to juries ever furnished grounds for reversal by the higher courts. The records of his court attest the industry, ability and honesty with which he discharged the duties of his office. These records are abiding monuments of his learning, skill and ability, and his name so connected with them will be honored as that of the learned lawyer and honest judge.In the social relations of life, Judge Chambers was as highly honored and respected as he was in his profession. His good name in all the relations of life was honorably won and well deserved.To mark our appreciation of him, let it be Resolved, That throughout his life, he discharged his full measure of duty, and has earned the reward of approval and commendation of his fellow citizens.Resolved, That we sincerely sympathized the family in their affliction.Resolved, That a copy thereof be presented to our Court of Common Please with the request that it be spread upon the journal.E. W. MATHEWS,J. A. TROETTE, J. B. FERGUSON, J. W. CAMPBELL, CHAS. S. TURNBAUGH, DAVID OKEY, ROBT. T. SCOTT.

*****

Stafford.

J. W. M. Brock, a former resident of this place was born in Monroe county, Ohio, March 11, 1822, and died at Caldwell, Ohio, February 14, 1913. He was married to Marie Morris at Antioch, Monroe county, Ohio in 1842. Four children were born to this union, Elihu C. who died in 1854, aged 11 years; N. Dustin who died at his home in Kansas in 1912, aged 67 years; J. W. who died at Olive, Nobel county, Ohio in 1902 aged 52 years; Viola L. who died in infancy. His wife Marie died at their home in Stafford, Ohio, in 1892. He was married to Nancy S. Reed of Woodsfield, Ohio, in 1895. She died in 1899. He served in the civil war as first Lieutenant in company D, 27 Regiment O. V. I from the organization of the regiment in 1861 until March 1862, when he was promoted to Captain. He was wounded July 22, 1864. From the effects of this wound he never fully recovered and it caused him to resign from duty September, 1864, having served his country loyally, faithfully and courageously for a period of three years and two months. He is survived by six grandchildren and six great grand children, descendants of N. Dustin. He was a member of the Christian church for 72 years and of the Masonic Fraternity 66 years and his attitude toward both of these institutions was characterized by loyalty, fervency, and zeal. Captain Brock, as he was familiarly known, was a quiet, unassuming Christian gentleman whose whole life was devoted to his God. His home and his native land, and when we contemplate the noble deeds and loving words of the poet when he says, To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.”The last eleven years of his long eventful and useful life was spent with his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Minnie F. Brock of Caldwell, Ohio. The remains were brought to Stafford Monday and funeral after a brief discourse by Rev. Applegate of the Christian church of Caldwell, was taken in charge by the Masonic order, District Lecturer Chamberlain of Caldwell, assisting, interment in Stafford cemetery.

 

*****

WINS APPLAUSE OF BALTIMORE

The Oratorio Society of Baltimore gave its first performance for the present season last evening (January 23) at the Lyric, under the direction of Prof. Joseph Pache, presenting Handel’s oratorio, “Sampson.:” The chorus numbered over 300 singers, well balance, in its divisions of soprano, alto, tenor and base. Miss Ada Chambers was the soprano soloist.“Sampson” is one of the long, old fashioned oratorios, and is never given entire, as it requires more than four hours for its performance. Instead
selections, equal to about one-half the entire work are given, and sometimes numbers omitted from the program are brought in, as was the case last evening, when Miss Chambers sag the aria, “Ye men of Gaza, hither bring the merry pipe and pleasing string.”The air is one of the best for the soprano part and was well sung. She also had the aria of Delilah, “My faith and truth, O, Sampson, prove, but hear me, heart the voice of love.” Her greatest triumph, however, was the aria, with cornet obbligato, “Let the bright seraphim in burning row their loud uplifted trumpets blow.” This makes on of the climaxes of the great oratorio.--Baltimore American.

*****

Mrs. Martha P. Chambers

Mrs. Martha P., wife of the late Judge William chambers, died last Friday evening at he home of her brother, I. B. Philips, at Marietta. Mrs. Chambers suffered a stroke of paralysis about four years ago, and from this illness never fully recovered.Mrs. Chambers, who as a daughter of Rev. Jerry Phillips, was sixty-three years of age, and was born in Noble county. She was married to Judge Chambers in 1870. For twenty years Mr. And Mrs. Chambers resided in Caldwell. Mrs. Chambers was a life long member of the Methodist church and was particularly active in the work of the Woman’s Christian Temperance
Union. She is survived by three children, Dr. A.P. Chambers, Columbus, H. B. Chambers, Marietta, and Miss Ada, who is now in Europe. The funeral, which was private, occurred from the home of her brother, Mr. Phillips, at Marietta, last Sunday, interment taking place in the Oak Grove Cemetery.

*****

Eighty-Ninth Anniversary.

Capt. J. W. M. Brock celebrated his 89th birthday anniversary at his home on West North street, last Thursday. The captain enjoyed his usual good health, and spent the day conversing with visiting relatives and friends, relating may war incidents. On that day Capt. Brock received a large number of post cards with kindly birthday greetings, and for these embraces the Captain wishes to extend his sincere thanks. (hand written 94 cards).

*****

Capt. J. W. M. Brock, of Caldwell, is spending this week with relatives in Woodsfield. The Captain was not only a brave and loyal soldier but is a model gentleman and his many Woodsfield friends are always glad to see him.--Gazette

 


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