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Simonton Family Obituaries

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Arne H Trelvik
 

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OBITUARY ALICE D. SIMONTON

On the twentieth day of February, 1854, Alice Sidney Drake Simonton, second child and daughter of Isaac Lincoln and Sarah Evans Drake, was born in the house, which until recently stood on the north-west corner of Broadway and Silver Streets. From her late home on south Broadway, at ten minutes after one, on Wednesday morning, the fifth of November, she passed to eternal rest, - a life on earth of sixty-five years, eight months and fifteen days, all of which were spent in Lebanon.

At the age of nineteen she graduated from the Lebanon High School and shortly after graduation became Assistant Instructor in this Department. Later she accepted the position of teacher, in what was then known as Room No. 3, retaining this until the close of the school year of 1877 and '78 when she declined reelection.

On Wednesday afternoon, June the twenty-sixth, 1878, she was married to L. Simonton. Two children were given to this union, Mr. Lucy S. Cropper and Robert John Simonton, the latter at the age of ten, on October the second, 1895, preceded her into the Heavenly Country.

At the age of fourteen, on the seventh day of March, 1868, she made a public profession of her faith in Jesus Christ as a personal Saviour, uniting with the East Baptist Church, under the Pastorate of Rev. L. G. Leonard, D. D. who also officiated at her marriage. To the Master to whom thus early in life, she gave her heart, she was always a faithful and consistent follower, and until incapacitated, was interested and active in all the activities of the church.

It is the source of profound satisfaction to the husband who survives her, and who has known her so long and so intimately, to be able to look back upon the life that is past, and to realize, as only those con, to whom the earthy separation has come, how gentle and flawless that life has been. Never in all the more than forty one years of married life can he recall a single unkind word spoken by her, she was unselfish almost, to a fault if that is possible. Her thought was of others and their happiness. She lived the life of one who came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and having so lived, leaves as a legacy, a blessed, hallowed memory. Of her, in all truthfulness, can it be said, "Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, yea, sayeth the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them."

Funeral services were from her late home on Friday afternoon, 7th inst. At 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. F. Detweiler, of the East Baptist Church. Of this church she had been a faithful and consistent member for over 51 years.

Source: The Western Star, 13 Nov 1919 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 June 2003
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Clarence Daniel Simonton

Clarence Simonton died at his home on Silver street, Saturday evening. He was a carpenter and has lvied in or near Lebanon all of his life. His death was due to stomach trouble. We was operated on some time ago but he never fully recovered. His funeral was held from his late residence Wednesday afternoon.

Source: The Western Star, 7 Dec 1911 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 June 2003

Cyrena (Jackson) Simonton (1841-1872)

Obituary.

Cyrena S., wife of Rev. A. M. Simonton, died near Blanchester, O., December 15, 1873 [sic 1872], aged 31 years, 5 months and 2 days. Sister Simonton experienced religion and joined the M. E. Church at the age of thirteen years; was married May 18, 1865; the following autumn joined the F. W. Baptist Church, and was baptized in the summer of 1866 by Elder Cyrus Dudley.

She was taken sick in September 1871, and was a sufferer of the disesae [sic] consumption until removed by death from this world of sickness and sorrow to that fairer world on high. Death to her was not unexpected; to depart, was a joyful release from pain and suffering, and her spirit’s flight from earth, we are assured, was but a glad entrance into the peace and rest and beauty of heaven.

Sister S. leaves a husband, sister, three brothers and a large circle of friends to mourn her departure. Only in memory she sill lives; in memory she is loved and cherished; and I memory her place will be sadly and faithfully kept, till the day comes when those who mourn shall be united with the loved ones in a land where there is no more death, and painful partings never can be known.

Her last words to her husband were, ‘Preach Jesus;’ and to our sorrowing brother we extend our earnest and heartfelt sympathies. –
She is gone to a brighter and better home, where, with loving soul; she waits to greet him. May God direct his footsteps through life, until he is safely landed on the other shore, to live and rejoice with her in heaven for evermore.

The funeral services were conducted by Elder John Hisey, and discourse preached from Malachi 3d Chapter, 17th verse.

Source: The Miami Gazette, Waynesville, Ohio; Wednesday, January 15, 1873 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

Note: Cyrena was the daughter of Stephen Jackson (1802-1865) and Mary Bennett (1801-1848)

by
Arne H Trelvik
24 Feb 2007
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Ede C. (Harper) Simonton

SIMONTON - Mrs. Ede C. Simonton, died at her home on Cherry street on Friday in the eighty-ninth year of her age. Her maiden name was Harper and she was born in Iradel county, South Carolina, where, in 1820, she married Jesse H. Smith. Soon after their marriage they came to Madisonville, O. They had six children, only two of whom, Isaac and Edward H. of this place, survive. Mr. Smith died in 1832. In 1845 she married Elder Richard Simonton, who died in 1849. Since 1845 she has resided in Lebanon and victnity [sic]. In early life she joined the Baptist church and after her removal to this neighborhood became a member of the Fellowship church in which communion she remained to the day of her death. The funeral services were held at the residence of her son, Mr. Isaac Smith, and were conducted by Rev. J. P. Scott, D. D. of the Presbyterian church.

Source: The Lebanon Gazette, 13 Feb 1890 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003

Eliza J. Simonton

Mrs. Eliza J. Simonton, aged 71 years, died at her home in this city, Monday, and was buried on Wednesday afternoon from the East Baptist Church. Services by Rev. Beaver.

Source: The Western Star, 26 January, 1888 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
23 Oct 2004
 

Miss Frankie Simonton

Miss Frankie Simonton, a maiden lady living with her two sisters on Cherry street died suddenly at half past 3 o'clock this morning. She had been suffering for some time from a bronchial affection but yesterday was as well as usual. This morning she took a coughing spell and died in five minutes from strangulation. The funeral will take place at the house Sunday afternoon at half past three o'clock, sevices to be conducted by Rev. T. A. Brandon and Rev. H. A. Sumrell.

Source: The Western Star 17 Aug 1883 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 January 2006
 

Hannah (Stokes) Simonton (1823-1910)

MRS. HANNAH SIMONTON PASSES AWAY
Hannah Stokes Simonton, twelfth and youngest child of William and Hannah Hatcher Stokes was born on the Stokes homestead four miles northeast <of> Lebanon on the 6th day of January, 1823, and after a brief illness of three days, died at 214 North Mechanic Street, where she has resided continuously for sixty years, at 5 o'clock Saturday morning, August 27th, aged 87 years, 7 months and 21 days, thus outliving and having lived a longer life than any of her brothers or sisters.

She was married at the Stokes homestead on Wednesday, September 15th, 1841, to John Simonton, a devoted husband, with whom she lived happily until January 15th, 1888, when he preceded her into the Heavenly Country. She was the mother of five children, three sons and two daughters. The eldest son, Hiram, and the two daughters, Mary and Lucy have passed over before her, while two sons, Leonidas and William remain.

In company with her husband she united with the East Baptist church <of> Lebanon on March 14, 1853, under the pastorate of Rev. Harvey Dale and her life ever since has been a remarkably exemplary, consistent Christian one. From her mother, who was a member of the Society of Friends and who wore attire up to the time of her death at the age of 83, she inherited a great many traits of the Quaker character.

Clearcut and positive in her convictions of duty, she would have lost her right hand sooner than do what she believed wrong. Her affections were for her family, her home and her Church and departing as she has in the fullness of years, she had left behind to the surviving sons, a blessed, hallowed memory.

'Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them."

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Arthur Cooper Tuesday afternoon at the late home. Interment in Lebanon cemetery.

Source: The Western Star 1 Sep 1910 & 15 Sep 1910 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]
by
Arne H Trelvik
7July 2006
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ELDER HIRAM SIMONTON (1810-1880)

About 11 o'clock of the night of the 10th day of August, 1880, Elder Hiram Simonton quietly passed from his earth-life here to his spirit-life on the other shore. He went to sleep "like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him and lies down to pleasant dreams."
Though his years were not so many as some others, yet he had touched the boundary set for men when it was said, "The days of our years are three score years and ten." These years, after he had come to man's estate, were well filled in by calm, earnest Christian work. For nearly a half century the ministry was his calling. In this field of labor he took great delight, and ever held it an honor of the highest degree to be an ambassador of the anointed One.
On Friday, the 18th day of August, at 11 o'clock A. M., a large congregation gathered in the beautiful chapel in Franklin, Ohio, where solemn religious services were had, in which Brothers Coan, McWhinney, Summerbell, Sever, and McKinney took part, after which the earthly tabernacle of our dear Brother Simonton was laid in the earth, there to rest till the heavens shall be no more.
As it is proposed to hold memorial services in reference to our beloved brother at the next meeting of the Miami Christian Conference, a more extended notice of him as a Christian and a minister will be deferred till then.
A. L. McKinney.
Troy, O, Aug. 17, 1880

Source: unidentified 1880 newspaper [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 June 2003

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also see
tombstone
photo

at
Lebanon Cemetery

OBITUARY - HIRAM SIMONTON (1843-1903)

The following sketch was read at the funeral of Hiram Simonton:
"Hiram Simonton, eldest son and child of John and Hannah Stokes Simonton, was born at No. 111 North Mechanic street, Lebanon, Ohio, on January 29, 1843, and died of acute pneumonia at 12:45 Friday morning, April 17, 1903, at No. 214 North Mechanic street, aged sixty years, two months and nineteen days.
"His early education was received at the Lebanon Academy, and afterward at the Southwestern Normal School, which, under the auspices of President Alfred Holbrook, succeeded the Lebanon Academy. From here he went to Dennison University, Granville, Ohio, taking the Classical Course, but, the Civil War breaking out, he enlisted, before attaining his majority, as a private in the Eighty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, where he remained until the end of his term of enlistment. In 1863, he received a commission in the navy as Master's Mate, and was assigned for duty to the United Sates steamer Benton, then lying off Natchez, Miss., at that time the largest ironclad in the world, carrying eighteen guns, and for many months the flagship of Rear Admiral Porter. He participated in both the Red River expeditions, when the gunboat squadron co-operated with the land forces under General Banks, and was at the siege and capture of Fort De Russey. Shortly after this he was promoted to the rank of Ensign, and was transferred to the United States gunboat Grosbeak, where he remained until the close of the war, resigning his commission after all hostilities had ceased. Coming home, he for a time engaged in business at Lebanon, and afterward at Downey, Iowa, but later took up the study of law, and was admitted to practice here at Lebanon, following this profession for a long time. His later life is too well known to need comment.
"He was a man with intellect and talents far above the average, a close reader of historical and scientific works, giving but little attention to the light literature of the day, an ardent paleontologist, and a man who kept thoroughly abreast of the times in the discoveries and events of the day.
"Of singularly sweet and gentle disposition, he was a kind and loving son, an affectionate brother, and a faithful and appreciative friend.
"No further seek his merits to disclose,
Or draw his frailties from their dread abode;
There they alike in trembling hope repose -
The bosom of his Father and his God."

Source: Warren County Record 18 Apr 1903 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 June 2003

infant son of H. & E. Simonton

"Born into the spirit world, on the evening of the 10th inst., the infant son of H. and E. Simonton, aged 5 months and 14 days.

Sweet bud of hope, though Autumn's breath
Hath chilled thy fair but fragile form,
Though tender ties are torn in death,
We mourn thee not in garb forlorn;
For high above earth's dark array,
Like sunlight through the tempest gloom,
The spirit pass'd to realms of day,
And Hope, bright angel of the tomb,
Points to thy home where fragrant breath
Of endless Spring calls forth from death,
"Immortal flowers whose fadeless bloom
Shall wake to scorn their earthly doom."

Source: The Western Star 16 Dec 1853 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
31 October 2006
  Death of John S. Simonton (1807-1885)

Mr. John S. Simonton, one of the best known and prominent of the old pioneers of La Crosse county died at his home on Fourth street last night at half-past nine o'clock, in the 78th year of his age. Mr. Simonton has been gradually declining with softening of the brain for over a year and his demise was not unexpected.
John S. Simonton was born in Clermont county, Ohio, about sixteen miles from Cincinnati, May 4, 1809, (sic) which makes his age seventy eight years. He came to La Crosse in 1852, arriving by steamboat on the 10th of April. In the fall of that year he entered a partnership with F.M. Rublee and S.T. Smith and built at the mouth of La Crosse river the pioneer saw mill of the city's greatest industry. At the same time he was an equal partner with A.T. Clinton and S.T. Smith in a general store. He sold his mill interest and the store was destroyed by fire. He next engaged in the furniture trade, but after a year or two sold out to W.W. Ustick. Later he was captain of the steam ferry General Pope, then of the transfer boat McGregor. In 1870 he was appointed Chief of Police and served one year. In 1872 he was elected Sheriff of the county and served his term of two years. Of late years increasing feebleness has prevented his taking an active part in the business of life, but his many old friends will remember him as he was in his prime, an active, vigorous, capable man."

Mr. Simonton leaves a widow who is also in a feeble condition and not expected to long survive her husband, and three grown up daughters, Mrs. O.L. Smith, Mrs. J. Hathaway, and Mrs. Fred N. Bagley, all of whom reside in La Crosse, except Mrs. Bagley who will arrive to-night to attend the obsequies. The funeral will take place from the residence of Mr. O.L. Smith, 117 North Fourth street at two o'clock, Friday afternoon. One by one the old pioneers pass away and gradually a new generation springs up, but among the memories of those who hewed a way into the Great West, the life of "Uncle John S. Simonton" will stand out among the leading ones in the early history of La Crosse county. Peace to the ashes of him whose race is over.

Source: La Crosse, WI: The La Crosse Daily Republican and Leader, Thursday, March 19, 1885, page 3

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003

also see
tombstone
photo

at
Lebanon Cemetery

John Simonton (1815-1888)

DEATHS.

Mr. John Simonton died at his late residence on North Mechanic street, on Sunday morning, January 15, at 8:30 a. m., aged seventy-two years, three months and one day. His disease was chronic bronchitis, with which he has been afflicted for about ten years. Mr. Simonton was well known to the business community, having been engaged in business in Lebanon since about the year 1840. For many years preceding his death he had been a prominent dealer in grain and wool. Funeral services were held on Tuesday last at the E. Baptist church, Revs. Beaver and Scott officiating. Mr. Simonton was born about two miles east of Lebanon, on the farm now owned by Wm. V. Bone, and was a son of the late Rev. Richard Simonton, on of the pioneer preachers of Southern Ohio

Source: The Western Star, 19 January, 1888 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
23 Oct 2004

John Simonton (1815-1888)

John Simonton, one of the oldest citizens and business man of Lebanon, died at his residence on Mechanic street, on Sunday morning, In the 73d year of his age. He was a son of Elder Richard Simonton. for many years a minister of the Christian Church, and was born on the farm now owned by William Bone, two miles east of Lebanon, then known as the William Van place. He was a carriage-maker by trade, but about 1850 he went into the grocery business at the "Star" corner. About 1855 or 6, he changed his business to that of dealing In agricultural implements. At this time he commenced dealing to some extent in grain, and for the last thirty years this has been his exclusive business. On the 15th of September, 1841, he was married to Miss Hannah Stokes, by whom he had several children, and of whom only three survive him, Hiram, Leonidas and William S. He has been a member of the East Baptist Church of this place for about thirty-five years, and for a number of years he has been one of the Deacons of the church. His health began to fail some eight or ten years ago, and for the last few years he has been quite an invalid. His funeral services were held in the Baptist church on Tuesday afternoon conducted by the Rev. A. H. Beaver, and were largely attended by his relatives, neighbors and friends.

Source: Lebanon Gazette, January 19, 1888 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
23 Oct 2004

John Simonton (1836-1908)

John Simonton, son of Alexander and Hannah Simonton, was born on a farm near Murdock, O., Warren County, February 2nd, 1836; and departed this life at his late home in Dayton, O., August 28th, 1908, in the 73rd year of his age.

In the early spring of 1862 he was united in marriage to Martha Jones. To this union seven children were born, four of whom survive, three having preceded father to the eternal country. The four living are Sylvan, Libbie, Mrs. J. W. Shank and Lillie.

On the 24th day of January, 1882 during a gracious revival of religion in the Methodist church in Morrow, O. There Mr. Simonton was then living, he experienced religion, and united with the M. E. church. More than half of his earth life had now been spent and while he was a man of few words, he nevertheless by his quiet sincere life, gave testimony to the fact of the new experience formed and life entered upon. He had the confidence and respect of all the people.

During the civil war he served his country in the 100 days service; having been sent home invalided and was never able to rejoin his regiment.

By occupation a carpenter but for many years, owing to an injury which became permanent, he has been unable to follow his trade but in and about the home, in his quiet tender manner, was ever useful and helpful being devoted to his children.

On the 8th of July 1876, he was bereft of his wife, leaving him with the care of the entire family of children, the youngest of which was a babe of fifteen months, so that to his children, he has been both a father and mother for the past thirty years. How greatly he will be missed, and how much they have to look forward to, to the grand family reunion in the skies, in that eternal home.

For almost twenty years past, Brother Simonton has resided in Dayton. Not leaving the home much, his acquaintance was comparatively limited, and yet the friends who knew him, honored and prized him for his genuine manhood.

Some twelve years ago he transferred his church home from Morrow to the Raper M. E. church in Dayton and from her fellowship he was transferred to the church triumphant. We hope to meet him there. – V. F. B.

Source: The Western Star, 10 September 1908 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]
[also see Family Tombstone at Morrow Cemetery]

by
Arne H Trelvik
23 Oct 2004

Joseph Simonton (1813-1881)

SIMONTON - Died at LaCrosse, Wisconsin, Saturday April 30, 1881, Joseph SIMONTON, aged 68.

The subject of this notice was well and favorably known to very many of our old citizens, and was for quite a number of years prominently identified with Lebanon and Lebanon interests. He was born on the Wm. Van farm, now owned by Wm. V. Bone, near Bethany Church, on April 30, 1813, his death, consequently, occurring on his 69th anniversary.

At an early age he learned the trade of carriage making with Wm. Lewis, an uncle of our fellow townsmen Wm. C. Lewis, who was then engaged in the business about one-half mile above Genntown, his shop being situated on the farm now owned by Wm. Monroe. From here he came to Lebanon, working at his trade with Lewis Chamberlin. In the autumn of 1835, in company with John Simonton, now the only surviving brother, he purchased the carriage shop located on the lot now occupied by Jacob Schwartz as a marble yard, then owned and operated by a gentleman named Penneo. In October 1837, he was married to Eliza J. Drake, daughter of Samuel J. Drake and sister of Jno. R. and S. C. Drake, who with one son Richard L. survive him. In the fall of 1845 he purchased the interest of his brother John carrying on the business himself until 1850, when he removed with his family to Cincinnati taking an interest in an extensive spoke, hub and felloe factory under the firm name of Royer, Simonton & co. This business which was an eminently successful one, was carried on until in 1862, when he severed his connection with this house, remaining for a few years out of active employment - if we except the position of the Inspector of army wagons, which he was urged to take on account of his special fitness for the position, and which he acceptably filled. His habits of active business would not allow him to remain long out of mercantile life, and in 1865, he identified himself with the wholesale grocery house of Whitehead, Eggleston & Co., at the same time operating a large cotton plantation in Arkansas. These ventures, however, however, were unfortunate, resulting in loss both in health and purse. While in Cincinnati he was an attendant of and a large contributor to the Christian Church and the needy in other denominations found in him a willing friend. In 1868, he was stricken with paralysis; and for months as unable to leave his room. Recovering partially he was advised by his physician to travel as a means of regaining health, and for several years he visited nearly all parts of the United States, representing first the Sarvin Wheel co. In 1878 he removed to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, where he had large property interests, intending to devote his time in the development of these, and has since made that place his home. On November 8th, 1880 he was taken sick, his illness terminating fatally on Saturday, April 30th. His body was brought to Lebanon for interment in our beautiful cemetery, it being his wish that he might be laid to rest among the friends of his early days.
Thus has ended a busy life. A large hearted, noble, generous man has gone - a man loved by those how knew him, and the places that have known him shall know him no more forever; but in the memory of those to whom he was near and dear will be ever live.

Source: The Western Star 1 May 1881 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
20 November 2004
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Leota (Bradley) Simonton

 

By special request the following obituary is printed although somewhat belated. It was read at the deceased’s funeral services conducted by Rev. W. A. Cooper.

This service is held in memory of Leota Bradley Simonton who was born September 29, 1873 and died June 14, 1909 at the age of 35 years 9 months and 15 days.

On the 15th day of August 1908 she was married to Clarence D. Simonton. Her illness covers nearly nine years which was borne with wonderful patience, she was never heard to complain. So long as her health and strength permitted, she was a faithful and devoted friend to those in sicknes and was ever ready to minister to their wants.

She was a loving daughter and faithful wife. For the sake of her loved one’s she would have prized the return of health and strength that she might have lived with them and for them.

She leaves a loving husband, father, mother, brother and sister, beside a host of friends to mourn their loss.

Source: The Western Star, 23 Sep 1909 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
16 June 2003
 

Mary (Buzatt) Simonton (11 Aug 1808 - 26 Jan 1886)

Mrs. Mary Simonton, widow of Colonel John S. Simonton, died at midnight last night. She born in the town of Easton, New Jersey, August 11, 1808, and moved to La Crosse in 1853, since when she has been a resident of this city. The funeral will take place at three p.m. to-morrow (Thursday), from the residence of O. L. Smith, on Fourth street

La Crosse Daily Republican & Leader, Friday, January 29, 1886, page 3 column 2
The funeral of Mrs. Mary Simonton took place from the residence of O. L. Smith, Thursday afternoon at three o’clock. Rev. D. B. Cheny of the First Baptist Church officiated. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bagley, of Milwaukee were present at the obsequies. The remains were taken to Oakwood cemetery for interment. Deceased would have been seventy-eight years old next Augnst. [sic]

Source: La Crosse, WI: La Crosse Daily Republican & Leader, Wednesday, January 27, 1886

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003
 

Mary (Buzatt) Simonton (11 Aug 1808 - 26 Jan 1886)

The funeral of Mrs. Mary Simonton took place from the residence of O. L. Smith, Thursday afternoon at three o’clock. Rev. D. B. Cheny of the First Baptist Church officiated. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bagley, of Milwaukee were present at the obsequies. The remains were taken to Oakwood cemetery for interment. Deceased would have been seventy-eight years old next Augnst. [sic]

Source: La Crosse, WI: La Crosse Daily Republican & Leader, Friday, January 29, 1886

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003
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Mrs. Wilson Simonton

MORROW
Mrs. Wilson Simonton

Word was received here of the death of Mrs. Wilson Simonton at Dayton. Mr. Simonton was a resident of Morrow for many years. He is also in very poor health.

Source: The Western Star, Thursday, 12 Sep 1901 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003

Death of Elder Richard Simonton.

This venerable and worthy minister of Christ died at his residence, near Lebanon, on Saturday evening last. He was in the 63d year of his age. He came to the State of Ohio when a boy, and has been a resident chiefly of Warren county for about fifty years. He attached himself to the “Christian Church” thirty-five years ago, and for thirty-three years of this time has been a faithful, devoted, and successful preacher of the Gospel. His field of labor sometimes extended over a circuit of fifty miles; his appointments were promptly filled, and during this long period he averaged three sermons a week. He was eminently useful, and there are scores and hundreds, now living, who were converted and received into the Church by Elder Simonton. He lived and died without an enemy. We have never known a more honest, self-denying, humble, and inoffensive man; and he died as such a man should die, rejoicing—in peace with God and man. “Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright: for the end of that man is peace.” His funeral sermon was preached on Lord’s Day to a very large congregation. As an evidence of the esteem in which he was held by his neighbors, we may mention the fact, that there were not much less than a thousand persons present, and on the ground there were ninety-six carriages and eighty saddle horses. A more extended account of his life and character will appear hereafter.

Source: Western Star, dated 28 September 1849 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]

by
Judy Simpson on 10 June 2004

Theophilus Simonton

Deaths

- On the 6th inst., in Hamilton tp., this county, Theophilus Simonton, Esq. in the 87th year of his age.

Esquire Simonton was one of the earliest settlers in this county, having emigrated from the State of North Carolina, and settled on the waters of Obanion Creek, as early as 1796, and lived on a farm he cleared out of a thick forest. At that early day and up to the day of his death, few men sustained a better character for hospitality, sobriety and industry. He was for many years a Justice of the Peace in his township, and faithfully served a six month’s tour of duty as a captain in 1813, in the war of Great Britain.

Com.

- On the 15th inst., at the residence of her son James Turner, in Lebanon, Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, at an advanced age.

- On the 9th inst., at Cincinnati, Mr. Samuel Glenny, formerly of Lebanon, aged 52 years.

Source: The Western Star, 23 November 1855 [copy obtained from obituary collection at the Warren County Genealogical Society]
by
Arne H Trelvik
4 January 2005
 

Thomas Benton Simonton (1830-1882)

Death of Benton Simonton

The announcement yesterday morning of the death of Benton Simonton was received with very general surprise, as he was up about his business the day previous, and retired shortly before midnight in his usual health. This, however, has been none of the best for some time past, as he has suffered with a bad cough and frequent fits of choking. Some months ago he was informed by physicians that he had heart disease and death might occur at any hour. Friday night he retired to bed alone and when the family went to call him in the morning, it was found that he had been dead some time, and undoubtedly passed away without pain. The funeral will be held at 2:20 p.m. to-day at the residence, southeast corner Third and Jay streets.

Thomas Benton Simonton was born December 6, 1830, at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived until twenty-three years of age. He came to La Crosse in the fall of 1852, which entitles him to rank among the early pioneers of the city and county. He first engaged in lumber business, then in the furniture trade, then was proprietor of the Harrington house, the leading hotel of the city, and finally opened a feed store, in which business he continued up to the time of his death. He leaves a wife and three children.

Few men in La Crosse are more widely known within the limits of the city and county than “Ben” Simonton. He was a man who had no enemies but many hundreds of friends. His social qualities were predominant and he was noted for unfailing cheerfulness under all the circumstances of life. Even the consciousness of approaching death did not appal [sic] him or weigh heavily upon his temper. Kind hearted, generous and entertaining, he merited the good will so freely accorded him and his death leaves a vacant spot in the heart of many a whole souled companion that no one else can supply. He will be missed and mourned in a manner that may well be envied by men who have more that he had of worldly goods and importance.

Source: LaCrosse, WI: The La Crosse Chronicle, Sunday, January 29, 1882, Page 3

by
Arne H Trelvik
25 June 2003

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