Last CSS Update 29-Oct-2007 11:14 PM

Wyandot Indian Nation Ancestors Traded at Sulphur Springs

Submitted by Kenneth Striker, email: Kwstriker @ aol.com (remove spaces)

For photos on the web of these Indians Click Here

Another webpage on John Stewart

John Striker was the proprietor of Striker’s Market in Sulphur Springs, which was in business from 1934-1966. He had bought a business run by O & C Keller Bros. The building was built by Alfred Fry and dates back to the time of the Civil War. Among the ledgers that Mr. Striker acquired was one which dealt with business conducted with the Upper Sandusky Wyandot Indians. Some of the customers listed were prominent in the affairs of the Upper Sandusky Wyandot Nation. Among the names found in the ledger, the following were members of the 1828 Wyandot Missionary Society (WMS) at Upper Sandusky: Peacock, George Punch, Saint Peter, Doctor Grey Eyes, Francis Driver, Silas Armstrong, Henry Jacquis, John Hicks, Francis Hicks, Manoncue, and Mrs Manoncue. The 1832 listing shows Silas Armstrong was V.Pres of the WMS. Mononcue and John Hicks were Managers. The following are many others associated with the Wyandot Indians of Upper Sandusky, names of whom appear in the ledger:

Capt Thomas Hill, Robert Sharlow (Charloe), John Barnett, Jacob Coon (Tondee), Isaac Nicholas, James Ragen , Geo Ducheqnot, John Stanstone, John Peter (Stanstones son), Mary Jane Miller, Mary Ushyuhe “John Peter’s wife’s sister”, Ester Ann Rogers “Daniel Peacock’s wife” , Charles Elliott, Charlotte Brown “Old Squaw-lives near Indian Mill”, Mary Standing Water, Mary Stewart “wife of John Stewart”, Thomas Hicks “Frank’s brother”, Thomas Hicks “Franks brother” , “old” Mrs Manonky (Manoncue), “old man” Thomas Manonky (Manoncue), Cyrahusk, Carahoo, John Punch, Thomas Enos, David Young, and Thomas Clark.

The Wyandot Indians moved into Ohio in the mid 1700’s from Canada and Michigan. In 1816 they were visited by John Stewart, a man recently converted at Methodist camp meetings near Marietta. He came to the Sandusky Plains area to preach to the Wyandot Nation. He married Polly Carter December 25, 1818. Supposedly there is a record of this at the Crawford Co. Court House. I have read that they did not have children. He died very young. As mentioned above there is an account for “wife of John Stewart” in the mentioned early ledger.

The business reflected in this Musgrave & Merriman ledger was for a time period 1835-1839. From the 1933 History of Sulphur Springs, former Judge Enoch B. Merriman opened a stock of dry goods and groceries in the fall of 1834. This is reflected in the type of items purchased by the Wyandot Indians. Examples were fur caps, shoes, cloth, gingham, silk, velvet, buttons, flannel, ribbon, calico, blankets, padding, boots, umbrella, cord, frying pan, kettles, pocket knives, thread, comb, socks, shovel. sugar, tea, flour, bacon, coffee & tobacco.

The work of John Stewart resulted in the Methodist Church forming in 1819 a Missionary Society to support his work among the Wyandots. John Stewart was of poor health and died in 1823. However, the mission continued up until the time that the Wyandot Indians were forced to leave Ohio in 1843 and move to Kansas. Henry Jacquis (his x ) was one of those who name appears on the 1843 Wyandot Treaty.

The Wyandott Indian Mission at Upper Sandusky has kept up with most recent renovation in 1983. There is a web site Wyandot Nation of Kansas which can be accessed at www.ku.edu/kansas/wn/  where there is a wealth of information on the history of the Wyandot Indians, to include the Wyandot Mission at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. One can click on Wyandot Ancestors to see pictures of early leaders to include pictures of Mononcue and Silas Armstrong. Mononcue died before having to make the arduous trip to Kansas. A ledger entry on May 15, 1839 shows his account was settled on that date by Silas Armstrong, Executor.

Its interesting how a small ledger can bring to life the relationship Sulphur Springs had with its former neighbor, the Wyandot Indians Nation. The Wyandott Indians apparently had dealings in Bucyrus a little earlier. From the 1881 Crawford Co History: “Among the best customers of the early merchants and other business men of the village (Bucyrus) were the Indians, who came from the Wyandot Reservation to buy articles in the village. The names of these were: Walpole, Hicks, Summondewat, Gray Eyes, Sandstone, Barnett, Between the Logs, Sirehus, Jocco, CurlyHead, Big Turtle, Johnny Cake, Lewis Coon, Tom Enos, Charlie Elliot, and others.”

Compiled by Ken Striker, member of Crawford County Genealogical Society of Ohio. Ken sent a scan from the page of the ledger which you can view by clicking here

Re: TRACKING Vol 29 Issue #10:

It was noted that John Stewart , a Methodist Missionary served the Wyandot Indians., having come to Upper Sandusky area in 1818. He then married Polly Carter. There is a record of this at the Crawford Co Courthouse. Information at the Wyandott Wyandott Indian Nation Webpage indicated he died in 1823 and that they had no children. This has been confirmed by E.P. Stewart, a descendant of a brother of John Stewart. Hal Sherman of Englewood Oh has done paintings of several of the Wyandot Indians, including John Stewart. They hang in the Old Wyandot Mission Church in Upper Sandusky. Hal had seen the article about the Wyandot Indians who had dealings with Sulphur Springs merchants. Hal is in contact with E.P. Stewart of Cape Coral FL who wrote “ Yes it is true John and Polly had no children. I am a direct descendant of one of his younger brothers. He had nine siblings, one being Richard Stewart who is my great great grandfather. That makes John Stewart my great great uncle “. E.P Stewart has a copy of the ledger entry of John Stewarts marriage. She also wrote that a Dr. Gilbert Butler is a direct descendant of James Stewart, one of John Stewart’s older brothers.

“The children were as follows:

Elisha Stewart b ab 1783 d 1821 no children, occ: farmer

JOHN STEWART b 1785 d 1823 NO CHILDREN (METHODIST MISSIONARY)

Thomas Stewart b ab 1790 d 1818 no known children occ: Baptist minister & farmer

James B Stewart b 1775 d by 1850 eight children occ: Baptist minister, well known in Ohio (Gil Butler’s ancestor)

Elizabeth Stewart b ab 1799 d unk eight children involved with the Ohio Underground Railroad with her husband)

William Stewart b 1798 d 1858 one child occ:Baptist minister & farmer, migrated to Michigan

Richard Stewart b 1800 d 1885 occ: farmer, migrated to Michigan (E.P. Stewart’s ancestor)

Littleberry Stewart b unk d by 1854 five children occ: farmer

Rebekah Stewart b unk d unk eight children, involved with the Ohio Underground Railroad with her husband and sons

Mariah Stewart b 1810 d by 1870 eight children (a direct descendant lives in Chillicothe Oh)

The Crawford Co History 1881 pg 359 indicates the Wyandot Indians dealt in Bucyrus: “Among the best customers of the early merchants and other business men of the village (Bucyrus) were the Indians, who came from the Wyandot Reservation to buy articles in the village. The names of these were: Walpole, Hicks, Summondewat, Gray Eyes, Sandstone, Barnett, Between the Logs, Sirehus, Jocco, CurlyHead, Big Turtle, Johnny Cake, Lewis Coon, Tom Enos, Charlie Elliot and others.” Among the Bucyrus merchants were Enoch B. Merriman and Robert W Musgrave, who later operated dry goods and grocery stores in Sulphur Springs. Many of these same Indians had dealings in Sulphur Springs, as detailed in the referenced issue of TRACKING.

to return to Main Wyandot County Page

Graphics by: