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CREEK COUNTY TIDBITS

November 1, 1929 
Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma

Marriage Licenses issued

James R. Day 36 and Mrs. Bess Williams Day, 38 of Tulsa
James Caldwell 22 of Tulsa and Miss Catherine Anderson 19 of Independence,  KS
Carl C. Smith 32, of Little Rock Ark and Miss Gladys Gooch 19 of Sand Springs

Submitted by Jack Delmar.


November 1, 1929 
Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma

While J.C. Gray attended a negro football game yesterday afternoon, Sheriff D.B. Livingston and Deputy Sheriff Charles Henderson visisted his apartment at 14 North Maple Street and destroyed 100 bottles of home brew and 2 gallons of whiskey , keeping 1 gallon of Whiskey as evidence.

Upon his return from the game, Gray called the Sheriff's office, told them he was home, and said he was ready to surrender himself. He was bought to county Jail.

Submitted by Jack Delmar.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma

The first tractor to be owned and operated in Creek County was put to work yesterday in the big pasture south of town under the direction of its new owner, John Primm of Kiefer who has recently purchased the big engine from the I.H.C. through the Spaulding Swinney Company of this city.

The big machine with its plows and harrows is known as the Titan Tractor made in Milwaukee and strange as it may sound concerning its origin, it burns water as fuel.

Submitted by Betty Romine from reprint in the Centennial Moments, Sapulpa Herald, Sapulpa, Oklahoma, 2000.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
July 27, 1997, page 12B, column 1

Many Ate At Wimpy's Trolley Car

wimpys.jpg (58592 bytes)

Editor's Note:  On August 11, 1997, Sapulpa Trolley and Rail will move Sapulpa's last remaining streetcar from a residential lot to the TSU yard for restoration as a Sapulpa Centennial icon. The following story is about another one of the old trolley cars... now gone.

By Greg Lower, Herald Staff Writer

Sapulpa trolley cars were not only landmarks as passenger carriers, but even years later when they were turned into business buildings.

One of the longest "running" Sapulpa trolley's served for almost a half-century as Wimpy's Diner, operated by Whitney "Wimpy" Martin. The trolley car was decorated with the cartoon character from Elzie Segar's "Popeye" comic strip, known for his famous line "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."

With his wife Lola and $65 to start, Martin purchased an old trolley car from Steryl McAllister for $300. The car, which had already been remodeled and used as a diner, was moved to 515 E. Dewey, where it remained for almost half a century until Martin retired.

His son, Ron Martin, said Whitney Martin was born and raised in Claremore. His parents, Shorty and Nanny Martin, operated a sandwich shop in Sapulpa. Martin learned to cook while working at the Harvey House restaurant near the railroad tracks. He was a cook at the Mayo Hotel in addition to running the dinner. He operated that and ran back and forth to Tulsa.

During the diner's heyday, Bartlett-Collins glass plant produced a set of ashtrays inscribed "Stolen from Wimpy's Diner, Sapulpa, Oklahoma." For 18 months, Martin turner operation of the diner over to other people while he served in the US Navy during World War II. At one time, we had seven people working here.

The diner operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week with Martin and his brothers. Ron Martin said it operated for one or two years before it showed a profit.  The diner opened in July, 1934.

After Wimpy's closed in October, 1972, Clyde Sellers purchased the lot and the trolley car was torn down. Martin died in 1981 at the age of 69.

The restaurant's 1935 prices included 5 cents for coffee, 15 cents for chili or two jumbo hamburgers, 10 cents for pies or soup and 35 cents for a breakfast of eggs, bacon or ham. In those days meat cost 8 1/3 cents a pound and Martin had a standing order for 100 dozen buns a week.

In the past year, a family moving into a house discovered a set of plates in their attic that used to line the walls of Wimpy's Diner.  Martin advertised his menu by marking the current prices on the places in wax pencil. By 1972, the menu included chili 85 cents, a hamburger or coney for 40 cents.

Submitted by Betty Romine 


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Date Unknown

Trolley Readied for Move

A worker with Big G, little j Construction of Sapulpa tears of the roof of a shed covering Sapulpa's last remaining streetcar in preparation to move the car to Tulsa Sapulpa Union Railway where it will be restored as a Sapulpa Centennial project.

Bennett Steel Co. is planning to move the 1920s car on August 11. The car was recently donated to Sapulpa Trolley and Rail by Charlie and Shirley Brooks. The group which also plans to establish a rail museum, plans to have the trolley restored by Sapulpa's 100th birthday on Feb 12, 1998, and hope to have it operational for an excursion during the Centennial year.

Submitted by Betty Romine 


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Date Unknown

Sapulpa's 100th Birthday Celebration
1898-1998

Centennial Calendar

The Sapulpa Centennial Celebration officially kicks off Friday with the Pre-Centennial Fireworks display and runs through all of 1998 - right through the 1998 Christmas Parade.

Submitted by Betty Romine 


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
May 2-3, 1998
page 1

Restoration Complete

Chief Sapulpa Statue Now Inside City Hall

Chief Sapulpa is back where he belongs after a facelift, just in time for his centennial.

A carved wooden statue of this city's namesake returned to city hall Friday afternoon, although to a place indoors instead of in front of the building.

Artist Clayton Coss and restorer Charles Goff completed a 40 hour restoration on the statue, originally carved with a chainsaw in 1990 from a 90-year-old pecan tree taken from Polecat Creek. The wooden statue managed to escape eight years without vandalism in from of the city hall, but could not escape the ravages of time. The statue has been fortified with fiberglass, and Coss carved a new base and boots for the statute. The nearly 1,000 pound statute was moved to an alcove on the second floor beneath a window south of the atrium facing the city council chambers.

Although not a formal chief, Sapulpa acquired the title as a nickname and was elected to the Creek House of Kings. Born near 1824 as a member of the Kasihta tribe, he was one of the first settlers in the area before the Civil War.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
May 2-3, 1998
page 1

Remembering Old Sapulpa High School

By Virginia Wolfe

The first seniors in Sapulpa were graduated without ceremony because of lack of funds. They were Nell JAMES and Evelyn HUGHES in 1902.

The "Castle" was the term applied to Sapulpa's first school building erected in 1903, the Washington, located on East Lee Street between Maple and Walnut. It's structure was a 3 story square building with a cupola enclosing a school bell. The building had tall square chimneys on the corners giving the appearance of a castle. In 1910, fire destroyed the roof of the building and damage was so great, the top floor had to be removed and rebuilding done. In 1936, the "Castle" was considered unsafe and plans were made for a new building on the site, which was completed in 1937, a part of the WPA project, the cornerstone was laid in 1936.

At that time, J. W. Weeks who was 90 years old, the father-in-law of Dr. Wm. Polk Longmire, Sr., was the sole survivor of the original school board.

The first Sapulpa school was held in a small office of W. A. Smith's livery barn on North Main Street. The teacher, Miss Cassie Meadows, had completed the fourth grade, so she was well qualified. The students  paid one dollar per month.

The second school was held at what is now Little Cussetah, northeast of Sapulpa. A third subscription school was held in a little one-room building near the present courthouse.

In 1898, one hundred years ago, with so many pupils, school had to be held over two stores on Main Street, possibly an old theatre.

Then an Indian, Henry Land, completed a two and one-half story building, Dewey College, named for Admiral Dewey. In 1902, Sapulpa bought the building and moved it to the site of our present courthouse, which later became our city hall.

The original Washington School was completed in 1904, named so because it was the first of its kind in the city.

After this school had been rebuilt after the fire, it was dedicated and the cornerstone of the $85,000 building was laid on Wed. March 22, 1937. C. D. Daniel, member of the school board and Otis R. Rule, clerk, described the items being placed in the copper box in the cornerstone, such as copies of local newspapers and a host of other materials relating to the then present-day Sapulpa, as well as the contents of the old 1903 cornerstone. One of the interesting items placed within the box was the “Constitution and Laws of the Creek Nation” published in March 1890, a gift of Joe Bruner, president of the American Indian Federation.

 The Sapulpa High School located on the 900 block of East Dewey was one of the most beautiful schools in the state. It’s construction began February 10, 1918. The cost was $179,872. The architect who also worked on the construction of the Clayton Building, now Wells Building, was Larry Rooney.

Even as early as 1925, the beautiful high school attendance was growing so rapidly, there was talk of further extending the building and equipment. The oil industry was a factor which was largely responsible for the existence of Sapulpa, and from whose activities SHS had benefited extensively.

Previous to 1924, the 7th and 8th grades were referred to as Junior High. In 1924, they were moved into the high school building after an addition had been completed, thus, the six upper grades were under the same administration.

When Lemuel Rhodest, our fire chief, noticed a cracked floor and lack of guard rails near stairwells in the school building, in his mind the building was unsafe for our youngsters, so the school was demolished, which proved to not be a simple task, in the late 1960s.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Nov 8-9, 1997
pg 1, 2

meyer-store.jpg (84241 bytes)

Max Meyer and Sapulpa was a good fit
By Art Cox

Max Meyer, a strapping six-footer, was one of Sapulpa's first merchants, having settled in the new town in 1906, a year before statehood.

He and his first wife, Annie, opened a clothing store where the Douglas Funitures store now does business.  Meyer, a native of Arkansas, decided to settle in Sapulpa...

Lewis Meyer made his father famous with the publication of his biography of the merchant, Preposterous Papa. The book also became the basis of a Jackie Gleason move, Papa's Delicate Condition.

Max Meyer's heyday in Sapulpa came during the early years of the town's history when the Glenn Pool become the richest oil find in the world. The pool was located a few miles south and east of Sapulpa, in the town named for it.

Papa Meyer found riches early in the new land, but not from selling clothing. He had 55 producing oil wells on his 3,000 acre property east of Kellyville, near the Creek Co. Fairgrounds.

With hundred of thousands of dollars at his disposal, Max Meyer did things for his town like start the first moving picture show, establish a tourist court (now called motels) and build two service stations on Route 66 (one of each side of the road for the convenience of his customers).

Max Meyer's personality seemed to suit the town because he did everything in a big way. (continued on A-3) 

...he would have big parties and used his money until he went broke... Max never worried about money, though.

..."I know people say I'm foolish for throwing money around like a crazy man, but where would I have invested it? Both Sapulpa banks went broke and I'd lost it there. The stock market crashed and I'd lost it there. At least I have the land to show for some of it. And there's more oil there, too. Plenty of it."

But he also managed to give his town anything it needed and his children all had the benefit of a fine education.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Nov 8-9, 1997
pg 1

Book won attention for Papa's town too

When Lewis Meyer wrote a book about his Preposterous Papa, merchant Max Meyer, he not only made his father famous, but his town, as well.

Lewis Meyer was a product of Sapulpa - a graduate of Sapulpa High School as well as a best-selling author and bookstore owner. Meyer became well-known in the area mainly through a Sunday morning television show, Lewis Meyer's Bookshelf.

But his Sapulpa roots remained firm. In the introduction to Preposterous Papa, Meyer describes his hometown: "Sapulpa is a pleasant community which nestles in the shadow of the ever-growing metropolis that is Tulsa, yet maintains an identity and character of its own," he said.

When his book hit the best-sellers list (sold more than a million copies) Sapulpa benefited directly. Max Meyer became so well known, the town eventually sponsored a Max Meyer day, complete with parade. 

Dave Jones says "He was so passionate about books he would hunt you down to put the right one in your hands."

[Note: article continues on about his bookstore and his love of books]


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
Nov 8-9, 1997
pg 2
photo of motor court

Cottages on Route 66 next to the Creek County Fairgrounds is part of the Max and Lewis Meyer legacy. They stand now ghostly and very grown in weeds.


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
July 2, 1998
pg 2

A directory of Sapulpa businesses from 1905


Sapulpa Herald
Sapulpa, Oklahoma
July 2, 1998
pg 5, 9

Clips from the past
Old newspaper reports draw colorful accounts of Sapulpa

[note: no dates are given for the articles]

Sapulpa has been advertised east, west, north and south by R. B.  Dingman of the Territorial Stock Exchange. 

Born about the time the war started in April 1862, the colonel was born in Rice Lake, Minnesota; but his boyhood days were spent in Colorado. In 1882 he went to Kansas; about 1890 he came to Indian Territory. Col. Dingman was one of the foremost workers for the building of Muskogee. In January 1902, he located in Sapulpa because he saw that Sapulpa would someday rival Muskogee.

The spring of the following year he founded the Territorial Stock Exchange. The Territorial Stock Exchange literature was sent east, west, north and south and not a pamphlet goes out but what continues a good ad for the City of Sapulpa.

Trains coming into Indian Territory would be flooded with literature and not a home seeker ever comes to this town but who knows that the Territorial Stock Exchange does business here.

Bingman (sic) is a member of the IOOF, Eagles, AOUW, Red Men and a pusher in the Sapulpa Chamber of Commerce.  There is not a more social man in Sapulpa than the colonel and all strangers he meets are made to feel right at home and to think that Sapulpa is the thickest spot in the entire jar of cream.

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In 1899, when everything was on the jump, W. S. Bunting organized and put into operation the Sapulpa State Bank. He did a large and successful business for two years, when the bank was nationalized as the First National Bank of Sapulpa...

This is the first and only national bank in Sapulpa. Strict business rules and honest dealings have won large patronage and the bank has steadily grown until today it is one of the strongest financial institutions in the southwest...

The officers of the bank are Carl W. LEHNHARD, president; W. S. BUNTING, vice-president; Phil J. LEHNHARD, cashier; John WESTFALL, assistant cashier.

In 1905, the First National built a fine two story pressed brick building 25 by 75 feet, on the corner of Main and Hobson.

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Mr. A. C. FRAMPTON, proprietor of the Racket Store, came to our city in August 1904, from St. Louis and opened Sapulpa's Racket Store. He has carried on a successful business since his residence.

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One of the largest hardware stores in the Indian Territory is that of N. E. Chapman of this city. Mr. Chapman came to Sapulpa in 1902 from Enid.

His building on Main Street is of stone and brick, 135 feet long with a basement the entire length.  The basement and first floor are packed with goods of the hardware line. His stock of shelf and heavy hardware, harness, buggies, wagons and implements is conceded by all to be one of the largest in the territory...

A tin shop is run in connection with the store. Trade comes to Mr. Chapman from miles around...

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Col. W. Z. Gore's progressive grocery store - during the six months that he has been established, he has achieved a degree of success that has been remarkable...

The colonel was born in Mercer County, W. Va., in 1873; was married in 1892 to Miss Montez RICKETTS of Bentonville, AR. He came to Sapulpa in 1899 and opened the Porter House.  He dealt in real estate, oil and coal leases and pushed for Sapulpa when Sapulpa was but an infant. Today his Dewey Avenue grocery is one of the popular stores in our city.

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There is probably not a prettier, more up-to-date banking concern in the two territories than the Farmers & Merchants Bank of this city. In 1899 this bank was organized by W. J. BURNETT... H. C. MILLER was president, W. J. BURNETT, cashier; and B. B. BURNETT, assistant cashier.

Last year the bank built the prettiest building in this city on the corner of Main and Dewey. The building is 26 by 120 feet, two story, pressed brick, trimmed in white stone and cost $10,000. The inside fixtures are beautiful. All the woodwork is of rich mahogany. An extra large vault and a Mosler Tribble Timer screw door safe, with safety deposit lock boxes for private use, are among the fixtures.

The officers of the bank are H. C. Miller, president; John DERMOTT, vice president; B. B. Burnett, cashier; A. P. CRAWFORD, assistant cashier; C. W. WILLS, bookkeeper. Mr. Dermott, the vice president, is a capitalist of Webb City, MO...  Mr. Burnett is from the Blue Grass state.

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On the corner of Dewey and Water Street is located probably the neatest looking grocery stores in our city.

The store was started by Joe DENTON, who sold a half interest to John BRADY and later his entire interest to Huber HUGHES...finally G. C. Hughes purchased the Brady interest and since January the firm has been known as Hughes and Son, under the management of Huber Hughes. Two wagons are kept constantly on the go and from four to six clerks wait on the steadily increasing trade.

In February 1899, the Hughes family came to Sapulpa. G. C. Hughes is the Frisco Immigration Agent and a real estate man.

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The first of March 1898, D. H. and J. W. Buffington located in Sapulpa from Springfield, MO. They opened an undertaking establishment in a frame building on Main Street, where the large brick post office now stands. Three years ago they moved to their present location on Lee and Oak streets and a 75 foot flag pole with the stars and stripes always afloat points out their location to all.

D. H. Buffington is a professional embalmer and holds a certificate from the Territorial Board of Health of Oklahoma. All the Frisco railroad work from this division is taken to Mr. Buffington. The first job was on the 10th day of March 1898.

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E. M. McMahan is the proprietor of the West Dewey Avenue Livery Barn.  Mr. McMahan prides himself on his fine lot of rigs and fast horses. He has several rubber-tied traps and surreys and does a splendid business. "Mac" is always found at his place of business...

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Sapulpa has, in the J. G. Street and Co. furniture store, one of the largest in the Creek Nation. The store has been established in this city for a number of years and was bought in August 1904, from J. KAUFMAN by J. G. Street and Co. of Oklahoma City. The building is brick, three rooms, each 100 feet long and crowded from the ceiling to the floor with the best grade of furniture, carpets, mattings, linoleums, etc. carried in this section.

The undertaking department is in connection. Mr. Fred WILKENING is manager of the store...

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The Sapulpa Installment Co. does the general house furnishing business of the city. They keep new and second hand goods and enjoy a big trade. The proprietors are E. TIMMONS and J. RICE. Three years ago they launched in Sapulpa and today have one of the leading stores in the city.

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Possibly one of the largest exclusive clothing and men's and boy's furnishing houses in the Territory is that of Adams and Graham. The stock is complete in every particular. Mr. Fred ADAMS manages the business in Sapulpa, and Mr. GRAHAM is on the road all the time. The store competes with Springfield, Monett, Oklahoma City, Texas and other city stores....

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It is the business of the Arcade, Sapulpa's popular restaurant and short order house, to feed the hungry. 

W. H. HARLOW, the proprietor, has been in Sapulpa three years. Harlow and Blair was the firm name at first but after a year and a half, Mr. Blair sold his interest to Mr. Harlow....

A year ago the restaurant burned to the ground, but in less than an hour the Arcade was running at full blast in another building. 

Mr. Blair, the cook, has been with Mr. Harlow for seven years. He is one of the best in the Territory... Three people are kept busy in the kitchen all the time, and four waiters are constantly on the go. Sometimes as many as ten people are employed in the restaurant. The kitchen is fitted with hot and cold water tanks, hydrants, etc. and a large 12 hole range. 

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One of the busiest places in Sapulpa is the wholesale house of R. A. Bowden and Co. on Hobson Avenue.  Three years ago, Mr. BOWDEN came to this city and engaged in the grocery business. Later C. D. THOMPSON went in with him and they opened a wholesale flour and grocery house. About a year ago Mr. Bowden bought his partner's interest and opened a wholesale flour, feed, salt and produce house.

Today the commission house of R. A. Bowden and Co. is one of the largest in the Territory. The city merchants are supplied and from four to six carloads of goods are shipped to neighboring towns every month. They sell only to dealers.

Mr. Bowden is a native of Virginia. He enlisted in the 4th Virginia Infantry. He is a member of the AOUW, Chamber of Commerce and an earnest worker for Sapulpa.


Muskogee Weekly Phoenix
21 Jul 1892

Married at the residence of Mr. A.P. McKELLOP on Sunday evening last, Mr. A.E. McKELLOP and Miss Hattie SMITH, both of Sapulpa, I.T. 

Mr. McKellop is the National Tax Collector for the Creek Nation. They will honeymoon in Texas.


Boynton News
Muskogee Co, OK
19 Mar 1926

Miss Katherine THOMPSON, daughter of Dr. M.K. THOMPSON of Muskogee, was united in marriage to John D. RUTHERFORD in Sapulpa last Sunday.


Boynton News
Muskogee Co, OK
2 Jul 1926

Mr. & Mrs. Sam KHOURIE and family attended the wedding of Miss Nellie NAIFEH and Mr Elmer ZAMMER in Sapulpa today.


Fairland News
Fairland, Ottawa County, Oklahoma
Friday, March 17, 1911

LOCAL NEWS

Oscar WOODSON came up from Sapulpa the latter part of last week to doctor up a little, having an attack of rheumatism.


Fairland News
Fairland, Ottawa County, Oklahoma
Friday, Mar 24, 1911

LOCAL NEWS

Mrs. BIXBY went to Sapulpa the latter part of last week and brought her daughter, Mrs. Jim WALKER home with her, who is just recovering from a severe siege of illness.


Fairland News
Fairland, Ottawa County, Oklahoma
Friday, July 7, 1911

Mrs. J. M. Lanford and daughter were up from Sapulpa to see friends at our celebration.

 

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