Historic Homes of Tahlequah:
 
  Please select any home of interest for more information.
 
Baggette Home
Bedwell Home
Jim Duncan Home
Jane Anna French Home
Dr. Irvin D. Leoser Home
George M. Murrell Home
Powell-Antoine Home
Johnson Thompson Home
 

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Baggette Home
 
Built in 1906, by a Mr. Alston, a local contractor, the floor plan of this house is identical to the Bedwell home and has the same Carpenter Gothic features. The Baggette girls attended Northeastern State University and later became teachers.
 
 
Bedwell Home
 
This house was also built by Mr. Alston for a Mr. Bedwell, a biology instructor at Northeastern State University. The roof patterns and porch treatments of this house are typical of the Carpenter Gothic style (1870-1910).
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Jim Duncan Home
 
Built in the Carpenter Gothic style (1870-1910), this house incorporates sawn wood ornaments on the gables, porches, and cornices. Still standing in the yard is a spring house where early residents drew water and stored milk and butter. The house was built by Gus Ivey, a prominent Tahlequah businessman, and was sold to the James Duncan family. Mr. Duncan was a land surveyor, a teacher, and a farmer. About 1965, the city of Tahlequah bought the place and converted it into a community center, Brookside.
 
 
Jane Anna French Home
 
Something borrowed could be the theme for this house built in 1889 and given to Jane Anna as a wedding gift by her father. Brick and symmetry were borrowed from the Federal style (1780-1820). Decorative quoining from the Renaissance period garnish the exterior corners of the house. The home also has characteristics of the Carpenter Gothic style (1870-1910). Jane Anna was the wife of Constable Robert M. French, and was the daughter of wealthy Tahlequah merchant Johnson Thompson.
 
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Dr. Irvin D. Leoser Home
 
Built in 1833, the oldest portion, the log cabin - the part that remains standing, was known for its hospitality to the unfortunate during the Civil War. The house consisted of three rooms and a breezeway connected to a large room with a fireplace.
 
 
George M. Murrell Home
 
This home was built in the new Cherokee Nation about 1845 by George M. Murrell. Mr. Murrell was a native Virginian who married Minerva Ross in 1834. Minerva was a member of a wealthy mixed-blood Cherokee/Scottish family, and the niece of Chief John Ross.
The Murrell Home is the only remaining antebellum plantation home in modern-day Oklahoma. This home stands as a reminder of the high lifestyle practiced by a few in the Cherokee Nation before the Civil War. The home contains original and period artifacts and furnishings and is currently undergoing restoration.
For group tours and special program information contact: George M. Murrell Home Site, 19479 E. Murrel Road, Park Hill, OK 74451-9601. (918) 456-2751.
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Powell-Antoine Home
 
Cherokee Chief Downing once owned the land where this Victorian style home is located. Wooden shingles which cover the tower and the small stained glass panes above clear panes of glass are typical of the Queen Anne style. The house was built in 1905.
 
Johnson Thompson Home
 
The style of this two-story brick home is modified Gothic. A revival of the Gothic style took place from 1835 to 1880. Tall, slender windows emphasize a vertical effect. Johnson Thompson, one of the wealthiest merchants in Indian Territory, built the house in 1880.
 
 
 
 
 
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