OBITUARIES FROM THE ORANGEVILLE BANNER FOR THE YEAR 1906

Source: National Library of Canada - N258 Reel #31

This page is still under construction. More obituaries will be added as I pull them out of the paper. If you have any obituaries to contribute, please email me and I will add them to this page.

ANDERSON | BRODDY | BROTHERS | BROWN | BROWNE | CAMERON | CAMPBELL | CARROLL | CHISHOLM | COBEAN | COOK | DIXON | DUNNING | EVANS | FAULKNER | GALBRAITH | GOEGHEGAN | GREENAWAY | HAMMOND | HENDERSON | HICKS | HOGG | HOLMES | JOHNSTON | KANNAWIN | KEYS | LAMB | LAMONT | LARGE | LINN | LIVINGSTONE | MCFARLANE | MCFAUL | MCGILL | MCGILLIVRAY | MCILROY | MCKIM | MCKITTRICK | MCLEOD | MOFFATT | MURDOCK | MURRAY | MUTRIE | MYERS | NASMYTH | PERRY | RICHARDSON |
RIDLEY | ROBINSON | ROSS | ROWAN | RUTHERAM | SHIELDS | SMITH | STEVENSON | STODDART | SULLIVAN | SUTHERLAND | THOMPSON | TWEEDY | WALKER | WATSON | WEBB | WHEELER | WIGGINS


August 2, p.7:Archibald Anderson - Mr. Archibald Anderson, an old resident of Mono township, died at his home on 1st St., on Thursday from the effects of a paralytic stroke. Deceased who had reached the ripe age of 77 years, was a native of Tyrone, Ireland. He came to Canada with his parents when 14 years of age, the family settling on the 6th line east, Mono. After his marriage to Miss Ann Burns, of Toronto, 52 years ago, Mr. Anderson moved to lot 15, Centre Road Mono, where he in time acquired a splendid 400 acre property. Four years ago Mr. and Mrs. Anderson gave up farming and moved to Orangeville to spend their declining years in well earned leisure in their cosy home on 1st St. Although wedded over half a century and the parents of six sons and three daughter, Mr. Anderson's death, strange to relate, makes the first break in the family circle. The sons are Alexander, in Oregon; Benjamin in London; Jas. I. Melita, Man.; Stewart, Winnipeg; Dr. George, a physician in Elyria, Ohio, and Hilliard on the homestead, Mrs. R.G. Canning, Violet Hill, Mrs. Jos. Howard, Camilla, and Miss Ida, at home, are the daughters. Deceased was honest and industrious in his habits, of upright character and was highly respected as a good neighbor and a useful citizen, He was a consistent member of the Methodist church and in politics gave a steady adherence to the Conservative party. There was a particularly large attendance at the funeral, which took place to the Forest Lawn cemetery on Saturday afternoon. Rev. R. Hassard and Re. G.W. Hewitt conducted impressive services at the house and grave. The pallbearers were the deceased's three sons, Hilliard, Stewart and Benjamin Anderson - the other sons not being able to get home in time for the funeral - his sons-in-law, Jos. Howard and R.G. Canning, and his nephew, Robert Anderson.

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August 16,p.2: James Broddy - Mr. James Broddy, one of Erin's oldest and most highly esteemed citizens, passed away at his home in that village on Tuesday morning of last week. The deceased gentleman, who had completed the allotted span of his life, three score years and ten, had been in falling health for a considerable time. The end came quietly and peacefully. The deceased was one of the oldest bailiffs in Ontario, having been connected in that capacity with the Fifth Division Court of the County of Wellington for nearly fifty years. He was appointed in 1855 during the Sandfield Macdonald regime, and held office until four years ago, when failing health obliged him to retire. He was a fearless and painstaking official and at all stages in his official career discharged his duties with more than average efficiency. As a citizen, Mr. Broddy was highly respected. With a generous but unostentatious hand, he went among the poor dispensing charity where needed and many there are, who will long hold him in grateful remembrance for his kindly, helpful deeds. He was a member of the Methodist church and was for years a class leader in the Erin church. In politics he was a staunch Conservative
Deceased is survived by a family of two sons and three daughters, - William, a merchant in Uxbridge; James, Toronto; Mrs. H. Stevenson, Erin; Mrs. Symons, Detroit; Miss Maud, at home, Sheriff Broddy, of Brampton, as a brother and Rms. Hunter, Toronto, a sister. Mr. Broddy was enthusiastic Mason and there was a large representation of members of the Craft at the funeral on Thursday. The funeral was one of the largest seen in Erin for years.

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November 22,p.7:Thomas Brothers - Thos. Brothers, a respected resident of this town, died at his home on John street, on Saturday night, after a protracted illness. Deceased, who was 79 years of age, formerly resided near Arthur, but removed to Orangeville about four years ago. He was born in Banghall, Armagh County, Ireland, but came to Canada many years ago. He possessed many of the characteristics of the true Celt, and was not wanting in the open-hearted hospitality and generous spirit for which his race is noted. He was a Conservative, a member of the Anglican Church and an ardent Orangeman. Deceased is survived by a widow, two sons and four daughters. The family are William and Joseph Brothers, of Buffalo; Mrs. Post, Mrs. Gates and Mrs. Whitcomb, of Buffalo, and Mrs. Brain, living at Damascus, Luther township. All the members of the family were present at the funeral, which was held to the Forest Lawn cemetery on Tuesday atnoon and was largely attended by Orangeville friends and acquaintances of the family. Members of the Orange Order to the number of thirty or over were present in full regalia. The pallbearers were S. Montgomery, J.F. Bradley, J . Gilchrist, W. Fiddes, E. Fields and Jas. Brown, members of L.O.L. No. 427, Rev. G. A. Rix, rector of St. Mark's Church, conducted the services at the house and grave.

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September 13,p.6:Alexander Brown - It is with extreme regret that we record the death of Alexander Brown, which took place on Thursday last, after a trying illness of a few months' duration. The late Mr. Brown was about 60 years old and has resided here for probably a quarter of a century always enjoying robust health until this summer, when he took sick with cancer of the stomach. Since that time he has gradually failed until death came as a release from suffering. He leaves a bereaved widow and a sorrowing family of three sons and one daughter. The sons are Messrs. David, John and Alex., all at home and the daughter, Mrs. W. Bennett, of Black's Corners. One brother, Mr. D.B. Brown, of Orangeville, and sister living in the United States also survive. The deceased was a kind obliging neighbor and a highly esteemed citizen. He was a Liberal in politics and in religion a staunch Presbyterian. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to Shelburne cemetery, and was probably the largest ever seen in this locality. Rev. J .R. F. Bell, of Laurel, conducted the services. The pallbearers were Messrs. Charles Coolder, Wm. Sime, James Bell, Wm. Pa??y, Thos. Ferguson, and R. Pacey. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved family in the dark hours.

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December 27,p.7:Mabel (McGuire) Browne - Her many friends will learn with deep sorrow of the sudden and untimely death of Mrs. E.C. Browne (nee Mabel McGuire) formerly of this town, which occurred at her home in Woolseley, Sask., on Christmas Day. The deceased lady who was in her 21st year, was the youngest sister of Mr. B. McGuire, of the Banner, and Mrs. E.J. Ellis, of Caledon. She was married in 1901, and lived in Brighton, Ont., until about a year ago, when her husband decided to remove to theWast. Besides her husband, she leaves a baby boy, less than two week [sic] old at the time of his mother's death. Deceased was a general favorite, because of her sunny disposition and bright winsome manner. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved husband, who is very well known here, and the members of her family.

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August 2,p.7: Andrew George Cameron - Andrew George Cameron, second son of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Cameron, died at the home of his parents, lot 16, 3rd line, west, Caledon, yesterday morning. The lad, who was 3 years and 3 months old, had been ill only two or three days. His death was caused by some bowel trouble. The funeral will be held to Alton cemetery at two o'clock on Friday afternoon. The sympathy of the community is extended to Mr. and Mrs. Cameron in their bereavement.

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October 25,p.5:Mr. Charles Campbell - Mr. Charles Campbell, an old resident of Caledon township, died at the home of his son, Joseph, lot 16, con.2, west, on Monday morning, at the remarkable age of 92 years. Nowithstanding his years, the deceased was quite active and retained the possession of his mental faculties almost to the last. Mr. Campbell was a native of Tyrone, Ireland whence he emigrated to Canada about 60 years ago. He lived in Toronto for eight years after his arrival in this country, and then moved to Caledon, settling on the farm on which he died. Prior to his departure from his native country, he married Miss Eliza Wray, who at the age of 94 years, is still hale and active, and as bright mentally as most people are at seventy. The late Mr. Campbell was a Presbyterian, being a member of Knox Church, Charleston, for many years. In politics, he gave an unswerving allegiance to the fortunes of the Conservative party.
He is survived by a family of two sons and two daughters. The sons are Joseph, on the homestead, and Chas., railway agent at Red Bluff, Cal., and for thirteen years C.P.R. agen at Caledon. The daughters are Mrs. William Stinson, of Albion and Mrs. Duncan McArthur, of Caledon. It is interesting to note that Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have lived to see their great great grand children, one of great grand daughters, Mrs. Benjamin Grahame, of Caledon, being the mother of two. There was a large turnout of sympathizing friends and neighbors at the funeral, which was held form the deceased's late home, to Charleston, cemetery, at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Rev. Stanley R. Robinson, of Caledon, conducted impressive services at the house and grave.

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September 6,p.2:Victoria Amanda Campbell - The death of Miss Victoria Amanda Campbell, only sister of Mr. G.A. Campbell, of this town, occurred at the home of her cousin, Mrs. Jno. M. Wilson, Wilton avenue, Owen Sound, on Sunday afternoon. The deceased lady, who had not been enjoying the best of health for some time past, left her home at Mono Mills about three weeks ago on a visit to relatives in Owen Sound. She spent Friday prior to her death with Mrs. James M. Wilson and on returning to Mrs. John Wilson's in the evening complained that she was feeling unwell. She retired early in the evening and did not leave her apartment again. Sunday morning medical aid was summoned, but to no avail, and at three o'clock in the afternoon she passed quietly away. She had suffered from some time from heart and kidney trouble. The deceased was the only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Campbell, of Mono Mills. She was born at Mono Mills and was 54 years of age. She was a devout and consistent member of Mono Mills Presbyterian Church and a regular worshipper at its Sabbath Day services. The surviving members of the family are Hamilton, Toronto; Herbert, Ottawa; George A., Orangeville; and Albert, Mono Mills. The remains were brought to Orangeville on Monday evening, Rev. Samuel Lewis holding a brief funeral service at Mrs. Wilson's prior to their removal. There was an unusually large attendance at the funeral, which was held from her late home near Mono Mills to Mono East burying ground on Tuesday afternoon. Rev. F. Davey conducted impressive services at the house and grave.

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August 2,p.7:David Carroll - Mr. David Carroll, one of the early settlers in the township, died at his home on the 17th line, East Garafraxa on Thursday last in his 80th year. The deceased has been failing in health for some time, but was nevertheless able to go about until quiet recently. Deceased was born in the north of Ireland. He came to this country when a young man and shortly afterwards settled in East Garafraxa, where by patient industry coupled with frugality and good management, he succeeded in acquiring a splendid property. He was a member and staunch supporter of the Presbyterian church and a Conservative in politics. He was esteemed as a good neighbor and an honest, law abiding citizen and enjoyed the undivided respect of the community in which he spent the greater part of his life. He was a widower, his wife having died about twenty four years ago. A family of three sons and a daughter survive. The former are John J., proprietor of Stanley Park and Lake, a popular pleasure resort at Erin village; Joseph, a farmer in West Caledon, and William, who works the homestead. Mrs. Thomas A. McClure who lives at Brampton, is the only surviving daughter. The funeral was held to Greenwood Cemetery on Sunday afternoon and was largely attended despite the heavy downpour of rain. Rev. A.L. Burch, pastor of St. Andrew's church, conducting the services at the house and grave.

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October 4,.2:Kenneth Chisholm - Kenneth Chisholm, Registrar of Peel County, died at his home in Brampton on Wednesday morning, Sept. 26th. Deceased had been ill for some time, and the end was not unexpected. Two daughters and three sons survive him. Mr. Chisholm was a native of the county of Peel, born in Toronto township on March 17, 1829, of Scotch descent. After an apprenticeship as clerk he commenced business for himself, and in company with Mr. Elliott, and by reason of his sterling qualities and sound business ability, soon controlled some of the largest enterprises in the county. His interests included a general store and grain business at Brampton, mills at Eldorado, and a general store in Orangeville, in the premises now occupied by the Bank of Hamilton. He was also vice-president of the Haggert Mfg. Co, and a director of he Central Bank. As a young man he had an ambition to enter public life, and was a member of the town and county councils, and for a number of years was warden of the county. On the death of John Coyne he was elected member for Peel in the local legislature on the 19th of February 1873, and was re-elected in 1875, 1879, 1883,1886 and 1889. In 1892, he resigned his seat to accept the registrarship of the county, which position he held until his death. A vigorous and resourceful fighter, and a generous, warm-hearted man, he had few, if any, personal enemies, and in the days of his activity enjoyed the confidence of the people of Peel to perhaps a greater extent than any other man. The funeral, which was private, took place on Friday afternoon to Brampton cemetery. The pall-bearers were the immediate relatives of the deceased, Messrs. Chisholm, of Owen Sound and Cleveland, nephews and his son-in-law, Mr. W.H. McFadden, of Brampton, Rev. R.N. Burns, pastor of St. Paul's church, conducted the service. Among the many beautiful floral tributes was a wreath from Mr. Jas. Scott, of Winnipeg, a friend of deceased for many years.

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August 23,p.7: Margaret (Henry) Cobean - The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Cobean, formerly of Camilla, will be regret deeply Mrs. Cobean's death, which occurred at her home, 509 Ontario St., Toronto, on Friday last. The deceased lady has been in declining health for the last three years and was confined to her room almost constantly for a year or more prior to her death. Mrs. Cobean, whose maiden name was Margaret Henry was a daughter of the late John Henry of Mono Mills. For many years after her marriage she resided at Camilla, where her husband conducted a successful mercantile business, at the same time filling the responsible position of village postmaster and municipal treasure of Mono. Five years ago, or thereabouts, Mrs. Cobean, disposed of his business and removed to Toronto where he has since engaged in the manufacture and sale of Kola Wine, a popular beverage with valuable tonic qualities. Since their removal to Toronto,Mr. and Mrs. Cobean have sustained two crushing bereavements through the successive deaths of the two children, a son and daughter. The mother, who was wholly wrapped up in her children, never recovered from the cruel blow and under the influence of the loss, her health, at no time rugged, gradually gave way. The deceased was a lady of lofty character and was held in the warmest esteem by her many friends. She was devoted to her husband and family and to the former the loss occasioned by her death is well-nigh irreparable. Mrs. Cobean is survived by two brothers Robert Henry, of Toronto, and Alex. Henry of Buffalo, and two sisters, Mrs. Smith of Toronto and Mrs. Hugh McKenna of Mono. The remains were brought to Orangeville for interment on Monday morning, the funeral taking place from the C.P.R. Station here to the family burying plot in St. John's church cemetery, 7th line, Mono. Rev. Frank Davey, of Mono Mills, conducted the services. A large number of friends, many of them from the vicinity of the deceased's old home of Camilla, met the remains at the depot here and a large gathering awaited their arrival at the cemetery. The casket in which the remains reposed, was almost hidden beneath the numerous floral offerings, which bore silent testimony to the esteem in which the departed lady was held. Among these was noticed a beautiful spray from the Toronto Dufferin Old Boys Association, of which Mr. Cobean has been a prominent member. The pallbearers were Geo. E. Cobean, R.B. Henry, Jos. Cobean, Wm. A. Henry, Robert Henry and Joseph Howard.

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December 27,p.7:William A. Cook - William A. Cook, a well known Amaranth young man, passed away on Friday morning, after a protracted illness due to typhoid fever. The deceased, who was in his 21st year, was a son of Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Cook. During his illness he was under the care of his uncle Dr. A.J. Hunter and had a trained nurse in constant attendance at his bedside, but medical skill and nursing were alike powerless to stay the ravages of the disease that had marked him for its prey. Deceased had many friends and his taking off at the very threshold of manhood has caused general sorrow in the community. He is survived by his parents, three brothers and several sisters. There was a large attendance at the funeral, which was held from his late residence, lot 9, con. 2, Amaranth, to Greenwood cemetery on Sunday afternoon. The member of Laurel L.O.L. 330, of which deceased was a member, attended the funeral in a body. Rev. J.R. Bell, of Laurel, conducted the services at the house and grave.

December 6,p.3:Mrs. Jane Dixon - Mrs. Jane Dixon passed peacefully away at the residence of her brother-in-law; Mr. Oscar Banks, last Wednesday. the deceased lady, who was in her 50th year, has been indifferent health for some time and death was a happy release to the patient and cheerful sufferer. The funeral took place to Laurel cemetery Friday afternoon. The service at the house was conducted by Rev. G.W. Rose, B.A., and Rev. J.W. Wilkinson, of Laurel, and the grave by Rev. Mr. Wilkinson. The bereaved relatives had the sympathy of all.

August 16,p.2: George Dunning - In last week's issue we made a brief reference to the death of Mr. George Dunning, an early resident of Amaranth, who passed away at his home in Bracebridge, on Wednesday morning of last week. The remains were brought to this old home for interment, the body arriving in Orangeville on Wednesday night in charge of deceased son Dr. M. Dunning of which Mono Mills (sic). The funeral was largely attended, was held from the old homestead, west half lot 1, con.1, Amaranth, now occupied by Mr. Chas. G. Hughson, to Greenwood cemetery at 10 o[clock on Friday forenoon. Rev. Geo. Bury of Mono Mills conducted the service. The pallbearers were John Gillespie, John Crago, James Montgomery, Wm. Cook, James Copper and Wm. McKinney.
The late Mr. Dunning was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1833. He came to Canada when 23 years of age, first settling at Lloydtown. He lived here for two years and then moved to Farmington in Amaranth township, where he resided for six years. From Farmington he removed to the west half lot 1, Con. 1, Amaranth, where he lived for the long period of 42 years. In 1855, he was married to Miss Maria Payne, of Tobness, Eng., the union proving a very happy one. He is survived by his widow, three daughters and one son, Dr. M. Dunning, of Mono Mills. The daughters are Miss Lizzie Dunning, in Toronto, Mrs. Thos. Wodehouse and Mrs. Thomas Shannon, Bracebridge. Two years ago, while at work in a hayfield on his farm, Mr. Dunning was struck by lightning and left unconscious. He never recovered from the effects of the shock and a few months afterwards left his old home and went to Bracebridge in order to be near his daughters.

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December 27,p.1:Mr. Thos. Evans - Mr. Thos. Evans, a well known resident of Caledon, and formerly of Albion, died on Friday , Dec 14th, at the ripe age of 81 years. Deceased was a staunch member of the Anglican Chruch and a Conservative in politics.

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August 23,p.6:Allen Faulkner - Mr. Allen Faulkner, a well known resident of Caledon township, died at his home in this village on Monday, after a lingering illness. Deceased farmed in this vicinity for many years but a year ago last April declining health compelled him to give up his farm and retire to the village. He has been bed??? since July and his illness and death were the result of a long standing lung affection. He was in his 46th year and leaves a widow and a family of four sons. These and the other relatives have the sympathy of the neighborhood in this trying affliction. The late Mr. Faulkner was a worshipper in the Presbyterian church. The funeral was held from his late home to Charleston cemetery on Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. Rev. Stan R. Robinson, Presbyterian minister, conducted services at the house and grave.

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September 6,p.2:William H . Galbraith - The death of William Henry Galbraith, formerly a resident of Georgetown and well-known in Orangeville, occurred in Winnipeg last Thursday after an illness of five weeks from typhoid fever. Deceased's stepfather, Mr. T.J. Wheeler, of Georgetown, left for Winnipeg upon learning that his illness was serious and was with him when the end came. Mr. Galbraith had been living in London up to last November, when he went to Winnipeg, where he has since been employed in Dingmill's jewellery establishment. The fever was followed by pneumonia, which was really the cause of death. During his illness he was confined to the St. Boniface hospital, where he received every care and the best medical attendance. He was 44 years of age and unmarried. His demise makes the first break in the family since the death of his father, Alfred Galbraith, in 1868. Besides his mother and stepfather, he is survived by three brothers, Robert H., of Mulmur, A.V., of Shelburne, and Richard, of Toronto, and two half-brothers, Thomas and Charles Wheeler, of Toronto, all of whom were present at the funeral. The latter was held from Mr. Wheeler's home in Georgetown o St. George's Church and thence to Greenwood cemetery on Tuesday afternoon. The service in the church, of which the deceased was formerly a church-warden, was of a very impressive character. The floral tributes were many and beautiful. Other relatives present at the funeral were deceased's cousins, Postmaster W. McGuire, Tillsonburg, B. McGuire, Orangeville, J.S. McGuire, Gravenhurst, Mrs. E.J. Ellis, Caledon, and Ernest Jones, Toronto.

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September 20,p.3:Rev. Thomas Geoghegan - A friend to everybody passed from earth to heaven in Hamilton on Sunday evening in the person of Rev. Thomas Geoghegan, or Father Geoghegan, as he was affectionately called by all who knew him. He was a man known all over the county, and there were none more highly esteemed. He had lived in Hamilton eighteen years. He was plain in habit and manner, and entirely free from anything akin to ostentation, and had always a pleasant smile for all. Those who will miss him most are those who have benefited by his quiet charity. He was one of the best friends of the poor in Hamilton
Rev. Mr. Geoghegan was born in Loughbrickland, county Down, Ireland, in November 1848. When quite young he came to America and began life in business in the United States. He was successful, but was not satisfied with a business career, and gave it up to enter the church. He entered Trinity College, Toronto and in 1877 graduated. On July 1 of that year he was taken into holy orders, being consecrated deacon by Bishop Bethune. Two years later he was made a priest. His first charge was at Mono, and from there he was sent to Flamboro. He was the first rector of St. Matthews' church, Hamilton. In that charge he was associated with Rev. C.E. Whitcombe and Lennox Smith. He remained there about three years, when he founded St. Peter's church, of which he had been rector till the time Of his death. In the same year that he founded St. Peter's church he established St. Peter's infirmary. That institution has been doing splendid work for the helpless poor and aged in Hamilton since it was established, and the name of Rev. Thomas Geoghegan will never be inseparable from it, as he was untiring in making it the success it has been since its establishment. H is charity did not cease outside that institution, as his life was full of those nameless acts of kindness that endear a man to all whom he meets.
Ref. Mr. Geoghegan was married four years ago to Miss Geddes, a grand-daughter of the late Very Rev. Dean Geddes, and she and one daughter, Mary Josephine Hudson, aged one year and ten months survive him. He had several brothers and sisters residing in Ireland.
Several years ago, he was chaplain of the Seventy-Seventh Wentworth Regiment, an was one of the first gazetted chaplains.
Before his death, he asked that the funeral be free from display and that it be quiet.

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October 4, p.6: Dr. Minerva M. Greenaway - The death took place in St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, last Thursday night of Dr. Minerva M. Greenaway, a widely known and successful lady physician. The circumstances attending the death, are unusually sad. Shortly before her last illness, Dr. Greenaway returned to the city from Tottenham, where she had been nursing her father, the late Thos. M. Greenaway, and her sisters, who were down ill with typhoid fever. Her father's case resulted fataly but her sisters were brought safely to a point where recovery was assured. Shortly after her return to the city from attending her father's funeral, Dr. Greenaway was herself stricken down with the disease. The deceased lady, who was about 32 years of age, graduated from the Women's Medical College in 1899, also taking first-class honors at Trinity University. She subsequently took a post graduate course at Philadelphia. For the last five years she had carried on a successful general practice in Toronto. She was a lecturer on diseases of children at the Women's Medical College, secretary of the Alumnae Associatio, and lecturer to the nurses at the Orthopoedic Hospital.

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August 16,p.7:Isaiah Hammond - Isaiah Hammond, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaiah Hammond of the Mono -Caledon township died in the Royal Alexander Hospital , Fergus Saturday evening after a short illness. The boy was taken ill early last week ??? after consultation the physician ??? decided that he would have to operated on. The operation was performed Saturday forenoon, but unfortunately the lad did not rally and death ensued about six o'clock in the afternoon. His illness was caused by an obstruction of the bowels. The funeral was largely attended, being held from the residence of his parents to Greenwood cemetery on ??? afternoon. Rev. F. Davey, Presbyterian minister at Mono Mills, conducted the services at the house and grave. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs. Hammond in their sudden bereavement.

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October 18,p.7:Mrs. Bert Henderson - Mrs. Austin Wilcox, First Street, returned home yesterday morning, from Shallow Lake, near Owen Sound, whither she was summoned last week by word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Bert. Henderson. Mrs. Henderson's death occurred about 10 o'clock Friday forenoon, as the result of burning injuries received about 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon. The unfortunate lady was making a preparation in which was turpentine, ammonia and wax. Unthinking of danger she placed the dish on the stove, and it became overheated and ignited. Her clothing caught fire while she was attempting to remove the blazing dish and in a moment she was wrapped in flames. Before the flames were extinguished she was terribly burned about the neck, arms and body. She lingered until ten o'clock Friday enduring untold agony until death brought relief from her suffering. Deceased was 27 years of age, and was highly thought of. Her husband and a baby boy, 14 months old survive. The remains were taken to her former home at Thornbury, for interment, the funeral taking place on Saturday.

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August 16,p.2:James Arnold Hicks - Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hicks, Margaret St., sustained a trying bereavement last week through the death of their only child, James Arnold, an infant between eight and nine months old. The little one's death was caused by convulsions brought on by teething troubles. The funeral was held to the Forest Lawn cemetery on Sunday afternoon. Rev. John Trickey officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Hicks have the sympathy of their many friends in their affliction.

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September 20, p.5:George W. Hogg - The remains of George W. Hogg, second son of Mrs. S.J. Hogg, of Joseph street, Shelburne, arrived here by Dominion Express on Tuesday evening. The only information received regarding his death since the first telegram was the certificate accompanying the casket, which certified that death took place at the General Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, from typhoid fever, on Sept. 5th, 1906. Deceased was a clever and promising young man about 32 years of age. From some years he was employed as a druggist here and in Chicago, but being a expert telegraph operator he had latterly been in the employ of the C.P.R. and C.N.R. railways in Manitoba and the province. Up to the time of his late illness he was despatcher for the construction party on the Canadian Northern, and the first intimation received was a despatch from Messrs. MacKenzie & Mann announcing his death on 5th inst. No particulars were given and none have since been recieved. Much sympathy is expressed for his mother and other members of the family, as this is the second death in the family within a few years. He is survived by his mother, two brothers, Ed. Hogg and Simon Hogg, of Shelburne, and the sisters are Mrs. R.J. Patterson, Toronto; Mrs. J.D. Madill and Miss Lizzie Hogg, Shelburne. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon to Shelburne cemetery. The Rev. J.A. McKenzie conducted the services at the house and grave - Free Press.

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August 16,p.2:Jackson Holmes - The remains of the late Jackson Holmes, who died in Vernon, B.C. some days ago, reached Orangeville on Monday and were taken from here to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Holmes, of Caledon. There was a very large attendance at the funeral which was held to St. John's Church burying ground in Mono on Tuesday afternoon. Rev. G. Rix, rector of St. Mark's church, conducted the services at the house and grave. The pallbearers were tow nephews of the deceased, Elgin and Edward Holmes and his cousins, George and Selwyn Jackson, Willie Holmes and James Drummond. The deceased was at one time a clerk in Thompson Bros. dry goods store in Orangeville. He subsequently lived in Barrie for some years. He went west about three years ago, living for a time in Portage la Prairie, Man., from which place he went to Vernon, B.C., He was 34 years of age and unmarried. Besides his parents he is survived by three brothers, George, Thomas and W.J. All well known farmers in this vicinity and four sisters, Mrs. John Glassford, Mrs. Richard Speers, Caledon, Mrs. Jas. Shaw, Orangeville, and Mrs. Thomas Curry, East Garafraxa.

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August 30,p.7: William Johnston - At the home of his only son, engineer William Johnston, of the C.P.R. yard staff, there passed away yesterday at the advanced age of ninety years, William John Johnston, one of the pioneer farmers of the Orangeville district. He was a native of Ireland, but came to Canada at an early age. Since retiring from the farm twelve years ago he has made his home with his children, Mr. Johnston and an only daughter, Mrs. Alfred McGuire, of Toronto. His wife predeceased him twenty-eight years ago. He was a member of the Episcopal church and the funeral will take place on Saturday to Greenwood cemetery from his son's residence, West street - Owen Sound Times

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August 23, p.7:Robert Kannawin - Robert Kannawin, a highly respected resident of north Amaranth died at his home near Shelburne rather suddenly a week ago Tuesday night. Deceased, who was 63 years of age had been ailing for some time with lung trouble. Mr. Kannawin was a native of Armagh County, Ireland, but came to Canada with his parents quite early in life. He resided in Halton county up to 17 or 18 years ago, when he removed to Shelburne, He is survived by a widow and three sons. The latter are James A. with R. H. Benson & Co., Shelburne; Alex, on the homestead and Rev. W.M. Kannawin, of Woodville. Deceased was a consistent member of Knox Presbyterian church, and up to the time of his illness was a regular attendant at the Sunday services. There was a large turnout of friends and neighbors at the funeral which was held to Shelburne cemetery last Thursday afternoon. The deceased was an uncle of Mr. Robt. Kannawin, Zina St.

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July 12,p.3:Andrew Keys - After an illness of over eight months Mr. Andrew Keys passed away at his home on Hill Street, as a result of a stroke of paralysis. Deceased had been a resident of the town for twelve years and during that time had made a large circle of friends, among whom he was highly respected and popular. He was a native of Armagh, Ireland, and emigrated, when but a boy, with his parents to near Orangeville, where he worked at this trade, blacksmithing. Since coming to Owen Sound he has lived retired. He was a staunch Presbyterian, and a member of Knox church. His wife survives him, and also a family of six, Mr. W.J. Keys, Toronto Junction; Mrs. John Paterson, Shelburne,; Mrs. George Dean, and Mrs. Joseph Burke, Owen Sound; and Misses Lillian and Margaret, at home; Mrs. Joseph Henry of Mono Centre is a sister. The funeral took place on Sunday from his late residence, Rev. R.J. MacAlpine conducting the service. Interment was made in Greenwood cemetery. Messrs. Jas. Oatt, D.A. McLennan, John Young, Geo. Christie, D. Silverthorn and J.G. Spragge were the pallbearers - Owen Sound Times
Deceased lived at Whittington, in Amaranth township.

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October 25,p.5:Hugh Lamb - Hugh Lamb, for 37 years a resident of Mulmur, died on September 28th, aged 93 years and 13 days. Deceased was a native of Longford, Ireland, and came to Canada at the age of 13 years first settling near Georgetown, where he was married in 1843 to Charity Kennedy (Georgetown being named after her father George Kennedy). Mr. and Mrs. Lamb lived on a farm about a mile from Georgetown until their removal to Mulmur. He served with the artillery in the troubles of 1837-8, and had many interesting stories to tell of the scenes along the Niagara frontier at that time. Mr. and Mrs. Lamb celebrated the 63rd anniversary of their wedding day in August last. Mrs. Lamb is still hale and hearty. Deceased was a Methodist and Reformer. The interment took place in the Presbyterian cemetery at Mansfield on Sept. 30th. Besides the widow, a family of six survive, three sons and three daughters: - James, Geo., and Charles, of Mansfield; Mrs. Edward Morris, of Magnetawan; Mrs. C. Beacon, Toronto; Mrs. Abraham of Mansfield. - Economist

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October 18,p.2:Alexander Lamont - Alexander Lamont, a life-long resident of Caledon, died at his home, lot 15, 2nd line, east, in that township, on Thursday morning last. The deceased had been in failing health for some years before his death. He spent part of last summer in Powassan in the hope that a change of air and scene would proved (sic) beneficial, but unfortunately the visit did not bring any noticeable improvement. The late Mr. Lamont was 63 years of age, and was a native of Caledon, having been born and reared on the farm on which he died. His parents came from Scotland early in the last century, and were among the first settlers in the township.
Deceased was a staunch member of the Presbyterian Chruch, being an elder and treasurer of Knox Church, Charleston, for a number of years. A good neighbor, and an honest, law respecting citizen, he was a man who held a sure place in the esteem of the community. He is survived by one daughter, Miss Annie, one brother, Mr. John Lamont, of Caledon, and two sisters, Mrs. James McQuarrie, Orangeville, and Miss C. Lamont. The funeral was held from his late home, to St. Andrew's burying ground, 4th line, east, at 2 o'clock on Staruday afternoon. The services, which were conducted by the deceased's pastor. Rev. Stanley R. Robinson, of Caledon, were of a solemn and impressive character. There was a very large attendance at the funeral. The pallbearers were Messrs. D.Ferguson, J. Ferguson, Thos. Glassford, George Laughlin, Nathniel Harris, and Rev. Mr. Robinson.

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August 30,p.7:Mrs. Sophia (Barnet)* Large - Mrs. John Large, an old resident of Mono township, died very suddenly about noon on Sunday. The deceased has been in indifferent health for some time, and toward the end of last week became considerably worse. Saturday afternoon she decided to drive to Orangeville ton consult Dr. Lewis and accordingly set out from home in company with her daughter, Maggie. While driving along the Prince of Wales Road, Mrs. Large became very ill and was seized with vomiting. Becoming alarmed over her mother's condition, Miss Large drove into Mrs. James McMaster's residence, a couple of miles north of Orangeville, where her mother was put to bed and messenger dispatched to Orangeville for Dr. Lewis. When the Dr. arrived he found the sick woman in very critical condition from acute peritonitis. Despite the efforts of her physician and Dr. Kyles, who saw her Later in the evening, and the kindly offices of Mrs. McMaster and her daughters, who gave the physicians and suffering woman every aid in their power, her condition grew worse, death ensuing about noon on Sunday. The deceased, who was in her 76th year, was the widow of the late John Large, a prominent Mono farmer who died a couple of years ago. She was kindly generous woman, universally esteemed for her excellent qualities of head and heart. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a regular worshipper at St. Andrew's Church, Camilla. She is survived by the following family;: James, at present in the Northwest; Dougal and Daniel, on the homestead; Bruce, a medical student at Toronto University; Mrs. Peter Turnbull, in the West and Misses Lizzie and Maggie, of Rochester, N.Y. Mrs. john Barclay, of Mono Centre, is a sister. There was a large turnout of friends and neighbors at the funeral, which took place from the family residence, lot 18, con.3, west, Mono, to Mono Centre burying ground on Tuesday afternoon. Rev. G.W. Rose, Mono Centre, conducted services at the house and grave.

*Information from another source

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July 5,p.3:Elizabeth (Carson) Linn - The death occurred on Sunday, June 17, at her late home near Ben Allen, of Mrs. W.J. Linn, after an illness extending over several weeks. Deceased whose maiden name was Elizabeth Carson was in her thirty-ninth year and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Carson, of St. Vincent. She was born in the township of Mono, near Orangeville and when but a child moved with her parents to St. Vincent where she continued to reside until her marriage to Mr. Linn a little over fifteen years ago. Her death was due to heart failure following an attack of inflammatory rheumatism. Besides a sorrowing husband she leaves a family of three boys, Master Robert James, aged fourteen years; George Carson, aged twelve years and William Judson, aged two months, to mourn the loss of a loving wife and mother. The funeral took place on Tuesday, June 19th, to Sarawak, cemetery and was largely attended the services being conducted by Rev. P.C. Cameron, pastor of the Owen Sound Baptist church. The pall bearers were Messrs. John McInnis, W.H. Cavell, Angus McDougald, John McMillan, H. Nelson and R. England. -- Owen Sound Times.

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December 13,p.3:Agnes May Livingstone - On Tuesday morning, Dec. 4, there passed away at the home of her uncle, Mr. James Anderson, Caledon, Miss Agnes May Livingstone, of Detroit, at the early age of 25 years. About a year and a half ago the deceased contracted a cold, which though it did not seem serious at first, finally developoed into lung trouble. In the early stage of her illness she came to Caledon, thinking the favorable climate would soon restore her health, but, although loving friends did all in their power, nothing could stay the work of the dread disease. In health the deceased won the love and esteem of her associates by her noble character and bright, helpful disposition. During her illness, her cheerfullness and resignation, bore testimony to her trust in God's will. Her strong influence for good will live long after her in many a heart. Deep sympathy is felt for the sorrowing friends, especially the invalid father, the sister, and the young brother. May Heaven in its mercy help them to look-beyond this earthly parting to find peace and comfort in the hope of the happy reunion beyond.

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September 20,p.6:Hugh McFarlane - The death of Mr. Hugh McFarlane took place at his late residence on Monday, Sept. 10th, after an illness extedning through the greater part of the summer. Thed eceased was 59 years of age and has resided in this community for a number of years. The interment took place in Shelburne cmeetery the following wednesday, the funeral porcession being very large, indicative of the esteem in which the late Mr. McFarlan was held in the neighborhood. Rev. M.E. Lymburner, pastor of the United Brethren chruch officiated at the house and grave. Great sympathy is flet for hte decead's widow in her severe bereavement.

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August 23,p.6:Mrs. Albert (Dodds) McFaul - On Wednesday, the 15th inst. Mrs. Albert McFaul, an esteemed resident of this community passed away after a comparatively brief illness from stomach trouble. Deceased lady was 38 years of age and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Dodds. She was married to Mr. McFaul about two years ago and had well borne the part of an exemplary w?? and willing help mate. Needless to any her demise a severe blot not only to the the bereaved husband, but the stricken parents as well. Her life had been exemplary and outside the domestic role she had many warm friends by whom her departure will be mourned. She was a member of Charleston Presbyterian church and from childhood had lived a pure and stainless life.

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September 6,p.2:Dougald McGill - Mr. Dougald McGill, an old resident of Caledon township, died at his home on York St. on Sunday at the ripe age of 86 years and 5 months. Deceased was a native of Scotland, and came to Canada in 1848 with his father, who settled on the 9th line, Erin. He subsequently bought a farm on the 5th line, west, Caledon, where he lived for many years, afterwards moving to East Garafraxa, and from there to Amaranth Station. He came to Orangeville about four years ago. Deceased was a member and liberal supporter of the Congregational Church. He is survived by a widow. The funeral took place to Greenwood cemetery on Tuesday afternoon. Services were conducted by Rev. A.R. Schrag, of Alton, assisted by Rev. A. L. Burch.

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October 4,p.4:Mrs. Jas. McGillivray - Mrs. Jas. McGillivray, sen., passed away on Friday, Sept. 7th, at her home on Con. 3, N.D.R., Glenelg, after almost a century of years. Mrs. McGillivray was born at Bunessan, Isle of Mull, Scotland, and came to this country in 1848 with her husband and six children. She settled in the township of Vaughan, where two more sons were born. The family the moved to Glenelg and settled on the farm where Mrs. McGillivray lived until her death. She was a member of the Priceville Presbyterian chruch, and often walked the seven miles from her home to the church, to attend the Gaelic service. Only last Christmas, Mrs. McGillivray sang a Gaelic song for the entertainment of some of children. She had a cheerful, kindly disposition, and will be missed by old and young. Besides her eight children, John, in Iowa; Mrs. Turnbull (Mary) in Bruce; Mrs. Webber (Sarah) in Durham; Peter in Hiawatha, Kansas; Angus in British Columbia; Neil, Donald and James, in Glenelg, she leaves 41 grand-children and 24 great-grand-children. There is some disagreement about Mrs. McGillivray's exact age. Some think she was not quite 100, while others think she was over 100, but word has been sent to Scotland, and her correct will be obtained if possible - Mt. Forest Representative.

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October 18,p.2:Alexander McIlroy - Alexander McIlroy, a native of Alton and for the greated part of his life a resident of Dufferin County, died in one of the Toronto hospitals last Thursday afternoon. Deceased, who was 58 years of age, had suffered from gall stones for many years, and was undergoing treatment in the hospital when his death took place. When a young man, Mr. McIlroy learned the blacksmithing trade with the late John Jones, of Orangeville. He followed his trade in Connor for twelve years, and also in Palgrave, Farmington, and Stanton, at different times. He moved from Stanton to Toronto about five years ago, and of late has been employed in the Abeil Engine Works. He leaves a widow and an adopted daughter, Coral Barber. Josias McIlroy, Orangeville, James, William, Sam and Frank McIlroy, of Toronto, are brothers. There are also three sisters living in Toronto, and another brother, Leo, in Chicago. The remains were taken to Alton for interment, the funeral taking place from the C.P.R. station to the village burying ground at 10,30 o'clock Saturday. Rev. F.A. Nurse, pastor of Alton Methodist Chruch, conducted the burial service.

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December 20,p.4:Thomas McKim - The death of Thos. McKim at his home on First Avenue, Shelburne, on Thursday morning last, will come as a surprise to his many friends in this and adjoining counties, where he was equally well known. Deceased took ill nearly four months ago and at first nothing serious was anticipated by his family. After a few weeks he was able to go out for a drive occasionally, but on going to his room one day he fell and injured himself severely and he gradually became weaker for the want of nourishmnet, which he could not take, and about a month ??? evident to all that he ??? recover. Deceased was raised in Horning Mills, his father the late John McKim, being one of the early settlers. When a young man, he carried on an extensive business as a contractor, and built a good many ?? school houses and barns in Melancthon and Mulmur Tosnwhips. Since moving to Shelburne in 1880, he has been actively engaged in the ?? and Insurance business. Deceased was a progressive citizen, and always took an interest in any project for the good of the village. He was a member of the town council for two or three terms. Last spring on the resignation of Morricon Rooney, one of the license commissioners of Dufferin County, Mr. McKim was appointed to the vacancy on the board. Being an ardent temperance man, honest in his convictions and capable of deciding a question on its merits, his appointment met with the approval of all parties. He was prominent in church and Sunday School work, and will be greatly missed in this locality. He leaves a widow, two sons and two daughters. The sons are E.A. McKim, of Collingwood, and Alllen McKim, at home, and Miss Cora and Eva McKim, at home. The services at the house were conducted by the Revs. B. R. Stragways, J. Rankin, J.A. McKenzie and J.J. Redditt. There were a number of beautiful floral wreaths on the casket. The funeral was held on Saturday afternoon to Shelburne cemetery - Free Press.

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September 6,p.2:James McKittrick - Mr. James McKittrick, an old resident of Amaranth township, died at his home in Orangeville on Sunday at the ripe age of 87 years. Deceased was born in Tyrone, Ireland, but came to Canada over half a century ago. He lived on lot 1,con.2, Amaranth, for many years, moving from there to lot 6 con. 2, Mono , and subsequently to Orangeville He is survived by five sons and two daughters, his wife having died on Nov. 1st last. The family are: - Robert, of Toronto; Joseph, of Shelburne, Jonah, of London; Thomas and Hugh, of Orangeville; Mrs. Henry Varcoe, Burk's Falls; and Mrs. Wm. Newman, of Toronto. The funeral took place to Greenwood cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, Rev. G.A. Rix, rector of St. Mark's, being the officiating clergyman.

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November 1,p.3:Angus McLeod - The death of Mr. Angus McLeod, a well-known Caledon farmer, occured at his home on the 6th line, in that township, about two o'clock on Thursday morning. The deceased had been suffering since last spring from Bright's disease, but was always able to be about and attend to his affairs. Two weeks or so before his death he was operated on for strangulated hernia. The operation was successful, but some days afterwards the bowels became obstructed in some manner and death ensued in a few hours. The deceased was 69 years of age and was born near Glasgow, Scotland. He came to Caledon 47 years ago, living on the 4th line, east, for 17 years, and on the 6th line for the last 30 years. He is survived by a widow and a family of ten, two sons and eight daughters. The sons are: - James, who works the homestead, and John, who is in business in Buffalo, N.Y. The daughtes are: - Mrs. James Parks, Camilla; Mrs. Wilkinson, Cheltenham; Mrs. Elliott, Mono Road; Mrs. J .J. Rawn and Mrs. Gilmour, Rosemount; Mrs. Samuel Dickey, Alliston; Mrs. Anderson, Beeton, and Miss Josephine, at home. Deceased was a member of the Presyberian church, a Conservative in politics and belonged to Mono Road Court, Indepedent Order of Foresters. He was a successful farmer, a good neighbor, and enjoyed the respect of the community. There was a large attendance of friends and neighbors at the funeral, which was held to St. Andrew's Chruch burying ground, 4th line, East, Caledon, on Saturday afternoon. Rev. Hugh Matheson of Calaedon East, was the officiating clergyman.

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October 11,p.3:Mrs. Margaret Moffatt - Mrs. Margaret Moffatt, one the earliest settlers in the township, died at her home, lot 17, con. 5, east Caledon, on Friday, after a short illness. The deceased who was 90 years of age, was the widow of the late Adam Moffatt, who died some 24 years ago. She was a native of Tyrone County, Ireland, whence she emigrated to Canada with her parents in the years 1832. She was married in 1836, and with her husband settled on lot 17, con.5 east, Caledon, where she has ever since resided.
Deceased was a devoted member of the Methodist church, having joined the church when only 12 years of age. She was a woman of many estimable qualities, and was greatly beloved by her neighbors and friends. She is survived by a family of nine??:-Samuel, of Mono; Robert, who conductes a blacksmithing business in Hockley; William, a farmer, near Charleston; Thos., on the homestead, James, of Orangevile; John, of Toronto, Mrs. Richard McCandless, of Albion; Mrs. Arthur Braden, Toronto; and Miss LIzzie, of Orangeville. The deceased was ill only a short time, and her death came quite unexpectedly. Considering her advanced age she was in the enjoyment of remarkably good health up to the time of her short illness. The remains were interred in Snell's burying ground, Mono, on Sunday afternoon. There was a very large attendance at the funeral. Rev. Mr. Burry, of Mono Mills, conducted the burial service, deceased's six sons acting as pall bearers.

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August 16,p.5:Archie Murdock - A telegram on Saturday brought the startling intelligence of the death that morning at Fort William, of Mr. Archibald Torrie Murdock, of this place. He had been in poor health for two or three years. For a month back however, he had been arranging some gangs and camps on a contract of construction work on the G.T.P. 190 miles northwest of Fort William, and being troubled for several days with an attack of piles for relief from which he underwent a minor operation. He rallied form this but before morning it became evident that the shock of the operation and chloroform had been a sever strain on his heart which rapidly gave out at six o'clock the next morning.
The body was brought by C.P.R. Arriving her Monday noon, and the following day at 2:30 after an appropriate service conducted by Rev. A. Shepherd, was borne to the public cemetery followed by a large concourse of sorrowing and sympathizing people and there interment took place The pallbearers were Messrs. D. D. Murdock, Dugald Smith, Archie Torrie, Alex. McColeman and John Mercer.
Deceased was born in Erin township Wellington County in December 1863; came with his parents some five year later to Euphrasia where his father died some twenty years ago. At an early age Archie went railroad building, first on the Ontario and Quebec and soon after became a foreman and then contractor of construction work in B.C., and later in New Ontario. He was a man of undoubted integrity and superior business capacity, highly respect on all sides. Seven years ago he married Miss Maggie McColeman, of Sullivan, who with two children, Donald,John, aged 5 and Arthur Robert, aged 3 years survive. His mother, aged 82 years, also a resident of this place, and three brothers, Arthur, Montreal; John, on the homestead, Harkaway; Duncan, Reid's Station, Quebec; also one sister, Mrs. C. Morgan, of Shoal Lake, al of whom were at the funeral except Mrs. Morgan, who found it impossible to be present. - Markdale Standard

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December 20,p.6:Emma Murray - The death of Mrs. Emma Murray occurred on Thursday morning, Dec. 13th, at the home of Mr. Samuel Lemon, lot 22, 5th line, east, Caledon, where the deceased was employed as housekeeper. The departed woman was a native of Lancashire, Eng. and came to Toronto about six months ago. Death was caused by a severe stroke of paralysis, which baffled alike the medical skill of Dr. M. Dunning, and the carefull attention of her daughter, who was summoned to her bedside from Toronto. Besides her daughter, who is the wife of Mr. Harry Buckley, an expert in J. J. Taylor's safe works in Toronto, she leaves to mourn her loss, one son. John, in Oldham, Eng. The funeral was held to St. John's burying ground, Mono, on Friday. Services at the house and grave were conducted by Rev. P. R. Soanes.

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September 20,p.2:John Mutrie - Mr. John Mutrie, one o the best known residents of the township of Pilkington, near Elora, died very suddenly one morning recently, while engaged at plowing. He had not come in to dinner, and Mrs. Mutrie went out to see what was detaining him. She found the team standing in the field, and Mr. Mutrie lying dead, the reins in his hands. Mr. Mutrie was aged 54 years. Besides a widow, he leaves a family of two sons, Mr. Forbes Mutrie, at home and Mr. J.F. Mutrie, of the Merchants' Bank, Elora.

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October 4,p.6:Thomas W. Myers - The dark messenger of death visited our peaceful community on Sunday morning again for the fourth time within a month, this time taking to the Great Beyond, a respected octogenarian resident, Mr. Thos. W. Myers. the deceased who was 86 years of age, had been confined to a bed of sickness for almost a year, suffering terribly from the effects of a paralytic stroke. The late Mr. Myers was born in England, but came to Canada at an early age, settling in Murray township, Northumberland County. In 1869, with his wife and family, he removed to Amaranth, settling at Waldemar, where he followed railroad contracting for a number of years. He then removed to Shelburne, afterwards purchasing lot 26, concession 2, Amaranth. Later on, he removed to Maple Grove, to the farm where his death occurred. In politics, deceased was a consistent Conservative, and in religion a methodist. He is survived by six sons and one daughter. The sons are Messrs. Wm., Frank and Newton, of Maple Grove; Silas, of Coleridge; and Thos. and Wellington, of Gravenhurst; and the daughter, Mrs. Wm. Besley, of Coleridge. The funeral proceeded on Tuesday afternoon to Shelburne cemetery, Rev. M. E. Lymburner officiating. The six sons of the deceaed acted as pallbearers. Four years ago next November, the six sons carred the remains of their aged mother to the grave. We extend the sympathy of the community to the bereaved in the trying affliction.

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August 9,p.6: Alexander Nasmyth - Alex. Nasmyth, one of our well known and oldest citizens, answered the last call on Monday and joined the grand army after a long siege of illness. The old veteran had reached the patriarchal age of over four score years, having been born in Haddingtonshire, Scotland, about 88 years since. At the age of 13 he crossed to America with his parents, and visiting several points in the States, and in Canada, he settled in Goderich in 1845, thus having been a resident of the town 61 years. He joined the Presbyterian church shortly after his arrival in Goderich, and had in his possession at his death, a members cared dated February 1849, signed by the late Rev. Charles Fletcher. In 1866 he was one of the first to offer to repel the Fenian invaders, and with many other residents received the medal and one clasp for his services on that occasion, and a few years since received from the Ontario Government a certificate granting him 160 acres of land as a reward for his loyalty during that campaign. For several months preceding death, the late Mr. Nasmyth looked exceedingly frail, but in his coffin he looked himself of former years. Deceased was well acquainted throughout this part of Huron, as his 61 years of residence mad him known to hosts of people, and his death will cause sympathetic remarks from all who knew Alex. Nasmyth. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon form the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Harrison, Kingston street, and was attended by many old friends. Revs. Jas. Hamilton and Dr. Meldrum, officiated at the house and at the grave, and the pall bearers were Alex. Ingles, A.G. McDonald, W. R. Robertson, H. Dunlop, David Stoddart and Wm. Skimmings, Deceased was married in Zorra to Ann McKenzie, who predeceased him many years. There are nine children born to them four only now living, Mrs. C.C. Crabb, town; Alexander, Toronto; Mrs. J. McElroy, of Orangeville, and Mrs. Harrison, town. Of grandchildren there are twelve now living, and of great grandchildren, twenty-one -Goderich Star.

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October 11,p.5:James Perry - Mrs. James Perry, lot 27, west townline, Mono, died very suddenly on Thursday evening. Sept. 27th. The deceased, who was apparently in his usual health, had been in Shelburne in the forenoon, and on returning home, assisted at the threshing on his farm, and took a turn at feeding the machine. The threshers finished early in the afternoon, and moved to the farm across the road. Geo. Perry, with his team, assisted to move the machine, and the deceased took the team back home. He spent the remainder of the afternoon gang-plowing in the field. He ate a hearty supper with the family, and Mr. and Mrs. Miller, of Berlin, and Mrs. William Sheilds, who had spent the afternoon with Mrs. Perry. Shortly after tea he assisted Mr. Miller to hitch up his horse and came up to the house with him, and while chatting, waiting for the ladies to get into the buggy Mr. Perry dropped to the ground and was dead in an instant. Dr. J.A. Smith was sent for, but death had been instantaneous. Deceased was 70 years of age, and had always been a healthy man. He was highly respected in the community by everybody. He is survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters. The sons are: - John Perry, of Toronto, and George and Gordon at home. The daughters are Misses Maud and Jennie, both at home.

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July 5, p.3:John Richardson - Mr. John Richardson, an old and highly respected resident of Amaranth township, died at his home at Laurel on Saturday after a brief illness resulting from a paralytic stroke. The late Mr. Richardson was bon in Yorkshire, Eng. in 1831. He came to Canada in 1848, a young man of 17 years. At the age of 22 he settled in the township of Amaranth where he has since resided. In 1858 he and Miss Sarah Clow were united in matrimony and have lived together in sweetest harmony during these 48 years. Thus he spent 53 years in Amaranth, watching and aiding in the development of this beautiful section of the country. He always took an active part in forwarding the interests of the community. Although actively engaged thruout life he always found time to visit the sick and made an earnest effort to comfort any who might be in sorrow and trouble. In fact his whole life was one of helpful more widely and though more deepness and usefulness. He possessed a thoughtful and studious mind. Probably no layman in the community readily than he. Hence he soon became a man of mature judgment, whose advice was freely sought. But more than this he possessed a warm, loving heart. He was a n ideal husband, a loving parent and a true friend It is not uncommon to hear it said of him , "He was never known to speak an unkind word," In religion he was a Methodist, and dearly loved and earnestly worked for the church of his choice in which, for many years, he had been an official. During the past 48 years his residence has ever been a home for the ambassadors of the Cross. How much this was appreciated and especially by the minister in the early days, when accommodation was not so plentiful, cannot be estimated. In these days often three and four ministers at a time shared the hospitality of his Christian home. Quiet and unassuming, yet happy and joyous, he enjoyed life and made the most of it. On June 12th, he was more than usually bright and active His joyous merriment of that day was a matter of comment with neighbors who had been with him. That evening he retired, prepared to take the morning train for Toronto, to attend the Methodist conference and visit his daughter, Jennie. But this was not to be, for in two hours he was stricken with paralysis. Medical aid was summoned immediately, but in spite of every effort he gradually became weaker, and surrounded by loving friends, peacefully passed away on Saturday., June 30th to wear a victor's crown. His home was blessed with four children: two of whom preceded him to the Glory Land. The two surviving members are, Edward, who works the old homestead, and Jennie, wife of Rev. Isaac Couch, M.A., B.D., pastor of Woodgreen Methodist Tabernacle, Toronto. His sorrowing widow tarries for little longer, but mourns not as those who have no hope. On Monday, July 2nd, the funeral service was conducted in the church by the pastor, Rev. James w. Wilkinson, assisted by Revs. John Goodman, C. Langford, J.R. Bell, W.E. Wilson and W.T. Bailey, Esq., who bore testimony to the sterling qualities of the departed. The pall bearers were : Messrs. John Johnston, E.B. Cooney, John Banks, Wm. Hamilton, Jas. Gordon and Robt. Hamilton. A vast assembly was present at the church, Rev. J.W. Wilkinson and Rev. C. Langford conducted the service at the grave, and thus were laid to rest the remains of one of the sweetest, purest, truest, best of men.

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October 11,p.3:W.J. Ridley - The death of Mr. W.J. Ridley, a resident of Orangeville for some months past, took place at the home of his brother, Mr. John Ridley, Church street, on Sunday evening. The deceased, who was 31 years of age, had been a sufferer from Bright's disease for some time past, and had been unable to work since the middle of July . While comparatively unknown to the great majority of our citizens, Mr. Ridley was held in high esteem by a circle of intimate friends. The funeral was held to Greenwood cemetery Tuesday afternoon. Deceased leaves a widow, but no children.

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November 1,p.3:Esther Robinson - The death of Mrs. Esther Robinson, relict of the late Samuel Robinson, of East Garafraxa, occurred on the 17th ult., at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Geo McBride, with whom she has been living for about a year. Deceased, was a native of county Antrim, Ireland, and with her husband came to near Streetsville in 1857, where they remained for a short time, removing to lot 14, con. 13, East Garafraxa, where they spent many days. The privations of pioneer life were their lot, but which they turned to good account in forming thrifty habits, persevering till success became theirs. About 28 yeasr ago Mr. Robinson died, leaving her with the care of a young family, and the responsibility of keeping the home. In this she was most successful as the homestead is one of the finest in the township, and the children grown up respected by all. They are: - Mrs. Daniel McBride, and Mrs. Jas. Gibson, of East Garafraxa; John, Wm., James and Thomas in Seattle; Mrs. George McBride, in Fergus; Hugh, in East Luther; Samuel, in West Garafraxa and Robert in Amaranth. The funeral took place on Saturday to Price's Corners. - Star and Vidette.

September 20,p.2:John Ross - Monday's Globe contained the following reference to the death of Mr. John Ross, of Aurora, father of Mr. W.J. Ross, West Broadway: - The oldest resident in that section of the country passed away on Monday evening at 6 o'clock in the person of Mr. John Ross, of Aurora.
Mr. Ross was born on what is now Sherbourne Street, Toronto,m on March 27, 1911 and was therefore in his 96th year. He lived in this city until he was about seven or eight years of age when his parents moved four miles out in York township, There he lived until 1836, when he married Emma Ellson, and took up a farm for himself on lot 7 in the fourth concession of King. Mrs. Ross died nearly twenty-two years ago. Mr. Ross resided on his farm until the year 1885, and since that time had made his home with his daughters, Mrs. J. Ausman, of Toronto, and Mrs. C.A. Willis, of Aurora.
The late John Ross came through the stormy days of 1837, and though living in the county where the agitation was hottest and where most of the fighting was done, yet he refrained from any active participation in the rebellion. Nevertheless he was not lacking in decision as to the merits of the quarrel. His first vote was cast in 1836 for Peter Matthews, the land surveyor, who was candidate for the Parliament of Upper Canada, the man who was afterwards a leader in the rebellion and, with Samuel Lount, was hanged as a rebel.
Mr. Ross next voted for William Lyon McKenzie in the days when the latter was struggling to retain his seat in an adverse Parliament. Mr. Ross was entirely in sympathy with the Reform party. He will remembered George Brown and the efforts he made to establish the Globe back in the forties, when the Globe was familiarly termed the Scotchman's Bible, Mr. Ross, however, while a reader of George Brown's paper, read the Bible more than the Globe, and knew large portions of the new Testament so well that they were a source of great comfort to him.
Mr. Ross was brought up a Presbyterian, but about fifty years ago joined the Disciples of Christ.
The member of the family are: - Thomas, dead; Philip Charles, dead; Mrs. J.M. Moore, Acton; James C., Wychwood; Jno. Henry, Orillia; Mrs. Ausman, Toronto; Richard, Picton; Mrs. (Rev.) J. J. Redditt, Toronto; Henry, Alliston; William James, Orangeville; Mrs. Chas. Willis, Aurora.

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September 20,p.2:Mrs. A.E. (Cassie McLean) Rowan - It is with unfeigned sorrow that we record the death of Mrs. A.E. Rowan (nee Cassie McLeau, of Alton) which occurred at her home in Thompson, N.D., on Thursday last. The deceased lady was ill only a short time, her death resulting from a severe attack of pneumonia. Less than seven months ago she left her home her a happy bride, with what seemed a bright and useful future in store for herself and her husband. To-day the home about which the hopes and aspirations of yesterday centered is bereft of its young and gracious mistress and the heart of a devoted husband is crushed by the awful bereavement that has so suddenly overtaken him. During her short residence in Thompson, Mrs. Rowan had, by reason of her graciousness and charming social qualities, won for herself many devoted friends and it is quite within the mark to say that her untimely death is as sincerely mourned there as in the home of her girlhood. The remains were brought to her old home for interment, being accompanied during the long journey by the grief stricken husband and his brother Dr. S. Rowan, of Hillsboro, N.D. The funeral was held from the home of Mr. Rowan's brother-in-law, Mr. Richard Thomas, Alton, to Greenwood cemetery, Orangeville, on Tuesday afternoon, Rev. A.R. Schrag, of Alton, conducting services at the house and grave. There was a large gathering of former friends at the house and a lengthy cortege followed the remains to their last resting place. The floral tributes were beautiful and literally covered the casket. The pall-bearers were Mr. Rowan's six brothers, John and Thomas, Orangeville, William, Andrew and Robert, Erin and Dr. Samuel Rowan, Hillsboro, N.D.

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October 11,p.5:John Rutheram - John Rutheram, a 16-year-old Barnado Home Boy from England, who has been employed at Joseph Kendrew's, Primrose for the last year and a half, was one of those who were working at Samuel Buchanan's threshing, lot 19, Prince of Wales Road, Mono, on Tuesday. When quitting time came in the evening, Rutheram, who was on a stack of straw, undertook to slide off with his fork in his hand. By some means he held the fork by the tines instead of by the handle, and on landing he fell forward on the tines, which penetrated his abdomen above the lower rib and doutless into his heart, as he put his hands to the injured part, said, "I'm hurt here!" fell foward, gasped a couple of times, and was dead before the startled onlookers scarcely realized what was the matter. Coroner Steels, of Shelburne, viewed the body, but deemed an inquest unnecessary. The funeral takes place to Shelburne cemetery this (Thursday) morning at 10 o'clock. - Economist

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October 25,p.5:Robert Shields - Mr. Robert Sheilds, who was for many years Chief of Police in this town, died rather suddenly in Brampton early on Thanksgiving monring. Mr. Sheilds moved from Orangeville to Toronto about a year ago, and has since made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Lawrence, of Parkdale. He went to Brampston the week before last, and from there drove out to visit his farm at Tullamore, tenated by Mr. W. Davey. He was in Brampton a week ago Friday, and in the evening made a friendly call at Mr. Partridge's residecen. He had only been in the house a short time when he was taken very ill, and shortly afterwards lapsed into unconsciousness. He lingered until Thursday morning, when he passed peacefully away, his daughter being with him when the end came. Death was caused by uraemic poisooning, resulting from Bright's disease, from which he had suffered from some years. The late Mr. Shields was in his 67th year, and was a native of Cinguacousy, bein ga son of the late John Shields, of Tullamore. He was a very large man, standing about six feet, four inches. and weighing over three hundred pounds.
He moved to Mono when a young man, and farmed on lot 9, con.5, east, for a number of years. He gave up farming and moved to Orangeville about 27 years ago. He was weighmaster for the late F.C. Stewart, for some years, and held the position of Chief of Police for nearly 19 years. He was a member of the A.O.U.W, Orange and Masonic orders. Deceased was married twice, but survived both of his wives. He leaves a family of three sons and two daughters. The sons are: - John, who resides in New York City; Robert, who is in business in Port Arthur, and William better known as "Cooney," a noted lacrosse player, now living in Houghton, Mich. Mrs. Wm. Lawrence, of Toronto and Mrs. G. F. Williamson, of Brandon, Man., are the daughters. The remains were interred in the Forest Lawn cemetery on Saturday forenoon, the funeral taking place from the C.P.R. station immediately after the arrival of the Credit Valley train from the south. Rev. G.A. Rix, rector of St. Mark's Church, was the officiating clergyman. Deceased was buried with Masonic honors, W.Bro. A. Hill, P.W.M., of Harris Lodge reading the beautiful Masonic ritual over the open grave. The pall bearers, members of Harris Lodge, were W.M. Green, G.H. Goetchius, D. McNaughton, J.E. Booth, Geo. McIntyre, and M.E. Stewart.

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December 27,p.7:Stewart Smith - Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Smith, Zina St., have the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends in the trying bereavement they have suffered through the death of their infant son, Stewart. The little fellow, who was about seven monthy of age, had been particulararly bright and lively on Thursday, the day he passed away, In the afternoon his mother was preparing to take him and left him in charge of her maid, while she went upstairs to finiish dressing. A moment later the girl called her down saying there was something wrong with the baby. She reached him barely in time to see him expire. The physician attributed the death to heart trouble. The remains were laid to rest in the Forest Lawn Cemetery on Friday afternoon, Rev. A.L. Burch conducting the burial service.

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October 25,p.5:Mrs. Lucy Anne Stevenson - Mrs. Lucy Anne Stevenson, who moved to Orangeville from Arthur about six months ago, died at her home on 1st Avenue about twelve o'clock Tuesday night, after a short illness. The deceased, who was 77 year of age, was born in New Brunswick. She was a respected resident of Arthur township for nearly forty years, her husband, the late Robert Stevenson, being reeve of the municipality for a number of years. About six months ago Mrs. Stevenson came to Orangeville to reside with her son-in-law, Mr. Oliver Hayward, the latter purchasing the fine residence on 1st Avenue, which has since been their home. While comparatively unknown to the majority of our citizens, the deceased lady, during her short residence in town, had endeared herself to a circle of her intimate friends, by whom her demise will be sincerely mourned. She is survived by a family of seven; four sons and three daughters. The sons are: - Thomas and Jacob, of Sault Ste. Marie; James, on the homestead, and George, a dentist, in Buffalo. The daughters are: - Mrs. Oliver Hayward, Orangeville; Mrs. (Rev.) Geo.T. Webb, Chicago, and Miss Kate Stevenson, a trained nurse in Buffalo. The latter was in attendance on her mother during her last illness. The deceased lady was a member and liberal supporter of the Baptist church.
The funeral will be held from her late residence to the C.P.R. station, Friday forenoon, the interment taking place at Mt. Forest.

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October 25,p.8:Guly Emely Maria (Allen) Stoddart:The death of Mrs. Henry Stoddart, one of the most esteemed residents of the community, took place at her home on the 5th line, Melancthon, on Friday morning, Oct. 12th. Deceased lady, who was 54 years and 8 month of age, moved shortly after her marriage with her husband, to Laurel, where she spent many years enduring the hardships and privations of an early pioneer's life. About two years ago the deceased was taken ill with that direful and malignant disease, diabetes and although she had the treatment of the best physicians that could be obtained, and the tender care of an affectionate husband and a loving daughter, yet all failed to ward off the fatal disease to which she succumbed when least expected. The deceased was a kind and loving mother, and was universally esteemed and respected by her friends and neighbors, who all who had the privilege of enjoying her society. She was an ardent member of the U. B. Church for many years, and a woman of the highest Christian attainments. She leaves to mourn her sad loss a husband, five sons and five daughters. The sons are William, George, David , Reuben, and John. The daughters are Mrs. Morby, of Amaranth; Mrs. Richard Smith, Amaranth; Mrs. Wm. Smith, Mono; Mrs. T.J. Rutledge, Mono and Elizabeth, at home. After the service was concluded the funeral cortege, which was very large, proceeded to the Shelburne cemetery Monday afternoon, where the remains were laid at rest.

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December 27,p.1: John Sullivan - John Sullivan, eldest son of Mr. C.F. Sullivan, 3rd line, Albion died a week ago Tuesday morning after a lingering illness. He was 38 years of age.

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November 1,p.3:Donald Sutherland - Mr. Donald Sutherland, a respected citizen of Woodstock, died at his home in that city on Thrusday morning last, after a week's confinement to his bed. His death was caused by cancer of the stomach. Deceased, who was in his 79th year, was the father of Mrs. Henry Watt and Mr. Paul Sutherland, of Orangeville. Mrs. Watt and Mr. Sutherland went ot Woodstock upon learning of their father's illness, and with the other members of the family, were at his bedside when the end came. Mr. Watt went down on Friday evening and was present at the funeral, which was held on Saturday afternoon. The deceased was a staunch Presbyterian, and was an elder in Chalmers Chruch Woodstock. He leaves a widow and a family of three sons and five daughters. Two sons, John and Burns and three daughters, Lucy, Bessie and Lavina are at home. The other daughter, Mrs. Geo. Patterson, lives in Woodstock. Mrs. Watt and Mr. Sutherland have the sympathy of our citizens in their bereavement.

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September 6,p.5:Mrs. George Thompson - Mrs. Geo. Thompson died at his (sic) home in Corbetton last week after a lingering illness. Deceased lady was 84 years of age, and leaves a husband and one daughter.

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December 20,p.5:William Thompson - One of the few surviving pioneers of East Garafraxa passed away on Sunday, Dec. 9th, in the person of Mr. Wm. Thompson, of the 14th con. of East Garafraxa. About two years ago he suffered a paralytic stroke, which left him weak, but he was about till a week before his death. The late Mr. Thompson was a native of Antrim, Ireland. He set sail on the 17th of March, 1847, for the New World, landing about May 1st. He remained for some time near Toronto; following the occupation as sawyer in the mills for a number of years. About 45 years ago he came to East Garafraxa and work in the late Mr. Phillip's mill. Garafraxa was an unbroken wilderness, and Grand Valley was yet unknown. On lot 15 he commenced to hew out a home for himself. He suffered the privations incidental to pioneer life, and persistently he pursued his laborious task, that of transforming the forest into tillable land. On the 11th of June, 1862, he married May Ann Hillis, of Streetsville, who, with six boys and five girls, survive him: - Mrs. W.W. Dickson, of East Luther; Mrs. John Ritchie, Acton; Wm. J. and D.H. of Amaranth; James L. and Robert G. on the homestead; Misses Kate L. and Maude E., of Toronto; Mrs. P.J. Madigan, of Toronto; G.S., a druggist, of Wapella, Sask.; and J.T., a missionary for the Latter Day Saints. In religion he was a firm believer in the doctrine promulgated by the Latter Day Saints, and often rejoiced in the fact that he was over permitted to hear and obey the old Jerusalem Gospel. In politics he was a Reformer. The funeral took place on Tuesday to Greenwood cemetery, Orangeville and was conducted by Elder John H. Taylor. - Star and Vidette.

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November 29,p.3:Maria (*White) Tweedy - Mrs. John Tweedy, a lady well-known to many of the olden residents of Orangeville and the surrounding county, died at her home in Grand Valley a week ago Satuday. The deceased had been in poor health for many years, and death brought release from severe pain and suffering. Mrs. Tweedy was born in Monaghan County, Ireland, but came to Canada with her parents when only three years old. The family settled in Mono and while living there she married Mr. Tweedy about 55 years ago. Shortly after their marriage the young couple moved to Springbrook, just west of Orangeville, where they resided for 35 years. Leaving Springbrook, they went to Farmington and subsequently to East Luther, eventually moving into Grand Valley, where they have since resided. In addition to her husband, the deceased is survived by the following family: - Mrs. W.J. Buchanan, Kansas City; Samuel, in Gainsboro, Sask.: John in Toronto; Johnston, in New York; Robt. J. at Richards Landing, Ont.; Mrs. Thomas McCulloch, of East Luther, and Mrs. J.I. Buchanan, of Grand Valley. The funeral which was largely attended, was held to the Union Cemetery, Grand Valley, last Thursday.
*Information from another source

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December 27,p.7:Hunter Walker - Mr. Hunter Walker, one of Orangeville's respected citizens, died at his home on York street on Christmas Day, after a prolonged illness. Deceased, who was 41 years of age, was born at Brampton, where he spent his boyhood. He moved to Amaranth about 20 years ago, settling on lot 11, con.6, where he in time became possessed of a fine property. About a year ago he sold his farm because of failing health, and removed to Orangeville. Deceased was thrice married. He is survived by a widow and a family of four children, two of whom are by a former marriage. Mrs. Walker, is a daughter of the late John Eldon, of Mono, Robert and Jacob Walker, of Toronto, George Walker, of Shelburne, are brothers, and Mrs. O.J. Kelly, of Franklin, N.H., is a sister of the deceased. The late Mr. Walker was a staunch member of the Methodist Chruch, and in politics inclined to the Liberal side. He carried $1,000 life insurance in the C.O.F. and had a policy for a like amount in a stock company.
The funeral will take place to Greenwood cemetery at 2 o'cock this afternoon.

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December 27,p.6:William Walker - On Friday, Dec. 14th, there passed away at the residence of Mr. William Walker, one of the earlier settlers of this community in the person of Mr. Laban Boggs. He was in his usual health till about two weeks previous to his death, when pneumonia set in, and owing to his advanced age, his recovery was not expected. He was born in the County of Wicklow, Ireland, nearly 80 years ago, and when 20 years of age came to this country and resided for many years on the 11th line, where he followed the trade of shoemaking. About 16 years ago he moved to Orangeville and continued his trade. For the past two years he has been living with his daughter, Mrs. Wm. Walker, who nursed him in his last illness. His wife died in Feb., 1904. The remains were interred in Price's cemetery on Sunday The Rev. Mr. Smith conducted the service at the house, and the Rev. Mr. Woolner at the grave. He leaves behind one daughter and two sons, Samuel, of Guelph, and George G. of Dallas, Texas.

October 25,p.4:Sarah Jane (Johnston) Watson - It is with much regret that we chronicle the death of Sarah Johnston, beloved wife of the late Jno. Watson, in her 63rd year. The deceased was born near Toronto, and while quite young she moved with her parents to Melancthon, settling on the B.L., which was then an unbroken forest. On the 30th of March, 1861, she became the wife of the late Jno. Watson, who was the Master of the first Orangeve lodge (known as 709) in Melancthon. Deceased, with her late husband, settled on lots Nos. 295 and 296, B.L., where they set to work amid the privations incident to a pioneer life, to procure a home for themselves and their future posterity. The late Mrs. Watson was a sufferer from that dreadful disease, bronchitis, for 20 years, and although the skill of the best physicians was called into requisition, none were able to effect a permanent cure. About two months before her death she went to Credit Forks to visit her daughter Mrs. Noble Johnston, and while there she took suddenly ill, and finding her strength failing, she started for the home of her son, Wm. J . Watson, B. L., where she continued to get worse, although she received the best treatment and careful attendance of her son and his wife. Besides, her daughters were very assiduous in their attentions to her in her last moments. Mrs. Watson was a staunch member of the Gravel Road Methodist church for over 40 years. She was a good neighbor, kind in her disposition, a faithful wife and a loving mother. She is survived by a family of five sons and four daughters. The sons are T.A., Wm. Jno., James, Robert and George, all of Melancthon. The daughtes are Mrs. Jno. Gray, Mrs. Wm. J. Henry, Mrs. Frank Brown, of Melancthon; and Mrs. Noble Johnston, of Credit Forks. The funeral, which was a very large one, over 90 rigs being present, was held to Shelburne cemetery Sunday afternoon, Rev. Wm. Tribble gave a very interesting and impressive discourse from Rev. 22, 14 and also officiated at the grave. The pall bearers were Wm. Atkinson, David Waters, Wm. Stone, Wm. Johnston, John Johnston, and Alex. Hogg.

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November 1,p.6:Wm. Webb - Wm. Webb, who has resided in this village for about 20 years, died on Sunday the 21st ult. The funeral was held on Tuesday to the new cemetery at Brown's. The deceased leaves a widow who will reside with her son William, two daughters, Mary and Lizzzie, and two sons, William and Robert, of Toronto.

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October 11,p.3:Mrs. James Wheeler - Mrs. Wheeler, wife of Mr. James Wheeler, lot 29,7th line, Erin, died very suddenly on Tuesday of last week. Deceaed was sitting quietly in her chair when the summons came, death being caused by a stroke of apoplexy. Mrs. Wheeler was in her 73rd years, and is survived by her husband, and three sons. The latter are Uriah, who resides in Minnesota; William, on lot 22, 9th line, Erin; and George on the homestead. The remains were interred in tehHuxley cmeetery on Thursday afternoon, Rev. R.S. Scott, pastor of St. Andrew's chruch, Hillsburg, conducting the last services.

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December 6,p.3:Oliver Wiggins - At his home, at 619 street, Longmont, Colo, at 1.40 a.m. Saturday, November 24, 1906, of Brights disease, Oliver Wiggins, aged 33 years.
Mr. Oliver Wiggins was born at Orangeville, Ontario,Canada, August 8th 1873. He moved to Colorado with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Wiggins, at the age of twelve years. He finished his education in the Longmont public schools, and after his school days were over he went to work for his father at the carpenter trade and has followed that business until the present illness made it necessary for him to quit work. He was for some time engaged in the building business with his brother, Frank. He was a man who held the esteem of all with whom he associated or did business.
He married Miss Alice Finlon Oct. 27 1897. His domestic life has been ideal, and few there are who depart from this world with the affection and regret that did Oliver Wiggins.
The funeral was held from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. James Wiggins, 534 Emery street, Tuesday at two o'clock pm. Interment in the Longmont cemetery. The burial services were in charge of St. Vrain lodge No. 23, A.F. & A.M. - Longmont(Colo.) Times

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