OBITUARIES FROM THE ORANGEVILLE BANNER FOR THE YEAR 1909

Source: Archives of Ontario N258 Reel #

This page is still under construction. More obituaries will be added as I pull them out of the paper. If you have any obituaries to contribute, please email me and I will add them to this page.

BANKS | BRADLEY | BRINKMAN | CAMERON | DOWLING | FAWCETT | FERGUSON | HENDERSON | HUGHSON | ISLAND | LANKTREE | MCGOWAN | MCMURCHY | RIBBANS | SMITH | SPEERS | WILSON

Apr. 29,p.7:Miss Millie Banks- -Miss Millie Banks, daughter of the late James Banks, of Perm, who was killed in the Caledon wreck in September 1907, died at her home on 1st St., on Thursday evening after about three weeks illness with pneumonia. The deceased was a bright, amiable young woman and had made many warm friends during her short residence in town. Much sympathy is expressed for the mother and brothers and sisters in their trying bereavement. Miss Banks was 30 years of age. She is survived by two brothers, Earl and Thomas, of Perm, and six sisters. The latter are Mrs. A.H. Keyes, Amaranth; Mrs. W.J. East, Mono; Reta, of Perm; Bertha, of Toronto; and Edna and Robina at home. The funeral was held from her late home to Laurel cemetery on Saturday. The funeral service was held in Laurel Methodist church and was conducted by Rev. T.R. White, assisted by Rev. J.R. Bell.

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Apr.22,p.6:Mr. Benjamin Bradley - Mr. Benjamin Bradley, an old resident of East Garafraxa township, passed away at his home on Bythia St., about one o'clock yesterday morning. The deceased who was 80 years of age, had been in very poor health for five months or longer. His death was caused by an internal trouble of a rather unusual and obscure nature. The late Mr. Bradley was a native of Yorkshire, England, where he was born on March 4th, 1829. He came to Canada when 21 years of age, settling first in Puslinch township in the neighboring county of Wellington. While living here he was married to Miss Tabitha Fountain, a sister of the late Benjamin Fountain, at one time a leading citizen of Orangeville. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley moved to East Garafraxa in the spring of 1858 making their home on the east 1/2 lot 5, con 18, where they resided until about a year ago when they gave up farming and moved to Orangeville Their marriage which proved very happy one, was blessed with a family of seven sons and one daughter. The oldest son, John, died about seventeen years ago. The other sons are John and Benjamin, farmers, in Mono; William, of Orangeville,; Isaac, of Caledon and Joshua and Joseph, of East Garafraxa. The last mentioned resides on the homestead. Mrs. Wm. Smith, East Garafraxa is the only daughter. Mr. Bradley had the Yorkshireman's fondness for thoroughness and was known as one of the best framers in his neighborhood. Shrewd, thrifty, and industrious, he used his opportunities to advantage and was successful in accumulating a goodly share of this world's goods. By his neighbors he was respected for his honesty and strength of purpose. He had the happy faculty of looking on the bright side of life and his smile, cherry greeting and good-natured joke will not be soon forgotten by his friends. He was a staunch member of the Methodist Church and up to the time of his illness was seldom absent from his pew at the Lord's day services. He was a strong Liberal. During his last illness he was attended by Dr. R. N. Kyles and Dr. A. Gibson, of Hillsburg, who had been his physician for years. The funeral will take place from his late residence to Greenwood cemetery at 2:30 o'clock his afternoon. Service will be held at 2 o'clock. The sympathy of the community is extended to the aged widow, who is grief stricken by her great loss.

During his illness Mr. Bradley vomited quantities of greenish colored matter, which appeared to contain some vegetable growth. Dr. Gibson procured a sample and forwarded it to Dr. McKinnon, of Guelph, who in turn submitted it to one of the Professors in the Ontario Agricultural college for analysis. The analyst pronounced the growth a species of water plant belonging to the algae order. This growth which was undoubtedly the cause of Mr. Bradley's illness and death, is of very rare occurrence. Dr. McKinnon, who is one of the oldest practitioners in the Royal City, states that this is the first case of the kind that has come under his observation during a practice of forty years. The only explanation the physicians can offer for the presence of the plant is that the seed has probably been carried into the stomach in oyster eaten in the raw state.

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Apr.22,p.6:Mrs. Margaret Brinkman -The death of Mrs. Margaret Brinkman, widow of the late Joshua Brinkman, occurred at her home near Granger early on Monday morning of last week. The body was taken to Dundalk on the noon train on Tuesday the interment taking place in Dundalk cemetery. Rev. H. Miller, conducted the services. Mrs. Brinkman, who was almost 75 years of age, was born in Ireland. She was married in in Toronto Gore about fifty years ago and with her husband moved to Proton shortly afterwards. The following sons and daughters survive: - John, of Dundalk; Joshua, of Meaford,; Robert, of Primrose; Mrs. Robert Goodfellow, Oregon; Mrs. W. Arnold, Nottawasaga; and Mrs. S. G. Shaw, Granger.

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Apr.15,p.7:Jane Elizabeth (Smith) Cameron - Her many friends will learn with deep sorrow of the death of Mrs. John Cameron, who passed away at her home on the Centre Road, Caledon, early yesterday morning, after a long and trying illness. The deceased was a sufferer from heart and nervous trouble and had been seriously ill for the last six months. Everything that medical skill could suggest was done to win her back to health, but unfortunately neither this nor the tender care of a devoted husband and family were of any avail. The late Mrs. Cameron was the 54 years of age and was a daughter of Mr. Moses Smith, of Holland Centre. Besides her husband she is survived by a family of one son and two daughters - George, a member of Caledon Township Council and Misses Edith and Blanche. The husband and family have the sympathy of the community in their trying bereavement. The funeral will be held from her late home to the Forest Lawn cemetery, at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon.

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May 13,p.3:James Dowling - The death of Mr. James Dowling, a well-known and universally esteemed resident of the community, occurred at his home at Streetsville on Thursday morning, April 29th. The deceased was born in Caledon 81 years ago and when a young man purchased the farm in East Garafraxa, now owned by Mr. Walton King, where he resided for twenty-nine years. Fifty-seven years ago he married Miss Elizabeth Pinkney, of Caledon, who survives with a family of two sons and two daughters. The latter are Messrs. W.A. Dowling, of Caledon; John Dowling, of Streetsville, Mrs. W.J. Robinson, of Toronto, and Mrs. Michael Robinson, of Orangeville. The late Mr. Dowling was a Liberal and a Methodist and had been one of the trustees of Streetsville Methodist Church for several years. There was a large attendance at the funeral, which was held to Streetsville Cemetery on Saturday afternoon. The pallbearers were five grandsons, Messrs. George, Ernest, Frank, Bert and Wilfred Robinson, and Mr. Peter Pinkney, Mr. Dowling's demise will be greatly regretted by the many who were privileged to enjoy his acquaintance.

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May 20,p.7:James Fawcett - A fatal accident took place on East Broadway between 8 and 9 o'clock on Friday night, resulting in the instant death of James Fawcett. The deceased, who was a laboring an about sixty years of age was driving home with James Ellis, a Mono farmer, with whom he had just engaged for the fifth summer. Ellis had driven in to the station to meet Fawcett and take him out to his home. He had only the bottom boards on his wagon. While they were driving down the East Broadway hill a-short distance below the Market Square, the boards began to shift forward and some of them struck the horses, frightening them, and causing them to run away. The two men, were seated on Fawcett's trunk, Ellis driving. Fawcett grabbed the lines to assist his companion to control the thoroughly frightened team, Their combined efforts were unavailing and as the team plunged madly forward Fawcett was jerked from his seat and thrown head foremost to the ground in front of the wagon. His neck was broken by the force of the fall and it was afterwards found that several of his ribs were crushed, presumably by one of the wheels passing over him. Seeing that it was useless to attempt to stop the team, Ellis dropped the lines, crawled to the back of the wagon and dropped to the ground, escaping unhurt.
Some citizens who had witnessed the distressing affair helped Ellis to carry Fawcett's body to the Town Hall, where it was view by Coroner James Henry. After leaning the facts the Coroner decided that an inquest was unnecessary. Meantime, some of the officers of Harris Masonic Lodge, in which the deceased was a member, arrived and under their instructions the remains were conveyed to Mr. J. H. Hulse's undertaking rooms. Word was sent to Mr. John R. Cook, Centre Road, Caledon, a cousin of the dead man, who drove in as soon as he was apprised of the sad fatality and took charge of the funeral arrangements.
Fawcett farmed for a number of years in the neighborhood of Alton, but owing to the ill-health of his wife sold his place about six years ago. He was a quiet, industrious man and had the reputation of being an excellent worker. Mr. Ellis, thought a great deal of him and is very much distressed over the sad fatality. He leaves a widow, who had been in the Mimico Asylum for the last few years. A brother and sister are also living in Ireland.
There was a very large attendance at the funeral, which was held form Mr. Cook's home to the Forest Lawn Cemetery on Sunday afternoon. Rev. W.M. Morris, pastor of St. Andrew's Church, conducted the services at the house and grave. The members of Harris Masonic Lodge attended the funeral in a body and Mr. C.R. McKeown, a Past Master of the Lodge, read the beautiful burial service of the Order over the open grave. The pallbearers,, all members of the fraternity, were Messrs. R. Irvine, E.J. Ellis, Jas. B. R??, Alex. Dick, J.M. Dods and Geo. McIntyre.

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Apr.15,p.5: Thomas C. Ferguson - It is with sincere regret that we are called upon this week to record the death of Thos. C. Ferguson, one of the pioneers of the township f Mulmur, in the 74th year of his age. For the past three years he had suffered from dropsy gradually becoming weaker, until death came to his relief on Wednesday afternoon, March 31st, 1909. The deceased was born in the township of Tecumseth and came to Mulmur about 53 years ago, settling on lot 11, con.3, W.H.S., where he lived until about 10 years ago, when he removed to Horning Mills, where he resided until his death. Mr. Ferguson in his earlier years had always taken an active and leading part in the municipal affairs of the township and had been councillor and deputy-reeve, which position he occupied just previous to his retirement from municipal politics in 1883. The deceased was much esteemed and highly respected by all who knew him and his death will be deeply regretted y all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He possessed an amiable and cheerful disposition, and was a man of unblemished reputation and the strictest integrity of character. In religion he was a Presbyterian, ad for many years was an elder in the church at Primrose, and at the time of his death held the same position in the church at Horning's Mills. He is survived by a widow, four sons and four daughters and two brother and a sister. The sons are: - Rev. J.B. Ferguson, Seattle Wash.: Thos. A. Ferguson, living on the homestead in Mulmur; Hugh A. Ferguson, San Francisco,Cal; Charles Colwell Ferguson, Burlington, Iowa. The daughters: - Mrs. Jas. Torrance, Amaranth; Mrs. Geo. Taylor, Belleville; Mrs. Wm. Ferris, Masonville; Mrs. (Rev.)Allan Lang, Ohio. The brothers are Alex. Ferguson, Huntsville and Hugh Ferguson, Amaranth, and the sister is Mrs. R. Crawford, of Toronto. The funeral took place on Friday afternoon at 1:30 from the late residence of he deceased and proceeded to Primrose cemetery, where the interment took place. There was a large attendance at the funeral, testifying to the respect and esteem in which the deceased was held by his friends and neighbors. - Free Press.

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Apr.8,p.8:Edward Henderson - Edward Henderson, one of Shelburne's old and esteem citizens, died on Thursday evening of last week after a short illness. He has resided here for over 30 years and was for many years grain buyer for E. Berwick & Co. Before moving her he resided at Primrose. He was twice married. By the first marriage he had one son, Wm. Henderson, of Everett, and three daughters, Mrs. J. Lovell of Troy, Mich.; Mrs. E. Teetzel, Capac, Mich.; and Mrs. R. B. O Oldfield, Dundalk. By the second marriage there are two sons, Bert Henderson, of Corbetton and Harkie Henderson at home, and two daughters, Mrs. Thos. H. Reburn of Fergus and Miss Sadie Henderson at home. John Henderson, of Durham; and Wm. Henderson of New Lowell are brothers. Deceased was well known all over the county and no one was more highly respect. He was a member of Court Shelburne, N o. 45 Independent Order of Foresters and Shelburne A.O. W.U. Lodge an L.O.L. No. 1321, under whose auspices the funeral was held. The bereaved widow and family have sympathy of all in their great trouble. All the children were present at the funeral which was held on Sunday afternoon at Shelburne cemetery. The large crown present testified to the esteem in which the deceased as held in the community. The funeral services at the house and grave were conducted by the Rev. R.J. Seton Adamson, rector of St. Paul's church.

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Apr.22,p.6:Margaret (Gillespie) Hughson -The death of Mrs. Hughson, wife of Mr. Andrew Hughson, of the "Model Farm", East Garafraxa, took place on Sunday after a brief illness. Deceased was stricken down a short time before her death with pneumonia. Her condition speedily grew critical and despite the loving care of her family and the best efforts of her physicians, she passed away at the time already state. The deceased lady was 70 years of age and was a sister of Mrs. Wm. Fiddes and the late John Gillespie of this town. She was married to Mr. Hughson about forty years ago. Besides her husband she is survived by a family of four sons and three daughters. The family are Nelson, Andrew, Stewart, Susie and Amelia, at home. Charles G., of Amaranth, and Mrs. W.J. Hunter, of this town. The esteem in which the deceased was held was shown by the large attendance at the funeral, which was held to Greenwood cemetery on Tuesday afternoon. Rev. W.M. Morris, pastor of St. Andrew's church, of which she was a member, conducted the services at the house and grave. The pallbearers were Messrs. Joseph and W.H. Gillespie, James Montgomery, John Cruikshank, Thos. Wright and J.C. Reid. The family leave the sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement.

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Apr. 29,p.7:Mary Ann (Shaw) Island -Orangeville has lost an esteemed resident in the person of Mrs. George Island, whose death took place at her home, corner Second St. and Third Avenue, about noon on Saturday. The deceased was taken ill two weeks before her death with the typhoid influenza that has been prevalent in town this spring. Her condition speedily grew critical and some days prior to her death her friends were informed that her chances for recovery were not at all favorable. The late Mrs. Island was 67 years of age and was born in the township of Toronto Gore, being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shaw, prominent residents of that place. She was married to Mr. Island on June 13th 1866. The union proved a very happy one and was blessed by a family of six sons and a daughter, all of whom survive. The sons are Samuel L, of Caledon, Arthur of Duluth, Minn. and Robert H., George E., William A., and Frank, of Mono. Mrs. J. E. Jenkins, of Mono, is the only daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Island resided on their fine property on the 1st line, east, Mono, until about three years ago, when they gave up the cares and responsibilities of farm life and removed to Orangeville. The deceased lady was a true-hearted Christian woman, whose kindness and ready sympathy won her a high place in the affections of her friends and neighbors. She was devoted to her husband and family, to whom her death means an irretrievable loss. General sympathy is felt for the sorrowing husband and family in their bereavement. The esteem in which the departed woman was held was shown by the unusually large attendance at the funeral on Monday afternoon. All classes and denominations of our citizens were represented and a great many of the Mono and Caledon friends of the family were present to pay their last tribute of respect. The service was conducted by Rev. G.A. Rix, rector of St. Mark's Church, Rev. G.W. Hewitt assisting. The pallbearers were the six sons.

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September 9,p.?:Matthew Lanktree - One of the oldest residents of Amaranth passed away at his residence, lot 7, con.4, Amaranth in the person of Matthew Lanktree, who had reached the great age of 80 years and 8 months. Mr. Lanktree had been ailing since January and his death was not unexpected. It was however, none the less sad. Every attention was given him by the members of his family, but for some the end was looked for.

Mr. Lanktree was born in the township of Albion, his parents coming from Ireland a few years before the event. At an early age, in 1845, they moved to the Township of Amaranth and became one of the first settlers of that township. When they passed through Orangeville, there were only three houses here. He lived all his life on the farm on which he died and helped to clear it and several other farms. Mr. Lanktree was a genuine pioneer and the kindly and neighbourly nature that was common with the first settlers remained with him all his long life. When he came to Amaranth, that township was an unbroken wilderness, the place being alive with bears, deer, wolves and other big games and many a thrilling tale die the old pioneer tell about he strenuous days they put in when the country was young., The labour of clearing the land, harvesting the crops and going to market in Brampton and Toronto was very hard indeed and the early days produced a rugged and hardy class of men of which the deceased was one of them. The parents of Samuel J. Brown came to Amaranth about he same time and settled next lot the Mr. Lanktree.

Deceased was twice married, the surviving members of the family being Joseph on the homestead, Mrs. George Varcoe, Matthew and Miss Eliza of Amaranth, William of Bellwood, and Mrs. Robert Curry of this town. Mrs. William Staveley of Whittington was a sister. Mr. Lanktree was a quiet man who never interfered with others and he was very highly respected by all who knew him and his death will be generally regretted. He was a consistent member of the Anglican Church and in politics he was a conservative. Mr. Lanktree was one of the first members of the Orange Lodge that formerly was located at Farmington. The family have the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to Greenwood Cemetery and was largely attended showing the high esteem in which the deceased was held. Service took place at the residence and was conducted by Rev. G.A. Rix. Pastor of St. Marks Church and the preachers paid high tribute to the sterling worth of the deceased pioneer. Revs. J.R. Bell and T.R. White of Laurel also spoke highly of the character of Mr. Lanktree. The bearers were: Messrs G.A. Rennick, O. Banks, Richard Girggs, John Greason, S.J. Brown and William Hughes.

Copy provided by Marjorie Lanktree

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Apr.29,p.7:Mrs. Hugh (Connor) McGowan -Mrs. Hugh McGowan died at her home near Lowry last Friday, April 16, after an illness of a month's duration. Mrs. McGowan was born in Ireland seventy-two years ago. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Connor. She emigrated to Ontario at the age of six years. On May 1st, 1861, when was married to Hugh McGowan. The family moved to this state in 1891 and have been residents of the county since then.
The deceased was survived by her husband and six children., Mrs. Alex Oliver of Marsville, Ontario; Mrs. Carl Johnston, Wheaton, Minnesota; Robert McGowan, Pilot Mound, Manitoba; Mrs. H.N. May, Duluth, Minnesota; James S. McGowan, Weyburn, Saskatchewan, and Bert McGowan of Lowry. She is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Robert Donaldson, of Ontario. Funeral services ere conducted on Monday by Rev. W.A. Rice, of Glenwood at the Evangelical church at Lowry with interment in the cemetery near that village. All of the children excepting Mrs. Alex. Oliver were present at the funeral.
Mrs. McGowan was a good, Christian lady who enjoyed the esteem of all her acquaintances. The bereaved family have the sympathy of heir many friends in the loss of a kind and devoted mother - Glenwood (Minn.) Herald. From
the same paper we learn that Mr. McGowan has gone to Weyburn, where he will spend the summer with his son, James. Mr. and Mrs. McGowan were at one time esteemed residents of East Garafraxa.

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Apr.15,p.7: Donald McMurchy - Mr. Donald McMurchy, one of the oldest and most widely known resident of Erin township, died at his home near Hillsburg early last Thursday day morning He was found by his daughter-in-law lying upon the floor of his bedroom, cold in death. He had apparently been overcome, by a weak spell after getting out of bed and finding himself unable to return had sunk down upon the floor with a cushion under his head. Mr. McMurchy was born in Cantyre, Agyleshire, Scotland, on April 10th, 1828, and was therefore within two days of being 81 years of age when overtaken by death. He came to Erin township with his parents when 13 years of age. He is survived by a family of our sons and two daughters. The sons are Thos., of San Francisco, Cal,; Norman, Science master, of Regina, Sask., Collegiate Institute; John chief machanical draughtsman for the Westinghouse Co, Pittsburg, Pa., and Charles on the homestead. The daughters are Mrs. Alex. McMurchy, Sundridge and Mrs. James Carmichael, Hillsburg. Three brothers and six sisters also survive. The deceased was a man of the highest respect by the whole community. He was a prominent member of St. Andrew's church, Hillsburg and a staunch Liberal. The funeral, which was one of the largest held in Erin for years, took place on Monday afternoon to Huxley cemetery. The services were conducted by Rev. R.S. Scott, pastor of St. Andrew's Church, Hillsburg, assisted by Rev. D. Strachan, of Toronto, and Rev. F. Fowlie, of Erin.The pallbearers were Norman, John and Chas. McMurchy, sons of the deceased, Angus McMurchy, K.C., of Toronto and Calvin Green, nephews, and James Carmichael, son-in-law.

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Apr.15,p.7:Emma Nellie Ribbans - Emma Nellie Ribbans, daughter of Mr. William Ribbans, James St. died on Good Friday after a short illness from heart trouble. She was 13 years and 10 months old. The funeral was held to the Forest Lawn cemetery on Saturday afternoon, Rev. G. A. Rix conducting the services. Much sympathy is felf for the fahter and family, who have had a trying time of it lately with sickness.

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Mar.11,p.2: John Smith - John Smith, ex-M.P.P. for Peel , died at his home in Brampton early, on Friday morning after three days illness form pneumonia. Mr. Smith conducted an auction sale on Monday and was taken ill while the sale was in progress. He returned home early in the evening went to bed and his family summoned a physician. Despite the doctor's efforts and careful nursing he rapidly grew worse and it was soon apparent that his case was hopeless. The late Mr. Smith was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, seventy-eight years ago, and came to Canada when quite young. He was a man of enormous stature and magnificent physique and rarely suffered a day's illness. He was first elected to the Ontario Legislature as member for Peel County in 1892, and held the county until last election, being successful five times. He was a strong Liberal and was perhaps the best known man in the County of Peel. He was a Presbyterian in religion, and is survived by a widow and three daughters.
With his father, the late Andrew Smith, in the year 1832 he came to the United States, remaining at Caledonia, in the state of New York,f or a few months and then with his father he came to Canada settling in Caledon towship, Peel County, the family acquiring a number of farms in Caledon and the adjoining township of Chinguagcousy. Mr. Smith moved to Brampton in 1854. In his earlier years, ???? on an extensive scae, he d??? to introduce good stock into the county. The funeral on Monday was one of the largest ever held in Brampton.

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Apr.29,p.7:Mr. Alexander Speers - The death of Mr. Alexander Speers, a lifelong resident of Caledon township, occurred at his home, lot 15, con. 6, east, on Wednesday of last week after a short illness. The deceased who was 82 years of age, had suffered from nerve trouble for some years, but apart from this was in the enjoyment of good health until eight days or so prior to his demise. Mr. Speers was born and had always lived in Caledon. He is survived by a widow (nee Miss Mary Penelton, of Mono) and a family of four sons, and three daughters. The sons are Thomas, Alexander, James, and Arch. Speers, all of Caledon, and the daughters, Mrs. Walker, Orangeville, Mrs. David McMullen, Caledon, and Mrs. Crawford, Albion. One brother, James Speers, of Caledon, father of Chief Speers of this town, also survives at the remarkable age of 94 years. The funeral was held from his late residence to St. John's Church cemetery, 7th line, Mono, on Friday afternoon, Rev. A.C. Collier, rector of Mono Mills parish, held the funeral service in the church, which was crowded to the doors. The pallbearers were the four sons and Messrs. Geo. McMullen and Crawford, sons-in-law.

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May 13, p.3:Catherine (Lindsay) Wilson - The death of Mrs. Catherine Wilson, wife of the late Robert Wilson, better known as Squire Wilson, and for many years reeve of Mono and a prominent figure in township affairs, occurred at the home of her sister, Mrs. Robert Colwell, lot 16,con.8, Mono, last Thursday, Since the death of her husband, which took place at his home in Orangeville about fifteen years ago, Mrs. Wilson has spent much of her time with her niece, Mrs. Robert Murphy, of Rosemont, and with relatives in Collingwood. S he came to Mrs. Colwell's on a visit about two weeks before her death and was taken ill quite unexpectedly. She was 74 years of age and leaves no family. Deceased was highly thought of by her friends and neighbors. In her younger days she was connected with Primitive Methodist Church and later was an active worker in Ebenezer Methodist Church at Relessey She was widely known for her kindness and open-handed hospitality. George and James Lindsay, of Toronto, are brothers. There was a very large attendance at the funeral, which was held to St. John's church cemetery in Mono on Saturday afternoon. Rev. A.C. Collier, rector of Mono Mills parish, conducted the services. The pallbearers were Messrs. James and Percy Colwell, Robert Murphy , W.J. Holmes, Thos. Laverty and George Lindsay.

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