OBITUARIES FROM THE ORANGEVILLE BANNER FOR THE YEAR 1931

Source: Archives of Ontario - N258 Reel #45

This page is still under construction. More obituaries will be added as I pull them out of the paper. If you have any obituaries to contribute, please email me and I will add them to this page.

JOHNSTON | LEMON | LINKLATER | MAY | MCCANDLESS | MCGUIRE | MCMASTER | REID | SHERMAN | SPEERS | TANSLEY | WALLACE | WARD

March 19, p.3:Elizabeth (Arnold) Johnston -The death took place in Lord Dufferin Hospital, Orangeville, on Wednesday, March 11th of Elizabeth Arnold, widow of the late John Johnston, of Laurel, after an illness of two months. The late Mrs. Johnston was born 77 years ago on the 10 con. of Vaughan township and lived there until her marriage to John Johnston, of Toronto Gore, when they moved to Laurel, Amaranth township, 55 years ago. Surviving are one son, Louis Johnston,on the old homestead, 5th line, Amaranth, and one daughter, Mrs. Elijah Dynes, of Orangeville, two brothers, George Arnold, of Nashville, and John Arnold of Durand, Mich., and two half-brothers, James and William Clayton, of Chatham, The late Mrs. Johnston was one of the pioneer residents of the Laurel district and was a member of the Laurel United church, in which she had long been active worker. A kindly, sympathetic woman, she was every ready to offer kindly counsel or lend a helping hand in times of need. As a neighbor she was held in the highest regard.

A short funeral service was held at the Funeral Home, Orangeville, on Thursday afternoon, Rev. F.J. Dunlop, of Laurel ,conducted the service and paid tribute to the dutiful christian character of the departed woman. The burial took place on Friday morning, March 13th, at Nashville, where a large number of old friends and relatives had gathered to pay their last mark of respect to the memory of an old friend and neighbor. A memorial service was held in Laurel United church on Sunday afternoon at 8 o'clock.

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March 5, p. 3:Gavin J.Lemon - One of the few remaining links between the present day and the pioneer life of the township of Caledon was sundered last week through the death of Mr. Gavin Lemon Sr., who passed away at his late residence, lot 16, 3rd line, east, on Saturday, February 28th, at the ripe age of 88 years. Deceased was always a hale, vigorous man and retained possession of his physical and mental faculties in an unusual degree almost to the last. He was a lifelong resident of Caledon, being a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Lemon, who were among the first settlers in the northeast corner of the township not far from Mono Mills. He spent his lifetime in that section of the township and in his early years was widely known as one of the successful cattlemen of the district, shipping extensively to outside points at a time when this practice was only in its infancy. He took a keen and intelligent interest in public and religious affairs and was usually able to acquit himself with credit in any discussion of current topic. In his early days he was an active Orangeman and was a member of L.O.L. No. 260, which was afterwards absorbed by Mono Mills L.O.L.No. 192. One of his cherished possessions was a badge, which he received from this lodge about 60 years ago. He was an adherent of the United church and a Liberal in politics. He is survived by his aged wife, formerly Rachel Speers, also a member of an early Caledon family, to whom he was wedded 55 years ago, and two sons, G.J. Lemon, of Rock Glen, Sask., and H.A. Lemon, of Caledon. Another son, Dr. Ernest Lemon, of Sault St. Marie, who had a distinguished war record, died about three years ago. Of his own family, only one sister, Mrs. Henry, Strathcona, Man., survives. The funeral was held to the Forest Lawn Cemetery, Orangeville, on Monday, Rev. R.K. Burnside conducting the services. The pallbearers were Messrs. Geo. Woolner, Geo. Giles, Wm. Baker, John Speers, A.C. Speers, and James Speers.

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March 5, p.1:Amelia (Luxton) Linklater- Another of the older residents of Grand Valley passed to her long rest on Saturday afternoon last, in the demise of Amelia Luxton, beloved wife of Wm. B. Linklater. The deceased had been in failing health for some weeks, but indications pointed to her recovery. While still confined to bed, she was stricken with a paralytic stroke on Wednesday morning of last week and remained in an unconscious condition until the end. The late Mrs. Linklater was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Luxton, pioneer settler of this locality. She was born on lot 29, con. 1, East Luther, and had lived in this locality practically all her life. She was in her 75th year. For some years she and her now bereaved partner farmed in East Luther, after which they moved to Muskoka, where they remained for a short time, later returning to take up their residence here. The deceased leaves, besides her bereaved husband, one son, Geo. W. Linklater, of Grand Valley, and two daughters, Mrs. John Osborne, of Trout Creek, and Mrs. Herb. McDougal, of East Luther. She is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. John Lawrie, of British Columbia, and Mrs. John Sanderson, Toronto, and one brother, Wm. Luxton, in the West.
The deceased was a member of Knox Presbyterian church and the private service at the home on River Street on Monday afternoon of this week was conducted by her pastor,, Rev. S.C. Graeb. Interment followed in the Union cemetery. The pallbearers were: Messrs. Peter Gilbert and Chas. McArthur, W.J. Watt, George Luxton and Ed. Linklater.
Friends and relatives from a distance in attendance at the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. John Osborne, Trout Creek; Miss Annie Linklater, Buffalo, N.Y.; Miss Anna Linklater, Erin; Mrs. and Mrs. Dave Simpson, Belwood, and George Luxton, Jessopville - Star and Vidette.

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March 19, p. 3:John Wesley May - John Wesley May, a well-known Erin township, farmer, passed away in Lord Dufferin Hospital, on Sunday, March 15th, after a rather lengthy illness from the effects of a stroke. Deceased, who was 71 years of age, was a native of Albion township, where he spent the early part of his life. He was the son of the late John May, of Albion, and was unmarried. He is survived by three brothers, George May, of Mono Mills, William May, Weyburn, Sask., and Robert May, also living in the West, and two sisters, Mrs. N.J. McMullen, Caledon East, and Mrs. Sarah McKenzie, Minneapolis, Minn. Deceased was a member of the United church and a staunch Conservative. The funeral was held from the home of his brother, George, 3rd line, Albion, to Caledon East Public Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon. Services were in charge of Rev. R. K. Burnside, Mono Mills.

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March 26,.3:John Wesley May: John Wesley May, of Erin, formerly of Mono Mills, passed away in Lord Dufferin Hospital, Orangeville, on Sunday, March 15th, in his 71st year. His death was due to pneumonia, following a paralytic stroke. The funeral was held form the residence of his brother, Mr. George May, to Caledon East Public cemetery on Tuesday, March 17th, and was largely attended by neighbors and friends from a distance. Rev. W.L. Nichol, pastor of Caledon East United church, conducted an impressive service at the house and also at the grave. The deceased is survived by three brothers and three sisters, William, of Weyburn, Sask., Robert, of Regina, Sask., George, of Mono Mills, Mrs. Elizabeth Irwin, of Toronto, Mrs. W.T. McKenzie, of Minneapolis, Minn., and Mrs. Martha McMullin, Caledon East. The pallbearers were Messrs Marshall Kearns, Launie Perry, Wesley McMullin, Charles, Fred and Kenneth May. The flowerbearers were Messrs. Walter Rollley, Clifford Coffey, Harry Morris, and William Lyness. The floral tributes included : Pillows, Mrs. Martha McMullin, Mr. William May and family, sprays, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred McKinley, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley McMullin, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred May; wreaths, Mr. and Mrs. W.T. McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Robert May and Mr. and Mrs. George May.

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March 5, p.3:Richard McCandless - Another lifelong resident of the Mono Mills community passed out on Wednesday, February 25th, when Mr. Richard McCandless succumbed in Lord Dufferin Hospital after an illness of over two years duration. Mr. McCandless was the eldest son of the late William and Mary McCandless and was born in Albion 63 years ago. He was well-known as an energetic, industrious man, honest and dependable in all his dealings. Through frugal living he had acquired a comfortable home and a good property in the village of Mono Mills, where he was living up to the time of his demise. The late Mr. McCandless was a lifelong member and supporter of the former Methodist church and since Union had been a regular attendant at the United Church, where he took an active interest in everything connected with church work. He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Sarah Jane Moffatt, of Caledon, and three brothers, Joseph, of Caledon East, William J. and Thomas, of Mono Mills. The funeral was held to Caledon East Public Cemetery on Friday afternoon, service being held at the home of his brother, Mrs. Thomas McCandless, where a large number of friends and neighbors gathered to show their last tribute of respect. The service was conducted by Rev. R.K. Burnside, who also officiated at the grave. Among the floral offerings were: a sheaf from the wife, wreath from the brothers and a spray from Mono Mills United church. The pallbearers were Messrs James Taylor, Stuart Mason, James Haffey, John A. Vance, Robert Harvey and Geo. Patterson.

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May ?,p.?:Blayney McGuire - This week the Banner mourns the loss of its founder, Mr. Blayney McGuire, who passed away at Homewood, Guelph, about 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, May 5th, at the age of 71 years. Starting The Banner in Jun 1893, Mr. McGuire had been actively identified with the management of this journal until January 25th last, when a sudden illness compelled him to relinquish his daily round of duties. After a couple of weeks his condition seemed to improve and his physicians held hope for his recovery. Unfortunately the improvement did not continue and during the last two weeks there had been a marked change for the worse. Death was due to hardening of the arteries aggravated by lesion of some of the smaller blood vessels of the head. Blayney McGuire was born in Orangeville on January 28th, 1860. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Blayney McGuire, who took up their abode in this town in the late 50's of the last century. His father was born near the town of Castleblaney in Ireland. After completing his public school education, Mr. McGuire decided to learn the printing business and took a position as apprentice with Fisher Munro, who was at that time publishing the Orangeville Advertiser. He served three years as an apprentice and then went to Tillsonburg with his brother, Will, who had also served his apprenticeship at the printing trade in the office of the Orangeville Sun. The two brothers embarked in the publishing business in Tillsonburg. After the dissolution of their partnership, Mr. McGuire worked as a job printer in London, Brantford and Toronto, finally returning to his native town to take charge of the Advertiser for his old employer, Fisher Munro. A few years later he and Seneca G. Ketchum bought the Orangeville Gazette from the late J.B. Cuttell and changed the name of the paper to The Dufferin Post. They ran the Post for fourteen months and then sold out to D.J. Mungovan, who made Mr. McGuire his foreman. This position he held for five years, finally resigning to go into business on his own account. Early in 1893 he started a job printing business in Orangeville and in June of that year founded The Banner, with which he had been actively and continuously identified from that time until his fatal illness. In his long newspaper career Mr. McGuire had witnessed many far-reaching changes in the printing industry. Modern printing machinery was unknown when he commenced his career as an apprentice. Speed and accuracy in composition was the first qualification of a good printer and Mr. McGuire was known as a particularly speedy compositor. In the fifty years and longer that he had been in the printing business, Mr. McGuire had seen the industry completely revolutionized. As a young man Mr. McGuire was an outstanding athlete and sprinter. Few young men could beat him in a 100 yard sprint and he won many prizes at celebrations and athletic events. He was widely known as one of the outstanding lacrosse players of his day. He played with the famous Brantford team for two seasons and after returning to Orangeville was one of the scoring aces of the champion Dufferins of the late '80's. Strong, fleet of food and expert at dodging his opponents he was always a dangerous man when The Dufferins were attacking and the cry "Go in on the flags, Blayney!" is still remembered by the old followers of the greenshirts. His interest in lacrosse did not abate one whit with the passing of the years. When Orangeville had a lacrosse team it had no more enthusiastic supporter than Mr. McGuire, whether winning or losing. He seldom missed a Good Friday lacrosse convention in Toronto and gave good service to the game for two years as President of the Ontario Amateur Lacrosse Association. He took an active interest in the public life and affairs of Orangeville, served in the town council for three years and was one of the men who took an active part in the negotiations which resulted in the establishment of the Dod Knitting Industry. As a man he was absolutely fearless, never hesitated to express his views and was always prepared to back up his convictions on any issue of public interest. He was a consistent member of St. Andrews United Church, which he had served in earlier years as Secretary and member of the Board of Managers. He was an enthusiastic Orangeman being a member of Orangeville L.O.L. No. 2931 and Orangeville R.B.P. No. 621. He was also a member of Court Gardiner No. 159, C.O.F., The Caledon Lake Club and the Orangeville Lawn Bowling and Curling Clubs. He was fond of curling and bowling and was also an ardent angler, who always made it a rule to take a day off on May 1. In his passing Orangeville loses a loyal citizen who was always ready to give his hearty support to any movement for the benefit of the town in which he lived and labored for so many years. His loss is mourned by his wife, formerly Miss Jennie Henry, of Caledon, one son W.H. McGuire of St. Catharines, three daughters, Ruth, of Kitchener, Louise, of Orangeville, and Alice, of Harper Hospital, Detroit, one brother, J.S. McGuire, Timmins, and two sisters Mrs. Annie Ellis and Mrs. Fred Hatcher, Orangeville. Two sons Lieutenants Harry and R.B. McGuire, were killed on the Flanders front during the Great War. The funeral will be held from the family residence, West Broadway, to the Forest Lawn Cemetery this (Thurs.) afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. C.G. Armour will conduct services at the house at 2 o'clock, assisted by Rev. W.M. Morris of Toronto a former pastor of St. Andrews.

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February 19, p.3:Matilda (Tweedy) McMaster -Pneumonia, following a prolonged illness, resulted in the death on Monday of Matilda, wife of Matthew P. McMaster, 237 Belsize Drive, Toronto, in her 81st year. The late Mrs. McMaster, who was Matilda Tweedy, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Tweedy was born and spent her early life in Orangeville, but had resided for many years at Windsor, where her husband was a school principal. Mr. McMaster who was born at Purple Hill, also taught school in the Orangeville district when a young man. Deceased attended Glebe Presbyterian church, Toronto. Beside her husband, two daughters, Mrs. R.? Macklem, of Kingston, Mrs. F.A. Whitton, Toronto, and one son, Mr. S.E.W. McMaster, of the C.P.R. Telegraphs, Toronto, survive. The late Mrs. McMaster was a sister of the late Mrs. Nathaniel Sproul of Orangeville. The remains were brought to Orangeville by motor yesterday afternoon, interment being made at Greenwood cemetery., Rev. L.A. R. MacLean, pastor of Glebe church was the officiating minister.

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June 4, p.3: Dr. J.B. Reid -The news that Dr. J.B. Reid, F.R.C.S., had passed away in his sleep sometime during Sunday morning, May 24, at his home, 6 Fairlawn Ave., Toronto, caused profound sorrow throughout Tillsonburg and the surrounding countryside, where for forty years he had been engaged in the practice of medicine. Dr. Reid had contracted a cold while planting trees on his farm near Orangeville but no serious outcome was anticipated. On Saturday night he suffered an attack of heart trouble which was not thought to be of a grave nature, and from which he was thought to have recovered. After rising on Sunday morning he lay down again for a rest and about ten o'clock Mrs. Reid was shocked to discover that he had passed away.

The late John Buchanan Reid, was born in Mono Township, near Orangeville, on July 31, 1861. After his education in the public and high schools of the district he taught school for a time. While teaching school he secured works upon the anatomy of the body, the study of which turned his attention to medicine as a life calling. Subsequently he graduated in medicine and surgery at Trinity College, and in 1911 after post-graduate work in London, England, he became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, a much coveted and honoured distinction in the medical profession. Soon after graduation, Dr. Reid located in Tillsonburg, and commenced a professional career which continued in this town and district for over forty years until a few months ago, when Dr. and Mrs. Reid took up their home in Toronto. During his long residence in Tillsonburg, Dr. Reid won the esteem and respect of all classes of citizens. In his professional capacity he measured up to the highest ethical standards of his profession. He gave himself unsparingly in the service of humanity and financial reward was for him a secondary consideration. His deeds of kindness were innumerable. He was a splendid type of the old-fashioned family physician, now rapidly disappearing in this age of specialization. Dr. Reid was an Independent Conservative in politics. While he did not take an active part in municipal affairs he was keenly interested in everything that made for public welfare and served on the high school and public library boards for several years. He was an active worker in the Temperance movement. Quite early in life he became a member of the Methodist church, and during his long residence in Tillsonburg he was an active member of what is now St. Paul 's United church, holding various official positions form time to time, and was engaged as a worker at the time of his death. Dr. Reid is survived by his wife, May Spence, a daughter, Mrs. E. McKim, of Lucknow, three sons, Dr. Spence Reid, Dr. George Reid, and Fred, and also several brothers and sisters including Dr. Hannah and Minerva Reid,of Toronto.

A private funeral service was conducted at 6 Fairlawn Ave., Toronto, on Tuesday evening, May 26, by the Rev.A.W. Hone, of Tillsonburg, assisted by Rev.A.E. Marshall, and Rev. H.L. Partridge, of Toronto. On Wednesday interment was made in the family cemetery, Mono College, Orangeville. Amongst those attending from Tillsonburg were: Rev. A.W. And Mrs. Hone, Lansing, and Mrs. Rodgers, Stephen and Mrs. Scott, John and Mrs. Palmer, Mrs . Wallace Denton, Mrs Joel Bate, Dr. D.G. Leatherdale and Alex. Reynolds.
"So when the good man dies, For years beyond our ken, The light he leave behind him lies, Upon the paths of men." - Tillsonburg News

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February 19, p. 3:Isiah Sherman - Following a brief illness from pneumonia, the death of Isaiah Sherman occurred at the winter apartment of his daughter, Mrs. W.J. Hunter, Greenwood Avenue, Toronto. The late Mr. Sherman was born near Belleville 77 years ago, the son of the late John Sherman and Betsy English and was of United Empire Loyalist descent on both sides. When a child of ten he moved with his parents to Dufferin County, settling near Shelburne, where he later engaged in farming. A few years later he moved to Owen Sound and finally settled in West Toronto twenty-five years ago, where he was employed by the C.P.R. His wife, formerly Margaret Jane Lockhart, to whom he was married over fifty years ago, predeceased him ten years ago, also a son, Robert James, a daughter, Florence (Mrs. Lamount) and fifteen years ago a daughter, Lulu. He is survived by his two sons, John, of Vancouver, B.C. Mervin, of West Toronto, and four daughters, Mrs. W.J. Hunter, Mrs. Edward Irvine, Mrs. S.J. (Mae) McIntosh and Miss Vera, all of Toronto. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. John Ferris, of Yellowgrass, Sask., And Mrs. Boyle, of Hornings Mills. The funeral service was held at the home of his son, Mr. Mervin Sherman, St. John's Road, by Rev. Avison, of High Park United Church, of which Mr. Sherman was a member. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends. The remains were laid to rest in Prospect Cemetery. A large number of beautiful floral offerings were received from different friends and societies, including The Bell Telephone Co, the Bank of Commerce and the Knights of The Maccabees. The pallbearers, who were nephews and former friends, were Andy Sherman, Dixie, Ansley Sherman, Mono Road, William Ewing, Orangeville, Will Sparrow, Pickering, John Reburn, Shelburne, and Thos. Boyle Jr., Hornings Mills.
Mr. Sherman was a brother-in-law of the late Mrs. Andrew Ewing, Orangeville, the late W.M. Lockhart of Alliston, and Mrs. Robert Moffatt, Hockley.

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March 5, p.3:Elgin L. Speers - The entire community was shocked to learn of the death of Elgin Lewis Speers, who passed away at his home, lot 14, con. 5, east, Caledon, on Tuesday morning, February 24th. The deceased, who was 34 years of age, was in apparent good health until only a few days before his death, when he was stricken with pleural pneumonia. His smile will always be remembered by those who knew him and his removal, while in the prime of life, is lamented by all. The heartfelt sympathy of the whole community goes out to his wife and young children, as well as to his parents, brothers and sister. Mr. Speers was a member of Caledon L.O.L. No. 250 and of Mono Mills R.B.P. No. 297 and in politics was a Conservative. He also served during the Great War. He leaves to mourn his loss one son. Walden, two small daughters, Ina and Evelyn, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.D. Speers of Caledon, six brothers, Wesley, Fred, Mervin, Norman, Dave and Esmile, and one sister, (Viola) Mrs. J.A. Trathen, of Hamilton.

The funeral which was largely attended, was held to Caledon East public cemetery on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The service at the house was conducted by Rev. Bro. Douglas, of Caledon East, and Rev. R.K. Burnside, of Mono Mills, and at the graveside the services of the Orange and Black Knight Orders were read over the open grave. The pallbearers were his six brothers, who are also brother Orangeman. The flowerbearers were Vernet Davis, James Benson, Elmer Woolner and Sam Warnock. The floral tributes included: - A pillow, Wife and Family; broken wheel, father, mother and brothers; wreaths, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Trathen, R.B.P., No. 297, Mono MIlls, Warnock L.O.L. No. 250, Caledon, teacher and pupils of S.S. No. 10, Caledon, Mr. and Mrs. R.D. Speers and family, Mrs. Varey and Mr. and Mrs. Norman Maltby; bouquets, Mr. and Mrs. A. Cullen and Misses Grace and Doreen Davis. Friends were present at the funeral from Toronto, Bolton, Brampton, Orangeville, Dundalk and Caledon East.

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January 8, p. 4: W.H. Tansley - William H. Tansley, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W. Tansley, Crombie, passed peacefully away at his home, Third Avenue, Shelburne, on Saturday Dec. 27th after a lengthy illness in his 58th year. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon to Shelburne Cemetery, the service being conducted by Rev. C.J. McNichol and Rev. Levi Hailfyard.

The pallbearers were Messrs. John E. Spence, Richard Caven, Samuel Crombie, Alfred Graham, Victor Philips and Cecil Reid. Three sisters survive: Mrs. Jos. E. Phillips, Shelburne, Mrs. Elizabeth Ewing, Toronto, and Mrs. Jos. Billings, Amaranth - Economist.

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June 25, p.3:Mrs. Ann (Linn) Wallace -One of Dufferin's oldest residents was called to her reward last week in the person of Mrs. Ann Wallace, widow of the late John Wallace, who passed away at the home of her son, Mr. Wylie Wallace, lot 15, Con. 5, Amaranth, on Saturday, June 20th in her 92nd year. Mrs. Wallace had enjoyed excellent health until early last February, when she was taken ill and was afterwards removed to Lord Dufferin Hospital, where she was a patient for three months, being finally removed to the home of her son near Laurel. Deceased, whose name was Ann Linn, was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Adam Linn, Centre Road, Caledon, where she was born and spent her early life. Her father, who was a Baptist minister in England before coming to Canada, opened the Orangeville Baptist church. From her home in Caledon the subject of our notice went to Brampton, where she met and was wedded to John Wallace, who was at that time in the employ of the mercantile firm of Chrisholm & Elliott. Forty-eight years ago, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace moved to lot 15, con. 4, Amaranth, where the husband died some five years later. About twenty-two years ago, Mrs. Wallace and her daughter moved to Orangeville, where she continued to reside until her last illness. Deceased was a woman of many estimable qualities, kindly and sympathetic as a neighbor and exemplary in her life and conduct. She was a devoted wife and mother, who found her great happiness in life in the welfare of her family. Her loss is mourned by three sons, Joseph, Orangeville, Robert J. and T.W. , Amaranth, and one daughter, Mrs. W.C. Lathwell, Toronto. Another son, Ed., of Grand Valley, died about a year ago.
The funeral, which was largely attended, was held from the home of her son, Mr. T.A.W. Wallace, to Laurel cemetery on Monday afternoon. Rev. A.C. Whitcombe, pastor of Orangeville Baptist church, conducted the service and was assisted by Rev. F.J. Dunlop, of Laurel. During the service Mrs. Hunter Nelson gave a beautiful rendering of one of the deceased's favorite hymns, "The Old Rugged Cross." Many beautiful flowers told of the love and sympathy of friends and neighbors of the departed woman. The pallbearers were Messrs. Alex and Hugh Nelson, Wm. Phillips, Geo. Bidwell, Jos. Lanktree and Edward Richardson. The flowerbearers were two grandsons, Norman Wallace, Grand Valley, and Walter Lathwell, Toronto, and four young girls, Ivadel Walker, -- Walker, Pearl Wallace and Helen Simonds.

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February 19, p.3:Margaret (Scott) Ward -The death occurred at her home, lot 9, con.1, Adjala, on Monday, February 9th, of Margaret Scott, beloved wife of David S. Ward. Mrs. Ward, who was in her 50th year, had been in ill-health for some time and her death was not unexpected. She had lived in the Connor district for the greater part of her life and was held in the highest esteem by all with whom she was brought in contact in the course of the daily round of activities. She was the possessor of a kindly, sympathetic nature was devoted to her home and its duties and was regarded as an excellent neighbor. Her loss is mourned by her husband and one brother, Mr. Thos. Scott, of Midland. She was a member of St. John's Church, Mono, and was also identified with Connor L.T.B. Lodge. There was a large attendance at the funeral which was held from the bereaved home to Mount Tegart cemetery, Tottenham, on Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 11th, Rev.T.H. Floyd, of Caledon East, conducting the services. Numerous floral tributes bespoke the esteem and sympathy of friends of the family. The remains were borne to their last resting place by six nephews, Messrs. Lewis, Elwood and Borden Ward, Garnet Ward, William Ward and Borden Rolley. The flowerbearers were Jos. Varey, Hilton Lee, Lenard Purdon and Jack Ward. The floral tributes included: A pillow from the husband; wreaths, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Rolley and family, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. S. Ward and Mrs. John A. Ward, Caledon East, and sprays, Connor L.T.B. Lodge, No. 338, St. John's W.A., Mono and Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Scott, Midland.

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