Frederick Deverell
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Frederick Deverell

Fred Deverell was born in New York. He married Jane Bingham who was born in Canada. The father was a sailor in his younger life in northern Michigan and later worked as a handyman and carpenter.

Children born to this union were Gracie and a son, who were married in Michigan. One of these was killed by a falling tree. There were Will, Dell, Clarence, Oscar, Herbert, Charles, George, and Grace who was born after the family came to Oregon.

About 1882, hearing of the wonders of the west, the family decided to head for Oregon. They came by train to San Francisco, up the coast to Portland by boat. They lived in Portland for a year and a half. Mr. Deverell worked on the railroad as far east as Bonneville.

About 1883 they moved to a homestead in this area, which is now known as the Trickey place. They built a log cabin on this land which is still standing and being used as a home. During this stay in this area, their son George was drowned in the Bull Run River.

Mr. Deverell passed away in 1899. Later the family moved to Portland where Mrs. Deverell lived with her daughter until her death, some time around 1925.

Names and birth dates:
Frederick Deverell born 1837
Jane Bingham born 1840
Frederick Delbert Deverell born 1862
Gracey Deverell born 1864 (deceased in Mich.)
William Deverell born 1865
George Deverell born 1870
Joseph Deverell born 1873
Herbert Deverell born Nov. 26, 1875
Oscar Deverell January 9, 1877
Clarence Deverell March 15, 1881
Grace Deverell November 3, 1884

[Source: Submitted by Dorothy Keefe, from the compendium of biographies hand typed and distributed by the East Multnomah Pioneer Association in about 1972.  pp. 57-58.]