Robert Reed
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Robert & Emma Reed

Robert Reed and his wife Emma homesteaded the benchland between Oneonta and the Ira and Sarah Dodson property. The Reeds had three sons: Horace E. ("Pug"), Hiram and George. Pug was superintendent for the so-called "combine" or Columbia River Packers Association at Rooster Rock cannery. Later the company moved to Ellsworth, Washington, east of Vancouver, where he ran the cannery for several years. Pug took this writer much in his care.

Pug and I were on a business trip to Astoria at one time; we had been out on the river conferring with cannery executives. We had a room at the Astoria Hotel and had been in the room only a short time when Pug took sick in a most agonizing way. I wanted to call a doctor but his mother, Emma Reed, was of the Christian Science faith, and Pug resisted calling a doctor. I finally talked him into calling one. The doctor came and examined him but could not tell what ailed him. Just then the phone rang; it was a call from Portland that his mother had just died. Pug hung up the phone and said, "I am well now." He showed no symptoms of illness on the way back to Portland, talking about arrangements for his motherís burial. He wanted me to get help and go up to the Cascade Cemetery located in the Indian village of Green Leaf near Table Mountain. I had the grave dug and two or three days later an undertaker, with hearse, brought the body to Bonneville where we had a boat ready to take us across the river to Garrison Eddy. From there we carried the coffin a good mile over rough terrain. We filled the grave and fixed everything up. This was an experience that is not easy to forget. Pug and I lost track of each other in later years of his life, and the last I heard he was operating a ferry at The Dalles.

--Eric A. Enquist [submitter]

[Source:  Submitted by Dorothy Keefe, From a compendium of biographies hand typed and distributed by the East Multnomah Pioneer Association in about 1972, pp. 223-224. ]

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