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The House of Refuge of Western PA was incorporated by the state in 1850. The goal was to have a place where children who needed care would have it. It quickly became a place where children were sent when they got in trouble. The majority of the early admissions had lost at least one parent. Times were tough for these children.

While researchers are generally aware of Morganza in Washington Co, it should also be remembered that Morganza was first the House of Refuge and was located in Pittsburgh from its inception in 1850 until 1876.

In an effort to assist genealogy buffs and to not forget the sad stories of those children, we are looking for the names of anyone associated with the early days. Some of our finds will be transcriptions and others will be lists of names found in old newspapers.

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Articles:

The Jeffersonian, June 01, 1854, Stroudsburg, Monroe County, Pa., page 1

The following has been forwarded us from Philadelphia, with a request that we insert it. We cheerfully comply with the desire of the senders:

Bill for the House of Refuge

A further Supplement to an Act, entitled "An Act to incorporated the Articles of Association, for the purpose of establishing and conducting an Institution for the confinement and reformation of youthful delinquents, under the title of 'The House of Refuge,' " passed the 23d day of March, 1826.

Whereas, the new buildings now in course of erection by "The House of Refuge," are approaching completion, and are adapted for the proper accommodation and classification of double the number of inmates which the buildings at present occupied are capable of recieving -

And Whereas, It is deemed desirable, by the Board of Managers, that the Counties (other than that of Philadelphia) composing the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, should have extended to them greater facilities for the commitment of Juvenile Delinquents to the Institution, in order that the said counties may participate more fully in its benefits -

And Whereas, the Board of Managers of the said House of Refuge have memorialized the Legislature, praying that the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars, payable in four equal annual instalments of Five Thousand Dollars, may be appropriated from the Treasury of the Commonwealth, for the purpose of completing the said buildings -

Therefore,

SECTION FIRST, Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, that in lieu of the manner prescribed by the fourth section of the Act entitled "An Act to endow the house of Refuge, and or other purposes therein mentioned," passed the 2d day March, 1827, the Managers of "The House of Refuge," shall receive under their care and guardianship, infants under the age of twenty-one years, committed to their custody, by two Judges, the President Judge being one, of the Court of Common Pleas of any County in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (which said District shall embrace all the Counties of the Commonwealth from which infants cannot be sent to the "House of Refuge of Western Pennsylvania") except the County of Philadelphia, in which said infant resides or may be found, on complaint and due proof made to them by the parent, guardian, or next friend of such infant, that such infant is unmanageable and beyond the control of the complainant, and that the future welfare of said infant requires that such infant should be placed under the care and guardianship of said Managers of the House of Refuge; or when said complaint and due proof shall be made by the prosecuting officer of the County, that said infant is unmanageable, or a vagrant, and has no parent or guardian capable and willing to restrain, manage, and take proper care of such infant.
SECT. SECOND. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that the said Judges shall carefully examine the complaint made to them in the presence of the complainant and infant complained of, and for the purpose of bringing the parties and witnesses before them, shall be fully authorized to use such process of the Court as may be necessary; and where the said Judge shall adjudge an infant to be a proper subject for the care and guardianship of said Managers of the House of Refuge, they shall in addition to their adjudication, transmit to the said Managers the testimony take before them, on which their adjudication was founded, and the testimony shall be taken under oath or affirmation of the witnesses, and in the presence of the party complained of.
SEC. THIRD. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that the power and authority of the said Managers of the House of Refuge shall be as full and ample in all respects over the infants committed to their care and guardianship, under this Act, as are given and granted to the said Managers over infants committed to their care and guardianship from the County of Philadelphia, by the said Act, entitled "An Act to incorporated the subscribers to the articles of association for the purpose of establishing an Institution for the confinement and reformation of juvenile delinquents, under the title of 'The House of Refuge.' "
SEC. FOURTH. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that the Fourth Section of the Act entitled "An Act to endow the House of Refuge, and for other purposes therein mentioned," passed the 2d of March, 1827, be, and the same is hereby repealed.
SEC. FIFTH. Be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars be, and the same is hereby appropriated towards the erection and completion of buildings for the accommodation of white juvenile delinquents; which said sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars shall be paid in the following manner, to wit: Five Thousand Dollars thereof on or before the first day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five; Five Thousand Dollars thereof on or before the first day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six; Five Thousand Dollars thereof on or before the first day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven; and the remaining Five Thousand Dollars thereof on or before the first day of September, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight; and for which said sums the Governor of this Commonwealth shall, as they respectively fall due, draw his order on the State Treasurer in favor of the Treasurer of the House of Refuge.


Sunbury American, Feb 23, 1856

House of Refuge

The House of Refuge for Western Pennsylvania which was opened of the 13th of December, 1854, now contains 135 inmates. The cost of each per day according to the annual report in 23 1/2 cents. Some of the boys are now employed in the workshops, and as they are able to be more extensively and profitably employed the expenses of the institution will be lessened. The directors state that the institution exerts a salutary effect upon the minds and deportment of viciously disposed youths without, as well as upon those within its precincts.

Transactions of the Third National Prison Reform Congress
held at St. Louis, Missouri
May 13-16, 1874
The Third Annual Report of the Nation American Prison Association of the United States.


[page 450]
Pennsylvania Reform School

This is the western house of refuge under a new name, given to it by the legislature a year or two ago. It is soon going to changes its place and character, as well as its title, for it is to be removed from Allegheny City, where it is cooped up within very restricted premises enclosed by massive stone walls, to a large and splendid farm on Chartiers Creek, near Canonsburgh, in Washington county, where its inmates will be broad acres to cultivate; and the plan upon which it is thenceforth to be managed will be that known as the family in contradistinction to the congregate system.

The report of the superintendent, Rev. R. N. Avery, is comprehensive as well as able and interesting. I would like to cite largely from it, but can make room for only two extracts, one relating to discipline, the other to the change of locality. On the first of these topics Mr. A. says:

"In the male department, without degenerating into military rigor, strict discipline is maintained. We demand implicit obedience, and we always obtain it. Corporal punishment, although not entirely abandoned, is seldom inflicted, and only in cases of serious transgression. Seclusion from others, deprivation of play and privilege, and loss of standing in the institution, are the usual penalties. That strict discipline does not interfere with the happiness of the children, is evident from the cheerfulness which characterizes our whole family. We try to impress upon all that order is to be loved for its own sake, rather than be maintained by fear; and the cheerful obedience and gentle tone which everywhere prevail, show that a nobler and more efficient power that that of the uplifted hand and the threatened rod rules the minds and influences the hearts of those under our charge."

On the second he remarks:

"The removal of the institution to the Morganza farm, in Washington county, is looked for with great interest. Without a doubt it will be an auspicious event in the history of the reform school. The change will secure advantages which are sought for in vain in crowded congregate institutions, however well conducted they may be. The further the education of reasonable human beings is removed from the artificial, and the nearer it approached nature, the more it will reach its object and benefit society. Community is an aggregate of families, not of barrack-like establishments; and children trained in such establishments, when returned to society, will always more or less experience the evil effects of having been isolated from the community of which they are members."

A brief visit to this institution last winter confirmed and deepened the impression of its excellence, made by a longer visit several years ago. Mr. Avery was trained to this work under the late Rev. Mr. Wells, the first superintendent of the Boston house of reformation; and, as a disciplinarian, he is a worthy pupil of that excellent and eminent man.

The Journal of Prison Discipline and Philanthropy
Pennsylvania Prison Society
January 1888


[page 52]
An interesting trip was made to the Morganza Reform School, which appears to be a model reformatory institution. There is a farm of several hundred acres; the grounds are kept in excellent order. It is conducted on the Family system. The boys and girls are divided into eight families; each family is under the watch and care of a first and second officer and a matron. The female department is entirely separated from the male department, and its inmates never mingle with the males or speak to them; nor do they ever see them, except in the chapel services, or some of the entertainments provided for the benefit of the inmates of the institution. The inmates are brought as nearly into the condition of children in a family as possible. Everything indicative of a prison or prison life is avoided. The inmates are required to attend school six and one-half hours every secular day, except during the hot weeks of summer; on the Sabbath, each division has its Sabbath-school, and at least one preaching service is held in the chapel, at which a minister of some religious denomination officiates.

Some of the boys work in the kitchen, learning to be cooks, while others are in the bakery and on detailed duty, and the work on the farm, in the vegetable garden, and among the small fruits, is done by the boys. The boys also make their own shoes and clothing. In the female department, the girls do the washing for the entire institution, cook for themselves, mend for themselves, make their own clothing, and also shirts for the boys. The Managers say that the Pennsylvania Reform School has no equal in the United States.
After a bountiful repast, prepared by Superintendent Quay, the members of the Association returned to Pittsburgh, gratified with their visit.




The Pittsburg Dispatch, June 24, 1889, page 2

ESCAPED FROM MORGANZA
Seventeen Old and Shrewd Convicts Leave the Playgrounds - Ten of Them Captured - The other Seven at Large.

There was quite a large outing of young convicts from the playgrounds of the State Reform School at Morganza, about 7:10 o'clock Saturday evening. By concerted action, and upon prearranged plans, 17 of the older boys managed to leave the high prison wall first under, then behind them, and got away from the institution. Superintendent Quay and the vigilant officers who assist him were soon so hot upon the train of the larger one of two groups into which the fugitives separated that they captured ten of them early in the evening. The other seven are still at large, and the following is a full description of each and all of them. They are expected, some or all of them, to be caught either in or near Pittsburg; but the search for them will be vigorously pushed in other directions.

Here is the list:
Peter Kiser - Home at Marionville, Forest county. Age 16. Medium size, dark complexion, black eyes, straight nose, dark hair, scar on back of head, thick lips, is of German parentage.
Elvin C. West - Home at Erie, Sixth and Myrtle streets. Age. 19. Medium size, fair complexion, light brown hair, grey eyes. No special marks.
Frank Smith - Home at Erie. Age 17. Medium size, light brown hair, grey eyes, long face, small scar on back of right hand, face covered by fuzz. Irish appearance.
George S. Granger - Home at 32 Forbes street, Pittsburg. Age 17, Medium size, brown hair and eyes, straight nose, freckled face, full under lip, high forehead, small head, bright appearance.
John Raymon - Sent to the institution from Somerset. Has lived at Tyrone. Age 19. Medium size, very dark hair, dark eyes and complexion. Scar from cut on back of left hand; swelling from scrofula on both sides of neck.
John Fowler - Age 18. Home at Fayette City, Fayette county. Medium size, dark hair and eyes, has a dull stupid appearance; has a V shaped scar on back of head.
William H. Brown - Has lived at Derry station, Westmoreland county and at Pittsburg. Parents are now living at New Orleans. Age 18. Medium size, dark brown hair, dark eyes, light complexion, straight nose, large ears, light complexion, straight nose, large ears, slight scar over left eye, round black spots on right cheek.

The boys were all dressed in blue denim jeans shirt and pants. A reward of $10 will be paid for any information leading directly to the arrest of any one of the fugitives, or that amount and all expenses for arrest and return to the institution at Morganza.



The Pittsburgh Dispatch, Nov. 21, 1889, page 2

THE KIDNAPER CAUGHT
Owen Geoghan, Who Stole His Boy from Morganza, In Custody

Owen Geoghan, the man who kidnapped his boy away from Morganza a few days ago, was arrested by Chief Daily, of Petrolia, and Detective Fryer, of Morganza, on an information lodged before Magistrate McKenna, of this city.

The defendant was arrested on his farm near Millerstown, Pa. The boy, however, was not found with him. A telegram to that effect was sent to this city, and last night Detective McTighe succeeded in finding the boy at 43 Federal street, Allegheny, where he had been placed in hiding. The father will be brought here for trial.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, June 17, 1890, page 2

A GAY BOY BURGLAR
Who Rejoices in the Fact That He Is a Criminal of Repute.

A HANDSOME BUT HARDENED LAD.
Candy-Butchering Was Not A Quick Enough Way to a Fortune

GOES TO JAIL LIKE A LITTLE MAN

Sheriff W. B. Clarke, of McKean, brought to this city yesterday a very unique criminal and lodged him in the Central station for the night. The prisoner's name is Samuel Powell, he is 15 years old, and is proud of the fact that he has already committed two burglaries. The boy has black hair, bright black eyes and a dazzling white skin. He is remarkable big for his age, and would easily pass for 18 or 20 years old.

The boy's home is in Bradford. His father is dead, but his mother and sisters are living, and are highly respected and well connected. The boy, however, has been associating with some of Bradford's tough characters, and the Sheriff says they are very tough indeed. The boy obtained employment with the Union News Company about 15 months ago, but the trade of candy butcher did not open up a sufficiently short avenue to fortune to suit young Powell, so he determined to carve a fortune for himself with a burglar's jimmy.

HIS FIRST JOB
"The first crib I cracked," said Powell last night, as he unctuously rolled the thieves' slang under his tongue, "was about a year ago. A pal and I broke into a meat market in Bradford." Powell and his confederate, according to the officers, broke open a chest and stole $125 in money and about $100 worth of valuable articles. Both boys were arrested and convicted, but owing to their good connections and their youth, sentence was suspended upon promise of future good behavior.

Young Powell seemed to take this lesson to heart, and for several months behaved himself in an exemplary manner. Finally his thoughts turned again to the idea of attaining money with ease and rapidity, and he sought for an opening for his peculiar talent of housebreaking. Having been unfortunate with a meat market, he decided to open a shoe store - in the night. Having obtained a confederate, and he had no trouble in doing that, as he is a bright boy with a persuasive tongue, he entered upon his second campaign against the peace of the Commonwealth. Powell and his companion easily effected an entrance into the Rochester shoe store, at Bradford, and carried off $175, which had been deposited in an old fashioned safe. Both boys were arrested and taken to Smethport for trial. They were convicted, but the influence of Powell's friends secured his transportation to Morganza, instead of a penitentiary sentence. The other boy was released on suspended sentence.

MET BY HIS SISTERS.

Powell was taken from the jail at Smethport yesterday for removal to Morganza. The train passed through Bradford and the boy's sisters were there to bid him farewell. They boarded the train and rode several miles with him. The boy then seemed to realize the enormity of his actions, and promised earnestly to reform. His sisters pleaded with him in an affecting manner and shed tears as they kissed him goodbye. The young ladies had scarcely left the train when the boy returned to his usual bright and cheerful manner and again began to glory in the fact that he was a convicted criminal. When he reached the Central station last evening he was a chipper as possible, and was delighted when Inspector McAleese honored him by paying a visit to his cell. Powell will be taken to Morganza this morning.

Sheriff Clarke also brought with him Benjamin Nobles, who is sentenced to the penitentiary for two years for larceny. The Judge had Nobles marked down for two years and ten months, but Nobles made a nice little speech and the Judge threw off the odd months.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Oct. 14, 1890, page 4

MORGANZA DEFENDED - WHAT IS NEEDED

To the Editor of The Dispatch:

In Sunday's issue your editorial reference to the McNally case does an unintentional injustice to the Pennsylvania Reform School located at Morganza. That there are some persons so constituted that there is no reformation possible is patent to every intelligent person, and at the late convention of the National Prison Association, held at Cincinnati two weeks ago, some of the best men in charge of prisons, of large experience, who at the same time are devoting their lives to the amelioration of the condition of prisoners and their ultimate reformation, openly expressed the idea that such persons should be imprisoned like confirmed inebriates or insane people - that is, for indeterminate periods. I have not the records of the Morganza institution before me, but from what McNally said I should judge that he was never an inmate of that institution, but of the old House of Reform. The government and methods of the latter were as distinct and separate from that of the present institution as the practice of modern medicine is from that of 50 and more years ago.

The Morganza school system is second to none in this country, and the records show that 92 per cent of the boys turn out to be good and useful men, filling posts of honor as good business men, ministers of the Gospel, mechanics, physicians, artisans, etc. For obvious reasons these are never heard of, but when one of the eight out of the hundred turns out bad the papers are full of his escapades and the public sneeringly says "he is a Morganza graduate." What I have said has reference only to the boys. The record for the girls, I am sorry to say, is bad. The establishment of a separate State institution for them somewhere in the center of this Commonwealth, managed by women entirely, is a necessity, as our President in his reports for the past ten years has so clearly shown to the Legislature.

John N. Neeb, Allegheny, Pa., October 13



The Pittsburg Dispatch, Nov. 10, 1890, page 2

TWO GAY RUNAWAYS
Headed Off by Pittsburg Officers While On Their Way to the Free and Boundless West

TO WIPE OUT THE NOBLE RED MAN.
Chasing Truant Boys Who Have Failed to Learn That There is No Place Like Home.

LITTLE TRAVELERS WITH RECORDS
A Young Girl Who Soon Overcame Her Fear of Imprisonment.

The troubles of the Pittsburg Police Department are not wholly caused by the indiscreet actions of hardened criminals. The rising generation adds its share toward keeping the officers busy.
The geographical position of the Gas City is unique. It lies on the high road from the circumscribed and effete East to the wide and boundless West, where the barbaric red man is rapidly ripening for the small boy harvester with a $2 revolver and a barlow knife:

Young America, after imbibing the principles of freedom from the Fifth Reader in the Third ward school of Hoboken, N.J., refused to allow parental restraint to curb his bold spirits, and determines to add luster to the Stars and Striped by hewing his way to glory. Buccanneering having become unprofitable, owing to the tariff, telegraph and revenue cutters, the aspirant for fame turns his eyes toward the setting sun, and in the reflection of the last rays of that glowing orb as it sinks beneath the waves of the Pacific Ocean, sees himself mounted on a fiery mustang, chasing buffaloes and Indians, and rescuing enough fair maidens to start a successful seminary.

They Were Tired of Soap

The latest to arrive of these young seekers after fortune and fame, were Howard Woodruff and Isaac Johnston. Detectives Robinson and Fitzgerald ran against them yesterday, and after a brief, but satisfactory, cross-examination, placed them in the Central station. Howard is 14 years old, and is the son of a wealthy soap manufacturer of Trenton, N.J. Isaac is 16 years old, and was employed in driving a wagon for Woodruff.

The boys were well provided for an extended sojourn on the prairies. They possessed an old-fashioned revolver which carried a bullet about the size of a pea, and which would doubtless prove fatal in the hands of an experienced marksman, who was also a first-class anatomist. In addition to this each carried a knife and a box of matches. Simon, as the treasurer, clung to a $1 bill, while Howard assumed the position of sutler, and to prevent any danger of starvation, when buffalo were coy and game generally scarce, carried a $3 lunch ticket on a Pittsburg restaurant. The ticket was not intact, several meals of pie having been punched out of it.

SPOTTED BEAR IS SAFE.

The friends of the boys have been communicated with, and Spotted Bear and his renegade allies will continue to scalp the white dogs without let or hindrance.

Scarcely a day passes that the Pittsburg police are not notified to head off a boy who yearns for life on the plain. Last week one young fellow was pulled out of a sleeping-car at the Union Station. He had unostentatiously borrowed $100 from his father in Jersey City, and was on his way to see the world. He will have to wait awhile before he rivals the Captain Cook act.
Detective Bendel has considerable experience in capturing boys. Most of them are truants from the Morganza Reform School. These boys do not complain of their treatment; in fact, Officer Davy Hanna thinks the runaways are treated better than they care for. They want to go back to their semi-nomad life - selling papers, blacking shoes, pitching pennies, sleeping in dry-goods boxes, and generally enjoying themselves without restraint, in their own peculiar way.

Detective Bendel has had some funny experiences in catching these runaways. The other day he went out to Bloomfield to capture a refugee. The father of the boy had engaged some private detectives to find the boy, and they were at the house deploring their lack or success when Bendel arrived.

TOO SMART FOR HIS FATHER.

The latter walked through the house and into the yard and there found the lad fast asleep in an outhouse. The private detective and the father were crestfallen, especially when the boy confessed that he had been loafing around the premises for two weeks, sleeping in the daytime and doing business with his father's larder at night.

Another boy ran away from Morganza, and climbing into a farmer's wagon, as he thought, unperceived, rode several miles. Finally the farmer met three men, and asked them if they wanted to make $10. This is the regular reward for returning a Morganza refugee. This struck the boy as being ominous, and without waiting to hear the reply, jumped from the wagon and sped like a startled deer across the country. He reached home by avoiding the highways, but was soon returned to the Reform School by Detective Bendel.

Officer Hanna, who has been a member of the force for many years, has had considerable experience with youthful travelers. He was acquainted with one boy who traveled to Boston and back on a nickel and a copy of THE DISPATCH. He could not have heeded the warnings contained in the newspaper, as he afterwards landed in the penitentiary for robbery.

A BOY WITH A RECORD

At one time Hanna took four members of one family back to Morganza, from which they had escaped together. One of these boys, George Glenn, afterward achieved a reputation for himself by terrorizing the hill district of over a year. During that time Hanna gave up a large portion of his time to pursuing him, but Glenn was desperate and fleet of foot and for a long time escaped. He was finally captured and sent to the workhouse for two years.

Glenn got away from that institution, but his freedom was dearly bought. He was run down in Virgin alley by the assistant superintendent of the Workhouse. Glenn refused to yield and was shot in the leg by the official. The limb had to be amputated and Glenn is now in the penitentiary on one leg.

A VERY CHEERFUL GIRL

While girls are generally better behaved than the boys, some of them are very bad, and they soon get over their horror of a cell. Little Annie Dagnall was arrested two weeks ago for robbing a Butler county blacksmith, to whom she sold a bottle of whiskey on Sunday. When she was arrested she wept bitterly and could not find comfort.

Yesterday Annie was arrested again. She met three little girls on Second avenue, and because they would not tell her where they were going, she picked up a cobblestone and cut a frightful gash on the head of one. Annie was promptly arrested and taken to the Central station, but she was not the shrinking Annie of two weeks ago. She bounded blithely up the steps and into the cell room, greeting the Sergeant in charge with a cheerful "Well, here I am again. Ain't you glad to see me?" And Annie is but 14 years old.

The Piitsburg Dispatch, Nov. 15, 1890, Second Part, page 9

THE REFORM SCHOOL
Morganza Directors Will Ask for $135,000 for Bad Boys and Girls

The Pennsylvania Reform School, at Morganza, will ask the Legislature for $135,000 for the two years. This sum embraces $5,000 for the erection of an ice machine; all the money for salaries; and $10,000 for the building of an industrial school for the manual training of the boys. In this school will be taught brickmaking and bricklaying, carpentry, glazing and all other branches of the building trades. The school will be patterned after the great industrial school at Rochester, N.Y., which a committee of the Morganza directors have visited lately. The State appropriation asked for does not include maintenance of inmates as that is charged up to the counties interested.

The appropriation now asked for is in excess of that awarded the school two years ago, for the reason that now there are about 100 more inmates that there were then. In the school now are 515 boys and girls, and the capacity of the building is really only 300. Within the last year an assembly room for the girls has been erected over the brush factory, and a hospital department is now being built.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Feb. 2, 1891, page 4

Harmony of Pittsburg Clergymen.

I wish, though, that the Pittsburg priest and the Pittsburg parson who wrote the book together, and published it the other day, had set their names and their ecclesiastical titles upon the initial page. As it is, the little book appears with no other sponsor than Messrs. Stevenson & Foster, the printers. A Presbyterian minister and a Roman father have written conjointly, a book of theology, a catechism of the Christian religion. Remarkable!

Remarkable from the fact of its curious authorship. Remarkable, in the light of its origin, for what it says, and doesn't say. The little book was written for use at Morganza and was adopted by the board of control of that institution as containing truths to which no Christian could object. It is set forth for possible adoption in "mixed schools." Exactly what that verbal adjective denotes is not clear. What is supposed to be "mixed" in these schools? Probably the religious or theological opinions of the parents of the scholars. Especially should it be suited, one would infer from its authorship, for schools in which the Roman Catholic and Protestants meet together.

I have looked over this little pamphlet with great interest. If this priest and this parson represent any considerable number of their brethren, here is a common meeting place. Here is a significant prophecy of what may be in the future. The chief reason why religion is not taught to the future citizens of this republic is because the Roman Catholics and the Protestants cannot agree. But here they do agree. Here is Christianity without Calvinism and without Romanism. It is true; it is amply; it covers the ground; it is enough.

Why teach this admirable catechism only at Morganza? Why not teach it still more out of Morganza, that there may be fewer in Morganza to need teaching?




The Pittsburg Dispatch, April 16, 1891, page 1

TOO MUCH WHIPPING
And Too Little Substantial Food at the Morganza Reform School

RESULTS OF AN INQUIRY.
The Punishment in Many Cases declared to Have Been Brutal

NEARLY A HUNDRED LASHES GIVEN
A Radical Difference Found Between Theory and Practice.

STATEMENTS FROM LOCAL OFFICIALS

Harrisburg, April 15. - The report of Ellwood O. Wagenhurt, an agent detailed by the joint commission to investigate the charities and corrections of the State, to inspect the Morganza, shows a bad condition of affairs in that institution.

Mr. Wagenhurt says that in buildings, equipment and location the Morganza leaves little to be desired. The schoolrooms are as well equipped as the best in the State. The bedrooms are well aired, lighted and heated, but some are excessively crowded. The beds are clean and the clothing changed weekly.

The bathing arrangements are rude and uncomfortable, the 50 or 60 boys in one division bathing in a tank containing about two feet of water, the water being unchanged. The clothing appears sufficient, but the inspector objects to the boys being compelled to work out of doors in summer without shoes. The dining rooms are bare and unattractive.

Objections to the Bill of Fare

The breakfasts and supper consist of tea, bread and molasses, butter being served instead of molasses three times a week. Meat is served at dinner four times a week, soup on the other three. Vegetables from the garden are served in season. Boys complained of the quality of the food and the unclean way in which it is prepared. The Industrial Department is admirable, brushmaking, tailoring and shoemaking being the principal occupations.

The Inspector complains that boys of 10 or 11 years, engaged in brush making, were compelled to finish their tasks with hands and fingers absolutely raw. The work done in the farm gave excellent opportunity to learn every branch of farming.

Mr. Wagenhurt emphatically protests against the extreme disciplinary methods used. Whippings are inflicted which can only be characterized as brutal. The first information was received from convicts in the Western Penitentiary, who had first been at Morganza. Convict Sweeny, No. 8817 had been in Morganza from 1885 to 1887. He asserted that cruel whippings for slight offenses were inflicted with Long Straps Soaked in Oil and supplied with rubber ends. Sweeny said the penitentiary was "heaven compared with Morganza." A female prisoner who had been sent to the penitentiary for attempting to burn Morganza, said she had done it from sheer desperation. She had been badly fed and treated, and would do the same thing over again were she taken back.

Investigation at Morganza bore ample testimony to the cruelty. A frail boy of 10 years showed black and blue welts on his sides and abdomen. In several places the skin had been completely taken off in narrow cuts two inches long, It had been done with a leather strap, the blood following the blows. His offense had been talking in the dormitory. Williams, aged 16, shows great ridges cut on his back and sides, from which blood has been drawn. He had frequently been whipped until he could hardly stand up.

Steele, said to be half silly, had been whipped until the blood came: "all cut to pieces," the boys said, and then sent to his home at Rochester, Beaver county. Samuel C. Beatty, of Fayette county, had been given 85 stripes for noise in the dormitory, the skin being cut through until he bled. The scars remained. He had not been able to work for four weeks. This whipping was inflicted by one Ford.

Nearly a Hundred Strokes Given

Smathers had received 96 strokes, the blood soaking through his shirt. Although several weeks had passed the marks were plainly visible. One boy was found in a cell where he had been placed for running away. He was crying bitterly, and told Superintendent Quay that he was "as weak as a dog." He claimed that he was hungry, having been in the cell from Monday until Wednesday, receiving for food one slice of bread a day. Before being put in the cell he had been whipped, and exhibited the welts on his body. Mr. Quay said that prior to his running away he had been one of the most trusty boys in the school.

Superintendent Quay stated that in case of continued infractions of the rules the boys were locked up several days on bread and water , remaining in the cells night and day. On extreme cases corporal punishment is resorted to, Mr. Quay saying: "When we thrash them, we thrash them so that they won't want another right away."

Theoretically no boy may be whipped without specific orders from the superintendent, but the boys claim that the whipping is done first and the report made out afterward and the action ratified. The lash used is four feet long, an inch wide at the end, winding round the hand and tapering to a point. It is made of raw hide. When boys are let out to persons on parole, while it is provided for that the boy fulfill his part of the obligation, there is no one to see that the employer does his. The objections to the food supplies is based upon long hours of physical and mental labor and an improper amount of nourishing food.

Where Fault is Found

The reports conclude by saying that in equipments and regulations for cultivating industry, facilities for learning, etc., there is little to be desired, but in the fostering and cultivation of those minor elements which go to build up real upright character, the institutions seem to be at fault. Love, kindness, tenderness, are words not in the Morganza vocabulary. All is rigidity and force. The basis of reform is force. It is too much like a cast iron mold, into which every boy is forced and made to fit. Superintendent Quay seems to know little of the boys individuality. All that is left to the subordinate officers, who, in many instances, are not the men one would like to see the head of a family. The only respect the boys have for the officers is inspired by fear, not affection. The institution has all the outward paraphernalia of reform, but in the agent's opinion, not the true spirit.

With regard to the girls' department, the report states that no trades are taught the girls whereby they could earn a living after leaving the institution. Nearly all are put to work in the brushshop. They appear to hate their work, and there was not a straight back among those employed there, all being round shouldered from the work. Two girls, Naomi Chappelle and Cora Geiger, showed the inspector black and blue stripes from have been beaten with a rattan. The dinner, on the day of the visit, consisted of watery soup, boiled potatoes, raw leeks, bread and butter. The inspector does not regard the food as at all sufficient for growing girls who have to work as do those detained at Morganza.

The girls' department is in poor condition, and the laundry, in which 27 girls work, is pronounced unsafe. The matron and superintendent of the laundry are gentle and kind; the girls are genuinely attached to them. The matron receives $52 per month and the superintendent only $20. Henry Hall.

-------------------------------------
DENIED THE CHARGE OF CRUELTY.

Joseph Albree, a Member of the Board, Says Morganza is Well Managed.

Mr. Joseph Albree, a member of the Board of Management, was seen at his residence at a late hour last night, and informed of the tenor of the report. He said he knew nothing of the matters mentioned excepting what he saw in the newspapers. He said he had been unwell for some time and had not been able to pay much attentions to the business of the institution; he had [unreadable] for several weeks.

"They [unreadable]," Mr. Albree returned. "As far as I know the institution has been properly managed. I don't believe there has been an maltreatment of the inmates as you say is charged in the special agent's report." Mr. Albree begged to be excused from any further conversation, as he had retired and did not feel well enough to take any risks by remaining in the hall.
An attempt to talk with Mr. Wilson McCandless, another of the board, proved abortive. The household had retired, and a prolonged jerking of the tintinnabulatory apparatus in the wall was unsuccessful in arousing any of the inmates.

The residence of Thomas Wightman, another member of the board, was visited with the same result.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, April 17, 1891, page 2

FOR THE MORGANZA
Superintendent Quay Denies That Inmates are Badly Treated

MANAGERS ALL AGREE WITH HIM.
They Unite in Saying There is a Happy Family at the School.

HOW AND WHY PUNISHMENTS ARE MADE

"I think that a spanking, with the paddle such as is used here, would be the proper thing to be administered to Mr. Wagenhurt, the agent of the State Commission who visited this place and made such a lurid report to the Commission as to the bad things done here."

So said J. A. Quay, the Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Reform School at Morganza, yesterday. Mr. Quay was not disposed to talk. He considered that the members of the Board of Managers were the proper persons to tell about the workings of the school. So far as he himself was concerned, he did not think it proper to give out information that was equally as well known to the superior officers. Mr. Quay, after a little persuasion, consented to tell about Mr. Wagenhurt's visit to the institution, and finally about the charges that had been made.

"Mr. Wagenhurt came here," said Mr. Quay, "and spent nearly a day. He was given every opportunity to see, and to learn. There was no difficulty thrown in his way. He had the run of all the buildings. Later on, quite a time after the Commission had begun its work, Messrs. Dearden and Walk, members of the Commission, came her and had a look through the place. Then the next visit that we got was from Messrs. Lemon, Lyttle and Lisch, members of the Appropriations Committee. That has been the extent of our official visitors, with the exception of members of the Board of Managers.

Thorough Investigation Courted

"I would like to state her that just so soon as I heard that these charges would be preferred against the Reform School, I notified Messrs. Charles W. Houston, ex-Sheriff Gray and W. B. Lupton, who were on the visiting Committee. They came down here and made a thorough examination of the inmates. They know how many of them have marks upon their persons, even to the vaccination marks. In each case they were given my certificate as to the condition of the inmate and as to why he was whipped.

"Do we whip the boys? Of course we do. There would be no discipline here did we not have corporal punishment. Sometimes they have to be whipped hard. We don't whip them now with a strap, but with a paddle, the reason of the change being that a boy might throw up his arm and get a blow that would hurt him more than the one intended for his back. The rules of the school provide that every inmate who willfully violates a known rule shall be punished, either by the officer in charge when the offense is committed, or by the Superintendent or under his direction.
"Here comes the point, " said Superintendent Quay, "where Mr. Wagenhurt makes his claim that boys have been cruelly whipped. He says the punishment has first been inflicted and then a report made to the Superintendent. That is wholly untrue except in some instances which are provided for in this rule: 'Corporal punishment shall not be inflicted by any officer without first consulting the Superintendent and obtaining his permission, unless in cases where delay might be dangerous to the person or completely subversive of discipline.'

Discipline Must Be Maintained

"Again, what sort of a corrective institution would this be where the officer in charge, after the ordinary reproof in cases of marked insubordination had been administered, if an attempt was not made to maintain discipline at all hazards? In such cases punishment must be prompt and of such a character as to convince the offenders beyond a doubt that they must obey the rules of the school. We have not the element here of which angels are made. When the first offense is committed, if not aggravated, we ask a personal pledge; in the second case we put so many demerits to the inmate's credit. Then, if he persists in his conduct, we put him in the cellar on bread and water. The fourth and last punishment is that know as 'strapping' but really 'paddling.' A boy is only whipped when it is found that no other punishment will do him any good.

"Punishment," exclaimed Mr. Quay, "why, there have been only three boys whipped since the first of the present year. They sadly needed it. This talk about the boys being half starved! How absurd that is!" Then Mr. Quay called a handsome little fellow, the office messenger and asked whether he got enough to eat. The dimples in his chubby cheeks answered before the boy could form the reply. The Superintendent then went over the bill of fare for the benefit of the reporter, the season of the year making the difference in the quantity of vegetables served.

A Week's Bill of Fare

Sundays the bill of fare ordinarily is for breakfast, bread, molasses and coffee; dinner, soup. [Here the Superintendent stopped and give the composition of the soup. In the Sunday soup there were 125 pounds of fresh meat, five bushels of potatoes, one bushel of onions, five gallons of tomatoes and 24 pounds of macaroni. This Mr. Quay thought was good soup.] Then of course there were soup, meat and bread. For supper on Sunday there were bread and tea, ginger bread and cinnamon cake.

Monday - Breakfast: Bread and Butter, coffee and molasses. Dinner: Bean soup, breakfast bacon and bread. Supper: Bread, tea molasses and oat meal.
Tuesday - Breakfast: Potato stew, bread, molasses and coffee. Dinner: Vegetable soup, bread and meat. Supper: Bread, tea, molasses and stewed prunes.
Wednesday - Breakfast: Bread, coffee, molasses and sausage. Dinner: Corned beef and corned beef soup. Supper: Bread, tea and molasses.
Thursday - Breakfast: Bread, butter, molasses and coffee. Dinner: Bean soup, beef and bread. Supper: Bread, molasses, tea or milk.
Friday - Breakfast: Bread, molasses, cheese and coffee. Dinner: Pork, cabbage and bread. Supper: Bread, molasses, prunes, and tea or milk.
Saturday - Breakfast: Oat meal, bread, molasses, milk or coffee. Dinner: beef soup, bread and meat. Supper: Bread, molasses, milk or coffee.

All Are A Happy Family

"In the last two years," said Mr. Quay. "I have never had a complaint about the food served here. If it is bad the inmates should show it." Mr. Quay pointed to a dozen or so boys working in the vegetable garden, and asked if they looked as though they had been underfed. "Look at them closely," said he, "and you will find that they are stout, well built boys. They are not stooped-shouldered, nor are the girls in the brush factory. Always remember that the most tender point, the point upon which people committed to institutions of this character first object, is that of food.

The second is that of treatment

"You may send a person to a school of this kind, and if he be so disposed he may see many things that would not appear right to him. It requires men of judgment and discrimination, and while I have nothing against the Reyburn Commission, for all their work was a most important one, still I don't think that the agent they send here is a man in whom you could place implicit confidence. There are people for whom we form likes and dislikes upon first sight. His stories are not borne out by the facts, and my hope is that the Legislature will appoint a committee to come here and investigate the school."

Speaking of the parole system, Mr. Quay said that is was the desire of the managers to send the younger inmates of the school back to their homes. When this cannot be done, then they are sent to people who will take them upon the promise of doing the best they can for them and reporting the conduct of the paroled person to the Superintendent. "Unfortunately," said Mr. Quay, "we are compelled to send most of the children who have been here back to their homes, where they meet the same baleful influences from which they were supposed to have been taken." His preference was for outside homes, and a man who could give all his time to looking after them. But he thought a man who could fill that bill worth more money than could be paid by the State.

Mr. Quay took up the report from the female department, which was handed to him yesterday morning, when the question was asked about the girls not being taught useful trades. "Look at this," said he, "and tell me whether they are not doing useful work; helping the housekeeper, 7; cooking, 9; laundry, 48; brush works, 40; sewing, 21. It is nonsense about the girls in any department being overworked."

What the Managers Say

The Board of Managers of the Morganza Reform School are of the opinion that Inspector Wagenhurt is a lineal descendant of some of the biblical characters whose names appear in the same category with that public spirited citizen Ananias. They simply laugh at the report as ridiculous, and court an open investigation of the Morganza Reform School. The directors had known such a report was to be made, and on Monday night made an examination of the inmates alleged to have been brutally treated, as well as about 40 others. No marks of recent brutality could be found, although some were scarred by blows inflicted long before they entered the institution. The board has thorough confidence in Superintendent Quay, and say they do not promise to take any notice of the matter, but are willing to have a legislative investigation. They cannot understand why Mr. Reyburn and his colleagues did not make a person investigation instead of sending Wagenhurt. When Thomas Wightman was seen yesterday at his office, he said:
"If there is any cruelty practiced at Morganza I do not know of it, and I think I would know it if there was. Of course, the treatment of some of the guards may be rough at times, but that cannot be avoided. We try to get the best men we can for the money the State allows us. A good guard is soon found out, and he is wanted in other places. If he is offered more money than we can afford to pay, we have to let him go.

Takes Some Time to Find Out.

"Whenever a man is put in, the boys try to down him, and, or course it takes us some time to find out a man. Last winter we discharged one of our oldest teachers because he was in the habit of whipping the boys unnecessarily. There has been no abuse. We heard this was coming, and on Monday we examined the boys and found them all right, although there were scars on them, but they were not caused by wounds received at the institution. As for the food, they are well fed. The man said they got tea in the morning. That is not so. We always serve coffee in the morning. The boys are better fed than they ever were before. As for whipping without a permit, it has to be done sometimes. Last year several of the boys attacked a guard with a pick and would have killed him if he had not protected himself. Do you think there was any time then to go for a permit? The boys are all right and you cannot find a healthier lot of people in the whole country."

Children Well Cared For.

Dr. Allison made practically the same statement. He said the children were well cared for; that their perfect health was the best commentary on the good treatment they received. Said he, "We have a good set of keepers. Of course we cannot have a set of rules for each particular inmate. The boys who go to such an institution have to be whipped, but those whippings are not frequent. A broad paddle made of leather is used and not a strap. I would just as soon eat with the boys as with the superintendent. The food is of the very best.

"Speaking of Mr. Quay talking in monosyllables, he is not a talkative man. He is very lenient, he never threatens the boys and he never forgets that he was once a boy himself. It is also said the boys go without shoes during the summer. Why, I can remember when I fought because I had to wear mine. As for the girl who told a story of cruelty she is the one who set fire to the building and was sent to the penitentiary for her offense."

Charles Houston, who is also a member of the board, said he was present at the examination Monday night and found everything was in good shape. There were no marks of violence on the boys.

W. B. Lupton, another member of the board, does not believe there is any foundation for the report, but think the boys have been telling Wagenhurt stories for the funn of stuffing him. He said they had a room where they confined the boys when they become unmanageable, but they are released as soon as they promise to obey the rules.

The Charges Were Forestalled.

THE DISPATCH correspondent at Harrisburg saw a number of Allegheny county Representatives at Harrisburg yesterday in regard to the charges made by Agent Wagenhurt. Senator Neeb, among others, said that the charges were so evidently overdrawn that he could not think anyone could seriously regard them. In refutation of the charges, Isador Coblenz, Secretary of the Board of Managers, has made public a report of the Superintendent to the Instructive and Discipline Committee of the Board of Managers, filed April 13, accompanied by a report made by that committee to the full board, signed by Charles W. Houston, J.H. Gray, W. B. Lupton and Charles McKennan.

This report states that Superintendent Quay stripped all the boys in school, and found 42 marks of punishment. The committee found at least three-fourths of the cases were so slightly marked that under ordinary circumstances they would not be noticed. Of the 42 before the committee, 26 were marked on the arms, 6 on the body and 7 on the legs. Ten boys said they had received their marks within six months, and the balance had been punished previous to that time, some as far back as five years. "Your committee are of the opinion that there has been no cruelty in the punishment inflicted upon the boys."

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Apr. 18, 1891, page 2

BLAMES THE OFFICERS
A Young Man with A Morganza Experience Says Superintendent Quay is All Right

Harry Collins, a young man who some time ago passed a season at Morganza called at THE DISPATCH office yesterday and desired to express his opinion of the reformatory school and the people in charge of it. He was impelled to do this, he said, by what he saw printed regarding Superintendent Quay. "The fact is," he said, "that Mr. Quay is not aware of what goes on in the school. It is the officers who treat the boys cruelly, and I know that if Mr. Quay knew of it he would stop it. To give you an instance, a number of us were kept without shoes or socks when there was snow on the ground, and, watching our opportunity, two of us ran up to Mr. Quay and told him how it was. He immediately ordered every boy who wanted them to be given shoes.

"Mr. Quay was always kind to the boys and used to keep an eye on them after they left and help get them work; I know he got me my job. The officers are responsible for the bad treatment of the boys. I remember an officer hitting a boy so hard that his leg had afterward to be amputated. But there is no double the grub is bad; not fit for a dog to eat."

The Pittsburg Dispatch, April 25, 1891, page 2

TAKEN BY SURPRISE
A Senatorial Committee Investigates Morganza's Finances & Sanitary Condition

THE CRUELTY CHARGES IGNORED
Boys Found to be Healthy, & Tell the Senators They are Satisfied With the Treatment

THE FARM NOT A PAYING INVESTMENT
A Heavy Debt Weighing Down the West Penn Hospital Which May Be Wiped Out

The financial and sanitary condition of Morganza was investigated yesterday by a Senatorial committee that is making a tour of the State in a Pullman car. The finances of the institution are not quite satisfactory, but for the management all the members of committee, both Democrats and Republicans, had nothing but kind words to say last evening. The recent charges of cruelty were not aired, as the committee had no authority to probe the subject.

In the party were Senators Mylin, Chairman; Mehard, Showalter, Williamson, Flinn, Neeb, Green, Meek, Hall, McDonald, Monahan, Smith, of Lancaster and Upperman.
A Division of Labor.

Senator Mylin flattered himself that Superintendent Quay didn't know they were coming, but when they arrived in Pittsburg, for fear the Superintendent would not be at the institution to receive them, he sent the manager a telegram. When they got there two committees were appointed, one to investigate the finances, the other to look into the sanitary conditions. Senator Mylin said: "This committee has no authority to investigate charges against the management. I suppose a special committee will be appointed for that purpose. I have been on several such committees in my time, and we never discovered anything."

"Generally whitewashed the institutions," suggested a bystander.

"No, that is unjust," replied the Senator. "In such cases you must take into consideration the character of the witnesses, and as a rule you can't depend on the testimony of prisoners. People sometimes lie so long that they come to believe their own untruths."

Found the Books Looking Right.

Senator Williamson, who was on the committee to look over the books, said: "The bookkeeping was all right, as far as we could discover in an examination for two hours, which is not long enough. Morganza wants $110,000 of this sum, $30,000 is for an addition which the House Committee has ignored. The farm is behind about $3,000. They accounted for it by stating crops have failed for two years. I understand potatoes were short last season, but my recollection is that strawberries were plentiful. The trouble is that there are too many salaried men in State institutions, and it wouldn't surprise me if all State farms failed to pay for themselves. At Morganza they pay the boys from 7 to 10 years old 10 cents per day, or a cent an hour, and the 16-year-olds are paid 4 cents. Of course little could be expected from this class of labor."

Senators Showalter and Mehard are physicians, and they were appointed to examine the sanitary system, and to inquire into the health of the inmates.

The Health of the Boys Good.

Dr. Showalter said the sewerage is perfect, and the health of the boys is good. He only found one sick, and he had sore eyes from an hereditary disease. He remarked that some of the kids were tough specimens of humanity, but they were looking well, and their appearance showed they receive plenty to eat. They are very fond of bean soup. He said he couldn't see that any of them had been abused or ill-treated, and he didn't believe the cruelty charges were true. The boys are taught to work, and he was much please with the place, as it was his first visit here. In conversation away from the keepers the boys told him they were satisfied with their treatment, and no complaints to make.

"Ah, pshaw," said Senator Flinn, "I didn't go out to Morganza to-day, but I don't believe a word of the charges. The names of the men on the board are a sufficient guarantee to me that the institution is conducted properly. They would not tolerate cruelty for a minute. Some of those boys need to be spanked occasionally to keep them in line."

"Yes," remarked Senator Morrison, "a little shoe leather is a good thing for boys when fairly administered. They are well fed, even if they don't get champagne and other delicacies at every meal.
"

The Pittsburg Dispatch, May 6, 1891, page 2

SENT TO MORGANZA
Kate Steplein and Annie McGuire, the Two Girl Pickpockets, Must Serve Their Time

A MOTHER THREATENS SUICIDE
How the Girls Managed to Get Away with The Large Sums of Money They Have Secured.

ANOTHER REMARKABLE CASE RECORDED
Two Youthful Students Get Into A Quarrel and One Stabs the Other.


Kate Steplein and Annie McGuire, two of the little girl pickpockets arrested Monday evening, were sent to the Reform School at Morganza yesterday afternoon. Rosa Solm will be sent to the Home of the Good Shepherd, at Columbus, O., while Mary Shott has her liberty. Further investigation of the case developed the fact that the last two were not accomplices in the scheme to relieve ladies of the pocketbooks, although their intimacy with the others caused suspicion to full upon them at first. The story of the way the girls did their work was the general subject of comment in police circles yesterday. The case is one of the most remarkable on record. That a pair of girls 13 and 14 years of age should have successfully carried on systematic stealing for two years and eluded the watchful guardians of the law is considered something entirely beyond precedent.

Pasted Graphic 1

Kate Steplein

A Scene at Central Station

There was a scene in Central station yesterday morning when the parents of the girls appeared to see what was to be done with them. Mrs. Steplein was the only one who objected strongly to the police dealing harshly with the young marauders. On learning that her daughter must go to Morganza she exclaimed, frantically:
"I'll throw myself into the Monongahela river if you send her there."

"The water is wet this time of years, so you had better not," remarked Detective Bendel. Mrs. Steplein did not repeat her threat, but appeared very disconsolate over the affair. The parents of Annie McGuire made no objections to her being sent to Morganza after learning that she was really guilty.

The two girls made no effort to deny their guilt. In fact they seem to enjoy talking about their adventures. In reply to question as to why they did not wear better clothes, the McGuire girl replied:

"Oh, we were too smart to spend any of our money on dresses. The folks at home would want to know where we got the money to buy them."

Pasted Graphic 2

Annie McGuire

Not At All Fancy Dressers.

Both girls were dressed rather shabbily, probably for the reason given by Annie McGuire. They were sharp enough to see that any unusual display would cause suspicion. So instead of spending money for clothes they had a grand time of it, buying enough candy and ice cream to satisfy a score of little maidens. They went to all the plays and museums, took the best seats and were lavish in their expenditures. Such a time two little girls never had, with all the good things youthful hearts could desire and an easy method of securing a continuance of the supply.
They were frequently out at night until 11 and 12 o'clock and apparently enjoyed unlimited liberty. The on epoint on which both girls are silent is who taught them the tricks of their trade.
Detective Bendel is confident such little tots could not have learned these things without a tutor. The teacher may be found. The presence of a modern Fagin, however, is doubted, as the girls seem to have utilized all the money they got in satisfying their own desires.

"It is certainly the most remarkable cas of its kind we ever had in Pittsburg, " said Inspector McAleese yesterday. "I could scarcely believe that little girls like those could be so skilful in carrying on a pickpocketing trade, but there is no question about their guilt. They went about their work with all the shrewdness of old criminals."

Mary Shott, the only one of the four girls who comes out safe, has regular employment as a glass packer in a Southside establishment. She did not assist in the thefts, though she associated with the other girls to some extent. She is out on her good behavior. Rosa Solm's parents concluded the best thing to do with their daughter would be to send her to the Home of the Good Shepherd at Columbus, where she will be sent at once. On this consideration the police released the girl.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, June 13, 1891, page 2

Can't Keep Out of Morganza

Thomas McGaugh, aged 13, was committed to jail yesterday by Alderman Caldwell, on a charge of malicious mischief preferred by his guardian. Thomas has but recently been released from Morganza, and the chances are that he will be returned to that institution.


CAUGHT IN A BOATHOUSE

A Supposed Runaway From Morganza Captured on the Southside.

Lieutenant Johnston, of the Southside police, while searching last evening for a boy who had escaped from Morganza, found a 14-year-old boy in Palmer's boathouse at the foot of South Eighth street who said his name was Thomas G. McInally, the son of an East End policeman. He said he had been at Morganza, but has been discharged, and was wandering around the streets and had gone to the boat to sleep.

While he did not answer the description of the boy who had escaped the Lieutenant sent him to the Twenty-eighth ward station, where he will be held until his case can be investigated.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, July 13, 1891, page 2

OBJECTS TO BEING BOSSED

A Young Girl Asks to Be Sent Back to Morganza

Susie Edwards, aged 16 years, came to Central station, at 11 o'clock last night, and asked to be kept over night and sent to Morganza. She said she had been sent to Morganza a year and eight months ago at her mother's request, but was let off about a month ago for good conduct. When she got back to her home on McDonald street , Allegheny, she says her father had left home and his place in the family was being filled by a man named Christy, who endeavored to command the daughter. She resented this.

"He ain't my father, " said she, "and he can't boss me around. I won't take no bossin' from nobody. I'd rather live at Morganza than any place I know of."
The girl was put to bed and the mother will be investigated by the police.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Sept. 20, 1891, page 1

PATTISON IN PITTSBURG
He Makes an Inspection of the Morganza Reform School

The Governor is Dined at the Duquesne Club and Meets Local Democratic Leaders - Spirited Out of Town Before His Presence Became Known.

Governor Pattison drifted into Pittsburg and floated out again yesterday in a manner almost as mysterious as the movements of Fitzsimmons. He was accompanied by Colonel Bradley, of Philadelphia. As soon as he arrived in the city he left for Morganza and inspected the Reform school. When this was finished he returned to the city. At the Union station he was met by Inspector General McKibben and before the public had a chance to get a look at His Excellency he was placed in a carriage and driven to the Duquesne Club. There he was entertained by Mr. McKibben. At the dinner the other guests were Colonel Bradley, Adjutant General McClelland, James B. Scott, J. Pressley Fleming, ex-Postmaster Larkin, West Guffy, J.M. Guffy and A. F. Keating.

It was a quiet Democratic rally of the leaders in Allegheny county, and from behind clouds of high-tariff cigar smoke they discussed plans for the present campaign and made Presidential guesses.

After the dinner Adjutant General McClelland accompanied the Governor to the 4:30 train for the East. The Governor was interviewed and said he was merely out to inspect the reform school. He was much pleased with the condition of the house and the inmates. He also stated that he expected to return in about six weeks and inspect the Western Penitentiary and the West Penn Hospital. Regarding Pennsylvania politics he did not care to say anything, but said he did not believe that Campbell would have much trouble about being re-elected in Ohio.

His visit was entirely unexpected, and a number of the directors of the Morganza Reform School did not even last night know that the Governor had been in the city.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, Sept. 26, 1891, page 2

ANNIE FISH IS OUT
The Girl Who so Frequently Puzzled the Police Escapes from the Reform School a Second Time - Has a Record in Pittsburg.

Annie Fish is out again. The girl who for weeks baffled the efforts of the police to unravel the mystery surrounding her actions, escaped from the Morganza Reform School late Thursday night. Her record in Pittsburg was a notable one. She first made her appearance about 18 months ago, riding on a freight train from Franklin and attired in boy's clothing. Several nights she slept in Lawrenceville stables and was finally picked up, half starved, by a woman and given proper attire. Alderman McNierney's wife secured her a position with a Butler street family. The girl told a story of brutal treatment and was believed. A few days later she feigned a trance, was removed to the West Penn Hospital, where physicians worked two day to bring her about. She told half a dozen different stories, all equally plausible.

Then she disappeared, but turned up later in Sharpsburg and Agent Dean, of the Anti-Cruelty Society, had her sent to Morganza. She escaped, leaving no trace of her whereabouts. On January 12 last, the officers about Central police station were surprised to see her enter the office. Another pitiful story was produced. This time it was that she had married a young Southsider, who cruelly beat her and then disappeared, leaving her without a cent. But her reputation was too well known for any credence to be placed in her story. She was held overnight and the next day was sent back to Morganza, where she has been up to her last escape.

The appearance of Annie Fish has always produced plenty of sympathy for her. She is 18 years of age, slight of figure and graceful, with dark brown hair and beautiful blue eyes. Her home is supposed to be at Oil City, though it has never been definitely determined. The police say she is slightly demented, but there is no evidence of mental derangement in her talk, look or actions.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Oct. 15, 1891, page 5

A VISIT TO MORGANZA
Paid by the Members of the National Prison Association

At 2 o'clock about 150 members of the congress left on a special train from the Union station over the Panhandle for the State Reform School at Morganza. The party was in charge of George A. Kelly, Chairman of the Entertainment committee, who acted as pilot at both ends of the line.

Superintendent J. A. Quay met the special at the depot at Morganza with ample carriage accommodations for the entire party. Neatly printed programmes were distributed among the visitors, bearing the date at the Superintendent's office, as follows:

This institution welcomes the National Prison Association, and invites inspection of its main building, family buildings, girls department, barns, park, workshops, greenhouses, hospitals, etc., in the order named. Lunch will be served at 4:30 p.m., in the main building. Train leaves at 5:30 p.m. for Pittsburg.

This programme was carried out in the main, though interrupted for a short time on account of a shower which prevented outdoor travel.

PLEASED BY EVERYTHING

Much interest was taken by the members of the association in the perfect sanitary arrangements of the institution, the dormitories, natatorium, bakery, kitchen and dining room arrangements, heating and lighting fixtures, etc. The absolute cleanliness of every spot about the institution, outside and in, including the bright faces and clothing of the children, was especially referred to by the visitors. The splendid conservatories were the center of attraction for the ladies, nearly all of whom carried away souvenirs of the visit in the form of roses and carnations. The men found much to interest them in the stable arrangements, and President Hayes was an especial admirer of the exhibit of fancy poultry belonging to the farm.

An elaborate luncheon was served in the dining rooms of the main building after the reception. During the visit at the school music was discoursed by a cornet band composed of boys of the institution. The return train was a little late in leaving Morganza, and didn't arrive in the city untili 7 p.m. The members of the congress were universal in their praise of the institution, all agreeing that it is one of the finest and best managed reformatories for boys and girls in the world, and Superintendent and Mrs. Quay were the subjects of many choice compliments.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, Nov. 19, 1891, page 12

Secretary Biddle Thinks the Rod is an Excellent Thing.

Cadwallader Biddle, Secretary of the State Board of Charities, has been in the city for several days inspecting local institutions. Yesterday he visited the West Penn Hospital and the Home for Incurables. On Tuesday he went through Morganza. Mr. Biddle said he was on his three-month tour of the State. He expressed himself as well pleased with the places he visited here. Mr. Biddle is a believer in corporal punishment, and he thinks a judicious use of the rod would help the young offenders in Morganza.

Solitary confinement, he says, make the boys sulky. In England, he added, young thieves are flogged for their first offense, and if they persist in stealing they are then sent to the reformatories. He didn't wish to be ungallant, but he though a whipping would improve the moral condition of the girls also.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, April 2, 1892, page 2

MADE A PRETTY MAN
Jennie Scott Doffs Her Dress and Dons Masculine Attire, But is

BETRAYED BY HER WALK.
The Girl Was on Her Way to Visit Old Playmates in Jersey.

WANTED TO SEE HER LOVER AGAIN>
Ran Against an Old Acquaintance in Jail, Warden McAleese.

A MASQUERADER MAY GO TO MORGANZA

Jennie Scott, a pretty little blonde of 18, is in the county jail for wearing men's clothes several times too large for her, and the good people of the West End are all worked up over the finding of a bundle of women's clothing near the mouth of Fox's coal pit, a short distance from the end of the city line. The connection between the two circumstances will be readily understood when it is stated that the female attire had been worn by Miss Scott, as she called herself, until she dropped it to don the masculine trimmings. As far as can be learned, the girl's object was to join her lover in New Jersey, from where she originally came.

Constable Arthur Fee, of the West End, observed what appeared to be a boy skulking along in the shadows on West Carson street on Saturday midnight. The figure was clothed in a new pair of blue overalls and a jumper jacket of the same material. The evident effort of the figure to keep in the shadows on the dark, unused side of the street convinced the officer that an investigation would be proper. He followed and hailed the mysterious figure, but receiving no reply stepped up and laid a hand on its shoulder.

She Made a Boyish Rebuff

His repeated demands for information was answered by a badly simulated masculine voice requesting him to attend to his own business, but the voice was to palpably feminine that the officer decided he had caught a masquerader. He led the figure to the nearest street light and a scrutiny of the features corroborated his first impression. The clothing was masculine, but the face was a young woman's beyond a doubt and a pretty, saucy one at that. The blue jacket which the young lade wore was so much too large for her that it revealed a plump, white neck that was itself enough to reveal her sex, while the crown of a little soft hat she wore was bulged out with a wealth of blonde hair coiled tightly on top of her head, that gave her a ludicrous appearance.

The girl refused to talk and Constable Fee walked her up to Alderman Madden's house for further investigation. Alderman Madden talked to the girl in a kindly way and she seemed to be affected by it, for she told him a story that would interest any man.

Wanted to See Her Lover Again

She said her name was Jennie Scott; that her home was at Abscon, Doaty's Mills Postoffice, N.J., near Atlantic Cit, and that she had come to Pittsburg from that place two months ago. Since coming here she had been employed as a domestic at the house of John Caldwell, on Bates street, but had grown homesick to get back to her relatives and her lover, and, having no money, decided to don male attire, and endeavor to beat her way back on freight trains. In explaining how she had got out she told an ingenious story of how she had waited until the Caldwell family left for the theater, when she followed, came down town, bought her blue suit of overalls for a dollar, and 50-cent hat at a Market street store, then returned to Oakland, burned her own clothing in the kitchen stove and donned her adopted costume.

"I took a Duquesne car for the city and noticed the men looking at me and smiling, but thought it was because I looked so much like a farmer's boy and felt safe. I walked down to the Point bridge and was just going along the street when this man stopped me," she concluded breaking into tears, "and I thing it's real mean you won't let me alone."

Became a Guest of Warden McAleese

Alderman Madden was deeply interested in the story, but felt the necessity for further investigation and, though he disliked to do it, decided to send the young girl to jail until he could make some inquiries. Constable Fee procured a buggy and conveyed her to jail, where she was placed in one of Warden McAleese's most substantial apartments.

Early yesterday morning the Warden in passing through the jail noticed his new guest and her strange attire. Her face struck him familiarly. Calling her out into the corridor in the light he looked at her closely for a moment and then gave her a start by pleasantly inquiring: "How are you this morning, Roses?"

The girl colored, but otherwise retained her composure and in the most innocent way imaginable answered the question by asking what the Warden meant by calling her Rose. Her coolness rather deceived him but he thought he could not be mistaken and said: "Why, you are Rose Peterson, are you not? Surely you're the girl I sent to the Reform School three years ago?"
At first she denied but finally admitted the Warden was right, and then she began to tell a long story about how she happened to be in her present plight. The Warden's memory proved to be the best, however, and before long he stopped her and told her some facts he had learned about her when she had previously been thrown into his company.

Deserted by Her Stepfather

The substance of it all was that the only truthful points in the girl's story were those relating to her home and her lover. Although she claims to be 21, the girl is only 18. Her parents are dead, her father having been a hotel keeper at Salem, Ohio, 13 years ago and died there. Her mother returned to New Jersey, was married again to a man named Adams and seven years subsequently died in a New York hospital. Adams deserted Rose and her only sister, a few years her senior, in New York. Her sister was taken by a New York family and Rose was taken by her grandmother, Mrs. Annie Kreitzman, who was tolerably well-to-do living at Abscon, N.J.

Her grandmother took an interest in the little girl and sent her to Ocean City to a private school, but six months there sufficed and the girl ran away, coming to this city about four years ago. Having no other accomplishment the girl was forced to become a domestic. She first worked at Abel's restaurant on Union street, then with Mrs. Ryan at 208 Penn avenue, and later with Henry Smith, a farmer back of Coraopolis. The girl got in with bad companions after coming here, and one night about three years ago was arrested by Detective Fitzgerald on Market street in company with Annie Connelly, who was wanted by the police on several charges of larceny. The Connelly woman was sent to the workhouse.

Gave the Girl Another Chance

Inspector McAleese felt that the girl was not bad, but in order to break her way from her newly formed evil associations sent her to Morganza. She escaped from that institution soon after, but was recaptured and returned.

From her own story she was only released two months ago. She insisted that she has been living in Oakland ever since, but the finding of her clothing yesterday morning on the Washington pike indicates that she must have been living out in that direction. Henry Vierheller found the clothes on his way home early yesterday morning. He reported the matter to the police and a sensation ensued, the police knowing nothing of the arrest of the girl, and it was supposed there had been foul play. The girl insists that she burned her clothes, but the price tag she removed from her overall suit were found in the pocket of the dress she had discarded, settling that point conclusively. It appears that a form Abscon playmate of the girl's named Webster met her in this city before she went to Morganza, and her desire to return to him is the only reason that can be fund for her strange masquerade. Alderman Madden is looking up the case preparatory to a hearing to-morrow morning, and unless friends come to the front in the meantime she will probably go back to Morganza.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, April 4, 1892, page 2

WOULD-BE GLOBE TROTTERS
A Pair of Cleveland Lads Whose Ambitions Were Crushed.

Warden McAleese has under his care two boys from Newburg, Cleveland, whose parents are no doubt distracted over their disappearance. The boys were picked up in this city several days ago while wandering aimlessly about, and Magistrate Gripp sent them to jail for ten days as vagrants on the representation that they were orphans from Chicago and had no money, home or friends.

When they were taken to jail they continued telling this story, but when they realized that they might be sent to Morganza under the circumstances they made a clean breast of their identity. Their proper names are James McAllister, aged 15 years, and Thomas Richards, age 13. The latter's parents have a hotel at 96 Stafford street. McAllister's people live on Osage street. He stole $21 from his mother a week ago, and taking the younger boy along started out to see the world, stopping at several small towns en route to this city. They were each bedecked in gaudy neckties and scarf pins, which had used up considerable of their cash and seemed rather out of place with the balance of their attire. Their living expenses had reduced the balance so that they had but 16 cents between them when arrested. Both the lads are now heartily homesick, and promise never to run away again if they can get back to Cleveland.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, May 6, 1892, page 2

LIVELY CHASE FOR A THIEF
James Camp, a Graduate of Morganza, Arrested for Picking Pockets

Detective Fitzgerald had one of the liveliest foot races last night that he has had in years. The front office force has for some days been looking for James, alias "Reddy," Camp, who is a Morganza graduate out on parole and who was wanted for pocket picking. Shortly before 7 o'clock last evening Detective Fitzgerald say Camp on Fourth avenue and started after him. Camp was on alert and sought safety in flight. The pursued and the pursuer dashed through a number of streets.

Camp is quite a sprinter, but he found more than a match in Detective Fitzgerald, who succeeded in running him down on Sixth avenue. Camp attempted to show fight, but the officer choked the courage out of him and landed him in the Central station.

In speaking of the case last night Inspector McKelvy said that Camp had caused the department more trouble than a gang of professional thieves. The Inspector claims that Camp is at the head of a gang of young fellows who are pickpockets and who are taught by him, and they have succeeded in gathering in a number of pocket books lately. It is likely that Camp will be sent back to Morganza to serve out his time.



The Pittsburg Dispatch, May 31, 1892, page 2

SPOILED A GOOD THING

Sheriff Elliott, of Elk County, Now Takes His Prisoners to Riverside Without Stopping for Dinner - Boys for Morganza See a Theatrical Performance.

Sheriff S. B. Elliott, of Elk county, arrived in the city yesterday afternoon with nine prisoners for the penitentiary and two boys for Morganza. The Sheriff is a kind-hearted man, but a few months ago he had an experience here that spoils a good dinner for all the Elk convicts while he is in office. He was wont to take his prisoners to the St. James, and give them a square meal before going to Riverside. A drink of whiskey and cigars were added. The last time he was here one of his men picked the lock of a handcuff with a pen and broke away, giving the officer a lively chase, but he was recaptured on Penn avenue. The fellow was a desperate character, and while going into the dining room slipped a pen from the counter. With this frail instrument he opened the lock under the table, under the eyes of the Sheriff and his deputies.

Yesterday when the Sheriff stuck the town his men were securely handcuffed together, and he hustled them off to the penitentiary without any ceremony. The boys are Jacob Schreider and Frank Laird. They are not more than 14 years old and will be sent to Morganza this morning. They were taken to Riverside, and the Sheriff pointed out what would become of them unless they mended their ways. Last evening the Sheriff attended a theater, and he took the boys with him to see the play. It is not often that even youthful culprits are treated so kindly by officers of the law.

Sheriff Elliott had five deputies with him on this trip. They registered at the St. James last evening. The boys are pretty tough customers, and have been in jail for two months. When Mr. Elliott found he couldn't reach Morganza until morning he concluded it wouldn't hurt them to see a play. The deputies went with him, but the kids didn't need much watching. They soon became interested in the drama and were very much delighted. The Sheriff delivered the youngsters a good lecture at the penitentiary, and after they had seen how prisoners are treated they concluded it was best to be good boys in the future. Mr. Elliott thinks it is a good plan to show youthful offenders what they must endure unless they behave themselves. He reasons that it would keep many of them out or mischief.


The Pittsburgh Dispatch, July 21, 1892, page 6

OUT OF MORGANZA

Secretary Dorente Endeavoring to Secure the Release of an Unfortunate Boy -
Hard Time Experienced by Motherless Children - The Case Being Investigated.

Secretary Dorente, of the Anti-Cruelty Society, has made application to the Board of Managers of the Reform School to secure the release of Russell Zollinger, who was, it is alleged, surreptitiously committed to that institution by his father. The lad is about 16 years of age, and is subject to falling fits, superintended by an injury to the head received some years ago. Zollinger is a son-in-law of Andrew Moon, and since the death of his wife, Mr. Moon and other relatives had had charge of Zollinger's children. The boy Russell for a time lived with Mr. Zollinger's siter, who wanted his father to provide for him. Zollinger recently married again, and his wife and step-son failed to agree. The boy ray away from home and would be gone weeks, making his way over the country after the manner of a tramp.

Mr. Zollinger, it is claimed, failed to support any of his children, particularly the boy named, and complaint was made to the anti-cruelty societies. Zollinger was sued before Alderman Kerr and fined, the Alderman saying that the testimony developed showed most shocking neglect on the part of the father. All the children were placed in the care of the anti-cruelty societies, and the boy Russell placed in the care of his father, who was told that he must provide for him. In the course of a couple of weeks Zollinger complained that the boy was uncontrollable, and was told the matter would be looked into. Action was not taken soon enough to suit Mr. Zollinger and he and a neighbor went before Alderman Leslie, and upon their oaths the boy was sent to Morganza. In the meantime Mrs. John Shaner, an aunt of the boy, made arrangements to have him admitted to the hospital, for the purpose of having an operation performed on his head, to cure his tendency to fits, and when a messenger was sent after boy he could not be found. Mr. Zollinger refused to tell where the boy was, saying he had him cared for, and paying for him. It was discovered that the boy was in Morganza and application was made to the Board of Managers.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, July 30, 1892, page 6

LOOKING AFTER LITTLE ONES
Securing the Release of a Boy from Morganza

Secretary Dorente, of the Anti-Cruelty Society, yesterday secured the release of Russell Zollinger, who was committed to Morganza on the oath of his father. The father had been prosecuted and fined by Alderman Kerr for abusing his family and the children given to the care of the Anti-Cruelty Society, so that the commitment to Morganza was illegal. Secretary Dorente promised to assume the responsibility of the boy's future and the lad was given in his charge.



The Pittsburg Dispatch, Aug. 28, 1892, page 2

FIRST WARD JACK SHEPPARDS
Though Only 12 Years of Age, Four of Them Boldly Rob a Pantry.

Four boys, all under 13 years of age, were picked up at the lower end of Second avenue yesterday morning in a drunken stupor. When taken to Central station they were in such condition that Police Surgeon Moyer worked for hours to save their lives. The police allege they are members of the "scatter gang" party of boys, who are alleged to have an organization which has committed numerous desperate crimes. They boyd had yesterday morning secured keys to a back gate leading to a Second avenue establishment, and, going in, had consumed the liquor and eatables contained in the refrigerator. The liquor stupefied them and they fell over on the street each with a beer bottle in his arms.

To the police the lads are known as "Sheeney," "Garter," "Measles" and "Buster". "Measles" is given a frightful record, as one of the slickest pickpockets in the United States and other terrible things. The boys will be sent to Morganza where, it is said, six more of the "Scatter gang" have preceded them.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Aug. 30, 1892, page 2

Sent to Morganza

Two of the "Scatter gang," boys, Nathan Kline and James Schelinski, who have been stealing liquor and edibles from the downtown houses, were sent to Morganza by Inspector McKelvey yesterday. The other two boys of the gang were allowed to go home on a sort of parole, with an understanding that if they were caught in the city again they would be sent to the same institution without a hearing.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Oct. 2, 1892, page 3

WILL GO TO MORGANZA
Guss Cowelsky Comes to Pittsburg and Gets Into Trouble

Guss Cowelsky is in the Twenty-eighth ward station, and will be sent to Morganza to-day. The boy's parents formerly lived on the Southside, but recently moved to Detroit, Mich. Young Cowelsky ran away from home and came to Pittsburg. A few days ago he was arrested and sent to jail.

Magistrate Succop wrote to his parents, asking what he should do with the boy. The father replied that he could do nothing with his son, and if he was arrested again to send him to Morganza. Yesterday Guss got out of jail and was arrested last night on the Southside.


------

A MOTHER CUTS HER CHILD
Mrs. Harket Strikes Her Little Daughter With A Knife - The Flesh is Opened Clear to the Bone - Anti-Cruelty Society Arrests Her.

Mrs. Lewis E. Harket, of 18 First alley, Allegheny, was arrested Friday night by Secretary Dorente of the Anti-Cruelty Society, for abusing her 15-year-old daughter, Mary. She will be given a hearing Monday before Alderman Burns.

Agent Fisher investigated the case and learned from the mother that the girl was saucy and inclined to run about the streets with girls and young men of questionable character. The mother admits to having struck the girl with a knife on two or three occasions, cutting her arm badly in several places. The girl was taken to the Home of the Good Shepherd and will be kept there until the case can be thoroughly investigated.

After the arrest of the mother the father of the girl went to the office of the Anti-Cruelty Society and demanded that the girl be delivered to him. He claims that the girl is incorrigible and that he will send her to Morganza as soon as possible.

Mary's story is that both her father and mother have violent tempers, and when they get angry about anything they are sure to vent their passion on her. "On Thursday evening," she said, "one of my little brothers broke a cup, and mamma in a rage blamed it on me. I told her I had nothing to do with breaking the cup, and telling me that I was a lazy, good for nothing liar, she struck me with a bread knife on the arm, and here is the wound it made." She showed an ugly gash, cut to the bone, on her left wrist. "Mamma would not let me have supper that night, and when papa came home he ordered her to waken him up early the next morning so that he could see that I got no breakfast. When he did get up he ordered my to leave home and never come back any more. I am very unhappy at home, and I don't care where I go so I don't get beat for things I don't do."

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Oct. 6, 1892, page 2

YOUTHFUL ROBBER IN TROUBLE
Stein Johnson Arrested for Tapping a Till in a Southside Store

Stein Johnson, of 2874 Carey alley, was arrested yesterday as a suspicious character. He is only 9 years old and is thought to be one of three boys who tapped a till in Mrs. Miller's store on South Fourteenth street Tuesday evening. Mrs. Miller was out of the store at the time, but three boys, all about 10 years old, were seen to come out and run up the street. Yesterday afternoon when some boys went into the store, Mrs. Milled tried to catch some of them. When they went up the street she followed them and caught young Johnson. While bringing him down street, Office Diebold came up and lodged him in the Twenty-eighth ward police station. He will be given a hearing before Judge Succop this morning.

For some time a number of petty robberies have been committed by small boys, but the police have not been able to catch them heretofore. An effort will be made to send young Johnson to Morganza if he is guilty.

-----

NOT BELIEVED BY POLICE
Mamie Harrington Said She was Assaulted on Penn Avenue

A young girl about 17 years old and giving the name of Mamie Harrington, was brought to the Inspector's office last evening by a colored man. She told a rambling story to Inspector McKelvey of how a man had met her on Penn avenue, between Fourth and Fifth streets, and had assaulted her. She was found in a stable by two men, who turned her over to the colored man to take her to the station.

After a short examination it was found that the girl had been in the habit of sleeping in stables on Old avenue nightly. She said she lived with her aunt, Nettie Smith, in the Eleventh ward, but could not exactly say where. Her father, she claimed, is an engineer on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern road. She said later that she had been married in Cleveland some short time ago. The Inspector sent her to the Central station, from where she will be sent to Morganza for three years.




The Pittsburg Dispatch, Oct. 22, 1892, page 1

COLUMBUS AT MORGANZA

The Boys and Girls in the Pennsylvania Reform School Honor America's Discoverer - A Flag is Raised and the Children Make Speeches and Parade.

The 450 boys at the Morganze Reform School celebrated America's four hundredth anniversary yesterday. Probably no school in the country had a more appropriate programme or scholars more carefully trained than the boys at the Morganza Institute. For the last month Superintendent J. A. Quay and his wife have labored incessantly to make this celebration an event which the boys and girls would understand and never forget.

At 2:30 yesterday afternoon the six companies were formed on the parade ground in rear of the buildings, and, headed by the Boys' Military Band, marched to a position in front of the main building. After the reading of the President's proclamation "To the colors" was sounded, and instantly a large national flag was raised above the main structure. Then three rousing cheers greet America's sacred emblem as it moved proudly up the staff. With the right hand extended toward the flag the boys pledged themselves to honor it, and the Republic for which it stands. As their hands dropped to their sides the band stuck up "America," and all joined in singing it.

After Rev. David McDonald, of Cannonsburg, offered up a prayer, in which he thanked the Supreme Ruler of this mighty universe for this grand and glorious country, they all retired to the chapel, which was tastefully decorated with flags of America, Spain and Italy.

A very interesting programme was arranged for the chapel, which included the meaning of the four centuries and patriotic songs. The exercises of the day concluded with a dress parade.

The Pittsburg Dispatch, Dec. 6, 1892, page 2

SHE LIVED IN A CAVE
An Allegheny Girl Sent to Morganza for Incorrigibility

Elsie Young, the young girl arrested in Allegheny on complaint of her mother for incorrigibility, was given a hearing before Alderman Brinker yesterday. She was sent to the Reform School.

Mrs. Young stated that she was unable to control her daughter, who will be 15 years old next July, and for a youngster is quite well versed in the ways of the world. She had been confined for over a year in the Home of the Good Shepherd, on Troy Hill, but managed to escape by jumping from the third-story window. She lived for nearly four months in an abandoned coal mine. Mrs. Young said that she had not heard of her daughter for some time, but she was finally located in a house on Penn avenue. She refused to go home, and Mrs. Young entered the complaint against her. She will go to Morganza today.


The Pittsburg Dispatch, Dec. 22, 1892, page 2

A. W. Greenwood, of 42 Cliff street, called at headquarters yesterday morning and reported that his wife's sister, an orphan and a minor, had left home last Sunday and was preparing to run away with the opera company in defiance of her sister's wishes. He said the girl was only 16, inclined to be wayward and decidedly stage struck. He name was Nora Hill. Mr. Greenwood had no idea where she had been since Sunday, but believed she had not been in dangerous company. He asked that she be arrested and prevented from leaving the city if possible. It was on the description furnished by him that she was found by the officer.

Last night she had practically recovered from the shock of her arrest and surroundings, and although her eyes were swollen and red with weeping, she was still a pretty girl. Her manner was rather saucy and she declared she would not return to her sister's home. Denying that she intended to leave the city with the opera company, she admitted a strong desire to go on the stage, claimed to have considerable undeveloped vocal talent, and declared that her leaving home was all on account of a young man. It was a young man she loved. She wouldn't mention his name, but said he was awful nice and there was no reason why she should not receive his attentions, because she was 18 and not 16 years old, as her brother-in-law had alleged.

Regarding her whereabouts since leaving home Sunday she said she had been stopping with a respectable young lady friend on Bedford avenue, but persistently refused to divulge the young lady's name or residence, saying she would not subject her to any annoyance. Rather than do this she would go to Morganza or anywhere her sister wished to send her.

"So you will insist on going on the stage?" asked Superintendent O'Mara as he was leaving her.

"Certainly," was her reply, "if I can join a good company. I intend to be a little particular about that. If I can't joint a first-class opera company I will try to find something else to do. In fact I have been trying to get work in a store all this week."

Mr. O'Mara says he will turn the young lady over to her relatives to-day. He admits she is rather a unique character to deal with and hopes it will not be necessary to place her in the reform school.



The Third Annual Report of the Commissioner of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1908

[page 653]
MORGANZA, WASHINGTON COUNTY.
Pennsylvania Reform School

This application was made by the Board of Managers of the Pennsylvania Reform School, located at Morganza, Cecil Township, Washington County, and is for approval of plans for water filters, improvements to the water works system and for a new impounding reservoir.

It appears that the Pennsylvania Reform School is a State Institution for the care and education of incorrigible children up to the age of twenty-one years. The school was established in 1852 on the site of the present penitentiary in Pittsburg. In 1872, it was moved in its entirety to the present site at Morganza. The institution to-day comprises a main building, four cottages for boys, three shop buildings in which trades are taught to the boys, a hospital and farm building. There are in process of erection two cottages, one for boys and one for girls, and a large gymnasium and a power house. They are all situated on a 512 acres tract of land located in Cecil Township, Washington County, north and west of Chartiers Creek, which flows in a general south-easterly direction by the property. This creek makes a large bend in its course so that it forms the western boundary of the southerly portion of the property and through this part the Chartiers Valley Division of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad extends. Morganza Station is on the land occupied by the state buildings.

The Administration Building and four cottages are directly back from the station on a bluff which is one hundred feet or so above the creek valley and the other buildings are situated back from this bluff on rising ground which is laid out in regular plots and drives for the prospective cottage development of the institution.

The population of the institution, including officers, numbers about five hundred and fifty. It is estimated that the average daily water consumption approximates one hundred twenty-five thousand gallons.

At the present time the institution's water supply is derived from three sources: first, raw water from Morganza Run for general inferior uses; second, from springs for drinking purposes; and third, from Chartiers Creek and a drilled well at the creek pump house, for inferior use.

[page 785]
On February eleventh, nineteen hundred and eight, the Commissioner of Health sent the following communication to the President of the Borough Council of Canonsburg, Washington county:

"Dear Sir,

"In compliance with the unanimous agreement reached by the Governor, Attorney General and the Commissioner of Health, I beg herein notify you that your borough failed to comply with Section six of Act one hundred and eighty-two, approved April twenty-second, 1905, and that, therefore, its sewer system is not exempt from the provisions of this Act against the discharge of sewage into the waters from the State.

"It is further agreed that the Commissioner of Health request the borough of Canonsburg, and I do hereby and herein request you to prepare plans, either independently or in conjunction with the borough of South Canonsburg for the treatment of the sewage before it is discharged into the creek and submit these plans to the Commissioner of Health for approval on or before July first, 1908. If this be done, then the Commissioner of Health may fix the time in which such treatment works shall be constructed, which date shall not be in advance of the date upon which the sewage from the State Reform School at Morganza is ceased to be discharged into Chartiers Creek.

"Yours very truly,"

[page 1069]
Down stream below the Canonsburg sewer outlet, sewage is discharged into the creek and also industrial waste from the plant of the Standard Tin Plate company, and about one-half mile below this point the sewage from the State Reform School at Morganza is discharged into the stream, so it is reported.

[page 1243]
TYPHOID FEVER OUTBREAK
Pennsylvania Reform School, Morganza, Cecil Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania

During the summer an outbreak of typhoid fever occurred among the inmates of the Pennsylvania Reform School, located at Morganza, Cecil Township, Washington County, and the State Department of Health was asked to make an investigation. This work was conducted under the direction of the Chief Engineer of the Engineering Division. The following is a report of the investigations, the cause of the epidemic and the measures adopted to prevent a recurrence of this disease.



The Pittsburgh Press, Jan. 13, 1950, page 11

BASIC CHANGES NEEDED TO IMPROVE MORGANZA, CITIZENS' GROUT SAYS

Complete Reorganization, New Program of Rehabilitation Called Solutions
by Robert Taylor

A citizens' group today informed State Welfare Secretary William C. Brown that nothing less than a complete reorganization of the State Reform School at Morganza will improve it.

Directors of the Pennsylvania Citizens' Assn. for Health and Welfare gave Mr. Brown detailed recommendations for building up a program of rehabilitation for the hundreds of boys and girls committed to the Reformatory each year.

They said that only basic changes can improve the 100-year-old school, which in recent years has been the subject of repeated investigations and complaints, both public and private.

State Probing School

The school now is under investigation by the State Welfare Department, which is attempting to force changes.

Morganza's Board of Trustees last Tuesday finally acted on the many complaints by firing Superintendent J. Elmer Johnston, effective Feb. 15.

The Citizens' Assn., in a letter signed by Charles Denby and endorsed by 12 prominent Western Pennsylvanians, indicated this isn't enough.

Steps Recommended

They recommended these steps:
1 - "Board members must be selected for one reason only: their informed interest in young people and their knowledge of methods of reconstructing behavior in delinquent youth."
(The Association members said such people will have to be persuaded to take the jobs as a duty to the State, and that it's unlikely a competent new superintendent can be found unless the Board is organized.)
2 - A qualified superintendent must be found, from out of the State, if necessary. Under the best conditions, the group said, such a man would need several years to build an adequate staff and program.
3 - The staff should be chosen for qualifications only.
4 - The advice of an independent, informed group should be sought, in development of a sound program of vocational training and guidance.

One of the complaints against Morganza is that both the superintendent and many of the employees were hires through patronage politics and that, as a result, discipline was lacking among the staff and the boy inmates.

Group's View on Politics

The citizens' group had this to say about politics:
"If the superintendent is to be changed every few years for reasons not related to his administrative ability, there is no hope for the future. If the staff members are to continue to be appointed under the patronage system, no workers of any quality will seek employment here."

The group said they share Secretary Brown's concern over the inefficiency, waste and high costs of Morganza - now amounting to $3.83 per inmate per day.

"However," they added, "we are even more deeply concerned about the waste of young lives, a waste for which we will all pay even more heavily as boys and girls go out into society, with nothing in their experience at the so-called 'training school' that would lead them to want to become responsible citizens.

Get Last Chance There

"These are the children with whom the family, the school, the church, the community and the Juvenile Court have failed. The years they spend at Morganza offer literally their last chance.

"Experience in training schools in other state (for example, New York and Michigan), has proved that substantial number of them could be reclaimed for useful lives."

The citizens' group warned that piece-meal changes, such as attempts to strengthen discipline or eliminate waste in some places wouldn't solve the problem

Offer No Guarantee

"They offer no guarantee that in another administration the same evil conditions will not again arise," the group said.

Endorsing the letter were such members of the Association as Warden Stanley P. Ashe, of Western Penitentiary, a famed penologist who headed a committee that investigated Morganza several years ago; Dr. John H. Adams, retired educator now on the Allegheny County Juvenile Court staff, and Malcolm Hay, newly-appointed Chancellor the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Others in the group include William A. Ashe, Mrs. John P. Bankson, Mrs. Mary C. Burnett, Mrs. Heath S. Clark, John Harding, Mrs. Karl J. Kaufmann, Mrs. John W. Lawrence, Robert B. McKinley and Mrs. George L. West.

The Mount Washington News, 1930-10-03 page 1

Fear that he was going to be sent back to Morganza, from which he was recently paroled, is believed to have been the reason which caused Albertis Thompson, 18, Negro, of 400 block Simms St, to kill himself.  The boy's parents told Mt. Washington police he had learned Monday he was to be taken back to the reformatory and had brooded over the news.  He shot himself through the heart with a small caliber revolver.



--------------


Names Found in Newspapers:
ABBEY
Willie
x
Habit of Running Away

2

Pitts Disp

1892-11-18

ACHESON

C.L. B.


Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

ADAMS

John H. Dr.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

ADAMS

John H. Dr.
Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

ADDISON

Fannie
x
Packed Her Duds & Escaped

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-11

ADDISON

Fannie
x
Runaway Captured

2

Pitts Disp

1891-12-13

AIKEN

John Brig Gen
Acting Superintendent

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

AIKEN

John


Declined Top Position

17

Greensburg Daily Trib

1951-03-12

AIKEN

John Gen.


2nd In Command

19

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

ALBREE

Joseph


Board Member Knew Nothing of Beatings

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

ALBREE

Joseph


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

ALEXANDER

W.H. Dr.


In Charge of Patients

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

ALEXANDER

J. W. Dr.


Physician in Charge

4

Pitts Disp

1892-04-22

ALEXANDER

J.B. Dr.


School Physician

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

ALLEN

Mary
X
Wouldn't Take Dare - Set Fire

1

Phila Record

1900-09-20

ALLEN

Mary
X
Youngest Convict

1

Wash Observer

1902-06-20

ALLISON

James Dr


Member of Board of Managers

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

ALLISON

James


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

AMES

George H
x
Enjoyable Outing for Escapee

3

Pitts Disp

1889-07-15

ANDERSON

Frances
x
Sent to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-08-09

ANDERSON

William
x
Sent for Larceny

3

Pitts Disp

1889-04-14

ANDERSON

Bertha
x
Girl has Been Wronged

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-18

ANDERSON

Bertha
x
Girl Has Been Wronged

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-18

ARNOLD

W.H


Fire at Morganza

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

ASHE

William A


Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

ASHE

Stanley P.


Warden

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

ASHE

William A


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

ASKINE

Harry
x
Bid Bars Goodby & Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-19

ASTRIDGE

Arthur
X
Pleaded Guilty

6

Pitts Press

1946-04-02

BALL

Leonard


Owned Stolen Car

17

Post Gaz

1954-05-06

BALL

James
X
Held for Robbery

17

Post Gaz

1954-05-06

BANKSON

John P. Mrs.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BANKSON

John P. Mrs
Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BARBER

Charles L


Recommended Remedial Steps

21

Post Gaz

1948-10-08

BARBER

Charles R


Demanded Resignation

21

Greensburg Daily Trib

1949-12-29

BARR

John S


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

BARRY

Leo
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

BARTELS

Alma


Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

BEACON

Mrs


Matron

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

BEATTY

Samuel C
x
85 Lashes

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

BEATTY

James
x
Escaped after 2 years

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-22

BEAVER

Gov.


$91,857.40 Appropriated for Morganza

7

Pitts Disp

1889-06-07

BEBOUT

Bernard
X
Morganza Fugitive in Cleveland Hospital

1

Wash Reporter

1937-02-05

BECHAK

Michael J.
X
Escaped Inmate Arraigned

12

Daily Times

1946-02-05

BECK

Peter
x
Escaped

6

Pitts Disp

1890-11-07

BELL

Frank


Constable

11

Pitts Press

1903-08-10

BELL

William T


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

BENDEL

Detective


Experienced in Catching Runaways

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

BENNETT

Pearl


Threatened Prisoner

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-20

BERRYMAN

James E


Investigated Drunken Girls

2

Pitts Disp

1891-10-03

BETTS

W. J


Special Officer

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

BIDDLE

Cadwallader
Corporal Punishment Preferrable to Solitary

4

Pitts Disp

1891-11-20

BIDDLE

Cadwallader
Believer in Corporal Punishment

12

Pitts Disp

1891-11-19

BIGGER

James H. Maj
Drill Regiment

3

Pitts Gaz

1904-09-17

BIGGER

James H. Maj
Supterintendent Named w/Photo

6

Pitts Press

1906-11-25

BIGGER

Lt


18th Reg. Teaching Boys Tactics

23

Pitts Disp

1891-12-13

BIGGER

Lucy Mrs.


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

BIGGS

Eddie
x
Create a Row

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-17

BIGHAM

T. J.


Laying of Corner Stone

2

Pitts Comm

1873-07-19

BIRCH

Sallie
x
Attempted Arson

6

Pitts Disp

1890-02-14

BLACKLEDGE

Cora


Probation Officer

11

Daily Times

1920-11-04

BLANQUE

Judy
X
"Exotic Dancer" to Spy

3

Pitts Press

1956-01-24

BLUETT

Thomas


Visited Reform School

2

Reading Eagle

1927-04-02

BLUETT

Thomas


Committee Inspects Morganza

14

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

BLUETT

Thomas


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

BOGDEN

Stepheny
X
Inmate Suicide

11

Wash Reporter

1918-02-26

BOLAND

Mr.


Came to the Rescue

10

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

BOLLINGER

E.C


Admitted Beatings

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-16

BORTWICK

James
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

BOYER

John


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

BRADY

Fred


Does Not Condone Corporal Punishment

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-20

BREADON

Richard
X
Bloodied Head

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-18

BRENNAN

James
X
Escapees Returned

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

BRENNAN

Thomas
x
Runaway Boy

2

Pitts Disp

1891-03-27

BRENNEN

John
x
11-yr-old Robbed Mother

9

Pitts Disp

1892-08-25

BROWN

Marshall


Juvenile Court Judge

11

Pitts Press

1903-08-10

BROWN

Julius
X
At Large

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

BROWN

William C


Vindicated

21

Greensburg Daily Trib

1949-12-29

BROWN

William C


State Secretary of Welfare

3

Pitts Press

1950-01-07

BROWN

William C


State Welfare Secretary

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BROWN

William C


Biting Attack

9

Post Gaz

1950-01-21

BROWN

William C


Rejected Appeal

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

BROWN

William C


Complete Reorganization at Morganza

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BROWN

William H
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

BROWN

Alva C
x
Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-05

BROWN

Cagey
x
Back After Only 2-3 Weeks

5

Pitts Disp

1889-07-16

BROWN

Lee
x
Escapted

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-26

BROWN

J.O.


Was Testified Against

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

BROWN

Henry
x
Sentenced to Morganza

14

Pitts Disp

1890-10-19

BROWNSON

James I


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

BROWNSON

James Judge
Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

BROZENA

J.G


State Police Search for Barbaric Punishments

6

Post Gaz

1936-02-25

BRUCKER

Frederick
X
Burglaries & Thefts Since Escape

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

BUCHANAN

John M


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

BUDKE

John F


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

BUNCH

V.F


Inspecting Tunnels

6

Post Gaz

1936-02-25

BURLEIN

Lester F


Resignation of Board Member

4

Pitts Press

1955-01-26

BURNETT

Mary C. Mrs.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BURNETT

Mary C.


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

BURNS

Reily
x
Midnight Assault

3

Pitts Disp

1892-10-20

BUSH

John
x
12-yr-old Incorrigible

2

Pitts Disp

1891-08-08

BUTLER

John
x
Died from Whippings

6

Pitts Disp

1890-01-01

CAIN

George


Came to the Rescue

10

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

CALDWELL

James
x
Wrecking Trains

2

Pitts Disp

1889-08-17

CALL

James
x
Father Had No Control

7

Pitts Disp

1890-07-13

CALMINS

Walter
x
Incorrigible Boy Sent to Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1891-06-15

CAMP

James
x
More Trouble than a Gang of Thieves

2

Pitts Disp

1892-05-06

CAMPBELL

Sadie


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

CANEVIN

Begis Rev.


Morganza Chaplain

12

Pitts Disp

1889-03-23

CANSITE

Emanuel
x
Escaped from Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-09-27

CAPANA

Carl


Paddle-Wielding Guard

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-18

CARROLL

Eddie
x
7-yr-old to Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1891-03-31

CARSON

Roy I


Critical of "Soft Policy"

13

Pitts Press

1954-08-11

CARSON

Roy I. Judge
Changes in Discipline

21

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

CAULIFIELD

Mary G


Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

CAVANAUGH

John J


Constable

11

Pitts Press

1903-08-10

CECYRUS

Charles


Companion of Thief

2

Pitts Disp

1892-09-12

CERNOSKY

George
x
14-yr-old With Bad Habits

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-21

CHAPPELLE

Naomi
x
Showed Bruises

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

CISKO

Charles
X
Youths Escape Morganza

3

Pitts Pres

1927-08-20

CLARK

Frank
X
Arrested in Fayette City

2

Pitts Press

1919-02-22

CLARK

Heath S. Mrs.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

CLARK

Heath S. Mrs
Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

CLARK

Robert
x
Shooting Windows out of Schoolhouses

2

Pitts Disp

1892-12-11

CLEMENS

Steven
X
Morganza to Ministry w/photo

35

Pitts Press

1908-06-21

COARD

Robert D. Mrs
Pres. Congress of Women's Clubs

14

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

COBLENZ

Isidor


Appropriation for Industrial Workshop

1

Pitts Disp

1891-04-15

COLELLI

Peter


Ordered to Pay Son's Keep

2

Pitts Press

1911-11-19

COLLENS

Isadore


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

COLLINS

Harry
x
Blames the Officers

2

Pitts Disp

1891-04-18

COLLINS

Agnes
x
Released from Morganza

10

Pitts Disp

1889-03-30

COLVILLE

Arthur
x
Shooting Windows out of Schoolhouses

2

Pitts Disp

1892-12-11

CONNER

Patrick


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

COOK

Claude
X
Runaway

5

Youngstown Vindicator

1901-11-14

COOK

Claude
X
Runaways Arrested

5

Youngstown Vindicator

1901-11-14

COTTERREL

W. D


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

COTTRELL

W. D


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

COURSIN

B.L.


Advised to Send to Morganza

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

COURTNEY

Annie


Harboring Fugitive

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

COWELSKY

Guss
x
Arrested Again

2

Pitts Disp

1892-10-02

CRAIG

J. A. Prof


Principal of Morganza Reform School

3

Mahoning Disp

1909-12-24

CRAIGHEAD

James


Farm purchased for Morganza

3

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

CRAMER

D.W


Watch Stolen

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

CRANEY

Lizzie
x
Arrested for Incorrigibility

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-18

CRESS

Eva McCall Mrs
Companion of Escapee

12

Daily Times

1946-02-05

CUFF

James
x
"Jimmy Tough"

2

Pitts Disp

1890-01-20

CUNNINGHAM

Thomas
x
Escaped from Morganza

8

Pitts Disp

1892-08-24

CURILLA

George
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

DAGNALL

Annie
x
Wants to Go Back to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

DAVIS

John
X
Burglars Entered Pleas of Guilty

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

DAVIS

Roy
X
Sent to Morganza

11

Pitts Press

1903-08-10

DAY

Harry
X
Guilty of Larceny

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

De PASQUALE

George
X
Unruly Prisoner

21

Greensburg Daily Trib

1949-12-29

DEACON

J. B


Secretary of Associated Charties

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

DEGELMAN

Charles F
x
Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-07-20

DELAIR

John
x
Committed to Morganza, Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1892-11-26

DENBY

Charles


Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

DENBY

Charles


Recommended Steps for Improvement

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

DENNIS

Fred
x
Newsboy Returned to Morganza

3

Pitts Disp

1892-11-19

DeNOON

J.C. Mrs


In Charge of Arrangements

14

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

DEVINE

Robert
x
Create a Row

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-17

DEVINE

John
x
Held for Striking Woman

2

Pitts Disp

1892-04-25

DIAMOND

Albert
x
Sent to Morganza at Parents' Request

6

Pitts Disp

1891-06-24

DIAMOND

John
x
Sent to Morganza at Parent's Request

6

Pitts Disp

1891-06-24

DILL

Freddie
x
Brothers to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-19

DILL

George
x
Brothers to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-19

DIPASQUALE

George
X
Beating Case Probed

4

Pitts Press

1948-10-06

DiPASQUALE

George
X
True Case

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-20

DIXON

Gaynelle M. Mrs.
Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

DOERN

Arnold
x
11-yr-old Ran Away, Sent to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-03-06

DOLAN

Patrick
x
Attacked Mother in Shameful Manner

2

Pitts Disp

1891-08-25

DONABEDIAN

Henry Rev.


Testified at Hearings

23

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

DONALDSON

Walter


Came to the Rescue

10

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

DONNELLY

John
x
Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-05

DONOVAN

Samuel
x
Caught in Freight Car & Escaped Again

2

Pitts Disp

1892-05-29

DOOLEY

C. R


Principal of Industrial Education

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

DORAN

Ella
x
Would Rather Go To Morganza

3

Pitts Disp

1890-03-27

DORAN

Paddy
x
Escaped

6

Pitts Disp

1890-11-07

DORENTE

Secretary


Anti-Cruelty Society Made Applicatin

6

Pitts Disp

1892-07-21

DORN

Annie
x
Dead Drunk

2

Pitts Disp

1891-10-03

DOYLE

Jimmy
x
9-yr-old to Morganza

8

Pitts Disp

1892-04-18

DOYLE

Jimmy
x
9-yr-old Terror

2

Pitts Disp

1892-04-17

DOYLE

Jimmy
x
No Further Attemps on Grandmother's Life

8

Pitts Disp

1892-04-19

DREATER

Samuel


Resignation of Board Member

4

Pitts Press

1955-01-26

DUFF

James H. Gov
Rejected Appeal

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

DUFFY

Martin
X
Escaped from Morganza

2

Pitts Press

1905-09-11

DUNLAP

Jack M


Former Probation Officer Resigned

1

Pitts Press

1950-01-06

DUNLAP

Jack M.


Asst Super Resigned

3

Pitts Press

1950-01-07

DUNLAP

Jack M


Reasons for Quitting w/Photo

29

Pitts Press

1950-01-08

DUNLAP

Jack M


Deceived at Morganza

12

Pitts Press

1950-01-15

DUNLAP

Jack M


Resigned in Disgust

2

Post Gaz

1950-01-16

DUNLAP

Jack M


Made Charges

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

DWYER

John
X
Arrested

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

DWYER

John
X
Sentenced to Morganza

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

DWYER

Julia
x
Packed Her Duds & Escaped

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-11

DYE

Oakey
X
To Be Arrested

19

Beaver Times

1906-10-02

DYE

Jeannette


Urged to Investigate Morganza

27

Pitts Press

1948-10-07

DYER

Julia
x
Runaway Captured

2

Pitts Disp

1891-12-13

EATON

Jeannette M
Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

EBERLE

John


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

EDE

Franklin H.S
House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

EDWARD

Susie
x
Requested Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1891-07-19

EDWARDS

Susie
x
"He Ain't My Father"

2

Pitts Disp

1891-07-13

EDWARDS

Susie
x
Robbing Children's Savings Banks

8

Pitts Disp

1892-01-26

EGAN

Pat
X
Accomplices

6

Pitts Press

1946-04-02

ELLIOTT

S.B. Sheriff
Treated Prisoners to Theater

2

Pitts Disp

1891-05-31

ENSELL

Sam


Too Much Company

2

Pitts Disp

1889-10-07

ESHBACK

R. Russell


Resignation of Board Member

4

Pitts Press

1955-01-26

ESLER

Eddie
x
Sent for Larceny

3

Pitts Disp

1889-04-14

EVANS

David L


Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

EVANS

T. D


Proposal for Addition at Morganza

3

Pitts Disp

1889-09-11

FARR

Harry
x
Sentenced for Entering a Building

10

Pitts Disp

1891-06-27

FERGUSON

James
x
Lived with Grandmother

6

Pitts Disp

1890-04-26

FINN

John
x
Escaped

6

Pitts Disp

1890-11-07

FISH

Annie
x
Escaped - AGAIN

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-26

FISH

Anna
x
Unconscious after Escapades

2

Pitts Disp

1891-11-19

FISHER

Harold


Murderer

4

Sunday Vindicator

1898-08-14

FITZGERALD

Detective


Arrested Runaways

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

FLACH

Charles
x
Pleaded Guilty to Assaulting Father

8

Pitts Disp

1889-10-22

FLACH

Andrew


Assaulted by Son

8

Pitts Disp

1889-10-22

FLICK

William
x
Bid Bars Goodby & Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-19

FLINN

Earl
X
Arrested

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

FLINN

Earl
X
Sentenced to Morganza

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

FLOOD

Mike
x
Bad Little Flood

7

Pitts Disp

1889-12-21

FOREMAN

Rosie
x
From Bethesda to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-08-19

FOSTER

Auggie
X
Held for Assault

17

Post Gaz

1954-05-06

FOW

John H


Investigating Committee

6

Pitts Press

1893-02-25

FOWLER

Martin


Guest Speaker

8

Daily Times

1940-08-28

FOWLER

John
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

FOWLER

Mart I


Gordon's Successor

18

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

FOX

James


Robbing Newsboys

2

Pitts Disp

1890-01-20

FOYLE

Maud
x
McKeesport Girl to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-04-23

FRANKS

Robert A


Guest at Morganza

1

Pitts Press

1904-05-19

FRAZIER

R. S.


Commitment Means Ruination

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

FREW

Margaret A


Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

GABLE

Edward
x
Arrested on Shanty Boat

2

Pitts Disp

1892-05-30

GAITO

Frank
X
At Large

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

GALBREATH

John H. Rev
Asks for Morganza School Cleanup

2

News Disp

1948-11-10

GALES

Fred
x
Sentenced to 6 Years at Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1889-09-14

GANNON

Harry
X
Still At Large

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

GARBARD

J.


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

GASPRICH

George
X
Accomplices

6

Pitts Press

1946-04-02

GEIGER

Cora
x
Showed Bruises

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

GEOGHAN

Son
x
Kidnapped by Father from Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1889-11-21

GEORGE

Jack


Appointed to Board

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

GIATO

Joe
X
Missing From Morganza

7

Wash Reporter

1936-12-24

GIBSON

Carl E


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

GILES

Jack
x
Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-05

GLASGOW

Charles
x
9-yr-old Committed to Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1891-06-06

GLENN

George
x
Escapee

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

GOLIAT

Eugene
X
Escaped w/Address

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

GORDON

G.W
X
Skipped from Morganza

19

Beaver Times

1906-10-02

GORDON

Kenneth
X
Youths Sentenced for Stealing Cars

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

GORDON

Kenneth H.


Appointed After Investigations

31

Pitts Press

1940-03-19

GORDON

Kenneth H


New Superintendent

18

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

GOW

John L


Executors Sale of Morganza

8

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

GRANGER

George S
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

GRANT

Frank


Son Denied Rights

2

Pitts Disp

1892-09-07

GRAY

Mary Jane
x
Released from Morganza

10

Pitts Disp

1889-03-30

GRAZIER

Clara N


Made Charges

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

GREATHOUSE

Gilbert
X
Youths Escape

2

Pitts Press

1940-03-27

GREEN

Maggie
x
Dead Drunk

2

Pitts Disp

1891-10-03

GREENWALT

Wilson


Sentenced for larceny

3

Elk Co Advocate

1877-06-07

GREER

Wesley


Farm purchased for Morganza

3

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

GREGORY

George
X
Youths Escape

2

Pitts Press

1940-03-27

GRIFFITHS

Lizzie
x
Ran Away from Bethesda

2

Pitts Disp

1891-08-09

GRIFFITHS

Lizzie
x
Incorrigible

6

Pitts Disp

1890-12-12

GROVER

Jacob
x
Pleaded Guilty

5

Scranton Trib

1900-03-16

GRUBBS

Howard


Home Robbed

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

GUNNINGS

Stella
x
Packed Her Duds & Escaped

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-11

GWYNNE

Lizzie
x
Guilty of Perjury

10

Pitts Disp

1892-09-06

HAGAN

John
x
To Morganza at Father's Request

6

Pitts Disp

1890-12-23

HAMERSCHLAG

A. A.


Director to Open New Cottages

2

Pitts Press

1909-06-17

HAMILTON

Stewart Sgt
Locked Up Youngster

2

Pitts Disp

1892-04-17

HANFRANFT

John F. Gov
Laid Cornerstone

7

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

HANNA

Officer


Captured 4 Brothers

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

HAPPER

A.C


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

HAPPER

A. G


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

HARBAUGH

Springer


Entertained at Morganza

12

Pitts Disp

1889-11-10

HARDING

John


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

HARKET

Mary
x
Cut with Knife by Mother

3

Pitts Disp

1892-10-02

HARNEY

Albert V
x
Charged with Incorrigibility

5

Pitts Disp

1890-10-29

HARRINGTON

Mamie
x
Assaulted

2

Pitts Disp

1892-10-06

HARTMAN

William


Sentenced for larceny

3

Elk Co Advocate

1877-06-07

HAY

Malcolm


Episcopal Church Chancellor

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

HAY

Malcolm


Plan is Welcomed

13

Pitts Press

1954-08-11

HAY

Malcolm


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

HEFFERNAN

James J. Dr.
House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

HEFFRAN

James T
X
Post Mortem Examination

11

Wash Reporter

1918-02-26

HETHER

Joseph
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

HICKS

Robert
x
Enticed Lads from Home

5

Pitts Disp

1890-01-04

HILL

Nora


To join opera company

2

Pitts Disp

1892-12-22

HILLEN

Robert
x
Escapee Captured

2

Pitts Disp

1889-08-28

HILTY

Edna
X
Runaway Girl Sought

12

Youngstown Vindicator

1913-08-01

HINDMAN

Jennie


Probation Officer

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

HINER

Carrol


Beat Inmates with Strap

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

HINER

Carrol


Guard Used Straps for Beatings

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-16

HOFFMAN

George
x
To Morganza at age 9

7

Pitts Disp

1892-11-13

HOLLAND

Elmer J


Inquiry into Irregular Treatment

12

Greensburg Daily Trib

1955-03-01

HOLLAND

Elmer Sen


Report of Females in Isolation

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

HOLLINGER

Joseph A


Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

HOLMES

William


Blacksmith Appointed at Instructor

1

Daily Times

1907-08-15

HOPKINS

Ada


Head of Social Service

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

HOUSEKEEPER

Fred


Fire at Morganza

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

HOUSTON

Charles W


Wants to Change Name

4

Pitts Press

1908-05-19

HOUSTON

Charles W


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

HOUSTON

Charles W


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

HOUSTON

Charles Wilson
Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

HOWE

John F


Robbed

19

Beaver Times

1906-10-02

HUBER

W. Edwin


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

HUFF

Joseph
x
Recently Released

6

Pitts Disp

1892-08-12

HUGHES

Howard W


Award Diplomas

8

Wash Reporter

1940-06-19

HUMBERT

William


Ill-Treated Boy

2

Pitts Disp

1890-04-05

HUME

H.R. Rev


Pronounce Invocation

8

Wash Reporter

1940-06-19

HUTCHINSON

Maud
x
Quite a Record

2

Pitts Disp

1891-11-29

HYDES

John
x
Implicated in Robbery

9

Pitts Disp

1892-10-05

IAMS

John T


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

IESEL

Ludwig
x
Successful Burglar

9

Pitts Disp

1892-06-28

JACKSON

Arthur
X
Burglars Entered Pleas of Guilty

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

JACKSON

Charles
X
Escapee Captured

1

Daily Trib

1905-04-14

JACKSON

Flossy
X
Declared Incorrigible

2

Pitts Press

1911-11-19

JACKSON

Stella
x
Sent to Poor Farm

6

Pitts Disp

1892-07-30

JAMES

Howard
x
Father Sent Bill for Maintenance

6

Pitts Disp

1892-07-14

JANIKOWSKI

Joseph


Charged with Cruelty

2

Pitts Disp

1892-08-13

JISKI

Joseph
x
Sent to Morganza on Father's Oath

2

Pitts Disp

1889-07-24

JOHANATHANSEN

Arthur J
X
Guilty of Embezzlement

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

JOHNS

David


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

JOHNSON

J. Elmer


Superintendent Blamed

1

Pitts Press

1949-12-28

JOHNSON

Elmer


Resignation

17

Greensburg Daily Trib

1951-03-12

JOHNSON

Stein
x
Robber in Trouble

2

Pitts Disp

1892-10-06

JOHNSON

Ernest O.
x
Whipped & Sent to Morganza

3

Pitts Disp

1892-04-15

JOHNSTON

William
X
Asked to be Returned to Morganza

9

Pitts Press

1908-10-05

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Indictment Itemized

6

Pitts Press

1949-12-27

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Superintendent's Policies

3

Pitts Press

1950-01-07

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Superintendent Fired

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Under Fire

9

Post Gaz

1950-01-21

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Resigned in Wake of Scandal

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

JOHNSTON

Isaac
x
Runaway

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

JOHNSTON

Lieut.


Found Escapee

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-13

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Superintendent Fired

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

JOHNSTON

Joseph
x
Committed to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1892-02-22

JOHNSTON

Louis
x
Sentenced to Morganza

14

Pitts Disp

1890-10-19

JOHNSTON

Walter
x
Ran Off Repeatedly

6

Pitts Disp

1890-03-12

JOHNSTON

J. Elmer


Superintendent

19

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

JONES

Calvin K
X
Burglars Entered Pleas of Guilty

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

JONES

Richard Harry
X
Convicted of Forging Checks

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

JONES

Richard


Dormitory Supervisor

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-18

KASCAK

John
X
At Large

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

KAUFMAN

Clarence G
x
Escapee Caught

2

Pitts Disp

1892-05-29

KAUFMANN

Karl J. Mrs.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

KAUFMANN

Karl J. Mrs.
Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

KAY

Clara


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

KEATING

A. F


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

KEATING

A.F


Member of Board of Managers

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

KEATING

A.F


Thorough Inspection

2

Pitts Disp

1889-08-07

KELSEY

Carl Dr.


Head of Sociological Dept

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

KENDRICKS

James


Assaulted

1

Daily Trib

1905-04-14

KERR

Philip
X
Abscondment

63

Daily Times

1917-09-06

KESSLER

Joseph


Police Aid in Questioning

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

KIEFER

Emma


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

KIMBALL

J.M


To Find Perpetrators

2

Pitts Disp

1889-08-17

KINNEY

W. S


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

KIPACKA

George
X
Escaped w/Address

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

KISER

Peter
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

KLINE

Nathan
x
"Scatter gang"

2

Pitts Disp

1892-08-30

KNEPFSHIELD

Darrel


Guard Used Straps for Beatings

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-16

KOHEN

Joseph


Allegheny Co. Detective

1

Daily Trib

1905-04-14

LAIRD

Frank
x
Treated to Theater

2

Pitts Disp

1891-05-31

LAMB

James


New Administrator

1

Wash Observer

1957-07-13

LAMB

James


New Superintendent w/Photo

3

Wash Reporter

1957-09-21

LAMB

James


Director

26

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

LAMISON

Harry
X
Still At Large

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

LANE

William J.


Inquiry into Irregular Treatment

12

Greensburg Daily Trib

1955-03-01

LANE

William Sen
Report of Females in Isolation

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

LAWRENCE

John W. Mrs.
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

LAWRENCE

John W


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

LAYTON

L.C
X
Former Inmate Killed Saturday Night

1

Wash Observer

1896-04-15

LEDMAN


x

Shooting Windows out of Schoolhouses

2

Pitts Disp

1892-12-11

LEECH

Irene
X
Narrow Escape from Death

2

Observer-Reporter

1967-06-24

LEECH

George


Known as "Wrinkles"

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

LEFSTROM

Emma
x
Mother Seeking Daughter's Release

8

Pitts Disp

1889-02-13

LEISHAUCK

John
x
Brought in by Parents

9

Pitts Disp

1891-10-27

LEWIS

Ida
x
Still at large

2

Pitts Disp

1891-12-13

LEWIS

James


Son Returned

2

Pitts Disp

1891-01-29

LEWIS

James, Jr
x
Prodigal's Return

2

Pitts Disp

1891-01-29

LOFTUS

William
X
Still at Large

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

LOFTUS

Mark


Escapee's Father

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

LOFTUS

William
X
Mutiny at Reform School

1

Phila Record

1905-07-21

LOWRY

Louisa

Arrival at Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1892-02-26

LUCAS

Samuel


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

LUKASZEWSKI

Walter
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

LUPTON

W. B


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

MACKEY

John


Injured in Fire

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MACKEY

Herbert


Injured in Fire

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MAINS

Harry
X
Skipped from Morganza

19

Beaver Times

1906-10-02

MALIA

Joseph
X
Arrested

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

MALIA

Joseph
X
Sentenced to Morganza

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

MALONE

William


Sentenced for larceny


Elk Co Advocate

1877-06-07

MALONEY

Mamie
X
Sent to Morganza

4

Pitts Press

1902-09-10

MALONEY

Mary
x
Girl with a Temper

3

Pitts Disp

1892-12-30

MANE

Julius
x
Sent for Bad Behavior

2

Pitts Disp

1891-11-30

MANNING

Jacob


Athletic Director Improper Conduct

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

MANNING

Jacob


Fired for Improper Conduct

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-18

MARNER

Rersay
x
Beyond Control

7

Pitts Disp

1891-11-07

MARONEY

James F


State Police Search for Barbaric Punishments

6

Post Gaz

1936-02-25

MARSHALL

Meredity R.
Defense Attoryney

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

MARSHALL

Harry
X
Guilty of Burglary

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

MARTIN

Edward


Ex-Governor's Political Favor

3

Pitts Press

1950-01-07

MARTIN

Edward Sen.
Former Governor

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

MARTIN

Edward Maj. Gen
National Guard

19

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MARTZ

Hettie


Sent to Morganza on Father's Arrest

2

Pitts Disp

1890-01-24

MAYER

Edward E


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

MAZZA

John


Remove Girls From Morganza

47

Pitts Press

1951-06-07

McAFEE

Henry


Baker Run Down by Train

3

Pitts Disp

1890-06-09

McBRIDE

C.J


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

McBRIDE

John B


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

McCABE

John D.


Squire Sends Girl to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-18

McCANDLESS

Wilson


Refused to Talk

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

McCARTHY

Edward L. Dr.
Inmate Died in Montefiore Hospital

23

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

McCLELLAN

James


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

McCLELLAND

James


Board Member

14

Pitts Press

1933-02-26

McCOLLOGH

Prof


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

McCURDY

Edward
x
Struck Office & Got Away

2

Pitts Disp

1890-07-20

McDIARMID

W.H.K
X
Magistrate Ordered Boy Held

17

Post Gaz

1954-05-06

McDONALD

Edward


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

McDONALD

Edward


Committee Inspects Morganza

14

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

McDONALD

David Rev.


Celebratory Prayer

1

Pitts Disp

1892-10-22

McDONALD

Edward


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MCDOWELL

Garfield


Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

McDOWELL

Garfield A


Board of Trustees

7

Pitts Press

1949-12-30

McDOWELL

Garfield A


Announced Resignation Accepted

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

McDOWELL

Garfield A


Named New Superintendent

17

Greensburg Daily Trib

1951-03-12

McGAUGH

Thomas
x
Released from Morganza to Jail

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-13

McGOWAN

J. William


Reform Program

10

Pitts Press

1954-09-11

McGUIRE

Annie
x
Girl Pickpockets

2

Pitts Disp

1891-05-06

McGUIRE

Ed
x
Stealing Beer

2

Pitts Disp

1890-08-04

McILVAINE

J. Add


Continued at Manager

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

McINALLY

Thomas G
x
Hiding in Boat House

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-13

McINARY

Charles
x
Small Boy Acting Suspiciously

3

Pitts Disp

1889-09-16

McKAY

J. W. Rev. Dr.
Received youths

35

Pitts Press

1908-06-21

McKAY

J. W. Rev.


Speaking at Morganza

1

Wash Observer

1910-02-01

McKAY

J.W. Rev


Revival At Morganza

1

Wash Observer

1910-02-01

McKENNAN

Thomas


Appointed to Board of Managers by Gov

2

Pitts Disp

1891-09-10

McKIM

William R. Rev
Testified at Hearings

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

McKINLEY

Robert B


Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

McKINLEY

Robert B


Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

McKINNEY

William S


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

McMILLEN

Robert L.


County Detective

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

McNALLY

Owen
x
Pleads Kleptomania

9

Pitts Disp

1890-10-12

McNAMARA

Mary
x
Committed to Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-10-24

McNULTY

John
x
Pilfering Newspapers

2

Pitts Disp

1890-07-20

McQUISTON

James F. Dr
Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

MERHOUT

Andrew
X
Missing From Morganza

7

Wash Reporter

1936-12-24

MILES

George W.


Adverse Publicity

10

Post Gaz

1954-08-24

MILES

George W


Some Escapes Expected

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

MILES

George W


Mystery Surrounds Resignation

1

Wash Observer

1957-07-13

MILES

George


Joined Staff

20

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MILLER

James
X
Attacked Guard with Pitchfork

8

Phila Record

1910-08-03

MILLER

Christian


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

MILLER

George W


School Solicitor

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

MILLER

Richard


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MILLIGAN

James
x
7-yr-old to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-29

MILLIKIN

H. E


Training School Trustee

9

Post Gaz

1950-01-21

MILLS

George


Superintendent Declined Comment

4

Gettysburg Times

1957-03-25

MINTZ

Henry
x
Juvenile Jesse James

7

Pitts Disp

1889-04-06

MITCHELL

Annie Mrs.


Royally Entertained at Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-07-06

MONTSER

R.C


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

MOODY

Samuel


Resigned from Board

12

Gaz Times

1911-02-03

MOORE

Wilbert
X
Escapes from Morganza Officers

13

Pitts Press

1907-07-15

MOORE

D. Glenn


Committee Inspects Morganza

14

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

MORGAN

John Dr.


Owned Land

7

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MORGAN

George


Inherited Land

7

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MORRIS

Elizabeth
X
Charged with Incorrigibility

2

Pitts Press

1911-11-19

MORROS

S. John


Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

MORROW

S. John


Trustee Resigned

7

Post Gaz

1954-08-12

MORROW

S. John


Judges Quits as Morganza Trustee

7

Post Gaz

1954-08-12

MORROW

S. John


Trustee Resigned

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MOSCAW

Joseph
X
Burglars Entered Pleas of Guilty

2

Pitts Press

1903-03-12

MUESEN

John

Threatened with Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1892-10-26

MUESEN

William


Chasing Runaway Son

2

Pitts Disp

1892-10-26

MULLA

Francis
X
Nabbed

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

MULLEN

Frank
x
Recently Released

6

Pitts Disp

1892-08-12

MULLIGAN

Jimmy
x
Cannot be Controlled

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-28

MURDOCH

Alexander


Executors Sale of Morganza

8

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MURDOCH

Eliza


Executors Sale of Morganza

8

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MURDOCH

John R


Executors Sale of Morganza

8

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

MURRAY

James Gailey
Board Member Dies

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-29

MYERS

Milo
X
Skipped from Morganza

19

Beaver Times

1906-10-02

MYERS

Harry
X
Escaped

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

NAZDON

Jo
X
Fled Morganza

1

Post Gaz

1934-01-06

NAZDON

Michael Mrs.
Mother Dying

1

Post Gaz

1934-01-06

NEEB

John N


Reisgned as Morganza Manager

2

Bayonne Herald

1890-11-15

NEEB

John N


Praises Morganza

4

Pitts Disp

1890-10-14

NEEB

John N


Member of Board of Managers

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

NEEB

John N.


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

NEEB

John N


Member of Reformatory Board Bio

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-04

NEEB

John N


Resigned Position

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-13

NEELE

Officer


Attacked by Inmates

10

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

NEST

Harry
x
Shunned His Home

8

Pitts Disp

1889-11-16

NEVIN

W. T.


Entertained at Morganza

12

Pitts Disp

1889-11-10

NICHOL

Fred
x
Escaped

6

Pitts Disp

1890-09-11

NILAND

Martin
X
Paroled Lad Returned to Morganza

8

Pitts Press

1914-06-05

NOEL

Lottie
x
Father Wants Her sent to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-06-01

NUDD

Howard W


Sec. of Public Education

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

NULL

Lawrence B
x
Unfounded Charges

7

Pitts Disp

1890-03-30

NUNBERGER

Annie
X
Trying to Obtain Release

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

NUNBERGER

Catherine


Husband Insane

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

O'BRIEN

Jennie
x
Escaped

5

Pitts Disp

1890-01-27

O'DELL

James
X
Fatally Injured

3

Pitts Press

1956-01-24

O'DONNELL

Edward "Slobs"
x
Create a Row

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-17

O'LEARY

James
x
Charge of Larceny

3

Pitts Disp

1890-03-07

O'MARA

Roger


Detective

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

O'MARA

Roger


Arrested Street Walker

2

Pitts Disp

1889-09-30

O'TOOLE

John
X
Inmate Escapee

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

O'TOOLE

Bartley


Escapee's Father

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

O'TOOLE

John
X
Mutiny at Reform School

1

Phila Record

1905-07-21

O'TOOLE

Molly
x
Taken from Disorderly House

2

Pitts Disp

1891-11-17

OFCHNICH

Richard
X
Escaped w/Address

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

OGDEN

Charles H


Continued at Manager

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

OLIVER

John C


Continued at Manager

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

ORBUS

Joseph
X
At Large

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

PANDER

Albert
X
Escapee Captured

1

Daily Trib

1905-04-14

PARRISH

William M


Called for Resignation

9

Post Gaz

1950-01-21

PECHAN

Albert R


Invited Investigation

12

Greensburg Daily Trib

1955-03-01

PENN

W. F


Superintendent

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

PENN

W. F.


Cannot Lease Morganza Lands

12

Pitts Press

1906-04-12

PENN

W. F


Conditions Bad

5

Wash Observer

1907-01-21

PENN

W. F


Strenuous Efforts

4

Pitts Press

1907-02-27

PENN

W. F


Superintendent Welcomed Visitors

14

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

PENN

W. F


Continuance of Position In Question

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

PENN

W. F


To Attend Prison Conference

3

Wash Reporter

1930-08-25

PENN

Sara Mrs.


Memoriaized At Morganza

14

Pitts Press

1933-02-26

PENN

W. Frank


Wife Memorialized

14

Pitts Press

1933-02-26

PENN

William Franklin
Superintendent Resigns w/Photo

6

Pitts Press

1936-05-22

PENN

W. Frank


Replace Quay as Superintendent

11

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

PENTECOST

A. J


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

PENTROOST

Alexander


Appointed Manager at Morganza

1

Free Press

1890-11-12

PETERS

Helen


Staff Spoke to Kiwanis

1

Wash Reporter

1959-07-31

PHILLIPS

Ormsby


Director of Morganza

30

Ormsby of Pittsburgh

1892

PIDGEON

Charles H. Rev. Dr.
Conducted Services at Institution

35

Pitts Press

1908-06-21

PINCHOT


X

Youth Asking for Admission

2

Berkeley Daily Gaz

1932-08-02

PINKERTON

Carl
X
Gang Member

49

Wash Reporter

1936-05-01

PLUTKO

Joseph
X
Youths Escape Morganza

3

Pitts Pres

1927-08-20

POLLOCK

D.S


Board of Trustees

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

POLLOCK

Durell


Chairman of Board of Trustees

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

PORTER

Isaac


Visited School

1

Daily Eve Reporter

1878-05-16

POST

John L.


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

POTTS

T. M
X
Held Girl for Court

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

POWELL

Henry
X
Sees New York, Gets Morganza Trip

11

Daily Times

1920-11-04

POWELL

Samuel
x
Rejoices in Criminal Life

2

Pitts Disp

1890-06-17

POWELL

Samuel
x
Bid Bars Goodby & Escaped

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-19

PRASSE

Arthur T


Welfare Expert Attached to Morganza

9

Post Gaz

1940-01-24

PRASSE

Arthur T. Mrs
Killed on Pa. Turnpike

27

Youngstown Vindicator

1959-03-03

PRICE

John
x
Requested Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-04-05

QUAIL

Frederick
x
Morganza on Fire

1

Pitts Disp

1890-03-30

QUAY



Superintendent

1

Phila Record

1900-09-20

QUAY

Richard R


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

QUAY

J. A


Superintendent at Morganza

21

Greensburg Daily Trib

1949-12-29

QUAY

Superintendent
Boys Locked up on Bread & Water

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

QUAY

J. A.


Labored for Celebration

1

Pitts Disp

1892-10-22

QUAY

Jerome


Invited Performance to Morganza

12

Pitts Disp

1890-12-14

QUAY

Jerome


18th Regiment to Visit

12

Pitts Disp

1892-07-10

QUAY

Jerome S


Member of Board of Managers

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

QUAY

J. A


Paid $6,553.88 for Maintenance for Quarter

3

Pitts Disp

1890-03-23

QUAY

J.A


Invited Performance at Morganza

12

Pitts Disp

1889-12-29

QUAY

Theta


Marriage

12

Pitts Disp

1890-02-16

QUAY

Jerome


Daughter's Marriage Announcement

12

Pitts Disp

1890-02-16

QUAY

Jerome


Daughter's Marriage Announcement

4

Pitts Disp

1890-02-19

QUAY

Jerome


Entertained Wedding Guests

12

Pitts Disp

1890-03-02

QUAY

Jerome


Suffering from Erysipelas

6

Pitts Disp

1890-06-18

QUINLAN

Patrick
X
Still At Large

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

RAPP

Minnie
x
Sent back to Morganza

7

Pitts Disp

1892-12-03

RAYMON

John
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

REAGAN

William
X
Escapees Returned

11

Post Gaz

1954-08-25

REARDON

Daniel
x
Vagrant Sent to Morganza

7

Pitts Disp

1889-06-01

REED

Emma
x
Love for Dances & Forbidden Associates

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

REED

Edward M


Charged Sister

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

REED

Charles


Charged Sister

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

REILLY

George
X
Leap from Car Window

7

Phila Record

1904-08-24

RHODES

John A


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

RICHARDSON

Edwin J


To Wed Inmate

2

Pitts Press

1902-04-22

RICHMOND

McKinley
X
GuiltY of Murder

1

Phila Record

1907-08-29

RICHMOND

McKinley
x
10-yr-old Murderer

2

Salt Lake Herald

1907-08-29

RIDDLE

Emma
x
12-yr-old Girl to Morganza

6

Pitts Disp

1890-05-27

RIEDER

Howard F


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

RIGHTER

Edna C.


Elected President

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

RITCHIE

Craig


Moved Reform School to Canonsburg

7

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

ROBB

John Jr


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

ROBINSON

Harry C


Justice of the Peace

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

ROBINSON

Robert G


Police Chief

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

ROBINSON

Thomas


Police Aid in Questioning

23

Post Gaz

1945-11-29

ROBINSON

Detective


Arrested Runaways

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

ROBINSON

Robert


Escorted Inmate

2

Pitts Disp

1890-04-01

RODGERS

Elliott


Commitment Means Ruination

1

Pitts Press

1902-01-19

ROSENBERG

Ruben
x
Drunken Stupor

2

Pitts Disp

1891-01-24

RUMMEL

Frank


Held on Bail

3

Pitts Disp

1889-04-14

RUNION

A. L. Dr.


Typhoid at Morganza

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

RYAN

J. E


Arrested at Depot

2

Pitts Disp

1890-01-24

SALMON

John B


Son at Morganza

10

Pitts Disp

1891-10-08

SCARSCIATO

Perry
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

SCHELINSKI

James
x
"Scatter gang"

2

Pitts Disp

1892-08-30

SCHELLHARDT

Frank
x
Assaulted 6-yr-old Girl

2

Pitts Disp

1889-11-21

SCHMIDT

Edward
X
Wants to Join Navy

43

Daily Times

1912-04-17

SCHOENFELD

Julia


Head Worker Irene Kaufmann Settlement

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

SCHONFIELD

Miriam


Social Worker Dies

15

Pitts Press

1934-01-26

SCHRAMM

Gustav L.


Address By Juvenile Court Judge

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

SCHRAMM

Gustav L.


Juvenile Court Judge

3

Pitts Press

1951-11-01

SCHREIDER

Jacob
x
Treated to Theater

2

Pitts Disp

1891-05-31

SCHULTZ

Walter
X
Inmate Escapee

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

SCHULTZ

Walter
X
Mutiny at Reform School

1

Phila Record

1905-07-21

SCOTT

Jennie
x
Masquerades as Boy with Strange Story

2

Pitts Disp

1892-04-02

SECTOR

Mary D


Supervising Principal

8

Wash Reporter

1940-06-19

SEMINARY

Edward
X
Eluded Police

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

SEYLE

Harry E


Against Investigation

12

Greensburg Daily Trib

1955-03-01

SHAFFER

Vic


Football Coach

4

Wash Observer

1909-11-19

SHALLENBERGER

George A. Col
First Superintendent

9

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

SHAPIRO

Harry


Announced Building Project w/Photo

3

Wash Reporter

1957-09-21

SHAPIRO

Harry

State Welfare Secretary

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

SHARP

E. Preston


Declined to Give Name

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

SHARP

E. Preston Dr.
Superintendent of Wartime Morganza

18

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

SHARPE

E. Preston


Superintendent Fired

3

Pitts Press

1950-02-14

SHAUL

Truby


Officer Responded

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-10

SHAW

Gilbert


Appointed Director of Education

4

Post Gaz

1955-08-02

SHEENAN

Edward
x
Answer to Serious Charges

2

Pitts Disp

1892-08-15

SHIVERS

J. J.


Constable of Bridgeville

17

Pitts Press

1905-07-19

SHOVLIN

John


Could Earn More in Private Practice

4

Pitts Press

1955-01-26

SHUPKA

Joseph
X
Escapee Captured

2

Detroit Free Press

1908-04-05

SIAUS

Frank
X
Fell from Bandit Car w/Photo

19

Pitts Press

1942-10-13

SIBERT

Harry
X
Led Gang

49

Wash Reporter

1936-05-01

SILVESTER

James
X
Release Refused

6

Pitts Press

1910-07-30

SILVUS

Dan Capt


Had a Merry Chase

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-26

SIMPSON

Anna


Parole Officer

12

Youngstown Vindicator

1913-08-01

SKELDING

F.H


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

SLAGLE

Frank
X
Inmate Death

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

SLAGLE

Frank
X
Typhoid at Morganza

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

SMALL

William
X
Runaway

5

Youngstown Vindicator

1901-11-14

SMALL

William
X
Runaways Arrested

5

Youngstown Vindicator

1901-11-14

SMATHERS


x

96 Lashes

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

SMITH

Samuel
X
Ordered Released to Attend Funeral

1

Beaver Falls Trib

1912-11-13

SMITH

Jimmy
X
Classic Tragedy

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-16

SMITH

Frank
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

SMITH

Frank
x
Escapee Captured

2

Pitts Disp

1889-11-11

SMITH

Millie
x
Illegally Detained

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-16

SMITH

Bessie


Sister Detained

2

Pitts Disp

1890-03-16

SMITH

Robert
x
Charged by His Father

5

Pitts Disp

1890-06-14

SNOW

Robert
x
Intended for Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1889-07-29

SNYDER

Merle
X
Abscondment

63

Daily Times

1917-09-06

SOBECK

Wallace
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

SOFFEL

George H


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

SOMMERFIELD

Bertha
x
Sent to Morganza

7

Pitts Disp

1890-10-05

SOMMERFIELD

Charles


Daughter to Morganza

7

Pitts Disp

1890-10-05

SPAHR

Raymond
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

SPEER

Emma W. Mrs
Washington County Probation Officer

6

Wash Observer

1909-06-16

SPOCK

Benjamin Dr
On Advisory Committee

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

SQUIBBS

Maggie
x
Sent to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-07-28

STACKPOLE

E. J. Col


Troops Move to Morganza

1

Eve. Public Ledger

1922-07-25

STAUFFER

F. E


Appointed to Board

22

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STEEDLE

Joseph G. Dr
House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

STEELE


x

Whipped until Bloody

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

STEINFIRST

Donald C


Denied Corporal Punishment

13

Pitts Press

1954-08-11

STEPLEIN

Kate
x
Girl Pickpockets

2

Pitts Disp

1891-05-06

STERLING

Chester L


Superintendent Named

17

Greensburg Daily Trib

1951-03-12

STERLING

Chester L


Fresh Start

1

Post Gaz

1951-03-12

STERLING

Chester L.


New Superintendent

26

Pitts Press

1951-03-13

STERLING

Chester L


Sent SOS to Judge

3

Pitts Press

1951-11-01

STERLING

Chester


Superintendent

20

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STERN

Leon


Discussed Conditions

27

Pitts Press

1948-10-07

STERN

Leon


Drafted Resolution

21

Post Gaz

1948-10-08

STITCHES

Walter
X
Money Stolen

21

Pitts Press

1925-06-19

STONEHOUSE

Norman
X
Captured

2

Gaz & Bulletin

1940-02-19

STOWE

E. H.


Juvenile Court Judge

1

Pitts Press

1902-11-24

STRAUB

Theodore A


Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

STRAUB

Theodore


Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STUCKI

Guy


Fire at Morganza

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STUCKI

Carl


Fire at Morganza

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STUCKI

Arnold Jr


Injured in Fire

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

STUCKROTH

John B


Superintendent Murdered

4

Sunday Vindicator

1898-08-14

SUHREY

Frank
x
Mother Drowned in Johnstown Flood

2

Pitts Disp

1889-11-28

SULLIVAN

May
x
Sent to Morganza after Trial

2

Pitts Disp

1889-09-14

SULLIVAN

May
x
Imprisoned to Impeach Testimony

3

Pitts Disp

1890-06-09

SULLIVAN

May
x
Principal in Famous Affair

5

Pitts Disp

1890-05-30

SULLIVAN

May
x
Got Roommate

2

Pitts Disp

1889-09-30

SULLIVAN

Lucy
x
Neglected

9

Pitts Disp

1891-02-07

SULLIVAN

Kate
x
Cruelty & Neglect

9

Pitts Disp

1891-02-07

SULLIVAN

Mary
x
New Evidence

6

Pitts Disp

1890-06-07

SUNGAN

Peter
x
Threw Brick at Mother

2

Pitts Disp

1892-06-13

SURNAME

FIRST
INMATE
Note

PAGE

PUB

DOP

SWARTZ

Mary
x
Formed Bad Habits & Associations

2

Pitts Disp

1891-10-08

SWARTZ

Mary
x
Arrested for Street Walking

2

Pitts Disp

1889-09-30

SWEENY

Convict
x
Penitentiary Heaven Compared to Morganza

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

SWIFT

Rev. Dr


Revival At Morganza

1

Wash Observer

1910-02-01

SZALIA

Ilka
X
Committed to Morganza

17

Pitts Press

1911-03-17

TAYLOR

Harry
x
Pleases for Entrance to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1890-05-01

TAYLOR

Harry
x
Young Romancer

10

Pitts Disp

1890-05-29

TENER

John K.


Governor Accepting Letter

12

Gaz Times

1911-02-03

TENER

John K


Contemplates Changes

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

THOMPSON

Ruby
X
Waifs Sent for Shelter to Morganza

8

Pitts Press

1900-02-16

THOMPSON

Georgie
X
Waifs Sent for Shelter to Morganza

8

Pitts Press

1900-02-16

THOMPSON

Lizzie
X
Taken in Charge

8

Pitts Press

1900-02-16

THOMPSON

James
X
Prosecuted for Cruelty & Neglect

8

Pitts Press

1900-02-16

TOOHEY

Anna
X
Inmate's Engagement

2

Pitts Press

1902-04-22

TYSON

Helen Glenn
Radical Handling

7

Post Gaz

1954-08-12

TYSON

Helen Glenn
Reform 40 Years Behind

7

Post Gaz

1954-08-12

WAGENHURT

Ellwood O


Too Much Whipping

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

WAGENHURT

Ellwood O


Aired Cruel Treatment of Inmates

2

Pitts Disp

1891-04-22

WALKER

Hay, Jr.


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

WALLACE

William D


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

WALTZ

Virginia Mrs.
Board Member

13

Wash Reporter

1935-06-28

WALTZ

Virginia Mrs
Board of Trustees

24

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Accused of Beating

4

Pitts Press

1948-10-06

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Dismissal Recommended

1

Post Gaz

1948-10-15

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Incompetent, Aged Hired

1

Pitts Press

1949-12-28

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Direct Violation of State Law

21

Greensburg Daily Trib

1949-12-29

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Charges of Brutality

1

Pitts Press

1950-01-06

WANBAUGH

W. Gordon


Former Asst Super

3

Pitts Press

1950-01-07

WARD

Bert
X
School or Morganza

13

Beaver Times

1901-11-18

WASHINGTON

George
x
Charged as Pickpocket

5

Pitts Disp

1890-06-16

WATERS

Mary
X
Discharged

4

Pitts Press

1902-09-10

WATKINS

Jacob


Kidnapped in Reform School Break

13

Milwaukee Journal

1940-02-17

WEBB

Ira
x
Beyond Matron's Control

9

Pitts Disp

1891-12-08

WEIR

Stella
x
Forcible Removal from Catholic Home

2

Pitts Disp

1889-10-07

WEIR

Lizzie


Mother Will Prosecute

2

Pitts Disp

1889-10-07

WELLS

Minnie L
x
Escaped

5

Pitts Disp

1890-01-27

WEST

George L. Mrs
Citizens' Group Seeks Change

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

WEST

George L. Mrs.
Investigative Committee

11

Pitts Press

1950-01-13

WEST

Elvin
x
Escaped with Gang

2

Pitts Disp

1889-06-24

WEST

Bessie
x
Stole Mother's Valuable Ring

2

Pitts Disp

1892-09-12

WETTACH

James


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

WEYAND

Edwin S


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

WHITE

Hugh


Assaulted

1

Daily Trib

1905-04-14

WHITE

Eugene F


House Committee Inspects Morganza

28

Wash Reporter

1927-04-02

WHITE

J. Harvey


Rejected as Manager at Morganza

1

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer

1887-01-25

WIGHTMAN

Thomas


Social Services Course

7

Pitts Press

1916-07-07

WIGHTMAN

Thomas


Board Member Knew Nothing of Beatings

1

Pitts Disp

1890-04-16

WIGHTMAN

Thomas


Poor Farm not Necessary

2

Pitts Disp

1891-12-06

WIGHTMAN

Thomas


Member of Board of Managers

2

Pitts Disp

1889-05-10

WIGHTMAN

Thomas


Member Board of Managers

6

Pitts Disp

1889-05-09

WILL

Frederick
x
Sent for Larceny

3

Pitts Disp

1889-04-14

WILLIAMS

Dorothy


Explains Function of School

1

Wash Reporter

1959-06-24

WILLIAMS

Dorothy


Staff Spoke to Kiwanis

1

Wash Reporter

1959-07-31

WILSON

J. Sharp


Manager Term Expires

1

Gaz Times

1911-06-24

WILSON

Emma
x
Regarded as Incorrigible

2

Pitts Disp

1889-10-31

WILSON

Oliver
x
Wants Sent to Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1891-12-25

WILSON

Alonzo
x
Improper Behavior While on Parole

2

Pitts Disp

1891-10-17

WILSON

Breath
x
Not Entirely Reformed

3

Pitts Disp

1890-02-23

WILSON

Jack


Fire at Morganza

16

Jefferson College Times

2008-03

WINTER

Edward
X
Missing From Morganza

7

Wash Reporter

1936-12-24

WOOD

C. B. Dr.


Typhoid at Morganza

6

Gaz Times

1908-08-21

WOODRUFF

Howard
x
Runaway

2

Pitts Disp

1890-11-10

WOODS

Violet


Enticed the Girl from Home

2

Pitts Disp

1891-11-17

WORK

J. W. Rev. Dr.
Received youths

35

Pitts Press

1908-06-21

WORK

Rev. Mr.


Revival At Morganza

1

Wash Observer

1910-02-01

WORMSER

Katie
x
Inmate for Morganza

2

Pitts Disp

1889-10-25

YANKOWSKI

Antonia
x
Sleeping about the Mills

5

Pitts Disp

1889-07-09

YELLOCK

Edgar
X
Bridgewater Youth Sentenced to Morganza

1

Beaver Falls Trib

1912-11-13

YOUNG

Elsie
x
Lived in Cave

2

Pitts Disp

1892-12-06

YOUNG

James
x
Parole Did No Good

6

Pitts Disp

1889-12-04

YOUNG

Samuel
x
Mad Leap from Train

6

Pitts Disp

1890-06-16

ZAJAKOWSKI

Elmer
X
Escaped w/Address

3

Post Gaz

1942-04-13

ZILLIPO

Etta
x
Attempted Arson

6

Pitts Disp

1890-02-14

ZIRKEL

John


Assaulted

17

Post Gaz

1954-05-06

ZOLLINGER

Russell
x
Trying to Secure Release

6

Pitts Disp

1892-07-21

ZOLLINGER

Russell
x
Release secured

6

Pitts Disp

1892-07-30