History of Butler County Pennsylvania - 1883

Chapter 7 -- Civil History

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Transcribed by Penny Sabin. For an explanation and caution about this transcription, please read this page.


SURNAMES APPEARING IN THIS CHAPTER

ADAMS, AGNEW, ANDERSON, ARMSTRONG, AYRES, BALDWIN, BALPH, BARD, BARRON, BARTLEY, BEATTY, BELFOUR, BELL, BELTZHOOVER, BLACK, BLAKELEY, BOGGS, BOVARD, BOYD, BRACKEN, BRACKENRIDGE, BRACKING, BRACKNEY, BRADY, BRAHAM, BRANDON, BRANNON, BREDIN, BRINKER, BROWER, BROWN, BRYSON, BUHL, BURNES, BURNS, BURTNER, BURTON, CAMPBELL, CARNAHAN,CASHDOLLAR, CAVEN, CHRISTIE, CHRISTLEY, CHRISTY, CLARK, COATES, COCHRAN, COLBERT, COLL, COLLINS, CONN, CONWAY, COOPER, COOVERT, COULTER, COVERT, CRATLY, CRATTY, CRAWFORD, CRISWELL, CROSS, CROW, CROZIER, CUMMINS, CUNNINGHAM, CUPPS, DAVID, DEER, DENNY, DEWEES, DeWOLFE, DICK, DICKSON, DOBSON, DODDS, DONAGHY, DONALDSON, DOUGAN, DOUGAL, DOUGLASS, DOUTHETT, DUCHESS, DUFFERT, DUFFY, DUGAN, DUNBAR, DUNCAN, DUNLAP, EASTMAN, EITENMILLER, EKIS, ELDER, ELLIOTT, EMERY, EMRICH, EVANS, FEIDLER, FENNEL, FENNISTON, FERGUSON, FERRERO, FETTERMAN, FINDLEY, FINLEY, FLEEGER, FLETCHER, FORESTER, FORQUER, FOSTER, FRAZIER, FREER, GRAHAM, GALBRAITH, GALLAGHER, GAMPER, GARVEY, GARVIN, GIBSON, GILCHRIST, GILLELAND, GILMORE, GLENN, GOLL, GRANT, GREER, GRIBBEN, GROSSENOR, HAGGARTY, HAMILTON, HAMPSON, HAMSON, HANEY, HANLIN, HARBISON, HARRIS, HARTMAN, HASLETT, HARRIS, HAYS, HECKENBERG, HENDERSON, HENRY, HERERE, HILL, HILLIARD, HINDMAN, HOFFMAN, HOGAN, HOGUE, HUMPHREY, HUTCHESON, IRVINE, IRWIN, JACK, JAMISON, JUSTICE, KAMERER, KEARNES, KELLEY, KELLY, KENNEDY, KERNS, KERR, KINKEAD, KIRK, KIRKER, KIRKPATRICK, KNEISS, LANE, LEASON, LEFEVRE, LEE, LEMMON, LESLIE, LEWIS, LIGATT, LINN, LOUDEN, LOWE, LOWRIE, LUSK, LYON, MACKENHAUPT, MARKS, MARSHALL, MARTIN, MATTHEWS, MAURHOFF, MAYBERY, MAYER, MAXWELL, McBRIDE, McCALLISTER, McCANDLESS, McCLEARY, McCLELLAND, McCLUNG, McCLURG, McCLYMONDS, McCOY, McCREA, McCUE, McCULLOUGH, McCURDY, McDONALD, McGILL, McGLAUGHLIN, McLAUGHLIN, McGUFFIN, McILVAIN, McJUNKIN, McKEE, McLAUGHLIN, McLEAN, McLEARY, McLOUD, McLURE, McMAHON, McMICHAEL, McMILLEN, McNAIR, McNEES, McQUESTION, McQUISTION, MEALS, MECHLING, MICHAEL, MIFFLIN, MILLER, MITCHELL, MITTLEMAN, MONKS, MOORE, MORRISON, MORTON, MOYER, MULLIN, MURRIN, MURTLAND, NEAL, NEGLEY, NEIL, NEYMAN, NIBLOCK, NISH, NIXON, OKELY, POTTS, PARKER, PEARSON, PILLOW, POLLOCK, PORTER, PURVIANCE, QUEEN, RAMSEY, RANDOLPH, RAY, RED, REED, REIBER, REYNOLDS, RICHARDSON, RIDDLE, ROBB, ROBINSON, ROBERTS, RUSSEL, SCOTT, SELLS, SAMPLE, SEMPLE, SETH, SHALER, SHANER, SHANNON, SHERIDAN, SIMPSON, SKEER, SLATOR, SMITH, SNIDER, SPEAR, SPROUL, STEPHENSON, STEVENSON, STEWART, STONE, STOOLTIER, STOOPS, STOREY, STORY, SULLIVAN, SUMNEY, SUTTON, SWEENY, SWITHYE, TANNEHILL, TAYLOR, TEBAY, TEMPLETON, THOMPSON, TIMBLIN, TURNER, UMPSTEAD, VANDERLIN, VERNUM, WALDRON, WALLETT, WALKER, WALTER, WATERS, WEAVER, WEIR, WELSH, WHITE, WIER, WILKINS, WILLIAMS, WILLIAMSON, WILSON, WILT, WISE, WRIGHT, YOUNG, ZEIGLER, ZIMMERMAN.

Illustrations In Chapter VII

p. 43 -- Thirteen Townships in 1804

CHAPTER VII

CIVIL HISTORY

[pg. 40]
ERECTION AND ORGANIZATION OF BUTLER COUNTY -- FIXING THE SEAT OF JUSTICE -- EARLY AND PRESENT COURT HOUSES -- THE FIRST COURT -- ACCOUNT OF IT IN "BRACKENRIDGE'S RECOLLECTIONS OF THE WEST" -- THE FIRST JURORS -- INITIAL ITEMS OF PUBLIC BUSINESS -- DIVISION OF THE COUNTY INTO TOWNSHIPS -- THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN AND THE PRESENT THIRTY-THREE, WITH THE CAUSES THAT LED TO THEIR ERECTION -- ROSTER OF CIVIL OFFICIALS OF THE COUNTY

ERECTION AND ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY

CIVIL organization of Butler County followed early upon the settlement of the territory comprised within it.

Prior to 1773, the western part of Pennsylvania was included n Bedford County, but upon the 26th of February of that year that part which included what is now Butler County was set apart as the county of Westmoreland. Washington County was taken from Westmoreland by act of September 24, 1781, and Allegheny County was carved from Washington and Westmoreland Counties by act of September 24, 1788. The boundaries of Allegheny County were very extensive. It included all of the lands in the State northwest of the Allegheny and Ohio Rivers.

Butler County was erected (as it now exists) from Allegheny by act of the Legislature, passed March 12, 1800. Its boundaries were thus described in the survey: Beginning at a locust tree on the south side of Buffalo Creek (near Freeport); thence along the Allegheny line due west twenty-three miles to Alexander's District; thence due north twenty-three miles; along that line and Beaver County to a corner near the junction of Muddy Creek and Slippery Rock; thence north fifteen degrees east, fifteen miles along the Mercer County line to a white oak tree (a little north of Harrisville) [p.41] in the Third Donation District; thence due east along the Venango County line to the Allegheny River; thence due south along the Armstrong County line to the place of beginning. By the act of March 12, 1800, it was also provided that the place for holding courts of justice for the county should be fixed by the Legislature at any place not distant more than four miles from the center of the county.

An act was passed April 6, 1802, for the purpose of establishing the places for holding courts in the counties of Armstrong, Butler and Mercer, and under its provisions the Governor appointed Isaac WEAVER, John HAMILTON, Thomas MORTON, James BRADY and Presley Car LANE* as Commissioners to perform that duty.

*The name is spelled as here given in the Laws of Pennsylvania for 1802-3.

The next step in the location of the seat of justice in Butler County was taken in conformance with an act passed March 8, 1803, by which John McBRIDE, William ELLIOTT and John DAVID were appointed Trustees for the county of Butler, and authorized to survey 300 acres of land on the north side of the Connoquenessing, near Samuel CUNNINGHAM's mill (the site of Butler), "agreeably to a description given of the situation and boundary thereof expressed in the grant and obligation of Samuel CUNNINGHAM, John CUNNINGHAM and Robert GRAHAM, made by them to the Governor for the use of the county of Butler." The Trustees were authorized to lay out a convenient lot or lots of land within the 300 acre tract not exceeding five acres, whereon the public building should be erected for the use of the county. The act further provided for the laying-out of the residue of the 300 acres of land in town lots, and prescribed certain conditions which were to govern their sale.*

*See the history of Butler Borough for the text of the more important sections of this track.

Still another act was passed, under with the county was formally organized for judicial purposes. It bore date of April 2, 1803.

The counties of Beaver, Butler, Crawford, Mercer and Erie were made to form a separate circuit or district, numbered the sixth. One of the sections of the act set forth that the respective Commissioners of the Counties of Butler and Mercer should provide houses as near the respective centers of their counties as possible, in which they should hold their courts until court houses were provided.

The building provided in Butler was a rude log structure, which stood in the midst of a hazel patch upon the south side of the diamond (near the present residence and office of Clarence WALKER, Esq.). It served as a temple of justice until the first court house proper was built in 1807.* In this log cabin was held the first court in Butler.

*The court house of 1807 was a small stone building, which stood upon the ground occupied by the present handsome edifice.
   The present court house was commenced in the year 1853, but not finished until 1855. During the period it was in course of construction, court was held in the basement story of the old Presbyterian Church, and the county officers had their quarters in various parts of the town. The Commissioners' office was in Mrs. CUNNINGHAM's building, the Register's and Recorder's in the building now occupied by Mr. EITENMILLER as a hotel and the Prothonotary in the corner building now owned by the heirs of Judge BREDIN. The contractor of the present court house was William BELL; the Commissioners who gave the contract were James MITCHELL, Thomas WELSH and John MILLER. The original contract was for $37,000, but extras brought the total cost of the building up to $40,000.
   The building of the present jail and Sheriff's residence was commenced in 1867.

THE COURTS*

*By the Constitution of Pennsylvania (1790), the judicial power was vested in a Supreme Court, in courts Oyer and Terminer and General Jail Delivery, in a Court of Common Pleas, Orphans' Court, Register's Court and a Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace for each county, in Justices' Courts and such other courts as the Legislature might, from time to time, establish. - Wharton's Troubat's and Haly's Practice.
   By the new Constitution, the Register's Court was abolished, and the Circuit Court went out of existence in 1833.
   Under the Constitution of 1790, the Judges were appointed for life. By a provision made in 1838, the term was decreased to ten years, and by a constitutional amendment, adopted in 1851, the office was made elective. The new constitution (1874) re-affirmed this provision.

The first case brought in the Butler Court of Common Pleas was a "summons in case," on the 25th of November, 1803, Christopher McMICHAEL being plaintiff, and James FINDLEY defendant. The verdict was for the defendant, and the amount $250. BALDWIN was plaintiff's attorney, and SEMPLE the defendant's.

We glean an amusing and probably somewhat exaggerated account of this primal session of the court in Butler from Henry M. BRACKENRIDGE's "Recollections of the West."* However, inaccurate it may be in detail, it undoubtedly affords in spirit a good picture of the times:

*Mr. BRACKENRIDGE, son of Judge BRACKENRIDGE, of Pittsburgh, came to Butler in 1803, to assume the duties of Clerk to the first Prothonetary of the county, William AYRES, Esq.

"The first court held in Butler drew the whole population to the town, some on account of business, some to make business, but the greater part from idle curiosity. They were at that time chiefly Irish, who had all the characteristics of the nation. A log cabin just raised and covered, but without window, sash or doors or daubing, was prepared for the hall of justice. A carpenter's bench with three chairs upon it was the judgment seat. The bar of Pittsburgh attended, and the Presiding Judge, a stiff, formal and pedantic old bachelor, took his seat, supported by the two Associate Judges, who were common farmers, one of whom was blind of an eye. The hall was barely sufficient to contain the bench, bar, jurors and Constables. But few of the spectators could be accommodated on the lower floor, the only one yet laid; many, therefore, clambered up the walls, and placing their hands and feet in the open interstices between the logs, hung there suspended like so many enormous Madagascar bats. Some had taken possession of the joists, and big John McJUNKIN (who until now had ruled at all the public gatherings) had placed a foot on one joist and a foot on another directly over the heads of their honors, standing with outstretched legs like [P. 42] the Colossus of Rhodes. The Judge's sense of propriety was shocked at this exhibition. The Sheriff, John McCANDLESS, was called upon, and ordered to clear the walls and joists. He went to work with his assistants and soon pulled down by the legs those who were in no very great haste to obey. McJUNKIN was the last, and began to growl as he prepared to descend. 'What do you say, sir,' said the Judge. 'I say I pay my taxes, and have as good a reete here as iny mon.' 'Sheriff, Sheriff,' said the Judge, bring him before the Court!' McJUNKIN's ire was now up, and as he reached the floor he began to strike his breast, exclaiming, 'My name is John McJUNKIN, d'e see - here's the brist that never flunched, if so be it was in goode caase. I'll stan iny mon a hitch in Butler County, if sobe he'll clear me o' the la!' 'Bring him before the Court,' said the Judge. He was accordingly pinioned and if not gagged, at least forced to be silent while his case was under consideration. Some of the lawyers volunteered as amici curiae. Some ventured a word of apology for McJUNKIN. The Judge pronounced sentence of imprisonment for two hours in the jail of the county, and ordered the Sheriff to take him into custody. The Sheriff with much simplicity observed, 'May it plase the Coorte, there is no jail at all, at all, till put him in.' Here the Judge took a learned distinction, upon which he expatiated at some length for the benefit of the bar. He said: There were two kinds of custody: first, safe custody; second, close custody. The first is when the body must be forthcoming to answer a demand or an accusation, and in this case the body may be delivered for the time being out of the hands of the law on bail or mainprize. But when the imprisonment forms a part of the satisfaction or punishment, there can be no bail or main prize. This is the reason of the common law in relation to escape under capias ad satisfaciendum and also why a second ca. sa. cannot issue after the defendant has been once arrested and then discharged by the plaintiff. In like manner, a man cannot be twice imprisoned for the same offense, even if he be released before the term of imprisonment has expired. This is clearly a case of close custody - arcta custodia and the prisoner must be confined, body and limb, without bail or main prize in some place of close incarceration.' Here he was interrupted by the Sheriff who seemed to have hit upon a lucky thought:, 'May it plase the Coorte, I'm just thinken that maybe I can take him till Bowen's pig pen - the pigs is kilt for the Coorte, and its empty.' 'You have heard the opinion of the Court,' said the Judge, ' proceed, sir; do your duty, Sheriff.'"

And the Sheriff duly proceeded to place his prisoner in "durance vile;" but this was not the termination of the affair.

Brackenridge continues: "Peace and order had scarcely been restored, when the Sheriff came rushing to the house with a crowd at his heels, crying out, 'Mr. Jidge, Mr. Jidge! May it plase the Coorte!' 'What is the matter, Sheriff?' 'Mr. Jidge, Mr. Jidge! John McJUNKIN's got off, d'ye mind!' 'What, escaped, Sheriff" Summon the posse comitatus!' 'The pusse, the pusse; what's that, may it plase your honor? Now I'll jist tell you how it happened. He was goin' along quee-etly enough till we got till the hazzel patch, an' all at once he pitched off intil the bushes, an' I after him; but a limb of a tree ketched me fut, and I pitched three rad off, but I fell forit, and that's good luck, ye minte.' The Judge could not restrain his gravity; the bar raised a laugh and there the matter ended, after which the business proceeded 'quee-etly' enough."

A Circuit Court existed until 1833, and was entirely separate from the Court of Common Pleas. The Circuit Courts embraced three, four, five, or even more counties, and were analogous to what were afterward called the District Courts. The first case entered in this court was "Lessee of Michael MULLEN vs. Abigail COULTER and James COULTER, tenants" - an action for trespass and ejectment. It was entered September 17, 1804, and tried September 26, 1806, a verdict being rendered for the defendants. COLLINS & SAMPLE were attorneys for the plaintiff, and Gibson MOORE and A. W. FOSTER for the defendants.

The earliest record of the names of those who were called for Grand and Traverse Jurors is that for the February term of court in the year 1806. The lists are as follows:

Grand Jurors. - Samuel CUNNINGHAM (Foreman), David KERR, James KERR, Edward FRAZIER, William ARMSTRONG, Israel GIBSON, Robert LEMMON, Philip MACKENHAUPT, John SHANNON, Robert HOGAN, Daniel McDONALD, Jesse NISH, Robert IRWIN, William WILSON, Enoch VERNUM, James DOUGLASS, Francis KEARNES.

Traverse Jurors. - Hugh LEE, Andrew PORTER, Hugh HENDERSON, Philip SNIDER, Robert REED, Abram McMAHON, Philip HARTMAN, Edward DOUGLASS, Henry DEWEES, George DOBSON, John HINDMAN, Samuel MEALS, Ambrose KENNEDY, Thomas DUGAN, William TURNER, William BROWN, Daniel HERERE, Robert TAYLOR, James BURNES, Alexander RAMSEY, William SPEAR, James LIGATT, John CAVEN, Robert LEASON, Samuel WHITE, John BRANNON, Adam GILLELAND, Barnet QUEEN, Joseph SELLS, James ANDERSON, Andrew MITTLEMAN, Adam MAYER, Jacob SUMNEY.

The first business transacted in the Orphans' Court was upon May 14, 1804. Upon that date, Reuben AYRES, a minor above the age of fourteen years, came into court and prayed for leave to choose a guardian. [P.43] The prayer was granted, and the minor chose William AYRES, Esq., as his guardian.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

The first Sheriff's sale in Butler County occurred May 13, 1805. John McCANDLESS, then Sheriff, went into court and acknowledged a deed to John PURVIANCE, Esq., of Butler, for 300 acres of land, more or less, in Middlesex Township, adjoining land of D. C. CUNNINGHAM and others, and on which George BOYD then lived. This was the property of Samuel CUNNINGHAM and sold by the Sheriff as such.

The first will was recorded by William AYRES, Esq., Register, under the date of August 9, 1804. It was made by William McLOUD, of Connoquenessing Township. Henry EVANS and John McCANDLESS were his executors. The subscribing witnesses were John GRAHAM and John RICHARDSON.

The first mortgage recorded was one executed by Samual DUNBAR to Alexander HAMILTON for the payment of $120. It was executed May 10, 1804, and recorded on the 22d of May.

A mortgage was executed by William EVERS to Philip EVERS on the 14th of November, 1803, but it was not recorded until after DUNBAR's - upon May 24, 1804.

The first persons who applied for and obtained naturalization papers were Andrew DOUGAN, Guy HILLIARD, Charles McCUE and James SHERIDAN. The papers were granted by Prothonotary William AYRES, Esq., on the 14th day of May, 1804.

TOWNSHIP DIVISION

While the territory now included in Butler was still a portion of Allegheny County, it was divided into four townships, viz., Buffalo, Middlesex, Connoquenessing and Slipping [sic] Rock.

In 1803, Butler County having been erected in 1800, it was divided into six election districts, the Commissioners being Jacob MECHLING, James BOVARD and Matthew WHITE.

A division of the county into thirteen townships occurred in 1804, being made by order of the Court of Quarter Sessions, and approved in November. These townships were (1) Cranberry, (2) Middlesex, (3) Slippery Rock, (4) Buffalo, (5) Connoquenessing, (6) Butler, (7) Center, (8) Donegal, (9) Clearfield, (10) Muddy Creek, (11) Mercer, (12) Venango and (13) Parker. Nine of these townships were each approximately eight miles square, and four of them forming the northern part of the county were irregular in shape.

During the years intervening between 1804 and 1853, six additional townships were erected, making in all nineteen. A line extending from the west line of Butler eastward to the Connoquenessing and thence along that stream in a northeasterly direction divided the original Butler into North and South Butler. Connoquenessing was divided by a north and south line, and Muddy Creek similarly, the eastern half being given the name of Franklin. The eastern half of Slippery Rock was set apart as Cherry. The other townships were Allegheny, Washington and Fairview.

It will be seen that the northern part of the county had now undergone a more thorough subdivision than the southern. Having a greater number of townships, it had greater power in county conventions than the southern section, and this fact causing jealousy among the citizens of the southern part of the county, lead to the final division which was consummated in 1854.

June 18, 1853, citizens of Middlesex Township presented a petition to the Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace, setting forth that the townships of Buffalo, Middlesex and Cranberry, laid out at an early day, when the population was sparse and before the present common school system was adopted, were at this time cumbrous, however well the plan of division may have served the people when it originally [P. 44] went into effect. The petitioners continued: "The large extent of our township makes it very inconvenient and almost impossible for many of our citizens to attend the elections. Supervisors of township roads and other township officers cannot properly discharge the duties imposed upon them, owing to the great extent of territory; our schools are too much crowded, and our sub-school districts are so large that many who should be recipients of the benefits of the school system are prevented, either from the great distance or crowded condition of the schools."

The petitioners prayed the court to make such order as may be deemed necessary to effect a division of the townships of Buffalo, Middlesex and Cranberry into ten townships of convenient size, in the following manner, viz., "By a line running direct from the center of the western boundary line of Cranberry Township to the center of the eastern boundary line of Buffalo Township; then by four cross lines running from points equi-distant on the southern boundary line of the townships of Buffalo, Middlesex and Cranberry, thereby making ten townships out of the three aforesaid, the lines to be run so as to make the townships as nearly of an equal size as practicable." The citizens of Buffalo and Cranberry Townships presented petitions similar to the foregoing.

In accordance with the request of the petitioners, the court appointed as Commissioners to inquire into the practicability of altering the township lines, William PURVIANCE, Daniel GRAHAM and Thomas REED. These viewers subsequently reported to Judge Daniel AGNEW and his associates that in their opinion "the three townships were too large and inconvenient for the people in regard to roads, schools and the enjoyment at all times of the elective franchise" and "that townships five miles square would be more conducive to the public good."

The petitioners had appealed to the Legislature for the passage of a bill authorizing the division, and such a bill had been passed. The Governor, however, did not sign it, but sent the bill to the court for approval or disapproval. At the same time that the petitions from citizens of the three original southern townships were received, the court entertained another from "sundry citizens of Butler County," praying that the former mentioned should not be granted, as to divide the county in the same proportion would create forty-three townships. This petition requested the issuance of an order for the redistricting of the entire county into townships as near five miles square as it would admit.

After considering all the petitions (and some remonstrances), the court appointed as Commissioners to inquire into the propriety of granting the prayer of the latter petition, Hugh McKEE, James M. LANE and James T. McJUNKIN.

These Commissioners reported, November 19, 1853, in favor of the division into townships approximately five miles square. At a meeting which they had held on the 4th of October, delegates were present from several of the townships who represented themselves as instructed to favor the division. The people of the southern, western and central portions of the county were almost unanimously desirous that the re-districting plan should be carried out. The objections came from the townships then newly formed from old ones in the northern part of the county.

Upon the same day the report was made, the court issued an order for the carrying out of the plan, and appointed James T. McJUNKIN, Hugh McKEE and David SCOTT as Commissioners for that purpose. The division was duly effected; report of the same made March 6, 1854, and confirmed by the court upon the 29th of the same month and year, it being decreed that thereafter Butler County should consist of thirty-three townships to be known by name and number, as follows, viz: 1st, Mercer; 2d, Marion; 3d, Venango; 4th, Allegheny; 5th Slippery Rock; 6th, Cherry; 7th, Washington; 8th, Parker; 9th, Worth; 10th, Brady; 11th, Clay; 12th, Concord; 13th, Fairview; 14th, Muddy Creek; 15th, Franklin; 16th, Centre [sic]; 17th , Oakland; 18th, Donegal; 19th Lancaster; 20th, Connoquenessing; 21st, Butler; 22d, Summit; 23d, Clearfield; 24th, Jackson; 25th, Forward; 26th, Penn; 27th, Jefferson; 28th, Winfield; 29th, Cranberry; 30th, Adams; 31st, Middlesex; 32d, Clinton; 33d, Buffalo.

PROJECTS FOR NEW COUNTIES

Efforts have several times been made to erect new counties, which were to consist in part of Butler territory, but they have been opposed, so far as Butler County citizens were concerned, and it is probable that the county lines established in 1800 will remain intact for a great many years, until the population has very largely increased.

A project was on foot in 1856 to form a new county to be known as Madison from parts of Allegheny, Armstrong, Westmoreland and Butler. The town ships to be carved from the last named were Buffalo, Clinton and Middlesex. A meeting of citizens to oppose this contemplated measure was held February 4, at the house of George COOPER, in Middlesex, Thomas McLAUGHLIN being Chairman, and William CUNNINGHAM, Secretary. Butler County's representatives in the State Senate and in the House, respectively J. FERGUSON and Dr. A. W. CRAWFORD, were requested to use all of their influence against the proposition.

[P.45]
In 1870-71, there was considerable discussion in certain quarters relative to the formation of a new county from parts of Armstrong, Butler, Clarion and Venango, with East Brady or Brady Bend as the county seat, but the scheme died easily.

BUTLER COUNTY CIVIL LIST

Following will be found a list of Butler County officials and Representatives in the State and Federal Government:*

*Compiled from a list published in connection with the centennial address of Gen. John N. PURVIANCE, with additions making it complete to date.

CONGRESSIONAL, STATE AND FEDERAL

Senate - Walter LOWRIE.

House of Representatives - William BEATTY, Alfred GILMORE, Ebenezer McJUNKIN, John M. THOMPSON, Samuel A. PURVIANCE.

Federal Officers - Alexander W. CRAWFORD, Consul at Antwerp, Belgium; Edwin LYON, Consul at El Paso, Mexico; Charles McCANDLESS, Chief Justice Supreme Court of New Mexico; John N. PURVIANCE, Register in Bankruptcy; John M. SULLIVAN, Collector of Internal Revenue; James G. CAMPBELL, Marshal, Western District of Pennsylvania; Robert Linn MAXWELL, Register in Bankruptcy.

Members Constitutional Convention - William AYRES, Samuel A. PURVIANCE, Lewis Z. MITCHELL, John N. PURVIANCE.

Miscellaneous State Officers - Moses SULLIVAN, Canal Commissioner; John GILMORE, State Treasurer; John N. PURVIANCE, Auditor General; John M. SULLIVAN, Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth; Jacob ZEIGLER, Transcribing Clerk, House; also Clerk in Senate.

GENERAL ASSEMBLY

Senate - Walter LOWRIE, Moses SULLIVAN, William PURVIANCE, John LEWIS, Charles C. SULLIVAN, William HASLETT, John R. HARRIS, Charles McCANDLESS, James KERR, John M. GREER.

House of Representatives - John McBRIDE, Jacob MECHLING, Andrew CHRISTY, John NEGLEY, John POTTS, Walter LOWRIE, John GILMORE, Moses SULLIVAN, William BEATTY, James McKEE, William PURVIANCE, George W. SMITH, Samuel KERR, Samuel A. GILMORE, Joseph BRYSON, Samuel A. PURVIANCE, George POTTS, Isaac S. PEARSON, Jacob ZEIGLER, D. H. B. BROWER, John R. HARRIS, Samuel M. LANE, Joseph CUMMINS, Robert HAMPSON, Joseph CROSS, William STEWART, Alexander W. CRAWFORD, John M. THOMPSON, William W. DODDS, Thomas ROBINSON, William M. GRAHAM, Hiram C. McCOY, Hamilton GRANT, William HASLETT, John H. NEGLEY, Henry PILLOW, James T. McJUNKIN, George W. FLEEGER, Alexander LESLIE, David McKEE, William WALDRON, Joseph S. LUSK, A. L. CAMPBELL, William IRVINE, James HUMPHREY, George H. GRAHAM, Dr. S. D. BELL, William BRAHAM.

COUNTY OFFICERS

President Judges - Jesse MOORE, Jonathan ROBERTS, William WILKINS, Charles SHALER, John BREDIN, Daniel AGNEW, Lawrence L. McGUFFIN.
Appointed 1874 - Charles McCANDLESS.
1874 - Ebenezer McJUNKIN.
1874 - James BREDIN.
Associate Judges - Samuel FINLEY, John PARKER, James BOVARD, John DUFFY, Hiram C. McCOY, Christian BUHL, John McCANDLESS, Jacob MECHLING, Jr., Thos. STEPHENSON, Samuel MARSHALL, Joseph CUMMINS, Jas. KERR, Jas. MITCHELL, Thos. GARVEY, Daniel FEIDLER, Robert STORY, A. D. WIER, A. McCANDLESS.

District Attorneys - John GILMORE, Charles WILKINS, Robert MOORE, John BREDIN, W. W. FETTERMAN, Samuel A. GILMORE, John N. PURVIANCE, Dunlap McLAUGHLIN, Parker C. PURVIANCE, John GRAHAM, Ebenezer McJUNKIN.

1851 - John H. NEGLEY.
1854 - Archibald BLAKELEY.
1857 - Eugene FERRERO.
1860 - James W. KIRKER.
1863 - Robert M. McLURE.
1865 - W. H. H. RIDDLE.
1868 - John M. GREER.
1871 - Ferd REIBER.
1874 - Lev McQUESTION.
1877 - W. A. FORQUER.
1880 - A. M. CUNNINGHAM.
Sheriffs. -
1803 - John McCANDLESS.
1806 - Eliakim ANDERSON.
1809 - William CAMPBELL.
1812 - Samuel WILLIAMSON.
1818 - James McKEE.
1821 - William BEATTY.
1824 - Abraham MAXWELL.
1827 - John WELSH.
1830 - Jacob BRINKER.
1833 - Francis McBRIDE.
1836 - John POLLOCK.
1839 - John B. McGLAUGHLIN.
1842 - James G. CAMPBELL.
1845 - George W. REED.
1846 - Andrew KEARNES.
1851 - Arthur McGILL.
1854 - John McKEE.
1857 - Abraham McCANDLESS.
1860 - John SCOTT.
1863 - William O. BRACKENRIDGE.
1866 - James B. STOREY.
1869 - Harvey D. THOMPSON.
1872 - John T. KELLEY.
1875 - George WALTER.
1877 - John MITCHELL, appointed to fill vacancy one year.
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1878 - William H. HOFFMAN.
1881 - Thomas DONAGHY.
Prothonotaries. -
1803 - William AYERS.
1809 - Jacob MECHLING.
1818 - John NEGLEY.
1821 - William CAMPBELL.
1824 - John NEYMAN.
1827 - William STEWART.
1833 - Peter DUFFY.
1836 - John SULLIVAN.
1839 - Jacob ZEIGLER.
1842 - Jacob MECHLING, Jr.
1845 - James McGLAUGHLIN.
1848 - Campbell E. PURVIANCE.
1851 - John T. BARD.
1854 - Matthew F. WHITE.
1857 - Nathan BROWN.
1860 - Allen WILSON.
1863 - William STOOPS.
1866 - James B. CLARK.
1869 - Cyrus E. ANDERSON.
1872 - Eli CONN.
1875 - James H. TEBAY.
1878 - Alex RUSSEL.
1881 - M. N. GREER.
Clerk of Court -
1851 - Lewis Z. MITCHELL.
1854 - J. GRAHAM (died), W. K. POTTS to fill vacancy.
1857 - Emil MAURHOFF.
1860 - Watson J. YOUNG.
1863 - Robert A. MIFFLIN.
1866 - Frank M. EASTMAN.
1869 - Jefferson BURTNER.
1872 - John H. SUTTON.
1875 - Lewis M. COCHRAN.
1878 - W. A. WRIGHT.
1881 - W. B. DODDS.
Registers and Recorders -
1803 - William AYERS.
1809 - Jacob MECHLING.
1818 - Robert SCOTT.
1832 - Maurice BREDIN.
1836 - John WELSH.
1838 - William W. BRANDON.
1839 - Joseph McQUISTION.
1845 - William BALPH.
1851 - James T. McJUNKIN.
1854 - Isaac S. P. DeWOLFE.
1857 - Adam EKIS.
1860 - Cyrus E. ANDERSON.
1863 - James S. KENNEDY.
1866 - Simeon NIXON.
1869 - George W. KNEISS.
1872 - Matthew M. GREER.
1875 - James D. ANDERSON.
1878 - H. H. GALLAGHER.
1881 - H. W. CHRISTIE.
County Treasurers - John NEGLEY, John POTTS, Samuel WILLIAMSON, William CAMPBELL, Hugh McKEE, John GILCHRIST, William GIBSON, John SULLIVAN, Isaiah NIBLOCK, James SULLIVAN, Frances McBRIDE, Andrew SPROUL, George MILLER, John B. McGLAUGHLIN, James FRAZIER, Jacob MECHLING, Jr., William CAMPBELL, Andrew KEARNES, Daniel COLL, Isaac COLBERT, Michael ZIMMERMAN, Samuel C. STEWART, John MARTIN, William B. LEMMON, James KEARNES, Samuel MARKS, James DEER, George W. REED, Nathaniel WALKER, William E. MOORE, Christy MOORE (to fill vacancy), Hugh MORRISON, John HANEY, Francis ANDERSON, J. F. CAMPBELL, David CUPPS, I. H. MILLER.

County Commissioners and Clerks - 1803 - Matthew WHITE, James BOVARD, Jacob MECHLING; Clerk, David DOUGAL.
1804 - James SCOTT; 1805, Abner COATES; 1806, Jacob SMITH; 1807, Abraham BRINKER;
1808, John NEGLEY; 1809, Francis ANDERSON; Clerk, Walter LOWRIE.
1809 - Thomas DODDS; 1810, James WILLIAMS, Walter LOWRIE: Clerk, Robert SCOTT.
1811 - William BALPH; 1812, Robert MARTIN, Ephram HARRIS; 1813 - James McKEE; 1814 John CHRISTY; 1815, William CAMPBELL; 1816, Thomas McCLEARY; 1817, Francis FREER; 1818, Abraham BRINKER; 1819, Robert LEMMON; 1820, John DODDS; 1821, John BRANDON; Clerk, Thomas McCLEARY.
1822 - John COOVERT; 1823, John McQUISTON; 1824, Hugh McKEE; Clerk, William GIBSON.
1825 - Robert SCOTT; 1826, David DOUGAL; Clerk, Samuel A. PURVIANCE.
1827 - John McNEES; 1828, Alexander GRAHAM; 1829, Joseph McQISTION; Clerk, John N. PURVIANCE.
1830 - John McCANDLESS; 1831, William PILLOW; 1832, Robert GRAHAM; 1833, John VANDERLIN; Clerk William CAMPBELL.
1834 - Joseph GRAHAM; 1835, Hugh STEPHENSON; 1836, Nathan SKEER; Clerk, Jacob ZEIGLER.
1837 - William CRISWELL; 1838, William SHANER; 1839, Thomas R. McMILLEN; Clerk, George W. ZEIGLER.
1840 - George MILLER; 1841, John RAY; Clerk Alex S. McBRIDE.
1842 - Abraham MOYER; 1844, William W. DODDS; Clerk, William TIMBLIN.
1845 - Thomas BRACKEN; Clerk, John BREDIN, Jr.
1846 - David DOUTHETT; 1847, Joseph DOUTHETT; Clerk, George W. CROZIER.
1848 - Andrew SIMPSON; 1849, Thomas KELLY; 1850, Thomas WELSH; 1851, James MITCHELL; Clerk James A. McNAIR.
1852 - John MILLER; Clerk, John SULLIVAN.
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1853 - William C. CAMPBELL; 1854, John KENNEDY; Clerk, Thomas ROBINSON.
1855 - Andrew BOGGS; Clerk, Samuel MARKS.
1856 - Philip HILLIARD; 1857, Isaac ROBB; 1858, William HARBISON; Clerk, Samuel P. IRVINE.
1859 - Charles McCLUNG; 1860, Thomas McNEES; Clerk, Samuel MARKS.
1861 - Matthew GREER; Clerks, William L. JACK, John H. NIBLOCK.
1862 - Abner BARTLEY; Clerk, Harvey COLBERT.
1863 - Samuel LEASON;1864, A. C. CHRISTIE; 1865, William DICK; 1866, John W. BRANDON; 1867, Charles HOFFMAN; Clerk, George W. KNEISS.
1868 - James M. LOWE; 1869, John S. CAMPBELL; Clerk, Thomas B. WHITE.
1870 - William L. BARTLEY; 1871, Benjamin F. GARVIN; 1872, Robert BARRON;Clerk William SPEAR.
1873 - James P. CHRISTLEY; 1874, J.C. RIDDLE; Clerk, Eli J. CRATLY; I. B. STORY, Clerk.
1875 - Robert BARRON; Clerks, J. C. DONALDSON and W. A. CHRISTIE.
1878 - J. C. DONALDSON, James GRIBBEN and Jonathan MAYBERY; Clerk, Samuel McCLYMONDS.
1881 - Charles COCHRAN, George W. HAYS and T. I. WILSON; Clerk, S. McCLYMONDS (WILSON died before the time for being sworn in, and James COLLINS was appointed by the court to fill his term - three years.

County Surveyors - James IRVINE, Thomas GRAHAM, Hugh CONWAY, James I. HOGUE, Thomas H. LYON, Peter MURRIN, Hugh McKEE, William PURVIANCE, James DUNLAP, David SCOTT, J. Dixon McCANDLESS, Nathan M. SLATOR; 1874, F. WILT (died); N. M. SLATOR (appointed to fill vacancy); 1877, James M. DENNY; 1880, N. M. SLATOR.

Jury Commissioners -
1867 - William CHRISTY, Charles McCLURG.
1870 - I. W. BROWN, Peter EMERY.
1873 - T. Wilson KENNEDY, John M. McCANDLESS.
1876 - Samuel BELFOUR, Thomas JAMISON.
1879 - Hugh McCREA, I. W. MONKS.
1882 - Daniel WALLETT, Robert McCLURG.

Auditors - The first were Thomas GRAHAM, William MARTIN and Eliakim ANDERSON. Since their time, the following have served (in trios), but we are unable to give the dates of their occupancy of office: Matthew WHITE, Isaac COVERT, Henry KENNEDY, John CHRISTY, William CAMPBELL, Robert LEMMON, Moses SULLIVAN, Francis FREER, Barnet GILLELAND, William BEATTY, John BREDIN, John BRANDON, Hugh CONWAY, Jacob MECHLING, William PURVIANCE, John GLENN, Maurice BREDIN, Robert MARTIN, Joseph BRYSON, John LEWIS, Hugh STEVENSON, David DOUGAL, William MOORE, James COVERT, John NEIL, Jr., William CAMPBELL, Jr., James FENNISTON, John DODDS, John RANDOLPH, George EMRICH, Thomas McILVAIN, Thomas DODDS, D. H. JACK, John SETH, T. M. FORESTER, J. W. McCANDLESS, Alex RAMSEY, S. D. CHRISTY, George S. JAMISON, John M. BRACKING, G. S. RAMSEY, Samuel HILLIARD, Isaac HILL, Donwady McCULLOUGH, William H. CONWAY, John MARTIN, A. D. WEIR, William SWITHYE, Thomas BALPH, William S. WALDRON, Obediah CRATTY, Nelson McCALLISTER, William RED, Thomas B. WHITE, Simeon NIXON, J. H. CRATTY, Alex PURVIANCE, A. J. EVANS, W. H. H. RIDDLE, J. C. KELLEY, H. GAMPER, J. C. GLENN, W. H. BLACK, Peter FENNEL, H. A. WISE, E. ROBB, A. G. DUNCAN, Isaac MEALS, William BURTON, P. J. KELLEY, P. C. TEMPLETON, William McCOY, J. D. KAMERER, B. L. HECKENBERG, J. F. CASHDOLLAR, G. W. CROW, J. H. SHANNON, John M. LOUDEN.

County School Superintendents -

1854 - Isaac BLACK.
1857 - Thomas BALPH.
1860 - Eugene FERRERO.
1863 - Asa H. WATERS.
1866 - John CRATTY.
1869 - Samuel GLENN.
1872 - Robert H. YOUNG.
1875 - James B. MATTHEWS.
1878 - D. F. McKEE.
1881 - J. H. MURTLAND.

EARLY JUSTICES OF THE PEACE

As has already been stated in this chapter, the county was originally divided into six election districts. Justices of the Peace were elected in and for these districts for many years, instead of in the separate townships. We append herewith a list of the Justices elected in these districts and those elected later in the several townships and boroughs will be found in the chapters respectively relating to them.
District No. 1, 1804, Melzer TANNEHILL, Jacob SMITH, Ephraim HARRIS.
District No. 1, 1805, William ADAMS.
District No. 1, 1806, Thomas ELDER.
District No. 1, 1808, Hugh LEE.
District No. 1, 1809, Hugh HENDERSON.
District No. 1, 1812, James McKEE.
District No. 1, composed of Mercer and Slippery Rock, 1820, Robert REED.
District No. 1, same, 1824, William M. MICHAEL.
District No. 1, same, 1824, Andrew DONALDSON.
District No. 1, same, 1826, John REYNOLDS.
District No. 1, same, 1828, Samuel E. HARRIS.
District No. 1, same, 1830, Samuel KERR.
District No. 1, same, 1834, John MURRIN.
District No. 1, same, 1835, John NEAL, Thomas STEPHENSON.
District No. 1, same, 1836, Joseph JUSTICE, William H. McGILL, Alexander McBRIDE.
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District No. 1, same, 1837, William JACK.
District No. 1, same, 1838, John BLACK, Henry C. LINN.
District No. 2, 1804, Jacob MECHLING.
Same, 1805, Washington PARKER, John STEWART.
Same, 1808, Alexander YOUNG.
District No. 2, Venango, 1812, Matthew B. LOWRIE.
Same, 1813, Matthew B. LOWRIE.
District No. 2, Venango and Parker, 1815, John CHRISTY.
Same, 1817, Joseph KERR.
Same, 1823, John MURRIN.
Same, 1827, Andrew DONALDSON, Ben FLETCHER.
Same, 1828, William TURNER.
Same, 1834, David KELLY.
Same, 1835, Levi DUCHESS, John ANDERSON.
Same, 1836, Jacob HILLIARD.
Same, 1838, Josiah FLETCHER.
District No. 3, 1804, James BOVARD, James SCOTT.
Same, 1805, Thomas GILCHRIST.
Same, 1805, Samuel KINKEAD.
Same, 1808, Reuben AYRES.
Same, 1808, Patrick HAGGARTY.
Same, 1809, Walter LOWRIE.
District No. 3, Butler, 1812, Joseph WILLIAMSON.
Same, 1813, William HUTCHESON.
Same, 1813, William CAMPBELL.
District No. 3, Butler, Centre [sic], Donegal, Clearfield, 1815, Robert SCOTT.
Same, 1816, Samuel KINKEAD.
Same, 1816, John NEYMAN.
Same, 1816, John DUFFY.
Same, 1817, Abraham BRINKER.
Same, 1818, William ROBB.
Same, 1821, Maurice BREDIN.
Same, 1825, Thomas McLEARY.
Same, 1825, Francis McBRIDE.
Same, 1826, James McCURDY.
Same, 1826, John SWEENY.
Same, 1827, Daniel McLAUGHLIN.
Same, 1828, Moses HANLIN.
Same, 1829, James CUNNINGHAM.
Same, 1830, Hugh McKEE.
Same, 1832, David McCANDLESS.
Same, 1834, John McCLELLAND.
Same, 1835, Robert CARNAHAN.
Same, 1836, Bennet DOBBS.
Same, 1837, Parker C. PURVIANCE.
District No. 4, 1804, Robert GALBRAITH.
Same, 1804, Francis ANDERSON.
Same, 1806, John DAVID.
District No. 4, composed of Buffalo, Clearfield, Butler and Middlesex, 1822, William CAMPBELL.
Same, 1825, Isaac LEFEVRE.
Same, 1829, James POTTS.
Same, 1829, John DODDS.
Same, 1829, William WALKER.
Same, 1829, James BROWN.
Same, 1830, William R. ELLIOTT.
Same, 1835, William DICKSON.
Same, 1835, Johnston WHITE.
Same, 1838, Emil MAURHOFF.
District No. 5, 1804, Robert HAYS.
Same, 1806, Stephen STONE.
District No. 5, composed of Cranberry, 1810, Joshua STOOLTIER.
District No. 5, composed of Cranberry and Connoquenessing, 1813, Christian BUHL.
District No. 5, composed of Cranberry, Middlesex, Butler, Connoquenessing, 1820, Robert BOGGS.
Same, 1822, John OKELY.
Same, 1823, Daniel BELTZHOOVER.
Same, 1823, Robert BROWN.
Same, 1824, William McLEAN, resigned in 1836.
Same, 1824, Jacob GROSSENOR.
Same, 1825, William SIMPSON.
Same, 1825, Baltzer G. GOLL.
Same, 1827, Andrew WHITE.
Same, 1832, Samuel KIRK.
Same, 1833, James FRAZIER.
Same, 1836, Daniel GRAHAM.
Same, 1836, John HENRY.
Same, 1837, David SPEAR.
Same, 1838, William CUNNINGHAM.
Same, 1838, Henry UMPSTEAD.
Same, 1839, Thomas FLETCHER.
District No. 6, 1804, Eliakim ANDERSON.
Same, 1805, John BRACKNEY.
Same, 1808, Alexander BRYSON.
Same, 1808, Thomas CHRISTY.
Same, 1812, William DODDS.
District No. 6, composed of Muddy Creek, Connoquenessing, Butler and Center Townships, 1815, Robert MARTIN.
Same, 1819, Thomas SULLIVAN.
Same, 1820, Thomas CHRISTY.
Same, 1827, John THOMPSON.
Same, 1830, Henry DUFFERT.
Same, 1831, Robert HAMSON.
Same, 1832, George A. KIRKPATRICK.
Same, 1835, Thomas STEWART.

[End of Chapter 7--Civil History: History of Butler County, Pennsylvania. With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Waterman, Watkins, & Co., Chicago, 1883.]

Chapter 06--Internal Improvements
Chapter 08--The Bar in Butler County
1883 Butler County History Contents
Butler County Pennsylvania USGenWeb Homepage

Edited 19 Nov 1999, 16:16