History of Butler County Pennsylvania - 1883

Chapter 12 -- Butler County During War of 1861-1865

Thirteenth Regiment

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Transcribed by Tina Kinser. For an explanation and caution about this transcription, please read this page.


SURNAMES APPEARING IN THIS CHAPTER

ABERCROMBIE, ALLEN, AYRES, BANKS, BARCLAY, BEDILLION, BOUDER, BROWN, BURNSIDE, CALDWELL, CAMPBELL, CADWALLADER, CARNAHAN, CARNS, CRATTY, CROOKS, CROZIER, DAUB, DAVIS, DICKSON, DUNN, FITZSIMMONS, FLEMING, FOSTER, FRICK, GILLESPIE, GLENN, GRAHAM, GREER, GREGORY, HAGERTY, HARBISON, JACK, JAMISON, JOHNSTON, KEIM, KENNEDY, KINKEAD, LONGNECKER, LYON, M'CLUNG, M'LEARY, M'MICHAEL, M'QUISTION, MACKREL, MARSHALL, MCQUISTION, MECHLING, MELLINGER, MILES, MILFORD, MILLER, MOORE, MOREHEAD, MUCKLE, MUCKET, NEGLEY, NIXON, ORR, OTT, PATTERSON, PEARCE, POTTS, PURVIANCE, REDIC, REED, RILEY, ROBINSON, ROWLEY, RUCH, SCHINDLES, SCHLEPPY, SCOTT, SHANNON, SHAKELY, SHEPPERD, SIMMONS, SINGER, SMITH, STEP, STEWART, SYKES, TEBAY, THOMAS, THOMPSON, VANDYKE, WALKER, WALLACE, WEISENSTEIN, WILLIAMS, WISE, WOLF, ZEIGLE, ZIEGLER


Illustrations And Biographies In Chapter XII

p. 86a-- Samuel Graham    p. 86a-- Samuel Graham Bio


CHAPTER XII

*BUTLER COUNTY DURING THE WAR OF 1861-65

*The following abbreviations have been made use of in compiling the several rosters:   e., enlisted; dis., discharged; disab., disability; m., mustered in service; m.o., mustered out, m.o.w.c., mustered out with company; m.o.w.b., mustered out with battery; wd., wounded; m.wd., mortally wounded; nat. cem., national cemetery; P.V., Pennsylvania Volunteers; pro., promoted; Surg. cert., Surgeon's certificate; tr., transferred; vet., veteran; V.C., Volunteer Cavalry; V.I., Volunteer Infantry; V.R.C., Veteran Reserve Corp.
[pg. 87]
THE "BUTLER COUNTY BLUES"--HISTORY OF THEIR SERVICES AS COMPANY H, OF THE THIRTEENTH REGIMENT -- FORTIETH REGIMENT (ELEVENTH RESERVES) -- SEVENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT -- ONE HUNDREDTH REGIMENT -- ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND REGIMENT -- ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT

In this chapter and the one which succeeds it, the reader will find detailed at considerable length the history of various military organizations with which the brave men of Butler County served during [p. 88] the war of the rebelion. In their preparation, we have utilized a knowledge of things military gained by an experience of more than four years' service in the tented field--from April 20, 1861, to July 10, 1865. We have also been assisted materially by referring to Bates' valuable (yet sometimes erroneous) work, and lastly would we here acknowledge our obligations to many surviving members of the gallant commands whose history at the best can be but partially set forth. Among those to whom we are especially indebted for data and advice respecting these chapters, we mention the names of Gen. John N. PURVIANCE, Maj. Cyrus E. ANDERSON, Capt. George W. FLAGER, Capt. George W. HAYES, Lieut. C.O. KINGSBURY, Lieut. J.A. MILLINGER, Lieut. W.H.H. WASSON, Lieut. Col. Oliver C. PEDIC, Frank M. EASTMAN, Esq., Newton BLACK, Esq., Robert P. SCOTT, Esq., and Walter L. GRAHAM, Esq., to all of whom and to many others whose names cannot now be recalled, our most sincere thanks are returned.

THIRTEENTH REGIMENT

Company H of this regiment, which had the honor of being the first Butler county organization to take the field during the war of the rebellion, was organized as the Butler County Blues at a meeting held in the court house in Butler on the 22d day of April, 1861. The commisioned and non-commisioned officers then chosen were John N. PURVIANCE, Captain; Alexander GILLESPIE, First Lieutenant; John G. VANDYKE, Second Lieutenant; John B. MCQUISTION, First Sergeant; Edward LYON, Second Sergeant; Oliver C. REDIC, Third Sergeant; Samuel MUCKET, Fourth Sergeant; Thompson CAMPBELL,Jr., First Corporal; Andrew CARNS, Second Corporal; John P. ORR, Third Corporal, and Joseph B. MECHLING, Fourth Corporal.

Leaving Butler on the forenoon of that day, i. e., the 22d, the company reached Freeport at 3 P. M., and Pittsburgh at about 7 P. M. It remained there until the 24th, when with other companies a line was formed on Allegheny Common, and with Gen. NEGLEY in command the battalion marched through Allegheny City to Manchester, and thence to the railroad station, where a train bound for Harrisburg was waiting them. The latter city was reached about 1 o'clock A. M. of the 25th, and the command found quarters in the German Reformed Church. during the same day, the Thirteenth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer was mustered into the United States service for three months, by Capt. S. G. SIMMONS, and to this regiment the Blues were assigned, and designated Company H. During the same day also, Jacob ZIEGLER was elected Captain of the company, vice Capt. John N. PURVIANCE, commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. Capt. ZIEGLER resigned, however, on the 11th of May following, and at a company election held that day by orders of Col. ROWLEY, First Lieut. Alexander GILLESPIE was elected Captain. On the 14th of the same month, George W. SMITH was elected First Lieutenant to fill the vacancy occasioned by the promotion of Lieut. GILLESPIE.

Prior to the events last mentioned though, or on the 26th day of April, the regiment left Harrisburg, and reaching York went into camp near the latter town, the location being termed Camp Scott, in honor of Gen. Winfield SCOTT. Here the regiment remained for instruction until the 4th day of June, and the result, though the weather during a considerable portion of the time was stormy, was most satisfactory. On the 4th of June, the command moved to Camp Rowley, near Chamberburg, and on the 11th to Camp Brady, about three miles south of the town, where it reported to Col. Dixon S. MILES, commanding the Fourth Brigade,* First Division, PATTERSON's Corps. On the 13th, with five days' cooked rations and forty rounds of cartridges per man, the regiment began its march southward, the Thirteenth reaching Camp Lee two miles south of Greencastle, Penn., at 8 o'clock P. M. of the same night. This was the first march under arms fully equipped for service. Remaining at Camp Lee until the morning of the 15th the forces of which the regiment formed a part continued the march to Camp Riley, a point two miles north of Williamsport, Md.

* This brigade was composed of detachments of the Second and Third United States Infantry, Maj. SHEPPERD; Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. Henry C. LONGNECKER; Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. Thomas A. ROWLEY, and the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Col. Thomas A. ZEIGLE.

On Sunday, the 16th of June, the Thirteenth was assigned to the advance of the column, and passing through Williamsport about noon, just as the worshiping congregations were being dismissed, forded the Potomac (the stream being about three and one half feet in depth), and encamped at Camp Hitchcock, about three miles beyond--thus being the first northern men in arms to reach Virginia on this line. On the morning of the 18th, the volunteer regiments were ordered back to the Maryland side of the river, the regulars belonging to the corps and the cavalry and artillery having been ordered to Washington, D. C. This point near Williamsport was termed Camp Miles, and here the men of the Thirteenth constructed a strong field work or redan for the use of Capt. DOUBLEDAY's battery. When completed, three siege guns of a heavy caliber were placed in position, and their range tested by a shot from each, which, ricochetting on the hard turnpike on the opposite side of the river, caused sundry rebel horsemen who were intently watching the operations to beat an unceremonious and hasty retreat.
[page 89]

Amid frequent alarms and the hasty marshalling of the regiment in line of battle, caused by small though enterprising bodies of the enemy firing upon the Union pickets, the time passed until July 1, when Second Sergt. Edwin LYON was appointed First Lieutenant of Company H. On the 2d of July, PATTERSON's army, 20,000 strong, began crossing (by fording) to the south side of the Potomac, but the Eighth and Thirteenth regiments were left in the rear *to garrison Williamsport and keep open comunication [sic] with the base of supplies.

*It is stated that being thus cut off from the front--a position which they coveted--the men of the Thirteenth were determined to show their prowess, if not with arms, then with the pen. So, "procuring the use of the Williamsport Ledger office, they commenced the publication of the Pennsylvania Thirteenth devoted to the patriotic sentiment of the camp, and to the more elevated tone of wit and humor prevalent in the ranks. The first number was issued July 4, 1861, and was continued at intervals until after the battle of Antietam, September, 1862, a portable printing press and materials having been purchased, and moved with the regiment. The establishment was finally lost amid the confusion on that hotly contested field."--Bates' History.

Early on the morning of July 4, however, the regiment was ordered to escort the Rhode Island Battery belonging to Col. BURNSIDE's command to Martinsburg, Va. The pieces were moved with difficulty across the ford, but were safely reported to the commander of the forces early in the evening. The troops were then engaged in picket and fatigue duty until the morning of July 15, when the whole column--some twenty thousand men of all arms--under the command of Gens. PATTERSON, CADWALLADER, KEIM, WILLIAMS, NEGLEY, LONGNECKER, THOMAS and ABERCROMBIE, marched forth some ten miles, and occupied an abandoned camping ground of the enemy near the village of Bunker Hill. On the 17th, a forced march was made to Charleston, and nearly the whole distance over dusty roads was performed at a "double-quick." At a cross-roads called Smithfield, distant five miles from Bunker Hill, a halt was made by order of Gen. PATTERSON, a line of battle formed, the artillery placed in battery, and everything put in readiness for battle. The enemies' skirmishers rapidly gave way, however, and the march was continued to Charleston, Jefferson Co., Va., where the regiment remained until the 21st (the day the first battle of Bull Run was fought), when it was ordered to Harper's Ferry. It arrived at that point late in the afternoon, forded the river in the darkness, and encamped two miles beyond. On the evening of the 22d. it marched to Hagerstown, arriving at 2 A. M. of the 23d, and there remained until the morning of the 25th, when it proceeded via the Cumberland Valley Railroad to Harrisburg. Pittsburgh was reached at 2 P. M. of the 28th. The regiment was handsomely entertained by the citizens during the same evening, and on the following day it made its last parade under arms by marching through the principal streets of Pittsburgh and Allegheny City. It was mustered out of service by First Lieut. John B. JOHNSTON, of the Third United States Cavalry, August 6, and the ensuing day its members received final pay and discharge papers, and were disbanded.

Following is a list of the field and staff officers of the regiment; also the officers and men composing Company H:

FIELD AND STAFF
Thomas A. ROWLEY, Colonel
John N. PURVIANCE, Lieutenant Colonel
William S. MELLINGER, Major
Joseph M. KINKEAD, Adjutant
M. K. MOREHEAD, Quartermaster
James ROBINSON, Surgeon
George S. FOSTER, Assistant Surgeon
A.M. STEWART, Chaplain

COMPANY H

Captain, Alexander GILLESPIE; First Lieutenant, George W. SMITH; Second Lieutenant, John G. VANDYKE; First Sergeant, John B. MCQUISTION; Second Sergeant, Edwin LYON; Third Sergt., Oliver C. REDIC;* Fourth Sergeant, Samuel MUCKLE; First Corporal, Thompson CAMPBELL, Jr.; Second Corporal, Andrew CARNS, Jr.; Third Corporal, John P. ORR; Fourth Corporal, Joseph B. MECHLING; Musicians, Thomas A. CUNNINGHAM and William S. DICKSON.

*Mustered in Company H, Thirteenth Regiment, April 25, 1861; mustered out August 6, 1861; re-enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania Infantry as private September 1, 1861, promoted First Sergeant July 11, 1862; Second Lieutenant, June 7, 1863; First Lieutenant, January 1, 1864; Captain, June 6, 1864; Lieutenant Colonel April 25, 1865; was wounded at Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 1864; was personally complimented by Gen. Birney. "Kearney Badge of Honor" presented him by Gen. SICKLES June, 1863; was finally mustered out July 11, 1865.

PRIVATES

Alfred AYRES, John ALLEN, Jefferson ALLEN, Shaler C. BARCLAY, Peterson BROWN, Robert BEDILLION, Andrew M. BANKS, Jacob BOUDER, Eli G. CRATTY, William CROOKS, Robert W. CROZIER, John CALDWELL, Thomas J. CARNAHAN, John DAVIS, George DAUB, William DUNN, Hudson J. FLEMING, John FITZSIMMONS, Wallace FRICK, John L. GLENN, Samuel GRAHAM, Joseph B. GREER, John GREGORY, John D. HARBISON, Demosthenes HAGERTY, William J. JAMISON, William S. JACK, David R. KENNEDY, William KENNEDY, Robert W. LYON, Howe D. LYON, Daniel H. LYON, James MACKREL, Isaac M. MILLER, Thomas J. MILFORD, James P. MILFORD, Alexander W. MOORE, Dunwoody MARSHALL, William W. M'QUISTION, William J. MOORE, Charles H. M'CLUNG, James M'LEARY, George MOORE, Ethan S. M'MICHAEL, Simeon NIXON, Christian M. OTTO, James POTTS, Robert C. PEARCE, Alfred G. REED, Lawrence RUCH, George H. SMITH, William H. H. STEP, Adam SCHINDLES, Thomas M. C. SYKES, Isaac C. STEWART, James H. SHANNON, Augustus J. SINGER, Milton J. SCHLEPPY, Frederick R. SHAKELY, Robert J. THOMPSON, Oliver TEBAY, Oliver J. WISE, Samuel WALKER, George WOLF, Peter WEISENSTEIN, George F. WALLACE, Andrew S. ZIEGLER.


[BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES IN CHAPTER 11]

SAMUEL GRAHAM

Samuel Graham, M.D., one of the prominent practitioners of Butler County, was born in the borough of Butler January 31, 1836. He is descended from one of the old families, his grandfather, Robert Graham, having been one of the first settlers in the borough. He availed himself of such educational advantages as the schools of Butler afforded at that time, and in his twenty-first year commenced the study of medicine in the office of Dr. R.L. McCurdy. Having completed the usual course of reading, he went to Washington, D.C., where for two years he was a student in the National Medical College of that city. In 1861, he relinquished his studies, and entered the service as a private soldier in Company H, Thirteen Pennsylvania Volunteers. His experience in this department of the service, was, however, of short duration. He returned to his home, and shortly after went to Philadelphia, and entered the Jefferson Medical College, from which institution he graduated with honor in 1862. Soon after his graduation, he again entered the service of his country as Assistant Surgeon in the One Hundred and Seventy-fourth Regiment, and was actively engaged in professional duty until the close of the war in 1865, when he returned to Butler, where he was married in October of 1867 to Miss Eliza Cunningham. In 1867, he again went South as Acting Assistant Surgeon, and was stationed in South Carolina. In 1868, he left the service, and returned to Butler, where he established himself in the practice of his profession, and where he has since remained. Dr. Graham is in the possession of a lucrative practice, and possesses the necessary qualifications of a physician, other than knowledge, geniality of disposition, blended with firmness and compassion. He is a member of the different medical societies, and as a physician and citizen, he occupies an enviable position.

[End of Chapter 12--Butler County During the War of 1861-65, 13th Regiment: History of Butler County, Pennsylvania. With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Waterman, Watkins, & Co., Chicago, 1883.]

Chapter 11--Soldiers of the War of 1812
Chapter 12--Butler County During the War of 1861-65, 40th Regiment
1883 Butler County History Contents
Butler County Pennsylvania USGenWeb Homepage

Edited 29 Nov 1999, 20:30