History of Butler County Pennsylvania - 1883

Chapter 12 -- Butler County During War of 1861-1865

One Hundred and Second Regiment, Company H

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Transcribed by Pat Collins. For an explanation and caution about this transcription, please read this page.

Because this chapter is an extensive roster of military personnel, the surnames have not been included at the front of the chapter. The following abbreviations have been made use of in compiling the several rosters:   e., enlisted; dis., discharged; disab., disability; m., mustered in service; m.o., mustered out, m.o.w.c., mustered out with company; m.o.w.b., mustered out with battery; wd., wounded; m.wd., mortally wounded; nat. cem., national cemetery; P.V., Pennsylvania Volunteers; pro., promoted; Surg. cert., Surgeon's certificate; tr., transferred; vet., veteran; V.C., Volunteer Cavalry; V.I., Volunteer Infantry; V.R.C., Veteran Reserve Corp.


CHAPTER XII

BUTLER COUNTY DURING THE WAR OF 1861-65

ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND REGIMENT

COMPANY H*

*By Frank M. Eastman, Esq.

[p. 100]

When the dark war cloud came sweeping up from the South and the thunder of Fort Sumter's guns was heard, the brave sons of the North came forward to save this grand old Union. Butler County sent forth her full quota of men, ready to fill up the full measure of devotion to country with their lives

The first organization to leave the county was Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. That company was enlisted for three months; was commanded at first by Capt. John N. PURVIANCE, and attached to Col. Thomas A. ROWLEY's regiment. Its history has been fully written in the preceding pages of this volume.

When the Thirteenth Regiment was mustered out, Col. ROWLEY began the re-organization of his regiment for the three years' service. Thereupon, Capt. Thomas McLAUGHLIN recruited the company which is the subject of this sketch. Many of the men who had served in Capt. PURVIANCE's (afterward Capt. GILLESPIE's) company re-enlisted in this company. Col. ROWLEY claimed for the new regiment the number "thirteen," and refused to take any other. The Adjutant General declined to number his regiment "thirteen," and when the dispute was finally settled all the numbers under one hundred and two were taken, and that became the number of Col. ROWLEY's regiment.

Company H joined the regiment on the 1st of September, 1861, at Camp Sprague, located in the suburbs of Washington City, with 113 officers and men. The only arms at first were clubs, but finally Harper's Ferry muskets were provided, which were afterward [p. 101] exchanged for Springfield rifles. Picket duty, camp guard brigade, regimental, company and squad drill and dress parade were of almost daily occurrence for the next six months.

About the only thing to relieve the monotony was an occasional change of camp.

From Camp Sprague the regiment moved to Camp Lincoln, on Meridian Hill. Then to Camp Holt, on the east bank of Rock Creek, and finally to the village of Tenallytown, in the District of Columbia, where it went into winter quarters. Part of the duty was imaginary picketing along the river and Rockville roads, and at one time a night march on the chain bridge of the Potomac to prevent the enemy from crossing.

During the late fall and early winter of 1861, many of the company were stricken with typhoid fever, and several died. William H. NORRIS, Lewis KNEES and Robert THORNBERG found graves in the District of Columbia.

One night in January, 1862, Lysander ROBB, a private soldier of the company, was killed under very singular circumstances. He was on camp guard duty about one hundred yards distant from the tents of Company D, One Hundred and Second Regiment. Two men of that company (GAVIN and YOUNG) got into a quarrel. GAVIN discharged his musket in YOUNG's face, killing him instantly. That musket ball traveled the intervening space, struck ROBB and lodged in his heart. The author of this double tragedy was tried by court-martial, acquitted, served his term and was honorably discharged. His plea as to killing YOUNG was self-defense, and as to ROBB, that it was accidental.

At this time, the One Hundred and Second belonged to PECK's brigade, BUELL's division, and was reviewed on several occasions by Gen. McCLELLAN, President LINCOLN and Cabinet.

About the 1st of March, 1862, Gen. McCLELLAN gave the command "On to Richmond," and his army crossed the Potomac, marched up the hill in direction of Manassas Junction; then marched down again and back to camp without seeing the enemy.

The orders were to carry sixty rounds of ammunition on the person and forty rounds in the wagons for each man. By some misunderstanding, the men were compelled to carry 100 rounds on their persons, while the mules hauled the empty ammunition train. While on the Virginia side of the Potomac, a heavy rain set in, and the troops, without tents to shelter, were initiated into some of the hardships of campaigning. About the last of March, moved down to Georgetown, embarked on an old Fall River steamboat, called State of Maine, anchored in the Potomac until McCLELLAN's grand army, with artillery and trains, was all on board transports; then steamed down the Potomac, out into Chesapeake Bay, and the next morning were at Fortress Monroe, landed, marched out three miles in the direction of Newport News, encamped, and called it Camp SMITH. We then belonged to PECK's brigade, COUCH's division, KEY's corps.

Took up the line of march for Yorktown, and were on the extreme left flank. Came to the Warwick River, near Warwick Court House. Company H did picket duty on the Warwick, near where it joins the James River.

William KENNEDY and William MARTIN hailed the enemy on the opposite shore, and were invited to cross. They made a raft of boards, crossed the river, were made prisoners of war, and afterward paroled.

The rebel gunboat Teazer occasionally ran up to the mouth of the Warwick, and sheltered the pickets.

When the enemy evacuated Yorktown, we joined in the pursuit, crossed the Warwick at Lee's Mills, and on the 2d of May marched to Ebenezer Church, and rested until morning. On the3d, resumed the march in the midst of a heavy rain, reached Williamsburg at 3 P.M., and went in on the right to support Hooker's brigade. We advanced to a point within about six hundred feet of a large rebel earthwork, called Fort McGruder, but were concealed by a dense forest. We were so close, that when the guns on the fort opened fire on Hooker's troops, one of our Lieutenants stood behind a big tree, shouting: "Give it to them boys!" thinking all the while it was our own artillery. A few moments later, and we were undeceived when the same guns opened upon us. The regiment lost three killed and thirty-eight wounded.

Among the wounded was John DAVIS, of Company H, severely in the shoulder.

We joined in the pursuit of the enemy as they fell back up the peninsula, crossed the Chickahominy River at Bottom's Bridge, and took up a position on the left of the "Seven Pines." On the 31st of May, the enemy attacked us at 1 o'clock P.M. The One Hundred and Second supported Miller's battery until Casey's division was completely routed and driven back.

Then Gen. PECK in person led the regiment to stay the tide of advancing rebels. Gen. KEYS and Gen. KEARNEY were both in our front.

After marching a couple of hundred yards by the right flank, double quick, came to a front and charged the enemy. Gen. PECK shouted: "Go in, One Hundred and Second!" and Col. ROWLEY: "Go in, my old Thirteenth and Andy CURTEN's One Hundred and Second!"

We stopped the enemy's advance until MILLER got his battery off, and were flanked and compelled to fall back. In less than twenty minutes, Company H lost [p. 101] three killed and twenty wounded out of fifty-five men present for duty. J.G. REDDICK, John CROSS and S. H. MEYERS were killed; BROWN, SHIRA, STOOPS, YOUNG AND NOEL were severely wounded.

Went into camp on the battle-field, and did picket duty in White Oak Swamp, amidst malaria and the stench of dead horses and men. Remained there until the commencement of the "seven days' battle." We occupied an intrenched picket line on the left flank while the battle of Gaines' Mill was in progress, and about daylight one morning had a severe engagement with the enemy, in which they were repulsed.

Led the advance during McCLELLAN's change of base, and were the first to reach the James River. We then marched back to the front, and took part in the battle of "Malvern Hills."

Then fell back to Harrison's Landing, and remained over a month in camp during the hottest part of the summer of 1862. We then marched to Yorktown, crossing the Chickahominy near Charles City Court House. We spent a week dismantling the rebel forts around Yorktown. Then we embarked on steamer City of Vienna; sailed out of York River into the Chesapeake, and up the Potomac to Alexandria; landed, marched out to Centreville and supported POPE's troops at the battle of Chantilly.

We were now in HOWE's brigade and COUCH's division, detached from the Fourth Corps.

Returned to the Potomac, crossed at the Georgetown aqueduct and encamped at the village of Potomac Falls. Then marched toward Harper's Ferry to the relief of Col. MILES' troops, but countermarched when found MILES had surrendered to JACKSON, and arrived on the battle-field of Antietam at dark. We occupied the front line the next day, but there was no fighting, and at night LEE escaped across the Potomac. Went up to Williamsport and drove a rebel force across the Potomac.

When STEWART's cavalry raided Maryland and Pennsylvania, HOWE's brigade was sent on a "wild goose's chase" after them. We marched up the river as far as Hancock, and for several weeks did patrol duty along the river, but could not catch the rebel cavalry. Rejoined the main body of the army, crossed the Potomac at Berlin and marched to New Baltimore, near Warrenton, where McCLELLAN was superseded by Gen. BURNSIDE.

We then marched down to Stafford Court House, near Fredericksburg, and did guard duty to Acquia Creek Landing for one week, during which time we built commodious winter quarters, expecting to stay there all winter. On Saturday evening, got orders to rejoin the brigade the next morning, and to leave our elegant winter quarters for the benefit of the New York Regiment who were to relieve us. About the time the regiment got into line, fires began to break out among the shanties, and soon the whole city of shanties was in flames, and the New York boys were left to carry boards, etc., as we did, and build quarters for themselves.

We crossed the Rappahannock in FRANKLIN's grand division, SEDGWICK's Sixth Corps, NEWTON's division and WHEATON's brigade.

During the battle of Fredericksburg, we were under heavy artillery fire, but not actively engaged. We then went into winter quarters near Falmouth, and did picket duty on the Rappahannock during some very cold and rough weather. We took part in the trials and tribulations of "BURNSIDE's mud march."

Gen. HOOKER superseded BURNSIDE.

When the main body of the army marched up the north bank of the Rappahannock and made the advance on Chancellorsville, the Sixth Corps crossed at Fredericksburg and assaulted "Mary's Heights" and the famous stone wall, where TYLER's brigade of "nine months' men" met with such a terrible repulse the December before. We carried the heights and pursued the rebels five miles in the direction of Chancellorsville. When at Salem Church, they met re-enforcements from Lee's army, and a terrific battle took place, lasting from 3 P.M. until nightfall, during which time the enemy were heavily re-enforced. Rested on our arms that night and the next morning, the enemy began to maneuver for position. They had retaken Fredericksburg in our rear, and held the river there. They also held the river between us and the army of HOOKER.

The Sixth Corps was formed in the shape of a horsehoe, with the right and left resting on the river. The One Hundred and Second occupied the toe of the shoe, as it were. During the day, there was severe fighting on the flanks, but the enemy were repulsed. As soon as darkness covered the scene, a retreat was commenced. We were ordered to hold our position to the last extremity in order to allow the artillery and trains to get away.

At 11 P.M., finding the enemy had very nearly surrounded us in strong force, the Colonel ordered us to retreat, and the enemy opend fire at once. All went well until we reached an almost impenetrable forest, through which a narrow road led to the river. Then it became necessary to break ranks, and, every man for himself, make his own way to the river. Nearly half the regiment lost their way, and reached the river too low down and were captured, taken to Richmond, and soon after paroled.

In this battle, SMITH, TRINBLE and RANDOLPH were killed, and quite a large number of Company H wounded. The remainder of the regiment reached the bridge, crossed over, moved down to camp, near [p. 103] Falmouth, and remained there until LEE started on his tour of invasion to Pennsylvania. Then the Sixth Corps crossed the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg, and threatened LEE's rear. After several skirmishes, recrossed the river, and took up the line of march to head LEE off from crossing the Potomac. We forded that river at EDWORLL's Ferry, and started on a forced march to Manchester. While marching on the National pike, leading from Wheeling to Baltimore, were going at the rate of a mile every fourteen minutes, marching in ranks, and carrying from sixty to eighty pounds weight. When the Sixth Corps started for Gettysburg, the One Hundred and Second was detailed to guard the trains and reserve artillery, and were not at that great battle. We prevented STEWART's cavalry from taking Westminster and the wagon trains.

Rejoined the army in pursuit of the rebels to Williamsport. Had a skirmish with the enemy at Funkstown.

After LEE escaped across the Potomac, marched down that river, crossed over at Berlin, marched to near Warrenton and encamped until September. The Sixth Corps then moved down to Rappahannock Station, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, attacked a relief brigade in their fortifications and captured them, crossed the Rappahannock, and encamped near Brandy Station, on same railroad.

When LEE attempted to flank the Army of the Potomac under MEADE, and get between him and WASHINGTON, the One Hundred and Second did some hard marching. Then, in December, 1863, recrossed the Rappahannock, crossed the Rapidan at Germania Ford, and took part in MEADE's "Mine Run" campaign. Retreated across the Rapidan, and went into winter quarters at Brandy Station.

On the 31st of December, 1863, it rained all day and all night.

Many of the boys, at the hands of kind friends at home, received express packages containing good fat turkeys and other luxuries to garnish the humble camp tables on New Year's Day. About 11 o'clock that night the order came to pack up, fall in and march to the station through darkness, mud and rain; were loaded on platform cars and started for Washington. Got there about noon of the 1st of January, 1864, and were almost frozen. In the evening, were shipped in box cars by way of Baltimore to Harper's Ferry, and suffered terribly from the cold. Marched out to Halltown, and went into camp in eight inches of snow and thermometer below zero. Went into winter quarters. In January, 1864, enough of Company H had re-enlisted to make it a veteran organization, and we got a thirty-day furlough. At the expiration of that time, we went back to Halltown. Found the other eleven companies of the One Hundred and Second re-enlisting, and soon thereafter the regiment became a veteran organization, entitled to a thirty-day furlough, and with the regiment Company H came home, making a second leave of absence for us.

Rejoined the army at Brandy Station on the evening of the 3d of May. On the morning of the 4th, started on the "Wilderness campaign," and crossed the Rapidan at Germania Ford.

We were now in WHEATON's brigade, GETTY's division, SEDGWICK's corps.

On the morning of the 5th, resumed the march, and at 2 P.M. reached Gordonsville Plank Road, and were attacked by LONGSTREET's skirmish line. The engagement soon became general, and continued until night set in. Company H lost about thirty killed and wounded.

On the morning of the 6th, the fight was renewed, and raged all day. Company H lost two killed and several wounded.

The 7th was a day of rest. Were out on the right rear on picket duty. That night, started to flank LEE's army.

On the evening of the 8th of May, reached Spottsylvania. On the skirmish line, on the 9th Gen. SEDGWICK killed, and Gen. WRIGHT succeeded him in command of the Sixth Corps.

On May 12, supported HANCOCK's brilliant charge, and spent the day fighting, losing heavily in killed and wounded. On the 17th, charged the enemy and captured the first line of works. Flanking movement by the left resumed.

The army had been largely re-enforced by heavy artillery regiments not initiated, and many were the laughable incidents that occurred. A stalwart Vermonter, having got separated from his command, was heard to inquire for "Company K of the Sixth Corps." There was always a rivalry between the Pennsylvania and New England troops, and many jokes were cracked at the expense of the down-east Yankees.

The enemy were next encountered at the crossing of the North Anna River. The rebel position at SEXTON's Junction being too strong to carry by assault, another flank movement began, and ended at Cold Harbor, where, on the 3d of June, the One Hundred and Second took part in an assault, and carried the enemies first line of works.

Company H lost two killed and eight wounded. Were constantly engaged in skirmishing until the great flank movement was made from Cold Harbor to Petersburg. Crossed the Chickahominy at LONG's Bridge and the James River at Powhattan Point on a ponton bridge half a mile in length. Arrived at Petersburg on the evening of the 17th of June, and on the 18th assaulted the works, and advanced our [p. 104] line to within one hundred yards of the enemy's rifle pits, held and fortified the line. Company H lost three killed and ten wounded. The next movement was to cut the Weldon Railroad at REAM's station. On the 10th of July, marched to City Point, embarked on the Dictator and started in hot haste for Washington. When we got there, found the rebels within a few hundred yards of the fortified line on the north opposed by a line of armed Government clerks and convalescents terribly frightened. Relieved them and succeeded in driving Gen. EARLY and his rebel troops away the next day. Followed him across the Potomac at CONRAD's Ferry, through Snicker's Gap and across the Shenandoah River. Returned to the vicinity of Washington; then marched up the Potomac, via Monocacy Junction, to Harper's Ferry, and then back to Monacacy. Remained a few days; then back and crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry and marched up the valley of the Shenandoah, through Halltown, Charlestown, Winchester and Middletown, to Strasburg, and then marched down again. Gen. Philip H. SHERIDAN now took command of the Department of the Shenandoah. After a number of skirmishes and marches, on the 19th of September attacked EARLY at Opequon; drove him through Winchester, and, in the language of SHERIDAN's dispatch "sent him whirling up the valley."

In this action, the One Hundred and Second occupied the extreme left flank, and when the final advance was made a section of the rebel battery enfiladed our line and caused frightful loss. Company H lost seven killed and five wounded. ADAMS, OSENBAUGH, RENFREW, MATTHEWS, SHAKELY, PARK and CAMPBELL were killed.

We pursued the enemy, and on the 22d of September engaged him again at FISHER's Hill, above Strasburg, where his rout was complete.

The One Hundred and Second charged a line of rifle pits, captured a rebel regiment and four pieces of artillery without losing a single man. The charge was made up a steep bluff. The enemy fired over our heads, and before they could reload their pieces they were prisoners. We pursued the enemy to Woodstock after night, and continued the pursuit for ninety miles to Harrisonburg, when the enemy disbanded and took refuge in the mountains. The Sixth Corps returned to Cedar Creek and went into camp. The order came for us to rejoin the army before Petersburg. Marched to ASHBY's Ferry on the Shenandoah, when order was countermanded, and we returned to camp at Cedar Creek. Then Gen. SHERIDAN went on a visit to Washington.

On the morning of the 19th of October, at daylight, the enemy surprised the Eighth and Nineteenth Corps, outflanked them and drove them off the field, and forced the Sixth Corps back to Middletown, when SHERIDAN, making his famous ride from Winchester, twenty miles away, reached the front, re-formed his shattered troops, charged the enemy in front, broke his line, hurled his cavalry against him on the Middletown Meadows and gained one of the most complete victories on record. Company H lost three killed and thirteen wounded.

The Sixth Corps then returned to the Army of the Potomac, in front of Petersburg, and took part in the siege. When the battle of Five Forks was in progress, the Sixth Corps made the final advance, and captured the rebel works at Petersburg.

Company H lost one killed -- Samuel DAUBENSPECK. We then pursued the retreating foe, and came up with him at Sailor's Creek, where he was routed, and then marched to Appomattox, where Lee surrendered.

The Sixth Corps was then ordered to join SHERMAN's army at Raleigh, N.C., but when it reached Danville, Va., the order was countermanded, and we took up the line of march for Washington. Participated in the grand review, mustered out and reached home about the last of June, 1865.

Company H was in the service from September 1, 1861, until June 28, 1865, a period of three years and ten months. During that time, it participated in all the great campaigns, and shared the dangers of battle and the hardships of the march and biviouac with the Armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah. Thus it participated in the following engagements: Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, Mary's Heights, Salem Church, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, final attack on Petersburg and Sailor's Creek. And during its campaigns it had thirty-eight men killed or died of wounds, and seventy-eight wounded. In conclusion, we add that it made a record of which every member may be justly proud.

Following is a list of the officers and men who served in the company and regiment above mentioned:

Capt. Thos. McLAUGHLIN, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; pro. to Maj. June 1, 1863.
Capt. Robt. W. LYON, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; wd at Winchester September 19, 1862; pro. To Sergt. Feb. 1, 1862, to 2d Lieut. Juy [sic] 10, 1862, to 1st Lieut. July 1, 1863, to Capt. Oct. 1, 1864, to Brevet Maj. Sept. 19, 1864, to Brevet Lieut. Col. April 2, 1865; commissioned Maj. June 23, 1865; not mustered; m.o.w.c. July 28, 1865.
First Lieut. William CROOKS, m. Aug. 20 ,1861; resigned July 10, 1862.
First Lieut. Chas. S. BARCLAY, m. Aug. 16, 1861; wd Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; pro. to 1st Sergt. Feb. 1, 1862, to 1st Lieut. July 10, 1862; commissioned Capt. May 27, 1863; not mustered; dis. July 6, 1863; re-commissioned Feb. 29, 1864; dis. May 15, 1865.
Second Lieut. Armstrong RENISON, m. Aug. 20, 1861; resigned Feb. 1, 1862.
Second Lieut. Addison J. BRINKER, m. Aug. 20, 1861; pro. to 2d Lieut. Feb. 1, 1862; resigned July 10, 1862.
Second Lieut. Isaac C. STEWART, m. Aug. 20, 1861; pro. to 2d Lieut. May 21, 1864; commissioned 1st Lieut. June 17, and Capt. June 25, 1865; not mustered; m.o.w.c. July 28, 1865; vet.
[p. 105]
First Sergt. Jno. KALTENBAUGH, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; commissioned 1st Lieut. June 25, 1865; not mustered; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
First Sergt. Jas. B. STORY,* m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Dec. 16, 1864, for wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864; vet.; also wd at Cold Harbor.
*Sergt. STOREY entered the National Guard of Pennsylvania in August, 1875, as Captain of Company A, Thirteenth Infantry. He was commissioned Major of the Sixteenth Regiment December 2, 1878, and Lieutenant Colonel of the same command July 11, 1882. As Captain of Company A, Thirteenth Regiment, he was particularly efficient during the riots of 1877, and was specially mentioned in Gen. WHITE's report. He lost his left hand as a result of wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.
Sergt. Eli CONN, m. Sept. 2, 1861; commissioned 2d Lieut. June 25, 1865; not mustered; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Sergt. Lewis C. WHITE, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; absent at muster out; vet.
Sergt. John C. STORY, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Petersburg June 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28 ,1865; vet.
Sergt. James B. CARSON, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863; at Opequon Sept. 19, and at Cedar Creek Oct. 19, 1864; pro. from Corp. March 2, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Sergt. Andrew J. EVENS, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Jan 16, 1862.
Serg. Samuel E. SULLIVAN, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Aug. 5, for wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
Sergt. Adam SHIRA, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864; dis. by general order May 19, 1865; vet.
Sergt. M.F. DAVRAINVILLE, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Sept. 3, 1864, expiration of term.
Sergt. Benj. L. CHRISTY, m. Aug. 16, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., June 18, 1864, of wounds received in action May 5, 1864; buried in nat. cem. Arlington, Va.; vet.
Sergt. Wm. KENNEDY, m. Aug. 20, 1861; captured at Warwick, Va., April 14, 1862; dis. by general order May 23, 1862.
Corp. F.M. EASTMAN, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd at Salem Heights, Va, May 3, 1863, and at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864; absent at muster out; vet.
Corp. Alfred G. MEALS, m. September 2, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. S.V. HUTCHESON, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863, and at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. Joseph HEYL, m. Aug. 20, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. Joseph EKIS, m. Oct. 18, 1864; absent with leave at muster out.
Corp. Alex. CAMERON, m. September 2, 1861; severely wd at Wilderness May 5, 1864; pro. to Corp. May 1, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. James A. WILSON, m. Aug. 20, 1861; prisoner in Audersonville, [sic] Ga., in 1864; pro. to Corp. June20, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. Wm. STORY, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865; pro. to Corp. June 20, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
Corp. Eli BLACK, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Dec. 1, 1862.
Corp. Samuel CRITCHLOW, m. Sept 23, 1862; wd at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863; pro. to Corp. Sept. 19, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
Corp. John EXTER, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. by general order June 23, 1865.
Corp. Jacob EMORY, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. April 13, 1863.
Corp. John FITHEAN, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. April 19, 1862.
Corp. Michael FAIR, m. Aug. 20, 1861; w. at Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862; dis. Sept. 22 for wounds received at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.
Corp. Wm. FILNY, m. Sept. 6, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
Corp. Peter J. GALLAGHER, m. September 6, 1864; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., September 22, and at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
Corp. Isaac N. HAYS, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. July 19, 1862.
Corp. Ed. L. HOON, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Nov. 18 for wounds received at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864; vet.
Corp. Samuel HASLETT, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. April 2, 1862.
Corp. Henry KORN, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Dec. 22, 1862.
Corp. Wm. J. LACKEY, m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; dis. Feb. 23, 1865.
Corp. Jos. B. MARTIN, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Feb. 19, 1863.
Corp. Jos. REDOUT, m. Aug. 29, 1862; pro. to Corp. Dec. 18, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
Corp. Wm. H. COWAN, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. June 30, 1862; pro. to Com. Sergt. Nov. 1, 1864; vet.
Corp. John D. JAMES, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; tr. to V.R.C. Jan. 1, 1865; vet.
Corp. Andrew A. WASSON, m. Aug. 16, 1861; pro. to Sergt. Maj. Nov. 9, 1864; vet.
Corp. James ADAMS, m. Aug. 20, 1861; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; vet.
Corp. Harry K. CRITCHLOW, m. Aug. 20, 1861; died May 8, 1864, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va.; vet.
Corp. Thomas B. STORY, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863; died May 18, 1864, at Port Royal, Va., of wounds received in action May 5, 1864; vet.
Corp. Charles SWEITERING, m. Aug. 20, 1861; deserted Oct. 21, 1862.

PRIVATES

ALEXANDER, John C., m. Feb. 22, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
BARCLAY, Albert H., m. Feb. 12, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
BURNS, Samuel, m. Feb. 15, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
BULFORD, John, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. April 10, 1862.
BOURLAND, George W., m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. July 19, 1862.
BLANY, Samuel, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd at Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, and dis. on account of wounds received at Spottsylvania C.H. May 18, 1864; tr. to V.R.C. Jan. 1, 1865.
BROWN, John G., m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. July 29 for wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
BERNHART, Adam, m. Feb. 25, 1864; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
BEDILLIAN, David B., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Fortress Monroe, Va., Aug. 20, 1862.
CRISWELL, Joseph, m. Aug. 2, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
CRAMER, Alexander, m. Feb. 24, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; tr. to V.R.C.; dis. by general order March 1, 1865.
CAMPBELL, Wm. F., m. Feb. 22, 1864; wd at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; m.o. w.c. June 28, 1865.
CRITCHLOW, James O., m. Feb. 22, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
CRITCHLOW, Henry D., m. Feb. 15, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
CHRISTY, John F., m. Aug. 20 ,1861; dis. Aug. 5, 1862.
CROSS, John W., m. Aug. 20, 1861; killed at Fair Oakes, Va., May 31, 1862.
CARSON, John H., m. Aug. 20, 1861; drowned in the Mississippi River, date unknown.
CRITCHLOW, Alex., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 8, 1864; vet.
CREELY, Daniel A., m. Feb. 8, 1864; died June 10 of wounds received at Petersburg, Va.,; buried in nat. cem., City Point, Sec. E, Div. 1, grave 39.
CAMPBELL, John, m. Feb. 18, 1864; died Sept. 27 of wounds received at Winchester, Sept. 19, 1864; buried in nat. cem., Lot 18.
DAUB, George H., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DOUTHETT, David B., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DODDS, Josiah R., m. Feb. 16, 1864; wd. at Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DAUBENSPECT, W.L., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DODDS, James, m. Feb. 9, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28.
DAUB, Jacob, m. Feb. 15, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DEER, Warren, m. Feb. 15, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
DAVIS, John D., m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Feb. 1, 1862.
DUNBAR, Carson, m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. June 6, 1863.
DUNBAR, Samuel, m. Aug. 24, 1864; dis. April 1, 1865, for wounds received at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864.
DUNLAP, Henry, m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Tenallytown, D.C., Dec. 18, 1861.
DEER, Wm. J., m. Feb. 18, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 5, 1864; bu. rec., May 6, 1864; buried in nat. cem., Cold Harbor, Sec. C.
DODDS, Wm. J., m. Feb. 15, 1864; died at City Point, Va., July 5, 1864.
DAUBENSPECK, S.L., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.
DAVIS, John, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862; deserted May 8, 1862.
FITHEAN, John S., m. Feb. 23, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
FISHER, Jacob, m. May 27, 1864; drafted; deserted July 16, 1864; returned March 26, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
FIELDING, Wm., m. Sept. 6, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
FOUZER, Wm. J., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863, and at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; tr. to V.R.C. Jan. 1, 1865; vet.
GIBSON, Geo. S., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
GARDNER, Wm., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
GREEN, Geo. R., m. April 9, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
GLAZE, Jacob, m. Feb. 6, 1864; died at City Point, Va., July 5, 1864, of wounds received in action.
HETZEL, John, m. Aug. 20, 1861; absent on detached service at m.o.; vet.
HARBAUGH, Perry, m. Aug. 20, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
HAMEL, John C., m. Feb. 15, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
HILLIARD, John M., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
HOLMES, Alfred C., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864.
HAYS, Martin P., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863; tr. to V.R.C., July 1, 1864.
[p. 106]
HAWK, Isaac A., m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
IRWIN, James, m. Aug. 20, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
JOHNSTON, James, m. Aug. 20, 1861; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; vet.
KAYLOR, Isaac, m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
KIRK, Elias, m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Point Lookout, Md., Sept. 9, 1862.
KATY, Alex., m. Sept. 2, 1861; died on board steamer Vanderbilt May 19, 1862.
KNESS, Lewis Q., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Tenallytown, D.C., Dec. 14, 1861.
LAVERY, Joseph, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
LOVE, Robert, m. Feb. 9, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
LOWE, James M., m. Feb. 16, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
LEWIS, Robert O., m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
LESTER, Geo. W., m. Aug. 29, 1862; wd. at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863, and at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
LAVERY, Benj. A., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; tr. to V.R.C. Jan . 10, 1865; vet.
MILLER, John m. Sept. 2, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
MARTIN, James D., m. Aug. 20, 1861; re-enlisted; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; absent at m.o., having been tr. to Invalid Corps; dis. in June, 1865.
MOSER, Walter L., m. Feb. 16, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MEALS, Samuel P., m. Feb. 16, 1864; wd. At Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864, and at Cedar Creek Oct. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MAHOOD, Alex., m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MARTIN, David, m. April 9, 1864; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 21, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MILLER, George, m. Feb. 15, 1864; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MURTLAND, John S., m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
MILLER, Alfred, m. Feb. 18, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864, and at Cedar Creek Oct. 19, 1864; absent at m.o.; was dis. June 20, 1865.
MATHEWS, Orin H., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; dis. on Surg. cert. May 26, 1865; vet.
MAHOOD, James G., m. Sept. 6, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek Oct 19, 1864; dis by general order June 20, 1865.
MARTIN, Wm., m. Aug. 20, 1861; captured at Warwick, Va., April 14, 1862; dis. by special order May 23, 1862.
MYERS, Samuel, m. Sept. 2, 1861; died at Annapolis, Md., June 16 of wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
MATHEWS, N.H., m. Feb. 26, 1864; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.
MAYES, Rinaldo L., m. Feb. 22, 1864; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
MYERS, James H., m. Aug. 16, 1861; dis. Aug. 4, 1864; vet.
M'MILLEN, Daniel, m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
M'MILLEN, Thomas, m. March 7, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
M'KINNEY, T.W., m. Aug. 16, 1861; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
M'COLLUM, Andrew, m. Sept. 2, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 2, 1865.
M'CULLOUGH, J.M., m. Feb. 5, 1864; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 21, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
M'NAUGHTON, J.W., m. Feb. 27, 1864; wd. at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; dis. by general order July 24, 1865.
M'CUNE, Alex., m. drafted; dis. Feb. 7; returned April 21, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
M'KISSICK Josiah, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; dis. Sept. 3, 1864, expiration of term.
M'GILL, John, m. Sept. 2, 1861; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
NOEL, Wm. J., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
NORRIS, Wm. H., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., Oct. 26, 1861.
OSENBAUGH, John R., m. Feb. 23, 1864; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19; buried in nat. cem., Lot 14.
ORR, John P., m. March 2, 1864; wd. at Spottsylvania C.H., May 12, 1864; tr. to V.R.C. Jan. 15, 1865.
PARKER, Wm. H., m. Feb. 11, 1864; wd. June 18, 1864; absent in hospital at m.o.
POTTS, Robert, m. Feb. 5, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
PETIT, Daniel, m. April 9, 1864; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
PETTIGREW, Andrew J., m. Sept. 2, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., Aug. 2, 1864, of wounds received in action; vet.
PARK, Wm. H., m. Feb. 27, 1864; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.
RILEY, Robert, m. Aug. 21, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 25, 1865, vet.
RIGBY, Hamilton P., m. Aug. 20, 1861; absent with leave at m.o.; vet.
RIGGLES, Matthew, m. Sept. 20, 1864; drafted; deserted Sept. 20, 1864; returned March 28, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
RENO, John G., m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Sept. 5, 1862.
REDDICK, Jos. G., m. Sept. 2, 1861; killed at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
ROBB, Franklin, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Aug. 10, for wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
ROBB, Lysander, m. Sept. 2, 1861; killed accidentally at Tenallytown, D.C., Jan. 28, 1862.
ROSS, Isaac N., m. Aug. 16, 1861; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
RENFREW, Samuel R., m. Feb. 15, 1864; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; buried in nat. cem., Lot 17.
REA, John K., m. Feb. 8, 1864; died at Alexandria, Dec. 1, of wounds received at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864; grave 2,809.
RANDOLPH, John H., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., 31, 1861; killed at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.
SCOTT, Thomas, m. Aug., 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
SHIRA, David, m. Sept. 2, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
SHRYOCK, Wm. R., m. Feb. 22, 1864; wd. at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
SMITH, Wm. A., m. April 9, 1864; wd. at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 21, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
SUMONY, John, m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
SHAY, John, m. July 18, 1863; drafted; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
SMITHSON, Daniel, m. June 14, 1864; drafted; deserted June 28, 1864; returned May 27, 1865; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
STROOPS, Wm., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; dis. on Surg. cert. Aug. 29, 1862.
SEATON, Herman, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; dis. on Surg. cert. Sept. 23, 1862.
SHIRA, Robt., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; dis. on Surg. cert. Jan. 17, 1863.
STEEL, Amos, m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864; dis. Sept. 3, 1864, expiration of term.
SHORTS, Cornelius, m. Sept. 6, 1864; wd. at Cedar Creek, Va., Sept. 22, 1864; dis. by general order June 20, 1865.
SPENCE, Robt., m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. on Surg. cert. Dec. 13, 1861.
SMITH, David, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; killed at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.
STOREY, James H., m. Feb. 18, 1864; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.
SHAKELY, Sol. W., m. Feb. 18, 1864; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 19, 1864; buried in Poplar Grove, nat. cem., Div. D, Sec. C, grave 38.
SHAKELY, Fred'k, m. Feb. 16, 1864; killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.
STEWART, Jos. W., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Chickahomony, [sic] Va., June 7, 1862.
SHIRA, Robt. O., m. Feb. 21, 1864; pro. to 2d Lieut. Battery B., Two Hundred and Twelfth Regiment P.V., Sept. 14, 1864.
SMITH, Jacob, m. Feb. 8, 1865; sub. not on m.o. roll.
THOMPSON, W.P., m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. on Surg. cert. April 21, 1863.
TAYLOR, James L., m. Feb. 16, 1864; dis. Jan. 16, 1865, for wounds received at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864.
THORNBURG, R.E., m. Aug. 20, 1861; died at Tenallytown, D.C., Nov. 27, 1861.
THOMPSON, James, m. Sept. 2, 1861; died at Washington, D.C., June 4, 1862; bu. in Military Asylum Cem.
TRIMBLE, Sam'l J., m. Aug. 20, 1861; killed at Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.
THORN, Wm., m. Feb. 16, 1864; died April 13, 1864; bu. in Allegheny Cem.
WALLY, Alex. C., m. Sept. 2, 1861; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865; vet.
WILES, Adam, m. Feb. 18, 1864; m.o.w.c. June 28, 1865.
WADE, Nixon, m. Aug. 20, 1861; dis. Aug. 28, for wounds received at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862.
WHITE, John M., m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Sept. 18, 1862, for wounds received in action.
WALLY, James S., m. Sept. 2, 1861; dis. Sept. 3, 1864; exp. of term.
WASSON. W.H.H., m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862, and at Cold Harbor, Va., June 4, 1864; pro. to First Lieut. Battery B, Two Hundred and Twelfth Regiment P.V., Sept. 14, 1864; was dis. at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., June 15, 1865.
WELLER, Jacob, m. Feb. 9, 1864; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864.
WILES, Fred'k, m. Sept. 2, 1861; wd. at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864; died at Baltimore, Md., Dec. 4 of wounds received at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; vet.
YOUNG, Watson J., m. Aug. 20, 1861; wd. at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862; dis. Sept. 3, 1864; exp. of term.

[End of Chapter 12e--Butler County During War of 1861-65, 102nd Regiment: History of Butler County, Pennsylvania. With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Waterman, Watkins, & Co., Chicago, 1883.]

Chapter 12--Butler County During War of 1861-65, 100th Regiment
Chapter 12--Butler County During the War of 1861-65, 103rd Regiment
1883 Butler County History Contents
Butler County Pennsylvania USGenWeb Homepage

Edited 16 Mar 2000, 12:00