History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Early Military History, Chapter 17

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Transcribed by: Donna Mohney For an explanation and caution about this transcription, please read this page.

Surnames in this chapter are:

ACKLES, ADAMS, ADDAVIT, ALEXANDER, ALLEN, ALWARD, ANDERSON, ANNOM, ARMSTRONG, BAILS, BALES, BALPH, BARNES, BARNHART, BARTLEY, BAYARD, BEAM, BEATTY, BEECHER, BELL, BIGHAM, BLACK, BOLES, BOOK, BOSTON, BOWERS, BRACKNEY, BRADDOCK, BRADLEY, BRANDON, BREDIN, BRENNAN, BREWSTER, BRIDGEMAN, BRINKER, BRODHEAD, BROWN, BRYSON, BURK, BURNSIDE, BURTNER, BUTLER, BYERS, BYRNE, CAIRNS, CAMPBELL, CARSON, CARUTHERS, CELERON, CHAMBERS, CHRISTIE, CHRISTY, CLARK, CLELAND, COLEMAN, COLL, COMPTON, CONAN, CONNOR, COOK, CORNELIUS, COVERT, COYLE, CRAINE, CRATTY, CRAWFORD, CRESS, CRISWELL, CRITCHFIELD, CRITCHLOW, CROSS, CROZIER, CRUIKSHANK, CUBBISON, CUSTARD, CYPHER, DAUBENSPECK, DAVIS, DELONG, DENNY, DOBBINS, DODDS, DONALDSON, DOUDHISER, DUFFY, DUNBAR, DUNN, ELLIOTT, ENERY, EMMINGER, EVANS, FIELDS, FLAKE, FLEMMING, FOLTZ, FORRESTER, FRAZIER, FREW, GALBRAITH, GALLAGHER, GASTON, GIBSON, GIESLAND, GILCHRIST, GILDRESLEEVE, GILL, GILLESPIE, GILMORE, GLENN, GLOVER, GOLD, GOLL, GRAHAM, GRAY, GREEN, GREER, GROSSMAN, GRUCY, HAGERTY, HAMMIL, HAND, HANNON, HARBISON, HARKINS, HARRIS, HARRISON, HARTLEY, HARTMAN, HARTUNG, HAWK, HELMBOLD, HENRY, HESS, HEWITT, HILLIARD, HINDMAN, HOFFMAN, HOGE, HOGG, HOUCK, HUNTER, HUSTON, HUTCHINSON, IRVINE, JACK, JACKSON, JAMESON, JOHNSON, JOHNSTON, JOLLY, JORDAN, KENNEDY, KERR, KIESTER, KING, KINNEY, KIRKER, KNEISS, LAFAYETTE, LAWALL, LEACH, LEFEVER, LEASURE, LEMMON, LESLIE, LEWIS, LINN, LIPPEY, LITTLE, LLOYD, LOGAN, LONG, LOVE, LOUDON, LOWRY, LUSK, LUTTON, MACKEY, MAGEE, MAIDEN, MARSHALL, MARTIN, MAXWELL, MCBRIDE, MCCALL, MCCANDLESS, MCCANNON, MCCLEERY, MCCOLLOUGH, MCCONAGHEY, MCCONNELL, MCCORD, MCCOY, MCCULLOUGH, MCCURDY, MCDERMOTT, MCDONALD, MCELROY, MCELWAINE, MCFADDEN, MCGILL, MCGINLEY, MCKEE, MCKINNEY, MCLAUGHLIN, MCLEOD, MCMURRAY, MEAD, MEANS, MECHLING, MEEKER, MILLER, MITCHELL, MONKS, MONTOOTH, MOORE, MORGAN, MORRISON, MORROW, MOSER, MOTHERAL, MURRAY, MURRIN, MURTLAND, NEGLEY, NEYMAN, O=DONNELL, OGLE, O=HARA, ORR, OSBORNE, PARKER, PATTERSON, PEARCE, PENDER, PERRY, PETERSON, PIERCE, PILES, PILLOW, PONTIUS, PORTER, PORTERFIELD, POWER, PURVIANCE, RALSTON, RANDLES, RANKIN, RANSON, RAUSEL, REBSTOCK, REDICK, REED, RIDDLE, RIPPEY, ROBB, ROBERTSON, ROBINSON, ROCHAMBEAU, RODGERS, ROLLIN, ROOT, ROSS, RUDOLPH, RUSSELL, ST. CLAIR, SCHENDLEDECKER, SCHOBERT, SCOTT, SEDWICK, SEMPLE, SHERIDAN, SHEVAR, SHIELDS, SHIRA, SHIRLEY, SHORTS, SIPPOY, SLATOR, SMITH, SNYDER, SPEAR, SQUIRES, STANOOT, STEVENSON, STEWART, STINETORF, STONE, STOREY, STRAIGN, STRAWICK, STRIEBY, STUBBS, STUDEBAKER, SULLIVAN, SUMNEY, SUTTON, TALBOTT, TAYLOR, TERMEANS, THOMPSON, TIMBLIN, TINDLE, TRUESDALE, VANDERLIN, VARNUM, VENNATTA, WADDLE, WALKER, WALLACE, WALDRON, WARMCASTLE, WASSON, WATSON, WATT, WAYNE, WEAKLEY, WEIR, WELSH, WHITTENBARGER, WHITE, WHITMORE, WICK, WILLIAMS, WILLIAMSON, WILSON, WISEMAN, WOLF, WRIGHT, YATES, ZIEGLER


CHAPTER XVII

EARLY MILITARY HISTORY

[p. 217]
INTRODUCTION -- VETERANS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY AND WAR OF 1812 - MUSTER ROLLS OF BUTLER COUNTY COMPANIES -- MEXICAN WAR VETERANS -- PIONEER MILITIA ORGANIZATIONS - MUSTER DAY FESTIVITIES - BUTLER COUNTY MILITIA COMPANIES - NATIONAL GUARD - MILITARY ENROLLMENT

Many of the sturdy men who became the pioneers of Butler county were soldiers of the Revolutionary War, who after its close took up the work of clearing the forest and establishing home for themselves and their families on what was then the western frontier. They proved no less true to every duty of manhood in the pursuits of peace than they had in battling for liberty and independence during the long struggle that followed the firing of the first gun at Lexington. In 1812, when the encroachments of Great Britain made a second war necessary, these venerable veterans were among the first to offer their services in defense of their flag and country, inspiring by their patriotic example those of the younger generation to a quick response to the call to arms. It is needless to say that among these men and their descendants have been found citizens that have reflected honor upon Butler county. By their industry they have contributed to her up-building; and in every department of human effort have advanced her in the direction of progressive and enduring growth, and have given her a high place among the counties of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Among the Revolutionary soldiers who became settlers of Butler county were the following:

William HARBISON, served under Capt. James LEACH, in Col. HUND's old regiment, later BRODHEAD's; was taken prisoner; subsequently served under Captain JACK in the Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment in 1779.

John WELSH served in Colonel GREER's Seventh Pennsylvania regiment, was at Brandywine, and Paoli, and was wounded at Germantown. He received an honorable discharge after one year's service.

John GALBRAITH, a native of Ireland, who served in the Pennsylvania Line, settled in Centre township in 1796-97, making his home there during the remainder of his life.

John RANKIN served in William HUSTON's company of Colonel WATT's Rifleman of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, from July 1 to November 15, 1776, when he was transferred to Colonel ROLLIN's command, and a day later taken prisoner by the British at Fort Washington. He was held at New York until the last of March 1777, and was exchanged in November 1778.

John SLATOR, a soldier in the army of Count de ROCHEMBEAU, arrived with the fleet off Rhode Island in 1780, served in the Battle of White Plains; was present [p. 218] at the surrender of CORNWALLIS and continued in service until discharged at Wilmington, Delaware, May 9, 1788. He was a pioneer of Donegal township.

John JOHNSTON enlisted in September 1777, at Boston, in Colonel CRANE's artillery command, and served until after the surrender of CORNWALLIS.

Samuel PORTERFIELD, born in 1753, served eighteen months in the troops of Lighthorse of the Second Pennsylvania regiment.

John RANSON enlisted in Captain Talbott's company of the Sixth Pennsylvania regiment in 1776, and served three years. In October 1779, he was ensign of the Seventh Pennsylvania regiment.

Andrew DUNN, seventy -six years, in 1824, enlisted in Captain MORGAN's company of Virginia troops under Col. John GIBSON, in 1777, and served until discharged at Pittsburg, in 1788.

James BURNSIDES enlisted in the Eighth Pennsylvania regiment under Colonel BAYARD, in Captain LLOYD'd company, and served nineteen months. He was discharged at Pittsburg after the surrender of CORNWALLIS.

Capt. John MCCOLLOUGH, an early settler of Venango township, served as a captain of a company.

Hugh MURRIN, an early settler of Venango township, served in a New Jersey regiment.

John MCLEOD, of Connoquenessing township, served in Captain PATTERSON's company of the Second Pennsylvania regiment from 1777 to 1782. He was present at Germantown, at Monmouth, where he was wounded, and at Yorktown.

Daniel GRAHAM, Sr., who was seventy-two years of age in 1820, enlisted in the Tuscarora Valley, Cumberland County, in March or April, 1777, in Capt. Francis NEGLEY's company, of the Ninth Pennsylvania regiment, commanded by Col. Richard BUTLER. He received an honorable discharge at Trenton, New Jersey in 1781, which was signed by General BUTLER and countersigned by Gen. Anthony WAYNE.

Jacob RUDOLPH enlisted as a ranger in 1779, under Capt. Matthew JACK, and aided in destroying the Muncy Indian towns in 1780. He subsequently enlisted in another company for nine months, and was stationed at Kittanning. He re-enlisted in the Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, in which he served twenty-one months.

John BELL, enlisted in the Sixth Maryland Regiment, under Captain GIESLAND in 1777, and served until the close of the war.

George DOBSON, who was seventy-seven years of age, and a resident of Slippery Rock township in 1839, entered the Continental army at Staunton, Virginia, under Captain YATES, in October 1777, serving until the close of November following. In April 1781, he joined the Bedford County (Pennsylvania) Rangers, under Colonel DAVIS, serving in Capt. David James WALKER's company until September, 1781. The command was employed against the Indians.

James GLOVER, one of the pioneer settlers of the county, served with the New Jersey troops during the Revolution, participating in many battles and enduring the privations of Valley Forge. He settled in Adams township.

Thomas MCKEE, another Revolutionary soldier, settled in Butler township [p. 219] in 1797 where he resided until his death in June 1815. A biographical sketch of him will be found in another chapter.

Peter PETERSON, was a survivor of the ill-fated expedition sent in 1755 against the French, at Fort Duquesne, under command of General BRADDOCK, whose death and disastrous defeat are matters of history. He afterwards served in the Revolution, and later settled in Butler township, Butler county.

Alexander BRYSON, a native of Ireland, and a soldier of the Revolution, settled in the northwestern part of what is now Butler township.

William GILL, a pioneer of Mercer township, served under General Anthony WAYNE, and although wounded at Paoli, continued in the service until the close of the war.

Andrew CRUIKSHANK, who came from Ireland prior to the Revolution and took a full part in that struggle, died in 1813. His death occurred on the day that his son Andrew was to have started for the front as a soldier of the War of 1812.

John KENNEDY, who came from Ireland in Colonial days, served in the Revolution and afterwards settled in Winfield township. His son, James served in the War of 1812.

Thomas WATSON, a native of Ireland, served in the Revolutionary army until taken prisoner at Brandywine. Escaping form the British, he found a home in this State and settled in Clinton township, Butler County. His son James served in the War of 1812.

John GREEN, a native of Ireland, enlisted in 1776, at Little York, in Colonel HARTLEY's regiment of the Pennsylvania Line. After participating in the battles of Brandywine, Paoli, Germantown, and Trenton, he was discharged at Sunbury in 1781.

Nathaniel STEVENSON, who was seventy-six years of age, and a resident of Butler borough in 1827, enlisted December 27, 1775, in Captain RIPPEY's company of Colonel IRVINE's Pennsylvania regiment. He served until April 20, 1777.

George BYERS, aged sixty-seven years in 1823, served in Colonel Cook's Pennsylvania regiment from November 1776 to 1779.

John JAMESON, seventy years of age, and a resident of Parker township in 1820, enlisted at Hannahstown, Westmoreland county, at Colonel McCoy's Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment. He was discharged at Pittsburg in 1779.

Peter KINNEY, beter known as MCKINNEY, who was fifty-six years of age in 1821, served as a fifer in Captain BLACK's company of the Eighth Pennsylvania regiment. He entered the army a mere boy and served for six years and six months.

Charles SULLIVAN, the ancestor of the SULLIVAN family in Butler county, served under WASHINGTON in the Continental Line, and was with the army during the terrible winter at Valley Forge. While in the army, he made the acquaintance of Miss Susanna JOHNSTON, of Chester county, to whom he was married in 1785.

Philip HARTMAN, an early settler of Donegal township, Butler county, served in Colonel OGLE's regiment.

John HARBISON served under General St. CLAIR against the Indians in 1791 [p. 220] He was noted as a scout and spy. His wife, Massy HARBISON, was captured by the Indians in 1792, and after terrible sufferings escaped from the savages.

John PIERCE, who served in the New Jersey Line, settled in Butler township in 1796.

Michael O'HARA, who served under Gen. Anthony WAYNE, was an early settler of Butler County.

Andrew ORR, John VANDERLIN, Patrick MCDOWELL and James SHIELDs, early settlers of the county, all served in the Revolutionary war. Luke COVERT, another soldier, settled in Brady Township, William CARSON, one of the early settlers of Marion township, saw service in the Continental army.

Among the other Revolutionary soldiers who became early settlers of Butler county, may be mentioned James CRITCHLOW, Joseph SNYDER, who served in the Pennsylvania line, settled in Worth township and died in 1815; Thomas MARTIN, a native of Ireland, who served from 1776 to 1781 and settled in Middlesex; James BYRNE, who came to Butler county in 1800; Abraham LEASURE, who settled in Warwick township; John ALLEN, who settled in Allegheny township; Enoch VARNUM, who served in St. CLAIR's army, settled in Washington township, where he died in his ninetieth year; Thomas CLARK, Sr., who settled in Worth township; John MOSER, who settled in Oakland township; William ELLIOTT, who served two years in the milita and five years in the Continental army; David RUSSELL, a pioneer settler of Butler County; General CAMPBELL, a pioneer of Marion township; William SPEAR, who settled in Franklin township; and Jacob HILLIARD, who settled in Washington township.

In 1830, the Pennsylvania legislature refused a contribution to William Elliott, mentioned above, although his claims to recognition were strongly urged by William PURVIANCE, then a member of the House. In 1852, the legislature granted a pension of forty dollars a year to James MCELWAINE, a soldier of the Indiana war, and a like sum to Catherine MONKS, the widow of another soldier of that war. In 1840, there were twenty-six Revolutionary pensioners residing in Butler County.

THE WAR OF 1812

Within thirty years after the thirteen colonies had wrested their independence from the mother country, another call to arms resounded throughout the length and breadth of the young Republic. England, smarting under the loss of so large a portion of her American domain, had precipitated a second conflict, and had sent her fleets and armies to our shores. The struggle that followed is familiar history. At its beginnings the pioneers of Butler county were yet engaged in subduing the wilderness to the uses of civilization. The "spirit of '76'," however, yet lingered among them, and the call to arms found even the surviving soldiers of the Revolution as ready to defend the Republic as they had been to aid in establishing it. The sons, as patriotic as the sires, also took their places in the ranks, and proved their value on many a well fought field.

On July 19, 1818, the appearance of the British fleet off Presque Isle, evinced a determination on the part of the enemy to not only compass the destruction of the half-finished American fleet, but to invade the State itself. Commodore PERRY, appreciating the gravity of the situation and the necessity for prompt resist-[p. 221] ance, sent a courier to General MEAD, of Meadville, asking for reinforcements. The next day, General MEAD sent the following circular into every settlement within the Sixteenth Militia district:

CITIZENS TO ARMS

Your State is invaded. The enemy has arrived at Erie, threatening to destroy our navy and the town. His course, hitherto marked with rapine and fire wherever he touched our shore, must be arrested. The cries of infants and women, of the aged and infirm, the devoted victims of the enemy and his savage allies, call on you for defense and protection.. Your home, your property, your all, require you to march immediately to the course of action. Arms and ammunition will be furnished to those who have none, at the place of rendevous near to Erie, and every exertion will be made for your subsistence and accommodations. Your service to be useful must be rendered immediately. The delay of an hour may be fatal to your country, in securing the enemy in his plunder and favoring his escape.

David MEAD, Maj. Gen. 19th D. P. M.

The response was prompt. Butler county furnishing her full quota of men, and contributing to the notable naval victory that followed. In appreciation of the valuable services thus rendered. Commodore Perry sent the following letter to General MEAD:

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR LAWRENCE
OFF ERIE August 7, 1813

Sir:- I beg leave to express to you the great obligation I consider myself under for the ready, prompt, and efficient service rendered by the militia under your command, in assisting us in getting the squadron over the bar at the mouth of the harbor, and request you will accept, Sir, the assurances that I shall always recollect with pleasure the alacrity with which you repaired, with your division, to the defense of public property at this place, on the prospect of an invasion. With great respect, I am, Sir,

       Your obedient servant,
                        O.H. PERRY.
Maj. Gen. David MEAD,     Pennsylvania Militia, Erie

Shortly after war was declared, Col John PURVIANCE proceeded to raise a regiment for service, four companies of which were recruited in Butler county. This regiment, known as the "Second Regiment of Infantry," formed a part of the brigade commanded by Brig. Gen. TANNEHILL, and saw service at Erie and other posts in northern Pennsylvania. Under the call of July 1813, the men of Colonel PURVIANCE's regiment re-enlisted. In 1851, his son, John N. PURVIANCE, secured from the files of the war department at Washington, D. C., a roster of the regiment. It was published July 26, 1851 in The Democratic Herald, together with an offer of General PURVIANCE to procure pensions free of charge for the survivors of his father's regiment or for their descendants. From this roster are taken the following names of those who enlisted from Butler county:

BRINKER's Company.-- Captain: Abraham BRINKER

Lieutenant: William BALPH

Ensign: Robert LEMMON

Sergeants: Rueben AYRES, Alexander MCCANDLESS&lt; Abraham MAXWELL and Thomas MCKEE.

[p. 222]

Corporals: Henry SLATOR, Matthew RANDLES, Peter HENRY, and John MOSER, Jr.

Musicians: William PILLOW, fifer, and Peter MCKINNEY, drummer

Privates: Philip BARNHART, Samuel ROBB, Robert HOGG, Hugh MCKEE, Alexander WILSON, Martin MCCANDLESS, Alexander W. GALBRAITH, John DUNBAR, Matthew THOMPSON, William FRAZIER, Andrew PORTER, Arthur FRAZIER, Alexander SCOTT, Samuel WHITE, Samuel FULTON, Norbert FOLTZ, Reese EVANS, Alexander WRIGHT, William JOHNSON, James MCCLEARY, Samuel WILLIAMSON, David DELONG, James ROBB, and John WARMCASTLE.

STOREY's Company.-- Captain: Robert STOREY

Lieutenant: Robert MEANS

Ensign: Christopher STEWART

Sergeants: Amdrew CHRISTY, William WHITE, William WEAKLEY, and John ROSS

Corporals: Thomas MARTIN, Thomas ANDERSON, John GIBSON, and Edward COMAN

Musicaians: John BELL, fifer, and William Bell, drummer

Privates: Walter BELL, Isaac HILLIARD, Samuel WALLACE, John STANOOT, William MARTIN, Samuel CRAWFORD, Andrew CELERON, Pickert TAYLOR, Henry ADDAVIT, George ARMSTRONG, John JACKSON, David STEWART, James PORTER, David CROSS, William MOORE, Jesse GILDERSLEEVE, Joseph ADAMS, Richard TAYLOR, Robert CAMPBELL, Henry CAMPBELL, Signor STRAIGN, John BROWN, John HARTLEY, Robert WADDLE, Andrew MOORE, Samuel SUTTON, George MCDERMOTT, John WICK, Joseph STINETORF, Joseph STUDEBAKER, William MCCANNON, Solomon BEECHER, Samuel BLACK, Thomas WADDLE, Andrew BRADLEY, Alexander MCMURRAY, Samuel OSBOURNE, John MARTIN, Robert SUTTON, Hugh GILMORE, and Thomas CARUTHERS.

THOMPSON's Company.-- Captain: Robert THOMPSON

Lieutenant: Thomas PEARCE

Ensign: Charles HUNTER

Sergeants: William BEATTY, David PEARCE, Robert HARKINS, and E. T. STONE

Corporals: James GOLD, James BALPH, John MECHLING, and John CRITCHLOW

Privates: Charles O'DONNELL, John HARBISON, William ELLIOTT, Andrew SMITH, John MCCALL, Allen FLEMMING, William GRAY, Joseph KIRKER, James MORROW, Robert STEWART, Peter GRUCY, Robert KENNEDY, James JOHNSTON, Allen BAILS, James WATSON, Henry HESS, Thomas CLEELAND, John MAIDEN, Malachai SUTTON, John SHIRA, David STRAWICK, Richard MARTIN, and Robert FLEMMING

JORDAN's Company.-- Captain: Samuel JORDAN

Lieutenant: Leonard DOBBINS

Ensign: William TINDLE

Sergeants: John SEMPLE, Andrew LONG, William TAYLOR, and David WALLACE

Corporals: Robert PATTERSON, David WHITE, Nathaniel HAMMIL, and Benjamin STUBBS

Privates: Michael BRENNAN, William RODGERS, William GASTON, William COLEMAN, William ANNOM, Samuel VENNATTA, Samuel COVERT, Samuel LESLIE, Robert LUSK, Robert KING, James MILLER, James MOORE, Joseph MCCORD, Joseph [p. 223] SIPPOY, Joseph SHEVAR, Adam WHITTENBARGER, Thomas HOGE, David HOUCK, David MARTIN, Daniel BOLES, Daniel TERMEANS, John LIPPEY, John CLARK, John TRUESDALE, John SCHENDLEDECKER, Stephen MCCONAGHEY, Christopher STRIEBY, Charles SMITH, George BRIDGEMAN, and Hugh WILSON.

STEWART's Company.-- Captain: James STEWART

Lieutenant: John SCOTT

Ensign: Jesse MORROW

Sergeants: Thomas BURKE, Isaac ROBERTSON, John FREW, and George ACKLES

Corporals: David MORRISON, John BOOK, Jr., Matthew MURRAY, and Abel HANNON

Privates: William HUNTER, Thomas MURRIN, Michael BOOK, James LUTTON, Samuel STEWART, Francis LEWIS, Adam CONNOR, Caleb PILES, Thomas HANNON, Alexander CHAMBERS, William LUTTON, Uriah CAIRNS, John LEWIS, Jacob HAWK, Thomas MORRISON, Thomas MORROW, William HAWK, Andrew HEWITT, Robert MOORE, Jacob LEWIS, William WILSON, and John MOTHERAL.

MARTIN's Company.-- Captain: Robert MARTIN

Lieutenant: William LOGAN

Ensign: Jacob MECHLING, Jr.

Sergeants: Hugh STEVENSON, John GILLESPIE, Elijah ANDERSON and Matthew MCCOLLOUGH

Corporals: Thomas JOHNSTON, James RIDDLE, John GRAHAM, and William MOORE

Privates: John SULLIVAN, Moses SULLIVAN, John GALLAGHER, James CRATTY, William FORRESTER, William O'HARA, James BRYSON, William GRAY, Samuel ROBINSON, John MAIDEN, Mordecai GRAHAM, John LOVE, Robert MACKEY, George CUSTARD, Robert HINDMAN, Joseph WHITE, James COVERT, Benjamin DAVIS, Emanuel LITTLE, Abner MEEKER, Samuel CRITCHLOW, Archibald CRITCHLOW, Moses MEEKER, John COMPTON, James MCCANDLESS, John BROWN, James CRITCHLOW, Richard SHORTS, Joseph FLAKE, William DAVIS, William BALES, Alexander MONTOOTH, Daniel ROOT, Daniel MCDONALD, Henry PENDER, James BRANDON, and Robert MCKINNEY. This roll is taken from the roster of Captain MARTIN's Compnay, dated January 18, 1814. It was then in the battalion commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel MILLER, known as the One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth regiment.

In addition to the foregoing roster, the following names, obtained from their descendants and other sources of information; are given of those who served from Butler county, as well as those serving from other counties, who afterwards became residents of this county:

John BRANDON and John WALDRON, pioneers of Forward township. The latter served under Commodore PERRY on Lake Erie.

James MITCHELL, an early settler of Summit township.

Joseph ALWARD was wounded in one of the skirmishes with the British and Indians. He afterwards taught school in this county, until he removed to the neighborhood of Tarentum.

[p. 224]

James BARTLEY, who came from Ireland in 1803, served nine months.

Francis ANDERSON, known as 'Squire ANDERSON, who settled in Butler county in 1802.

Garrett MOORE and Capt. William WALKER in Clinton township.

Thomas ALEXANDER, of Brady township.

Dennis O'DONNELL and John PONTIUS of Donegal township.

Michael EMMINGER served as a lieutenant of a company.

Samuel and George BELL, Abraham and Isaac HILLIARD, and John SHITA, all early settlers of Washington township.

John GIBSON, who served from Washington county, under General HARRISON in Canada, settled in Butler county in 1828.

William, James, and Thomas WELSH, of Connoquenessing township. James WELSH, who died in 1878, was the last of these veterans.

William, James and John DODDS, sons of Thomas DODDS, who was born on the Atlantic ocean while his parents were en route from Ireland to America.

Matthew and Samuel IRVINE, sons of James IRVINE, of Adams township.

John MOORISON, a pioneer of Yellow creek.

Capt. Thomas JOLLY, James and George MURRIN, Levi WILLIAMS, and John JAMESON, of Venango Township.

James and Hugh MCKEE, sons of Thomas MCKEE, a Revolutionary soldier, early settler, of Butler township.

William CROSS, Samuel WEAKLEY, Samuel BARNES, Thomas BIGHAM, Jacob S. KIESTER, and John RALSTON, of Slippery Rock township.

George DAUBENSPECK, John and Samuel GIBSON, sons of Levi GIBSON, of Parker township.

Joseph GRAHAM, John SCHOBERT, Isaac LAFEVER, Philip BURTNER, and Alexander and James WRIGHT, of Jefferson township.

Elisha WICK, Jr. and Capt. John GLENN of Clay township.

Samuel STEWART, of Lancaster township.

Joseph MCCOY, William and Dunbar CHRISTY, and Simeon and Benjamin GROSSMAN, of Cherry Township.

William HUTCHINSON, Daniel WHITMORE, John MCGINLEY, Robert WILSON, and JOHn CHRISTIE, of Oakland township.

Henry KNEISS, a native of Maryland, served during a part of 1813-14, and settled in Harmony in the latter year.

James MAGEE, of Jackson township.

William REDICK, a pioneer of Allegheny township.

William HARBISON, Sr., of Middlesex Township.

Thomas, James, Robert, Jr. and John WADDLE, sons of Robert WADDLE; Joseph Porter, Joseph KERR, and John MURTLAND, of Marion township. Thomas WADDLE died at Buffalo, of "Black Rock Fever," while in the service.

Henry EVANS, of Centre township.

Matthew MCCULLOUGH and James CORNELIUS, son of Isaac M. CORNELIUS, of Worth township.

Robert WILSON, of Fairview township.

James and William STOREY, sons of the pioneer, Alexander STOREY. James [p. 225] died in service, and in 1816, Hannah STOREY, his widow, was granted a pension of five dollars a month, so long as she should remain single.

John HINDMAN and James WASSON enlisted in 1818. When they reached New Castle, the news of PERRY's and HARRISON's victories led to their being mustered out.

Mathias CYPHER, of Winfield township.

James MCGILL served with the Kentucky riflemen.

Mannasses MCFADDEN survived the war fifty years, dying in 1862.

Thomas BARTLEY, Robert MARTIN, John GIBSON, and William HARBISON, of Penn township.

William GRAHAM and Morris COVERT of Cranberry township.

John EMERY, of Concord township.

Platt SUTTON, of Jackson township.

John WEIR, of Buffalo township.

James CRATTY, of Franklin township.

John SCOTT, of Lancaster township.

Henry SLATOR, Robert MURTLAND, Patrick MCELROY, John COYLE, and Henry RAUSEL, also served from Butler county.

Owing to the lapse of years it is no easy matter to secure a complete list of all who served from Butler county during the War of 1812. Many names not given in the foregoing records will be found in the biographical sketches devoted to the various townships. They include names not only of those who served from Butler county, but those who served from other counties, and whose descendants are now residents of this county.

A meeting of veterans of 1812, held at Butler, March 14, 1850, adopted a resolution asking Congress to place them upon the same footing, in regard to pensions, as the veterans of the Mexican War. William BEATTY presided, with John KENNEDY and John GILCHRIST, vice-presidents, and John SULLIVAN, secretary. This meeting, with others held throughout the State, had the effect of winning for the veterans a small measure of recognition.

THE MEXICAN WAR

No regular organization from Butler county participated in the Mexican War. On June 18, 1846, the Slippery Rock Guards, of Centre township, assembled at Lieut. John M. BRACKNEY's house in West Sunbury. A motion of Capt. Samuel LOUDON was adopted offering the services of the Guards to the Governor as a rifle company. On February 18, 1847, the services of the Washington Cavalry, of Butler, were also tendered. Owing to the fact that the quota of Pennsylvania was already filled, these offers were not accepted.

Henry and Casper HARTUNG, of Butler township, enlisted at Pittsburg and served throughout the war.

In July 1848, Andrew G. MARSHALL, George L. GLENN, and Richard CROZIER, who served during the war, returned to Butler, and were warmly welcomed by their old friends and neighbors.

On July 31, 1848, E. G. SMITH, a returning soldier en route to Crawford county, died on the Butler stage, and was buried at Butler with military honors.

[p. 226]

Lafayette SULLIVAN, aged twenty-two years, a sergeant in Company E, Eleventh United States Infantry, of Gen. James SHIELDS' brigade, died in January 1848, in the city of Pueblo, Mexico.

James BREDIN, ex-judge of this district, served on the United States ship Ohio, along the Mexican coast. He was present at Luspan and Vera Cruz.

James REED, of Oakland township, served as government wagon maker.

Lafayette KERR, of Slippery Rock, died on the field of honor.

Charles HOFFMAN and Charles GALLAGHER gained military experiences that afterwards proved valuable to them in the War of the Rebellion.

Other men who came to Butler county in later days saw service in SCOTT's and TAYLOR's victorious armies. </p>

PIONEER MILITIA ORGANIZATIONS

The military service was kept alive after the close of the Revolutionary War, by the organization of militia in the various States, under laws providing for their arming, equipment, and discipline. They were to be ready to protect the frontier against Indians, or to take the field in the event of a foreign war or invasion by a foreign foe. Regular muster days were appointed, when the citizen soldiery of each district were required to meet, be exercised in the manual of arms and go through the evolutions usual to active service. These muster days were great events in the lives of the early settlers of Butler county.. Care was thrown to the winds, and fun and merriment, hilarity and jollification ruled the hour. They usually closed with a banquet, the tables groaning beneath the abundance of good things to eat, with enough to drink, ready to hand, to enable prompt and hearty responses to be given to the long list of toasts which formed the principal part of the programme of each occasion. Although muster days have long been things of the past, they are pleasantly remembered by the few now living, who, in their younger years participated in their duties and their pleasures. Since they ceased to be observed the county has passed through a civil war which has added to her citizenship a large body of veterans whose military experience was acquired on the hard fought fields of the South, and who in their regimental reunions, State and National encampments, foster and keep alive a patriotic and military spirit among the people.

At the time of the breaking out of the War of 1812, Butler county was included in the Sixteeenth Militia district, commanded by Maj. Gen. David MEAD, and her militia was called into service when the appearance of the British fleet on Lake Erie indicated a purpose on the part of the enemy to invade the state.

In 1814, a general reorganization of the militia of the State appears to have taken place. On August 1, of that year, John DUFFY was commissioned captain of the Third company of the Twenty-Fourth regiment by Governor SNYDER. This commission is now in the possession of his nephew, Charles DUFFY, of Butler.

In December 1820, in pursuance of an order of Col. Robert MARTIN, the officers of the Twenty-Fourth regiment met at Captain BEATTY's house in Butler to attend to regimental affairs. Capt. Robert STOREY and Capt. James MCKEE were appointed to make a settlement of the quartermaster's accounts.

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On April 12, 1823, the Butler Light Infantry, commanded by Capt. Robert T. LEMMON, assembled at Butler "for training."

In obedience to an order of Adj. Abraham M. NEYMAN, the volunteer battalion commanded by Major GIBSON, met in Butler. The "Centre Guard" met for training at John TIMBLIN's house, on May 6, 1823. In compliance with an order of Major Jacob MECHLING, the militia of the Second Battalion of the Twenty-Fourth Regiment assembled for training at Butler, May 6, 1823. The Butler Rifle Company, met at Butler for training, May 6, 1823, under Capt. William BEATTY. Samuel POWER, the brigade inspector of the First Brigade, Sixteenth division, Pennsylvania Militia, was present on the 28th, 29th, and 30th of May to witness the training at Butler. The "Butler Hornets" were grom the Prospect neighborhood. The "Harmony Blues" were commanded in 1823 by Captain GOLL; the "Connoquenessing Rangers," by Captain DAVIS, and the Rifle Company, by Captain BOSTON.

The "Bonny Brook Light Artillery," organized early in 1825, completed its organization, April 25, 1825, with Abraham Brinker, Captain. At that time the "Butler Light Infantry" was commanded by Captain LEMMON, with William CRISWELL, orderly sergeant; the "Butler Rifle Company" by Captain BEATTY, with John SHERIDAN, orderly sergeant, and the "Centre Greens" by Capt. John GLENN. These companies were leading attractions in the fetes of July 4, 1825, and joined in the thirteen cheers by which the toast--"Our Militia and Volunteers-the only safe bulwark of the Nation," was received at NEYMAN's, BRINKER's, and GOLL's banquet tables on that day. The "Harmony Blues" drank to several toasts at BEAM's tavern in Harmony; the ABuffalo Rifle Company, A at Philip BURTNER's, and the "CONNOQUENESSING Republicans" at MARTIN's.

The appointments of officers for the Twenty-Fourth regiment, First brigade, Sixteenth division, Pennsylvania Militia, were made March 20, 1829, by Jacob BRINKER, colonel of the command.

The staff comprised James THOMPSON, adjutant; J. L. MAXWELL, quartermaster; John N. PURVIANCE, seargeant-major; George LINN, surgeon; A. SPEAR and James GRAHAM, assistant surgeons. The ten captains commissioned were Alexander MCBRIDE, Jacob DOUDHISER, Thomas DODDS, Johnson WHITE, Samuel DODDS, George FRAZIER, of the First Battalion; and Alexander CRAIG, John WEIR, Thomas JOLLY, J. B. MCCONNELL and George WOLF, of the Second Battalion. The first and second lieutenants for the same companies were commissioned at that time, among them Eli BALPH, Thomas SULLIVANE, James SUTTON, Isaac ROBB, James GLENN, and Edward KENNEDY. In May following, the First Battalion under Major GRAHAM assembled at Prospect for militia discipline; the Second Battalion, under Major SUMNEY met at Butler; and the volunteer battalion under Lieutenant-Colonel HAGERTY and that under Colonel COVERT assembled at the same town. Colonel GOLL's battalion of the One Hundred and Fourteenth regiment drilled at Harmony.

The Washington battalion, of which John WELSH was major, and Frederick GRAHAM, adjutant; assembled for training at John DAVIS' house in Middlesex township, June 1, 1829.

The militia companies forming the First brigade of the Sixteenth division, in 1845, were the First Rifle battalion, meeting at Prospect; the Washington Vol-[p. 228] unteer battalion and the Lafayette Volunteer battalion, meeting at William LOGAN's, the McDonald Volunteer Battalion, commanded by Major BREWSTER, meeting at "SHOEMAKER's old stand"; the Union Volunteer battalion, under Major HARRIS, meeting at Harrisville; the Second battalion of Second regiment (formerly the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment) meeting at Browington Cross Roads; the Marion Volunteer battalion, commanded y Major ADAMS, meeting at North Washington; the First battalion of the First and the First battalion of the Second Regiment, and the Jackson Volunteer battalion, meeting at Harmony. The Portersville Volunteer battalion; the German Guards under Captain WISEMAN; the De Kalb Greys under Captain ZIEGLER, and the Butler Cavalry under Captain EVANS, met at Butler.

Maj. George W. Reed was connected with the militia of Butler for many years, first serving as captain and major. In 1835, he was elected brigade inspector for Butler and Beaver counties, and in 1842, for Butler county alone. In 1848, he was chosen brigadier-general, and subsequently was adjutant and major of the battalion.

The militia elections of June 1854, resulted in the choice of James M. DONALDSON, of Zelionople, for the office of Inspector of the First brigade, Nineteenth division; Thomas MCLAUGHLIN, brigadeir general, and George W. REED, W. C. ADAMS, R. E. GRAHAM, J. E. CORNELIUS, and E. A. HELMBOLD, majors of the Butler, the Marion, the Jackson, the Prospect, and the Lafayette battalions, respectively. The brigade, at that time, comprised the Saxonburg Light Infantry, the Butler Hornets, the De Kalb Greys, Middle Lancaster Guards, Connoquenessing Whites, Jackson Greys, Clearfield Blues, Centreville Artillery, German Guards, Repulican Blues, Portersville Guards, Marion Guards, Invincible Guards, Washington Cavalry, Venango Blues, Middlesez Guards, and the Slippery Rock Infantry.

In May and June 1858, the Butler Scott Guards organized under the new milita law.

The De Kalb Greys (new) was organized in June 1859, with Samuel COLL, captain; Joseph B. MECHLING and Prof. A. J. REBSTOCK, Lieutenants; J. A. SEDWICK, John Lawall, John R. DENNY and Benjamin W. BREDIN, Sergeants; Samuel F. MCBRIDE, Hugh W. MCBRIDE, William BOWERS, and Enoch FIELDS, corporals; John CRESS and George BOWERS, ensigns; and William W. GLENN, band leader. The companies voting for brigade inspector, June 6, 1859 were the Conoquenessing Whites, Prospect Guards, True Americans, Washington Rifles, Portersville Guards, Sunbury Blues, Jackson Greys, Venango Blues, Marion Guards, American Guards, Fairview Guards, Centreville Artillery and Saxonburg Light Infantry. In September 1859, a new company, known as the Butler Guards was organized.

These organizations served to keep alive the military spirit among the people of Butler county until the Rebellion, when they were merged into the volunteer commands that went forth in defense of the Union. The echoes of the war had scarcely died away when the organization of militia companies was resumed. On September 2, 1865, the "Butler Greys" was organized with the following officers: Captain, W. A. LOWREY; lieutenants, W. E. MOORE, and Thomas F. PARKER, and sergeant, J. T. SHIRLEY.

Following such independent commands came the National Guard of Pennsylvania. In 1873 Company E., Fifteenth regiment, was organized at Butler and is still in existence. W. T. MEHLING, lieutenant-colonel of the regiment, is a resident of Butler, Company E. did service at Homestead, and is recognized as one of the most efficient commands in the regiment.

The act of April 18, 1887, required the annual enrollment of every able-bodied citizen of good reputation, between the ages of twenty and forty-five years, outside the National Guard, who are subject to military duty if called upon by the state. This enrollment gave Butler county a militia army of about 8,000 men.

[End of Chapter 17 - Early Military History: History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

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Updated 29 Jun 2000, 15:34