History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 70 (Pgs. 725-775)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Ed


CHAPTER LXX

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

BOROUGH OF BUTLER

[p. 725]

SYLVESTER D. BELL, physician and surgeon, was born in Perry township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1847, son of Samuel S. and Margaret (McCLYMONDS) BELL, and grandson of Samuel BELL, a native of Westmoreland county, and an early settler of Washington township, Butler county. He was reared in this county, obtained a common school education, and afterwards attended West Sunbury Academy and Witherspoon Institute. He commenced reading medicine under Dr. T.M. McMILLAN, of Fairview township, and attended lectures at the medical department of the Western Reserve College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1870-71 and 1873-74, graduating in March, 1874. Dr. BELL commenced practice at Millerstown, Butler county, where he continued in the active duties of his profession until May, 1890, when he removed to Butler, and has since built up a very large and lucrative practice. He is one of the surgeons for the Pittsburg and Western Railroad Company, and his practice equals that of any other physician in his native county. He has been president of the Butler County Medical Society for one year, and has filled the office of secretary and treasurer of the same for three terms. He is a member of the State Medical Society and of the American Medical Association, and was vice-president of the former in 1891-92, and is also a member of the National Association of Railway Surgeons. Dr. BELL was married December 21, 1871, to Mary E., a daughter of William ALEXANDER, an early settler of Fairview township. Seven children are the fruits of this union, viz: Harry A., Lana A., Charles E., Bessie, Gertrude, Margaret Helen and Sylvester D. He and family are connected with Grace Lutheran church. The Doctor is an active Republican, has served as chairman of the county committee, was elected to the legislature in 1881, and was one of the presidential electors in 1892.

JOHN E. BYERS, physician and surgeon, was born in Summit township, Butler county, June 15, 1848, was educated in the common schools, at Witherspoon Institute and at Iron City College. He read medicine with Dr. A.M. NEYMAN, attended lectures at the Medical University, New York, and graduated in 1878. He commenced practice in Butler, and has since continued in the active duties of his profession, having built up a large and successful practice. He has been surgeon for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Butler for fifteen years, and is one of the well-known physicians of the county. He is a member of the Butler County Medical Society, also of the State Medical Society, and of the National Association of Railway Surgeons, and takes a decided interest in the growth and development of his profession. Dr. Byers was married, October 10, 1878, to Mary Katherine STEPHENSON, a daughter of James STEPHENSON, of Summit township. They are members of the Presbyterian church of Butler, in which the Doctor fills the office of trustee. In politics, he is a Republican, and [p. 726] has served in the borough council. He is a member of the K.of P. and the W.of W., and is a charter member and a director of the Citizens Natural Gas Company.

SAMUEL M. BIPPUS, physician and surgeon was born in Oakland township, Butler county, October 19, 1861, son of Capt. John G. and Rachel (MYERS) BIPPUS, natives of Wurtemburg, Germany. He attended the common schools of his native township, and Sunbury Academy, and graduated at Waynesburg College in 1879. He studied medicine with Dr. Samuel GRAHAM of Butler, attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, and graduated from that institution in 1884. He at once commenced practice, but owing to a severe illness, gave up the duties of his profession until 1886, when he located in Butler, where he has since built up a lucrative business, and is recognized as one of the leading young physicians of the county. Dr. BIPPUS is a member of Butler County Medical Society, also of the State Medical Society. He is connected with Butler Council, Number 242, Jr. O.U.A.M., and in politics, he is a Republican. He married Nannie, daughter of John MITCHELL of Butler, and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church.

LYSANDER BLACK, physician and surgeon, was born in Marion township, Butler county, May 16, 1854, son of James and Nancy (RUSSELL) BLACK, and grandson of John BLACK, one of the first settlers of Marion township. He was reared on the homestead farm and attended the district school of his neighborhood until 1865, when his parents removed to Franklin, Pennsylvania, where he completed his studies in the schools of that place. At the age of seventeen he engaged in the oil business, and subsequently operated in the oil and gas fields of Venango, McKean and Butler counties. In 1883 he was engaged in drilling gas wells in Allegheny, Westmoreland and Washington counties. He commenced the study of medicine with Drs. WALTER and BENNINGHOFF of Bradford, Pennsylvania, in 1881-82, but later engaged in the natural gas enterprise. In 1886 he entered the Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, from which he was graduated in 1890. He at once located in Butler, and has since continued in the active duties of his profession. Dr. BLACK was married January 1, 1874, to Lizzie EMERY, a daughter of Robert EMERY of this county. She died June 5, 1885, leaving three children: Jessie M., Lois and Alfred E. He is a member of the Masonic order, being connected with the Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, and is also a member of the B.P.O.E. of Butler. Since beginning practice Dr. BLACK has built up a large professional business, and is one of the busiest as well as most popular physicians in the borough.

JOSEPH FORRESTER, physician and surgeon, was born in Peterboro, Province of Ontario, Canada, July 4, 1860, a son of Thomas and Catharine A. (HORTON) FORRESTER, natives of England. In 1865 his parents settled in Erie, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and received a common school education. He subsequently attended Edinboro State Normal School, from which he graduated in 1884. He then taught for one year as principal of West Springfield Academy, in Erie county, and two years as principal of the public schools of Mr. Alton, McKean county, and was afterwards general secretary of the Y.M.C.A. in Johnstown and Butler for two years. He commenced the study of medicine with [p. 727] Dr. John E. BYERS, of Butler, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1891. Dr. FORRESTER at once located in Butler, practicing with Dr. BYERS the first year, and has since built up a gratifying practice. He is secretary of the Butler County Medical Society, and a member of the State Medical Society, and is one of the well known young physicians of the borough. Dr. FORRESTER is a member of the Presbyterian church, and takes an active kpart in church work. He is also connected with the K.of P., and the K.O.T.M., of which he is tent physician. Politically, he is a Republican.

DR. MCCURDY BRICKER, son of John BRICKER, was born on the homestead in Buffalo township, Butler county, April 2, 1868. After receiving a common school education, he attended the academies at Slate Lick, Tarentum, and Freeport, and then taught school for six years. In the meantime he concluded to enter the medical profession, and commenced his studies in the Medical Department of the Western University of Pennsylvania, and completed them at the Medical College of Indianapolis, where he graduated on March 26, 1894. He soon afterwards became associated with Dr. N.M. HOOVER, of Butler, and has continued in practice in this borough down to the present. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church; is connected with the Jr. O.U.A.M., and in politics, is an adherent of the Republican party.

STEPHEN A. JOHNSTON, D.D.S., third son of Jesse and Sarah J. (ALLEN) JOHNSTON, was born September 6, 1846, in Portersville, Pennsylvania. He received his primary education in the common schools, subsequently attended Witherspoon Institute, and graduated from Iron City College, Pittsburg, in 1868. He studied dentistry with Levere & Moore, of Butler, and in 1873 located in Downington, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he practiced his profession for over seven years. In 1881 he graduated from the College of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia, and in 1882 he located in Butler, where he has since built up a lucrative practice. Dr. JOHNSTON was married in 1870, to Ocilla, a daughter of William STOOPS, of Butler township, to which union nine children have been born: Frank A.; Sarah E.; Minnie O.; Charles W.; Flora M.; Wesley R.; Marion; James C., and Irene C. Dr. JOHNSTON has given considerable attention to oil producing, in which he has been quite successful, and is president of the Producers Torpedo Company. Politically, he is an independent voter, and is recognized as one of the leading professional men in the community.

VOLNEY McALPINE, dentist, was born in Crowland, Welland county, Ontario, Canada, May 27, 1830, son of Christopher and Sarah (HOUX) McALPINE, the former a native of New York and the latter of Maryland. After receiving a good English education, he commenced the study of dentistry under Dr. BROWN, of Niagara Falls, and later studied under Dr. WHITNEY, of Buffalo, and others. He commenced practice at Welland, Ontario, subsequently removed to London, Ontario, whence he returned to Welland, in 1864. In 1865 he located at Petroleum Centre, Venango county, Pennsylvania, removed to Rouseville, in 1871, to Petrolia, in 1874, and to Duke Centre, McKean county, in 1880. The same year he settled at Cleveland, Ohio, where he practiced his profession until 1888, and then went to Sitka, Alaska. He remained there in practice until the end of 1888, returned again at the end of 1889, and remained until October, 1890, [p. 728] and then came direct to Butler, where he has since built up a lucrative business. For some years Dr. McALPINE was a member of the Erie Dental Association. He was married in 1853, to Lavina, daughter of William CHAPMAN, of Pelham, Canada, and they are the parents of the following children: Archie, a dentist of Bradford; William, a physician of New York City; Amos C., a dentist of Warren; Kenneth; Victor H., and Jasmine, a physician of Wilkinsburg. He is an attendant of the Presbyterian church of Butler, and is connected with the K.of H., and the Royal Templars. In early life he was a Republican, but is at present an ardent supporter of the Prohibition party.

WILLIAM PURVIS, a native of Ireland, immigrated to Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Westmoreland county, about 1812, and settled on a farm. Owing to financial losses, he sold his farm about 1821 and came to Middlesex township, Butler county, where he purchased 120 acres of land, upon which he spent the remaining years of his life. He married Isabel DICKSON, who died in January, 1860. Mr. PURVIS died on December 25, 1850. Their children are as follows: Nancy, who married Andrew FULTON; Isabel, who married Henry SEFTON; Oliver; Samuel G.; Mary Ann, who married Robert WHITE; Sarah; William; Robert; Agnes, who married John DODDS, and Levi, all of whom are dead. Mr. PURVIS and wife were members of the Covenanter church, and were buried in Glade Run United Presbyterian cemetery.

SAMUEL G. PURVIS was born May 28, 1808, in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, eldest son of William and Isabel PURVIS. He resided on the farm with his parents until the age of twenty-three, and then went to Pittsburg to learn the carpenter's trade. In 1832 he came to Butler, where he continued to work at his trade for two years, a part of the time in the construction of the Presbyterian church. About 1834 he commenced contracting and building, and continued the same until 1867, in which year the firm of S.G. Purvis & Company was formed, his son, Joseph L., becoming a partner. In 1869 they embarked in the planing mill and lumber business, which they carried on in connection with contracting and building. They abandoned the latter line of trade in 1878, but continued the lumber and planing mill business, which has grown from small beginnings into one of the leading manufacturing institutions of Butler county. In 1876 Levi O. was taken into the business, which is still carried on, under the old firm name, by Joseph L. and Levi O. PURVIS. Mr. PURVIS was a stanch Democrat, served upon the school board, and filled the office of justice of the peace for sixteen years. He was a lifelong member of the United Presbyterian church of Butler, and an elder and trustee in that organization for many years. He was prominent in public matters and always took a commendable interest in the growth and progress of his adopted home. He was at one time the owner of the Democratic Herald, and one of the original stockholders in the Butler and Allegheny Plank Road Company. He was one of the projectors and first president of the Butler Water Company, and was also president of the Butler Mutual Insurance Company from its organization until his death. Mr. PURVIS married Elizabeth LOGAN, a daughter of Joseph LOGAN, of Middlesex township, and their children are as follows: Joseph L.; Isabel; Samuel D; William L., deceased; [p. 729] Levi O., and Sarah J., deceased wife of Harrison BLACK. He died on May 28, 1879, and his wife, in April 1892.

JOSEPH L. PURVIS, eldest son of Samuel G. and Elizabeth PURVIS, was born in Butler, October 4, 1838. He obtained a public school education, learned the carpenter's trade with his father, and entered into partnership with the latter in 1867. In that year the firm established a planing mill and two years later added the lumber business, both of which they have since conducted. Mr. PURVIS is one of the original members of the Home Natural Gas Company, is president of the Butler Savings Bank, and superintendent of the Butler County Agricultural Society. He is one of the leading and useful members of the United Presbyterian church, of Butler, was one of its trustees for a number of years, and chairman of the building committee in the erection of the new church building. In politics, he is a Democrat, has been a member of the borough council, and has served on the school board for fourteen years. In 1869 Mr. PURVIS married Mary Ellen BAILEY, a daughter of E.H. BAILEY, of Parker, and their children are as follows: Mary M.; Samuel H.; William B.; Wilson L., and Joseph D.

LEVI O. PURVIS, third son of Samuel G. and Elizabeth PURVIS, was born in Butler, May 12, 1846, and was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. He learned the carpenter's trade, and in 1876 he became a member of the firm of S.G. Purvis & Company, with which he has since been connected. He was married to Zoe, daughter of Capt. Francis DEMPSEY, of Erie, Pennsylvania, of which union have been born to them five children: Harold, Clara, Florence, May and Bessie. The family are adherents of the Presbyterian church. In politics, Mr. PURVIS is a Democrat, and has been a member of the school board for five years. He is connected with Butler Lodge, F.& A.M., also with the A.O.U.W.

SAMUEL D. PURVIS, son of Samuel G. and Elizabeth PURVIS, was born in the borough of Butler, January 20, 1842, received a common school education, and learned the carpenter's trade with his father. He afterwards worked at his trade in Pittsburg and Franklin, but returned to Butler in 1865, and has since been foreman in the sash and door factory of S.G. Purvis & Company. On February 20, 1866, he married Valeria EVANS, a daughter of Abijah EVANS, of Centre township,--one of the California Argonauts of '49--who is the mother of the following children: Annie E.; Ella; Perry E., deceased; Frank; Alfred B.; Samuel G., and Gracey Ferguson. Mr. PURVIS is an elder in the United Presbyterian church, and is a leading member of that denomination. In politics, he is a Democrat, and at present is a member of the school board. He is a director in the Building and Loan Association, and has always been active in educational and religious work.

JACOB MECHLING, SR., was born in Northampton county, Pennsylvania, December 8, 1770, and was a son of Jacob and Catherine MECHLING, natives of Germany, who settled in Northampton county, whence they removed to Westmoreland county, where they died, November 1, 1827, and August 18, 1832, respectively, each having reached the ripe old age of eighty-four years. Their son Jacob enlisted in the United States army, and in 1792 was sent with his company to Chamber's Station, Westmoreland county, to guard the settlers [p. 730] against the Indians. In 1796, after the Indian troubles had subsided, he came to Butler county and purchased a tract of land in what is now Washington township, whence he removed to the borough of Butler and engaged in the hotel business. He was also one of the pioneer merchants of the town. In 1803 he was elected county commissioner, and in 1804 a member of the legislature, and served continuously by re-elections up to 1808. In 1809 he was appointed prothonotary, in which office he served nine years. He was also a justice of the peace in 1804. He served several terms in the council, and was chief burgess of the borough for three years. He took an active interest in public affairs, and was widely known among the pioneers. A Democrat in politics, he voted for Washington in 1792, and for every Democratic president from Jefferson to Buchanan. In religious belief he was a Lutheran, and died in that faith, January 10, 1861. Mr. MECHLING married Mary Magdalene DRUM, December 30, 1794, and their children were as follows: Jacob, born October 20, 1795; Susanna, July 8, 1797, married John McCLEARY, and subsequently a Mr. COLE; George, June 3, 1799; Simon, September 16, 1801; Philip, August 20, 1803; Catherine B., March 3, 1806, deceased wife of Judge Joseph BUFFINGTON; Christian, January 24, 1808; Benjamin, March 28, 1810; Henry, March 22, 1812; Samuel, June 21, 1814, and Thomas, August 30, 1816, the last being the only survivor of the family.

JACOB MECHLING, JR., eldest son of Jacob and Mary Magdalene MECHLING, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1795, and died in Butler September 11, 1873. He succeeded to the hotel business of his father, and, like the latter, was one of the leading men of his day. He carried on the hotel up to 1865, when he retired from active business. Politically, he was a Whig and afterwards a Republican, and served as associate judge, prothonotary, and treasurer of Butler county, and was also chief burgess of Butler in 1849. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and served as lieutenant of a company from Butler, which was stationed at Black Rock, on the Niagara river. In early life he was connected with the Lutheran church, but in later years united with the Protestant Episcopal church of Butler, and was a leading member of that body, and for many years a vestryman and senior warden. Mr. MECHLING married Jane, a daughter of John THOMPSON, and sister of the late chief justice, James THOMPSON. She died in May, 1872, the mother of the following children: Mary J., deceased wife of L.L. Lord; Susan D., wife of Col. Archibald BLAKELEY of Pittsburg; William T., who graduated from West Point, was a colonel in the regular army, and now resides in Texas; Jacob J., of California; Simon S., deceased, and Joseph B., of Butler township.

SIMON MECHLING, son of Jacob and Jane (THOMPSON) Mechling, was born September 16, 1834, in Butler, Pennsylvania, and received a common school education in the schools of that borough. He was employed for many years in the various offices in the court house, and died September 30, 1866. He married Elizabeth ZIEGLER, and by this union they were the parents of three children: William T.; Josephine, wife of J.O. JACKSON of Franklin, and George S., of Butler. Mr. MECHLING is a resident of the borough. Politically he was a Republican and was a member of the Protestant Episcopal church.

COL. WILLIAM T. MECHLING, eldest son of Simon and Elizabeth (ZIEGLER) MECHLING, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, April 5, 1856. He learned the printer's trade in the office of the Democratic Herald, at which he worked for two years after serving his apprenticeship. He then engaged in clerking for various persons in the oil field, and subsequently filled the position of first deputy clerk of courts under CORCHRAN and WRIGHT for four years. He was afterwards bookkeeper for S.G. Purvis & Company eight years, and filled a similar position with the Jarecki Manufacturing Company, and now occupies the position of assistant manager with the Oil Well Supply Company. In 1886 he was elected to the council, and served in that body six years, being president during this time. He was elected with others of that period on the question of public improvements, independent of party, and during his service the street paving, sewering, lighting and many other improvements were carried out by the council and the town has since become quite modernized. Colonel MECHLING was one of the promoters and original stockholders of the Armory Building, and in many other ways has shown his public enterprise. He is one of the leading Democrats of Butler county, and takes a deep interest in the success of his party. He joined Company A, Old Thirteenth Regiment National Guard, served two years as a non-commissioned officer, and was then promoted to second lieutenant, serving eight years in those two ranks. He was then elected captain of Company E, Fifteenth Regiment, and subsequently colonel, which position he now holds. He served in the Pittsburg riots of 1877 with the Thirteenth Regiment, and spent seventy-one days at Homestead in 1892, with the Fifteenth Regiment, being provost marshal of the town during that period. Colonel MECHLING was married April 10, 1878, to Mary E., daughter of Hon. J.T. McJUNKIN, and they are the parents of five children: Mary E., Martha Helen, Clara Magaw, Georgia R. and Margaret L. He is a member of Connoquenessing Lodge, Number 278, I.O.O.F., also of Butler Lodge, Number 170, B.P.O.E. Both he and his wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal church of Butler.

ROBERT GRAHAM, SR., was a native of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. His father immigrated from Scotland in the last century and settled close to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where Robert was born. After arriving at manhood Robert removed to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and about 1797 came to Butler county and purchased a tract of one hundred acres, which he afterwards sold to the commissioners who laid out a part of the town of Butler thereon. This land was conveyed to the Governor of the State under the act of 1803, in connection with the CUNNINGHAM tract of 200 acres. He then removed outside the borough limits and purchased 400 acres, upon which he built a log cabin, now the site of John Berg's residence. Here he resided until his death, in 1849. He married in 1800, Sarah BROWN, a sister of Robert BROWN, one of the early justices of Middlesex township. His family consisted of the following children: William; Robert; James; John; Samuel; Williamson; Ebenezer; Rachel, who married Festus YOUNG; Mary, who married Daniel HEINER; Sarah, who became the wife of Walker REED; Lydia, who married John CRAWFORD. Politically, Mr. GRAHAM [p. 732] was a life-long Whig. In 1832 he was elected a commissioner of Butler county. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church forty years.

JOHN GRAHAM, fourth son of Robert and Sarah GRAHAM, was born in 1809, on the old homestead just outside the borough limits of Butler. He was reared a farmer, and was educated in the common schools. In connection with the farm his father was engaged in the manufacture of brick, and after John grew to manhood he took charge of that business and continued in it until retiring from active life. He located on Main street, Butler, in 1831, on what is now known as the GRAHAM property, where he resided for nearly half a century. He always took an active interest in the prosperity of Butler, and though he never held any public office, was identified with the Whig and Republican parties. He was a life-long member of the Presbyterian church. When the North Western railroad was built, he was one of the original stockholders, and took an active interest in its success. Mr. GRAHAM married Sarah, a daughter of Charles GILKEY, a pioneer of what is now Lawrence county. Their children are as follows: Walter L; Lydia, deceased wife of William PORTERFIELD; Samuel; Robert, an attorney of Meadville; Louisa, wife of Joel STODDARD, of Butler, and three who died in infancy. At his death, in 1893, Mr. GRAHAM was one of the oldest residents of Butler.

WALTER L. GRAHAM, attorney at law, son of John and Sarah GRAHAM, was born in the borough of Butler, October 25, 1831. He attended the common schools of the town, also Witherspoon Institute, and graduated from Jefferson College in 1854. He commenced reading law with Samuel A. PURVIANCE, completed his studies with Charles C. SULLIVAN, and was admitted to the bar in 1855, since which time he has continued to practice here and at Pittsburg. In politics, he is a Republican, and was a delegate to the National Convention, in 1860, which nominated Lincoln for the presidency. He has been president of the borough council, and has always taken a deep interest in local affairs. Mr. GRAHAM enlisted in Company G, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Militia, in 1862, that went out to assist in repelling Lee's invasion. He subsequently filled the office of notary public, by appointment of Governor CURTIN, for three years. He was married in 1854, to Catherine, daughter of Emanuel KELLER, of Cumberland county; she died July 4, 1861, leaving three children: Frank, deceased; Walter H., and Annie V., deceased. His second marriage occurred in 1867, to Margaret A., daughter of John Michael ZIMMERMAN, by which union two children have been born to them: John C., and Margaret. Mr. GRAHAM is a member of the Presbyterian church, and for twenty years he has been a trustee in the Butler organization.

LEWIS WALKER was one of the early settlers of Butler county, where many of his descendants still reside. He was a native of Newburyport, Massachusetts, and came to what is now Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, with the PLUMER family, prior to the Revolution. About the time of his majority he located on a tract of 800 acres of land in what is now Cranberry township, Butler county, where he lived until his removal to Butler. He erected several houses on North Main street, was recognized as an enterprising man, and died in 1845. Mr. WALKER married a Miss PARKS, and their children were as follows: John, who died in Cranberry township; Parks, who died in Wheeling, West Virginia; David, who [p. 733] was quartermaster of the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died at Mercersburg, Kentucky; Samuel, who died in Cincinnati, Ohio; Simpson, who died in Washington, D.C.; Nathaniel, who died in Butler; Mary, deceased wife of James BORLAND, and Keziah, deceased wife of James FRAZIER.

NATHANIEL WALKER, son of Lewis WALKER, was born on the homestead in Cranberry township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, and there grew to manhood. In 1846 he removed to Sharon, Mercer county, and the following year came to Butler, where he engaged in the manufacture of brick, purchasing his brother David's yard, which business he continued many years. He was elected treasurer of Butler county in 1862, and also filled the office of justice of the peace for a long period. Mr. WALKER was one of the early Abolitionists of the county, and maintained a station on the Underground Railroad for runaway slaves. He was a leading member of the Presbyterian church and active in all good works. He was twice married. His first wife was Grizella, a daughter of John and Jane (POLLOCK) CROWE, who bore him two children: Samuel and John, of Butler. His second wife was Sarah M. SLATER, and their children were: Leonidas, a lawyer of Denver, Colorado; Caroline, wife of W.D. JOHNSON, of Ohio; Clarence, and Leverett H., first lieutenant in the Fourth United States Artillery. In politics, Mr. WALKER was first a Whig and afterwards a Republican.

CAPT. SAMUEL WALKER, son of Nathaniel and Grizella (CROWE) WALKER, was born January 19, 1835. He was reared on his father's homestead in Canberry township until his twelfth year. He subsequently attended school at Witherspoon Institute. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was discharged August 6, 1861. On the 22nd of August, 1862, he joined Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Pensylvania Volunteers, and served with them until March 12, 1864. Captain WALKER was commissioned second lieutenant in the Reserve Corps February 20, 1864, and captain March 13, 1865, and was honorably discharged from the service August 27, 1868. He was one of the last twelve soldiers, including General HOWARD, discharged from the volunteer service. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the regular army September 16, 1868, and was retired from the service December 31, 1870. During the Rebellion Captain WALKER participated in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, losing his right leg at the last named battle, May 3, 1863. While in the United States army he was located at Memphis, Nashville, Chattanooga and Knoxville, being connected with the Freedmen's Bureau as agent, under General HOWARD. After retiring from the service he returned to Butler, and was teller in the First National Bank until 1873. In 1890 he was elected tax collector for the borough, which position he has since occupied. Captain WALKER married Caroline ZIMMERMAN, a daughter of John Michael ZIMMERMAN, a well remembered citizen of Butler. Two children are the fruits of this union: Samuel and Catherine McC [sic]. He is a Republican in politics, a member of Butler Encampment, Number 45, U.V.L., also of the K.of H. and A.O.U.W. Captain WALKER is one of the highly respected citizens of Butler, and enjoys the confidence of the community in which he has so long resided.

[p. 734]

CLARENCE WALKER, attorney at law, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1848, son of Nathaniel and Sarah (SLATER) WALKER. He received his primary education in the public schools, afterwards attended Witherspoon Institute, read law with Judge McJUNKIN, and was admitted to the bar in 1871. He has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. WALKER was married in 1877, to Elizabeth M., daughter of Hon. E. McJUNKIN, and their children are as follows: Wayne McJ.; Victor B.; Helen; Lucile; Clarence L., and Elizabeth. He is one of the managers of the Producers Oil Company, and is interested in oil production. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of the R.A., and the A.O.U.W.

JOHN WALKER, son of Nathaniel and Grizella (CROWE) WALKER, and grandson of Lewis WALKER, was born at Tarentum, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1836. His youth was spent upon the old homestead in Cranberry township, and he was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to learn the tinner's trade in Pittsburg, at which he served four years. At the expiration of this time he continued working at his trade for three years. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months as first sergeant of his company. He participated in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam and Chancellorsville. After his discharge he was appointed to a position in the provost marshal's office in Pittsburg, which he resigned to fill the unexpired term of his father as treasurer of Butler county. At the expiration of his term as treasurer he went to Oil City, and was engaged in buying oil for the refineries, which business he followed until 1865. He was then appointed to a clerkship in the Freedmen's Bureau, and was stationed at Knoxville, Tennessee, under his brother, Captain WALKER. In 1865 he returned to Pittsburg, where he engaged in the tinning business until 1873, when he weas appointed cashier of the German National Bank, of Millerstown, which position he filled acceptably for twelve years, when the bank wound up its business because of the oil supply giving out in that locality. He then received an appointment as teller in the First National Bank, of Oil City, where he remained six years, and then resigned on account of poor health. In 1891 he returned to Butler to accept his present position as book-keeper for Thomas W. PHILLIPS. Mr. WALKER was married October 9, 1873, to Sarah C. BOSLER, of Philadelphia, and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Politically, he is an ardent Republican, and is connected with the K.of H.

DAVID WALKER, son of Lewis WALKER, was born in Cranberry township, Butler county, in 1803, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm. He subsequently went to Pittsburg and engaged in the manufacture of brick, and then returned to Butler where he established a brick yard, which he carried on extensively for several years and then sold out to his brother Nathaniel in 1847. He afterwards engaged in buying horses and cattle, which he drove to the New York markets, and continued in this business until 1854, when he obtained a contract on the North Western railroad for making a cut three miles below Butler. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and in February, 1862, died from disease contracted through exposure in the service. [p. 735] Politically, he was a Whig and afterwards a Republican, and served as justice of the peace of Butler township for ten years. He was one of the early members of the Presbyterian church of Butler, and contributed liberally of his means towards that institution. He married Jane, daughter of John GILLILAND, and the following children were born to this union: Elizabeth, who married Rev. D. HALL; Lewis P.; Mary E., wife of William SLACK; Kesiah, wife of F.W. RHOADES; Hugh B.; Sarah B., wife of O.D. LEWIS, and Martha J., wife of J.W. YEAMAN. Mrs. WALKER died in 1848, in the faith of the Presbyterian church.

LEWIS P. WALKER, notary public, was born in the borough of Butler, March 10, 1833, son of David and Jane (GILLILAND) WALKER, and grandson of Lewis WALKER. He received a good common school education, and was afterwards connected with his father's business until 1856, when he engaged in hauling goods between Butler and Pittsburg, which he followed some eight years, or until the construction of the railroad, when he engaged in the oil business at Petroleum Center, Venango county. From 1864 to 1874 he followed the oil business at that point, and then returned to Butler, where he continued the oil and lumber business up to 1880. Mr. WALKER has filled the office of justice of the peace in Butler for eleven years, and was subsequently appointed a notary public. He was married in November, 1856, to Mary D., daughter of William BELL, of Warren, Pennsylvania, to which union six children have been born: Emma J.; William S.; Harry L.; Flora B., wife of T.H. DAVIS; Frank H., and Mary L. Mr. WALKER is one of the charter members of Butler Lodge, Number 94, A.O.U.W., and is a member of the Presbyterian church.

JAMES McJUNKIN was one of the early settlers of Butler county. Three brothers, James, John and William McJUNKIN, immigrated from the North of Ireland to Pennsylvania about 1796. James and William settled near what is now known as Muddy Creek church, in Butler county, in 1799. The former was born in 1777, and died in 1833. He married for his first wife Asenath TURK. She was born in Ireland in 1788, and her family were among the first settlers of Parker township, Butler county. She was the mother of two sons, David and William. Mr. McJUNKIN was married to Nancy TURNER, in 1818, who became the mother of eight children: Mary; James T.; Hannah; Samuel; John R.; Sarah J.; Martha, and Susan.

JAMES T. McJUNKIN, eldest son of James and Nancy McJUNKIN, was born in 1820 upon the old homestead. He received a common school education and in early life taught school for several years. In 1848 he was elected to the office of register and recorder, and re-elected in 1851. He engaged in the insurance business in 1860, and from that date up to 1873 followed that busines in connection with a foundry and marble shop. In 1867 he was elected to the legislature, and served in the sessions of 1868-69. He continued in the insurance business to the time of his death, March 16, 1885. He married Martha, daughter of John ROSE, a native of New Jersey, but a resident of Butler, and his family consisted of seven children, as follows: John P., who died February 6, 1866; Agnes D., widow of George A. BLACK; Mary E., wife of W.T. MECHLING; James C.; Loyal S.; Ira, and Minnie, deceased. Politically, he was a Whig and afterwards a Republican, and a leading spirit in public affairs. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, [p. 736] Fourteenth Pennsylvania Militia, which went out to assist in repelling Lee's invasion of the State. He was a member of Connoquenessing Lodge, Number 278, I.O.O.F., and Butler Lodge, Number 272, F.&A.M. In religious belief, he was a Presbyterian.

LOYAL S. McJUNKIN, son of James T. McJUNKIN, was born in Butler, May 22, 1856. He attended the public schools of his native town, and at his father's death he succeeded to the insurance business, and represents many of the leading companies of England and America. He is a Republican, and was a delegate to the State convention in 1880. He is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the Presbyterian church. From 1875 to 1881 he was a member of the National Guard of Pennsylvania.

IRA McJUNKIN, attorney at law, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, February 13, 1860, son of James T. and Martha McJUNKIN. He received a common school education, and subsequently attended Witherspoon Institute, and at the age of seventeen he was appointed, by Col. John M. THOMPSON, to the United States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he graduated in 1881. He then spent two years on the Asiatic Station in the United States service, and after his return stood a final examination, and by an act of Congress received an honorable discharge in 1883. In the fall of that year he commenced the study of law with Judge McJUNKIN, and was admitted to the bar April 10, 1886, since which time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1892 he was elected district attorney of Butler county, which position he is now filling. He has also held the office of school director for three years. He is a Republican in politics, and takes an active interest in the success of the measures and principles of his party. Mr. McJUNKIN is a member of the Masonic order, also of the I.O.O.F., and is captain of Company E, Fifteenth Regiment National Guard. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian, and both as a lawyer and citizen stands well in the community.

GEORGE VOGELEY, SR., was a native of Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, born August 5, 1793. He immigrated to the United States in 1836, first settling in Pittsburg, where he followed the shoemaker's trade three years. He then removed to Butler county and settled at Saxonburg, where he opened a general store, which he carried on in connection with his trade. He subsequently engaged in the hotel business in that village, which he conducted about twenty-five years. In 1866 he retired from active business and removed to Butler, where he died, February 22, 1871. Mr. VOGELEY was married in Germany, to Anna E. MARDORF, who became the mother of eleven children, as follows: Conrad, who died in Pittsburg, in 1883; Christopher, who died in Allegheny county, in 1871; John, who died in California, in 1871; William, who died in Butler, in 1873; George, of Butler; Edward, who died in California, in 1850; Anna, widow of Frederick HOLEMAN; Annie G., who died in infancy; Mary E., who also died in youth; Charles C., a resident of San Francisco, and Hannah, wife of Frederick WEIGAND. Mr. VOGELEY was for many years a leading citizen of Saxonburg. In early life he was connected with the Evangelical church, but after locating in Butler county he united with the Reformed church, of which he was an active member for many years. In politics, he was first a Whig and afterwards a Republican.

[p. 737]

WILLIAM VOGELEY, fourth son of George and Anna E. VOGELEY, was born in Germany, December 10, 1822, and received a limited education in his native town. He worked for his father at Saxonburg, until 1842, when he came to Butler and soon after purchased what was then known as the Rising Sun tavern, a log structure, which stood upon the site of the Vogeley House, now the Arlington. He subsequently erected the latter and conducted it up to 1867, when he retired from active life. Mr. VOGELEY was interested largely in real estate, was also extensively engaged in farming, and operated an early coal mine on his farm. He was a public-spirited citizen, and took an active interest in local affairs. He was one of the original members of the Reformed church of Butler, and contributed liberally towards the erection of the old church building, on Mifflin street, now occupied by the Baptist congregation. He was one of the first directors of the Butler Savings Bank, and was identified with that institution for many years. Mr. VOGELEY married Mary E., daughter of John OESTERLING, of Summit township, a native of Germany. Their family consists of eleven children, six of whom died in youth, and five grew to maturity, as follows: David E., who was teller of the Butler Savings Bank, and died in 1875; Annie, wife of W.H. ENSMINGER; Mary, wife of W.F. METZGAR; Amelia, wife of W.A. STEIN, and Theodore. Mr. VOGELEY died, October 5, 1873; his widow is a resident of Butler.

GEORGE VOGELEY, JR., fifth son of George and Anna E. VOGELEY, was born in Germany, November 9, 1824, and came to Allegheny county with his parents. After his father removed to Butler county, he remained in Pittsburg and learned the tobacco business, and on the completion of his trade he engaged in business for himself at Kittanning and Bridgewater, Pennsylvania. In March, 1852, he located in Butler, where he has since carried on a wholesale and retail tobacco trade. Mr. VOGELEY was married in 1850, to Mary N. GASS, of Pittsburg, who died in 1878. Seven children were born to this union: Edward; Jacob; Henry; Aaron E., deceased; Sarah; Emma, and Clara. The family are connected with the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He was one of the original trustees of St. Paul's Orphan Home, and is to-day one of the oldest merchants in active business in Butler.

THEODORE VOGELEY, youngest son of William and Mary E. VOGELEY, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, in 1867. He attended the public schools of the borough in youth, and subsequently Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, and Duff's Commercial College, of Pittsburg. He then entered the employ of the Fisher Oil Company, as book-keeper, and later filled the position of superintendent for the same company. He afterward engaged in oil producing, and in 1891 established his present real estate and insurance business, which he carries on in connection with his oil operations. He represents many of the leading insurance companies of Europe and America. Mr. VOGELEY is a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics, an ardent Republican.

WILLIAM HASLETT was born in Antrim county, Ireland, in 1816, and was the youngest son of William HASLETT a manufacturer of linen, who emigrated to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, about 1817, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and died in 1836. William HASLETT, Sr., was a son of Joseph and Rebecca [p. 738] (McMASTERS) HASLETT, who were born in the vicinity of Dublin, Ireland, and spent their lives in their native land. He was the father of two sons and one daughter: Joseph; Eliza, who married Joseph RHODES, and William. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of Pittsburg, and at the Western University in the same city. About 1832 he came to Butler, soon after commenced reading law with Judge John BREDIN, and was admitted to the bar December 11, 1837. He followed his profession for a brief period and then embarked in the newspaper business. His connection with the newspapers of Butler, as editor and publisher, is fully spoken of in the Press chapter. His early political affiliations were with the Whig party, and upon the organization of the Republican party he united with it. In 1844 he was elected a member of the legislature, and in 1849 he was elected to the State senate. He always took a very active part in local politics, and gave an unswerving support to the Whig and Republican parties. In 1870 he was appointed United States store keeper, which position he filled until his death. Mr. HASLETT was married to Harriet T., daughter of John N. PURVIANCE, and eleven children blessed this union, seven of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Samuel P., who died in the army; William; Charles, deceased; John of Butler; Mary; Louisa, and Eleanor. Mr. HASLETT died December 10, 1872; his widow survived until May 3, 1881.

CHARLES HASLETT, third son of William and Harriet T. (PURVIANCE) HASLETT, was born in the borough of Butler, August 4, 1853, and was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. He learned the printer's trade with his father and Jacob ZIEGLER, and followed his trade for a short period. In 1875 he purchased some oil wells upon the Dougherty farm, near Petrolia, and later operated five wells in Centre township. In 1878 he went to the Bradford field, where he operated for some years, then went south, and was engaged in mining for five years in the James and Shenandoah valleys, Virginia. Returning to Butler in 1887, he again embarked in oil producing, and developed many wells in different parts of the county. In politics he was a Republican, and served in the borough council. Mr. HASLETT married Alice, daughter of Moses WALTON, a deceased attorney of Woodstock, Virginia, who has two children: Virginia and Walton.

KLINGLER FAMILY-- The grandfather of Hermann Julius KLINGLER, of Butler, lived in Buttenhousen, Wurtemberg, Germany, and died in the early infancy of his grandson. It is known that the grandfather had one sister, and that he was twice married. The first union resulted in two daughters and one son; the latter, John Jacob, born June 6, 1791, was the father of Hermann Julius. John Jacob spent his early days in Buttenhousen, and later took up his abode in Marbach, Wurtemberg, Germany, the poet Schiller's birthplace, where he was married July 14, 1816, to Fredericka Magdalena KOCH, who was born there December 24, 1800. She had one sister, and two brothers, Christian and Gottlieb. Her father was engaged in the milling business, and his mill, situated at Marbach on the Neckar, consisted of twelve run of stone, and derived its water power from three immense dams. In 1817 the tide of emigration was directed towards the unsettled lands of Russia, to which the government gave possession and title after occupation for a number of years, and after making the improvements re-[p. 739] quired by law. At this time Father KOCH and family joined the emigrants to Russia, but died near Odessa during the voyage. His son-in-law, John Jacob KLINGLER, thus came into possession of the mill at Marbach, and operated the same for nineteen years, until 1836, and it is worthy of notice here that the old family mill property was sold in 1891, to the government, for 276,000 marks, about $70,000, and that the vast water power is now being utilized for the electric light plants of Stuttgart and Cannstadt. The children of John Jacob KLINGLER, born in Marbach, who survived, were: John Gotlob Frederick, January 12, 1818; Barbara Augusta Fredericka, May 29, 1820; Matilda Henrietta, January 11, 1828, and Hermann Julius, January 9, 1830. Another son, Gottlob William, was born July 1, 1842, in Hohen Neuffen, near by, to which place the family had removed in 1836, where they conducted one of the largest hotels in the town, and had in addition considerable suburban property. Here the family lived until May 23, 1844, when they embarked for America; the trip occupied thirty-six days. Frederick had preceded the family to the new world five years, and had settled in Philadelphia. He returned at this time to his native country for the purpose of conducting the family to their new home. On his way out he met his sister, Fredericka, by accident, at Havre-De-Grace, France, and assisted her in procuring a berth on a ship, as she was on her way to New York to join her husband. The family's first settlement was in Philadelphia, where they remained less than a year, afterwards removing to Armstrong county, and purchasing a large tract of land situated in Major township, now occupied by the works of the Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, of Ford City. Here they lived six years following agriculture, and then removed to Butler, Pennsylvania. The father, John Jacob KLINGLER, died November 1, 1857, while on a visit to his native country. His wife's death occurred at Butler, May 10, 1860. Frederick died in Philadelphia, September 27, 1848. Fredericka, who married Henry BECKER, died in St. Louis, Missouri, in July, 1851, and William died in Worthington, Pennsylvania, October 30, 1858.

HERMANN JULIUS KLINGLER is the only surviving male member of the old family, and with his sister, Matilda, wife of George MUNSCH, constitute the remnants of the first KLINGLER emigrants to this country. Hermann Julius was fourteen years old when the family arrived in America. He obtained his education at a "Re-al Schule," in Nürtingen, near his native place. After taking to himself a wife, he left the farm in Manor township, Armstrong county, at the age of eighteen, and accepted a situation as clerk in a store at Kittanning. Remaining there about one year, he, in 1849, settled in Butler, and purchased the old United States Hotel property, corner of Main and Jefferson streets, the present site of the Lowry House, which he conducted for three years. In 1852 he built the present Lowry House, and for eight consecutive years continued to be its landlord. During this time he was also engaged in other enterprises. Forming a copartnership with James CAMPBELL, under the style of Campbell & Klingler, the firm carried on a dry goods store for five years on the northwest corner of Main and Mifflin streets. Later he was associated with Martin REIBER, as Reiber & Klingler, in the foundry business. In 1860 he sold the hotel and built his present residence on the southwest corner of Jefferson and McKean [p. 740] streets. Two years later he severed his other business connections, and with John BERG, Sr., for several years operated in the oil fields above Oil City. It was in 1863 when Mr. KLINGLER and John BERG, Jr., took a cargo of crude oil to Liverpool, England. He was among the first to introduce petroleum in the old world, visiting, at the same time, his native land and other points of interest in Germany. The oil was put in barrels at Oil City, transported down the Allegheny river to Pittsburg, and from there shipped by rail to the seaboard at Philadelphia. Upon his return, in 1865, he led in the organization of the Butler County Oil Company, and during its existence of two years, served as its superintendent. In this capacity he leased 12,000 acres of lands in Butler, Armstrong and Beaver counties, the greater part of which were located between Martinsburg, along Bear creek on the north, and Coylesville on the south. He drilled four test wells, one at Buhl's Mill, Connoquenessing township; one near Martinsburg, on Bear creek, in Parker township; one at Croll's mill on Slippery Rock, in Brady township, and one on Buffalo creek, in Armstrong county. As none of these wells were drilled to the second sand no oil was obtained, and the richest oil territory known in this section, extending from Parker to below Millerstown, although leased for ninety-nine years, was abandoned and left for later enterprise to develop and produce therefrom millions of barrels of oil.

Following in the footsteps of his forefathers, Mr. KLINGLER at last embarked in the milling business, and in 1867 erected the grist mill located on Mifflin street, known as Klingler's Mills. The present main office, 139 East Jefferson street, he built during the Centennial year. After operating the mill for ten years, he remodeled the same with the new process, a method which reground the purified middlings on a small millstone. Several years later he introduced rolls into his mill, being among the first in the state to use them. In 1883-84 he reconstructed the mill to the entire roller system, naming it the Oriental Roller Mills, acknowledged as one of the most advanced roller plants in the United States. In 1885 he erected a shipping house, fifty by one hundred and ten feet, opposite the West Penn railroad station. On March 1, 1886, he associated with him his two sons, Harry S. and Fred J., under the style of H.J. Klingler & Company, to carry on the business more extensively. In 1889 the firm built the Specialty Roller Mills and West Penn Elevator, on the site of the shipping house, utilizing part of the latter. The Oriental Roller Mills was enlarged and again remodeled, externally and internally, in 1891. A fortune equal to four times the original cost of the mill has been expended in experiments and improvements on this plant in the last fourteen years. Mr. KLINGLER has been engaged in milling twenty-seven successive years, and one hundred years of milling history has been completed by the Klingler family.

Mr. KLINGLER was also prominently identified with many of the leading enterprises of this community. He was one of the originators and directors of the First National Bank, of Butler, and four years afterward withdrew to become one of the prime movers in the organization of the Butler Savings Bank, of which institution he was a director for a number of years. Dissolving his connection here, he took part in the organization of the German National Bank, of Millerstown, and served as a director as long as he was a stockholder in that [p. 741] institution. He was president of the Home Natural Gas Company from its organization until the company sold out to its present owners. For years he served the town as a school director and councilman, and was chairman of both bodies. In 1887 he was elected the first president of the Butler Improvement Association. It was at this time and in this capacity that he secured the location at Butler of the Standard Plat Glass Factory, in which project he figured as one of the principals. For the first two years he was president of the company, and during part of this time was general manager of the works. Upon his retirement as head of the concern, he simultaneously severed his connection with the company. He left the impress of his discretion upon the town by platting, in 1890, twelve acres of land into thirty-nine lots, between Mifflin and Penn streets, and donated to the city the land occupied by the streets and alleys, at the same time creating the new thoroughfare now known as Broad street. The entire length of Broad street, on each side, he planted with shade trees, and by deed required each lot purchaser to build twenty feet from the street line. Quite a number of private residences were erected by him in different parts of Butler.

In his religious belief, Mr. KLINGLER is a Lutheran, of which church he has been a life-long member. His name is conspicuous in the history of the denomination in this section, as an energetic worker in various capacities. In the general body he has held numerous positions of trust. For many years he was a director of Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, the largest educational institution of the Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Ohio and adjacent States, and for over ten years he was also treasurer of that body. He was a delegate from the Pittsburg Synod to the General Council Lutheran Assembly, which convened at Fort Wayne in the autumn of 1893. Politically, Mr. KLINGLER affiliated with the Democratic party until a recent date, but is now a strong Prohibitionist. While he always took an active interest in public matters, and though he was often urged to accept public office, the cares of a business life compelled him to deny the importunities of his fellow citizens. Mr. KLINGLER married, October 24, 1848, Anna Barbara, daughter of Martin REIBER, Sr., one of the settlers of 1839, of Summit township, Butler county, and by this marriage they are the parents of eight children, four sons surviving: Harry Samuel; Frederick Julius; Charles Washington, and Paul Gerhardt.

HARRY SAMUEL KLINGLER, eldest son of Hermann Julius KLINGLER, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1856. His education was obtained in the public schools of Butler and at Capital University, Columbus, Ohio. Direct from college in 1875, he entered his father's mill with a view of mastering the details of the business, and in 1878 he took charge as general manager, the duties of which position are still discharged by him, as a member of the firm of H.J. Klingler & Company. In the mill from boyhood, and since then without interruption for eighteen years manager of the two mills and elevator of his firm, he is recognized as a successful, practical and progressive miller. Mr. KLINGLER is well known among the millers of the United States as an author of many articles on milling, and in his connection with, and lectures before, the Pennsylvania Millers' State Association. In July, 1883, he was awarded the prize by the American [p. 742] Miller for the best essay on "The Handling of Middlings and the use of Purifiers," and in 1884-85 he was a monthly contributor to that paper; at the same time and for four years, he informally supported by his pen the Milling Engineer, writing occasionally for other trade papers. As "Random Reflector" he won notoriety from a column he edited, headed "Random Reflections." When the Pennsylvania Millers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company was organized in December, 1886, he was one of the prime movers and has ever since been a director. He was in the past interested in a number of Butler enterprises, but never to such an extent as to neglect his life's work, milling. A life-long Lutheran, he has served his church energetically as superintendent of the Sunday school for nearly a decade. At the fifty-first convention of the Pittsburg Synod of the General Council, held at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, September 13-20, 1893, he was elected trustee of Thiel College, Greenville, Pennsylvania. Mr. KLINGLER married, February 5, 1878, Louisa Catherine, daughter of Jacob KECK, of Butler, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents of five children: Charlotta Fredericka; William Julius; Alberta Barbara; Clara Louisa, and Harry Samuel.

FREDERICK JULIUS KLINGLER, second son of Hermann Julius KLINGLER, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1859. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and then attended Duff's Commercial College of Pittsburg, where he was graduated January 15, 1875. Upon securing his diploma he was appointed book-keeper of the German National Bank of Millerstown, and served in that capacity for three years. Impared health caused him to seek a more congenial climate at Cullman, Alabama, where he sojourned for a season. Returning, he entered the office of his father as book-keeper, which position he filled until the firm of H.J. Klingler & Company was organized, when he became a member, and took charge of the main office and the finances of the company. He married, September 4, 1888, Margaret EWING, a daughter of Harold ROGERS, of Baltimore, Maryland, and by this union they have two children: Emily Bryant, and James Hermann. Mr. KLINGLER was one of the organizers and original trustees of the Mutual Water Association of the South Side. In politics, he is a Prohibitionist, and, like all of his family, he is an adherent of the Lutheran faith.

CHARLES WASHINGTON KLINGLER, third son of Hermann Julius KLINGLER, was born in Butler April 12, 1861, where he was reared and educated. He attended for a time elsewhere a higher school than his native place afforded, but soon developed a preference for the handling of machinery, in which direction he early displayed considerable skill. He filled acceptably the position of engineer in the Oriental Roller Mills for several years, and upon the erection of the Standard Plate Glass Works of Butler, immediately entered the employ of that company as booker. Being one of the oldest employes of the factory, serving the company for six successive years, he is familiar with every detail of the business, and now occupies the position of time-keeper and foreman. Mr. KLINGLER married, April 16, 1885, Alice Ann, daughter of Alexander Baxter, of Butler, and their family consists of two daughters and one son: Mabel Irene, Carl Julius and Laura Marguerite.

REV. PAUL GERHARDT KLINGLER, youngest son of Hermann Julius KLINGLER, was born August 19, 1867, in Butler, where he was reared and received his [p. 743] early education. At the age of fifteen he entered Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, and graduated in 1887. Thereupon he entered Mount Airy Seminary, of Philadelphia, and was graduated May 27, and ordained June 30, 1890. During his theological course he established missions at Manayunk, Pennsylvania, and Lansingburg, New York, and in April, 1890, was called to the pastorate of St. Michael's Lutheran church, one of the oldest of the denomination in Philadelphia. Here he labored until October, 1891, when he removed to Sherodsville, Ohio, pursuant to a call from the Bowerston charge, comprising three congregations and four churches. After two years of service in this field he was called, in October, 1893, to Trinity Lutheran church, of Catasauqua, Pennsylvania, where he now resides. He was married, June 25, 1890, to Alberta, daughter of the late Prof. William F. LEHMANN, president of Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, and by this marriage they have three sons: Paul Lehmann, Hermann Julius and Jerome.

JOHN BERG, SR., was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, June 9, 1812, and was a son of John and Marian BERG. He was educated in his native land, and there learned the baker's trade. In 1832 he immigrated to the United States, in company with his uncle, Casper RITZERT, and first settled at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he found employment in a rolling mill. He afterwards removed to Pittsburg, and worked at his trade until 1835. In that year he came to Butler and opened a small bakery and grocer store upon the site of the hardware house now occupied by George A. Cypher & Company, which building he afterwards erected. He carried on the business here until about 1848, when he and his brother Herman leased the property on the corner of Main and Cunningham streets, erected a warehouse and engaged in a general store, produce and wool business, under the firm name of John Berg & Company. This partnership lasted until 1856, when Herman BERG retired and John BERG continued the business alone until 1870. In that year Mr. BERG founded the banking house of John Berg & Company, which has been in successful operation for the past twenty-four years. In 1874 he erected the brick building, 121 South Main street, and taking into partnership his son-in-law, George A. CYPHER, engaged in a hardware business under the name of Berg & Cypher, until his death. In 1880, in partnership with his son John, he embarked in a general grocery and wool business, which they carried on until 1882. Mr. BERG was one of the pioneer oil operators on the Allegheny river, Venango county, in 1859, in connection with H.J. KLINGLER, and was extensively engaged with other operators during the early oil days of Venango and Butler counties. In partnership with Mr. KLINGLER he shipped, in 1863, 1,000 barrels of crude to Liverpool, which was one of the first shipments of petroleum made to England. It was consigned to Boult, English & Brandon, and was sold by the ton. He was also associated with Mr. KLINGLER in the lease, of 12,000 acres of oil lands, which they finally abandoned, and which afterwards proved to be the richest oil field in Butler county. He was one of the largest, if not the largest, real estate owners in the borough and county. Mr. BERG was a Whig in politics until the organization of the American of Know Nothing party, when, because of the sympathy existing in the Whig party with Know Nothingism, he became a Democrat. In religious faith he was [p. 744] a Catholic, and, with his brother, was among the pioneers of St. Peter's church of Butler, and gave liberally towards the erection of that building. He married Martha, daughter of Roman EYTH, and nine children blessed this union, as follows: Mary; John; Magdalene, a Sister of Mercy in the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Ridgely, Maryland; Margaret; Elizabeth, deceased wife of George A. CYPHER; Henry A.; Annie; Mark; Louis, and Charles. Mr. Berg died June 9, 1884; his widow survives at the age of seventy-one years.

JOHN BERG, JR., was born June 23, 1842, in Butler, and is the eldest son of John BERG, Sr., and the head of the banking house of John Berg & Company. In 1867 he was appointed teller of the First National Bank, of Butler, and after a few months was elected cashier of that institution, which office he filled until the fall of 1869. In the autumn of 1870 his father founded the banking house of John Berg & Company, and he was a partner in that institution, and the practical head of the bank from its establishment up to the present time. Mr. BERG is one of the most extensive real estate owners in the county, as well as one of its most successful business men. In politics, he is a Democrat, and in religious faith, a member of St. Peter's Catholic church.

HENRY A. AND LOUIS BERG, junior members of the firm of John Berg & Company, were born in Butler, in 1857, and 1862, respectively. After attending the common schools of the borough they entered St. Vincent's College, Westmoreland county, where they completed their education. Henry A. was engaged in the hardware business until the re-organization of the bank firm, when he became a member of the latter. Louis has been a partner of the firm since 1889. Both are adherents of the Democratic party, and members of the Catholic church.

HON. JOSEPH HARTMAN, president of the Butler County National Bank, is the eldest son of William and Mary (WINTERS) HARTMAN, and was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1827. He worked at the blacksmith's trade with his father until seventeen years of age, and then found employment in the ore mines and at contracting until January, 1855. In 1849 he purchased a farm in Donegal township, Butler county, with money judiciously saved from his earnings, upon which his parents settled the same year. In 1856 he located upon this farm and resided there until his removal to Butler. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. In 1864 he commenced operating in the oil fields of Venango county, subsequently transferred his operations to Butler county, and has been successfully identified with oil producing for the past thirty-five years. Mr. HARTMAN has operated extensively in the Millerstown field, also in Allegany county, New York, while his production on the Black farm, in Butler county, was sold by him at a high figure. He has also operated in Armstrong county, and in the St. Joe, Jefferson Centre, Callery Junction and Hundred Foot fields, as well as in the McDonald field, and is now prominently connected with the development of the Mannington field, of West Virginia. He is a stockholder in the United States Pipe Line Company, and the Producers Pipe Line Company. At the time the movement was inaugurated to curtail production, Mr. HARTMAN earnestly supported Mr. PHILLIPS in his plan to set aside 2,000,000 barrels of oil [p. 745] for the protection of the labor engaged in the petroleum industry. In connection with other capitalists he purchased the Kelly Silver Mines, of New Mexico, and is a stockholder in the Trade Dollar Mining Company, of Idaho. Soon after the organization of the Butler County National Bank, Mr. HARTMAN was elected president, to succeed Mr. TAYLOR, and has filled that position in a very satisfactory manner down to the present. He is an ardent Republican, and in 1884 was elected to the legislature, serving in 1885-86. He is a member of A.G. Reed Post, G.A.R., of Butler, and a warm friend of the old soldier. Mr. HARTMAN has been twice married. His first wife was Margaret BLACK, a daughter of John BLACK, of Donegal township, whom he married in January, 1853. She died on July 5, 1869, leaving a family of five children, as follows: Mary E.; Lizzie J., wife of Patrick GALLAGHER; Anna L., wife of Michael LEONARD; Eva F., and Joseph. His second marriage occurred in 1873, with Miss Mary McFADDEN, who died on April 17, 1892. Mr. HARTMAN and family are members of St. Paul's Catholic church, of Butler, to which denomination his ancestors belonged. He is one of the substantial, enterprising and wealthy citizens of Butler, where he has resided since November, 1892, has always been a generous contributor towards religious and educational institutions, and was a prominent member of the building committee in the erection of St. Patrick's church, at Sugar creek.

J.V. RITTS, vice-president of the Butler County National Bank, was born at St. Petersburg, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, October 7, 1852, son of Elias and Elizabeth (VENSEL) RITTS. His boyhood days were passed upon his father's farm, and his primary education was obtained in the public schools. He afterwards took an academic course, and also attended Iron City College, of Pittsburg, where he received a thorough commercial training. After graduating, he was offered, without solicitation on his part, the professorship of the book-keeping and banking department of the college, which position he filled for two years. In 1872 he was appointed book-keeper in the St. Petersburg Savings Bank, and one year later was selected to fill the position of cashier. The stock of this institution was subsequently purchased by Elias RITTS, J.V. RITTS, and several other well known citizens of Clarion county, the bank re-organized, and Mr. RITTS became one of the directors, as well as cashier. He has been associated with the St. Petersburg and Clarion Railroad Company, now the Pittsburg and Western, as director; was treasurer of the Foxburg, Kane, and Bradford Railroad Company; a stock holder and director in the Parker, Karns City and Butler Railroad Company for several years, and also filled the office of secretary and treasurer of the St. Petersburg and Foxburg Turnpike Company. He has been interested in the organization of the following banks: Eldred Bank, of Eldred, Pennsylvania; First National Bank, of Salina, Kansas; Seaboard National Bank, of New York; Dallas National Bank, of Dallas, Texas; Meriden National Bank, of Mississippi, and the Keystone Bank, of Pittsburg. In April, 1890, Mr. RITTS was one of the leading spirits in the organization of the Butler County National Bank, was chosen first vice-president of that institution, was one of the original stockholders, and has been the virtual controller of its financial policy during the past five years of its successful existence. Aside from his banking interests, he has been extensively engaged in oil producing in Clarion and Butler counties. Mr. RITTS [p. 746] was married in August 1882, to Irene C. BLAKESLEE, a daughter of W.Z. BLAKESLEE, of New York, and has three children, viz: Elias; Maud A., and Leonard C. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, of Butler, in which Mr. RITTS is one of the trustees. He is a member of the Masonic order, and one of the progressive and public-spirited citizens of the community.

COL. ALEXANDER LOWRY was born in Blair county (formerly a part of Huntingdon), Pennsylvania, February 18, 1814. His great grandfather, Lazarus LOWRY, came from the north of Ireland, and in 1729 settled in Donegal, Lancaster county, on the celebrated farm known as "Donegal," now owned by Senator CAMERON. Col. Alexander LOWRY, a son of Lazarus LOWRY, and one of the most noted and successful Indian traders in the history of Pennsylvania, purchased from his father the homestead, and after living there for some time, sold the farm and removed to Huntingdon county. Here was born his son Alexander LOWRY, father to Col. Alexander LOWRY, of Butler. The maiden name of the mother of our subject was Margaret BOUSLOUGH, who was born and reared in Huntingdon county. When eighteen years old, Alexander became an apprentice at the cabinetmaker's trade, and after serving three years he continued working at the trade until 1837. In 1839 he opened a hotel at Yellow Springs, Blair county, and removed from there to Water Street, on the line of the Pennsylvania canal, in 1842, where he was in the hotel business until 1846. In that year he located at Hollidaysburg, and was proprietor of the American House until September, 1850, when he removed to Butler, and purchased the Beatty House, which stood on the site of the Troutman Block, and afterwards known as the Lowry House as long as the building was used for the hotel purposes. In 1868 he purchased the present Lowry House, and, in 1873, after the first oil excitement had commenced, sold the property to Cross & McOmber, but repurchased it in 1879. He continued as its proprietor until 1875, when he retired from the hotel business to his home on West Pearl street, where he has since resided. In 1841 Colonel LOWRY was married to Margaret SPEAR, of Williamsburg, Blair county, who died in Butler, December 11, 1886. His family consists of one daughter and seven sons, as follows: Belle W.; W.A.; Charles S.; John F.; Porter W.; George W.; Thomas L., and J.L., all of whom are living. Colonel LOWRY is now in his eighty-second year, and is an active, well preserved man. He has well earned the name of having been one of the most successful and best known hotel men in the State.

PORTER W. LOWRY, attorney at law, is a son of Alexander and Margaret LOWRY, and was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1855. He attended the public schools in early boyhood, and completed his education at the Witherspoon Institute. He read law with Hon. Ebenezer McJUNKIN, was admitted to the bar in 1876, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. LOWRY was married January 30, 1890, to Mary W. HAZEN, only daughter of Hon. A.L. HAZEN, president judge of the Seventeenth judicial district. She died on March 20, 1891. He has always been an active Republican, was elected chairman of the Republican county committee in 1894, and had the honor of being at the head of the party organization when Butler county gave the largest majority for the Republican candidates since the foundation of the [p. 747] party. Mr. LOWRY is a member of the Presbyterian church, of Butler, has been president of the Christian Endeavor Society two terms, and for several years has been actively identified with the growth and prosperity of the church.

LOUIS STEIN was born in the City of Marburg, Hessen Germany, July 3, 1811, a son of Prof. George STEIN. When Louis was about thirteen years of age his father was appointed a professor at the Medical University of Bonn and removed with his family to that place, where he died some sixteen years ago, aged 100 years. The subject of this sketch was educated at the University of Bonn, immigrated to New York City in 1832, and was employed in a large German importing house for five years. In 1837 he located at Wapakoneta, Ohio, and engaged in general merchandising in partnership with Bernard ROESSING, which they conducted until the spring of 1840. They then removed to Butler, Pennsylvania, and embarked in the same business under the firm name of Roessing & Stein, which existed until 1871, when Mr. STEIN purchased his partner's interest and carried on the grocery, queensware and dry goods business until February, 1882. His son William A. was then admitted to a partnership, and the firm became L. Stein & Son, and continued the dry goods business exclusively. The first store of Roessing & Stein was in a part of the Vogeley Hotel building, whence they removed to the corner of Main and Mifflin streets, and finally erected the building now occupied by their successor. In 1885 Mr. STEIN retired from active business, and continued to enjoy the fruits of his frugality and industry until his death, July 20, 1894, in the eighty-fourth year of his age. He was always an ardent Democrat, but his very active business life prevented him from devoting much attention to public affairs, with the exception of serving on the school board. Mr. STEIN was a member of the German Lutheran church, of Butler, and a liberal supporter of that society. In August, 1848, he married Matilda DIEKER, a daughter of Anthony DIEKER, of Wapakoneta, Ohio, to which union were born six children, as follows: Emily, deceased wife of John N. PATTERSON; Julia, wife of J.F. STRONG, of Cincinnati; William A.; Louis B.; Albert O., and Charles, deceased. Albert O., was born in Butler, March 23, 1858, was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute, followed the tinner's trade for several years, and has clerked for the past nine years in the store of L. Stein & Son. Although Mr. STEIN retired from the active management of his business in 1885, hardly a day passed, when in health, that he was not at the store assisting in the work. He enjoyed good health until a few months before his death. He was energetic and enterprising, and was an active mover in every effort made for the advancement of the town. In his business life he was successful, and in his social intercourse with the people made hosts of friends. His business career was marked by the strictest integrity and the most honorable dealings with those who in the past half century were patrons of his store.

WILLIAM A. STEIN, eldest son of Louis and Matilda STEIN, was born in the borough of Butler, October 9, 1853, and was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. In 1873 he entered his father's store as clerk, which position he filled until 1882, when he became a member of the firm of L. Stein & Son, and has continued in active business up to the present. He is a director in [p. 748] the Butler Savings Bank, and is one of the original stockholders and organizers of the Standard Plate Glass Company of Butler. Mr. STEIN was married in 1878, to Amelia, daughter of William VOGELEY, and has five children: Gertrude F.; Cora M.; Albert A.L.; Clarence L., and Emily H. Mr. STEIN is a past master and secretary of Butler Lodge, Number 272, F.&A.M., and also secretary of the Chapter. He is a Republican in politics, and attends the German Lutheran church.

LOUIS B. STEIN, second son of Louis and Matilda STEIN, was born in Butler, December 28, 1855, and received his education in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. In May, 1873, he was chosen book-keeper of the First National Bank of Butler, was appointed teller in 1877, and filled that position until the failure of the bank in July, 1879. He then entered the employ of Joseph Horne & Company, of Pittsburg, where he filled the position of book-keeper for two years, and then returned to Butler to take charge of the books of L. Stein & Son. On February 11, 1885, he was appointed teller of the Butler Savings Bank, which position he has filled for the past nine years. Mr. STEIN was married, January 1, 1885, to Julia, daughter of Philip WISENER, of Butler, and has two children: Laura M., and Edna M. Politically he is a Republican, and is a member of the German Lutheran church.

THOMAS STEHLE, SR., was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1813, was there educated, and learned the lock and gunsmith's trade. He came to the United States in 1832 and settled in Butler, where he worked at his trade. He kept a store on what is now South Main street, and afterwards bought the John NEGLEY property. He also purchased the Christian OTTO property and the Producers Bank building, where Stehle's store now stands, besides the Miller property, corner of Main and North streets, and the old fair grounds, which he purchased of Judge BREDIN. He was one of the successful and prosperous business men of the borough. Mr. STEHLE married Josephine STEHLE in 1838, and was the father of seven children, as follows: Mary, widow of D.T. PAPE; Annie, widow of William ALAND; Joseph, deceased; Elizabeth; John, deceased; J.F.T., and Thomas, Jr., deceased. Mr. STEHLE was a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and died September 13, 1887. His widow resides in Butler.

JOHN F.T. STEHLE, son of Thomas STEHLE, Sr., was born in the borough of Butler, February 21, 1852, and here received a common school education. He first clerked in his father's store, and in 1871 he engaged in the notion and toy business with his brother Thomas, under the firm name of Stehle Brothers, but he is now carrying on the business alone. Mr. STEHLE married Lena M., daughter of John MORAL, of Butler, September 22, 1879. They are the parents of seven children: Joseph T.; Victor; Raymond, deceased; Thomas, deceased; Gerard; John, and Paul. Mr. STEHLE and wife are members of the Catholic church, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

D.T. PAPE was born in Westphalia, Germany, in 1837, and came to the United States when thirteen years old, locating at Pittsburg, whence he removed to Butler, Pennsylvania. He was a salesman here for Thomas STEHLE one year, then returned to Pittsburg and clerked in Spencer's dry goods store. In 1858 he again came to Butler, and married Mary, daughter of Thomas and Josephine [p. 749] STEHLE. He embarked in the dry goods and millinery business, which he continued up to his death, October 7, 1885. The business is now carried on by his widow under the old firm name. Seven children were born to D.T. and Mary PAPE, as follows: Josephine, deceased wife of John R. GRIEB; Charles F.T.; Theodore D.; Gerard P.; Mary L.; Destella L., and Eugene A., who was born in Butler, August 15, 1874, educated in the common schools, and is now an apprentice with his brother in the jewelry business. Mr. PAPE was a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, he was a stanch adherent of the Democratic party.

CHARLES F.T. PAPE, eldest son of D.T. and Mary PAPE, was born in the borough of Butler, August 22, 1863, and was educated in the public schools and at St. Vincent's college. He learned the jeweler's trade with F.H. WEISER of Pittsburg, and in 1881 he engaged in the jewelry business in Butler, which he still carries on at 122 South Main street. He was married October 6, 1891, to Annie, daughter of Patrick and B. GOLDEN, of Butler, and has one son, Leo C.H. Mr. Pape is a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, he is a Democrat. In 1886 his brother, Gerard P., became a partner in the jewelry business, and the firm has since been C.F.T. Pape & Brother.

THEODORE D. PAPE, second son of D.T. Pape, was born in Butler, July 28, 1865, and received a public school education. Since his school days he has been a salesman in the store of D.T. Pape, now carried on by his mother. He is a member of the Catholic church, and is connected with the C.M.B.A. of Butler.

GERARD P. PAPE, third son of D.T. Pape, was born in Butler, July 30, 1867, and was educated in the public schools. He learned the jeweler's trade with John R. GRIEB, and in 1886 became a member of the firm of C.F.T. Pape & Brother. He is a member of the Catholic church, is a Democrat in politics, and is connected with Butler Lodge, B.P.O.E.

WILLIAM ALAND was a son of Ambrose and Margaret ALAND, natives of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany. His parents settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where William was born in 1845, and where he received a good common school education. His father was a merchant tailor, and carried on business in that city, and the subject of this sketch learned the cutter's trade with him and managed his business after arriving at manhood. In 1874 he located in Butler, and established a merchant tailoring business on South Main street. In 1888 he erected the building in which his son, Joseph W., now conducts business, where he carried on merchant tailoring until his death, October 19, 1888. He married Annie, daughter of Thomas STEHLE, one of the early residents of Butler, and became the father of eight children, as follows: Joseph W.; Charles F.; Estella; Bebeana; Florence, deceased; Edgar; Lillian, and Blanche, deceased. Mr. ALAND was a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, he was a Democrat. He never took much interest in political affairs, but devoted his entire attention to the prosecution of his business. He had the town's prosperity ever at heart, and always encouraged home industries. His widow resides with her family in the old homestead of South Main street.

JOSEPH W. ALAND was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1869, and [p. 750] is the eldest in the family of William and Annie ALAND. He was reared in Butler, and was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. He afterwards entered the employ of his father, and owing to the latter's failing health he took charge of the business, about 1886. After his father's death the entire business devolved upon his shoulders, and he has since conducted it very successfully. Mr. ALAND is one of the active young business men of Butler, and stands in the front rank as a merchant tailor. He is a member of the St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Democratic party.

FRANCIS X. GRIEB was born in the Black Forest, Grand Duchy of Baden, Ober-Ampt, Harb-Rexingen, Wurtemburg, Germany, February 1, 1820, where he was also reared and educated. He learned the watchmaker's trade in his native land, and in 1848 he immigrated to the United States and settled at Philadelphia. In 1849 he came to Butler and established himself in business in what was then known as the Major Hughes Property, and carried on the repairing of watches, jewelry, etc. In 1852 he purchased the property now occupied by the jewelry store of Henry GRIEB, remodeled the building and opened the first jewelry store in Butler, which he conducted successfully until his death, in 1865. Mr. GRIEB was married in 1849, to Elizabeth HEPFLE, a native of Bavaria, Germany, who survives, and resides on East North street. She conducted the business until 1883, since which time it has been carried on by her son Henry. They were the parents of the following children: Jennie; Henry; Alexander, deceased; Frank, a merchant at Braddock; John R., Charles R., deceased; and Louis M. Mr. GRIEB was a practical member of the Catholic church, and a pioneer of St. Peter's congregation, to which organization the whole family belong. In politics, he was a Democrat, and throughout his long residence in Butler was recognized as a successful merchant and a good citizen.

HENRY GRIEB, eldest son of Francis X. GRIEB, was born in the borough of Butler, April 8, 1852, and received his education in the public schools. In 1865 he went to Pittsburg, where he learned the watchmaker's trade, and since his father's death has had practical control of the jewelry store established by the latter, and now conducted under the name of E. GRIEB. He married Lena LIEBLER of Butler, in 1876, and they are the parents of one son, Edward F.X. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of the borough council. He is a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and is connected with Branch, Number 56, C.M.B.A., also the B.P.O.E.

JOHN R. GRIEB, fourth son of Francis X. GRIEB, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1858, and was educated in the public schools of the borough. At the age of fourteen he commenced learning the watchmaker's trade with his brother, and remained with the firm of E. GRIEB until 1883. In April of that year he established a jewelry store at 120 South Main street, where he remained until 1891, and then located at 125 North Main street, from where he moved to his present place of business in April, 1894. In 1889 he formed a partnership with R.J. LAMB, for the purpose of dealing in pianos and musical instruments, and the firm of Grieb & Lamb, carried on that business in connection with the jewelry store, up to June 15, 1894, when they dissolved partnership, and the business is now carried on by Mr. GRIEB at 118 South Main street. [p. 751] Mr. GRIEB was married January 1, 1883, to Josie, daughter of D.T. PAPE. One son was born to this union, Raymond, who died in August, 1884. Mrs. GRIEB died in Octiber, 1892. Politically, Mr. GRIEB is a Democrat, is a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and is one of the enterprising young business men of the borough.

ISAAC COLBERT was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, in 1798. His parents died when he was about two years of age, and he was reared by William McCOLLOUGH, of Armstrong county. He learned the hatter's trade, and in 1835 came to Butler county and settled in Butler township, where he built a shop and commenced the manufacture of hats, also carrying on a small farm at the same time. In 1836 he removed to Butler, and located on Main street, where he continued the manufacture of hats and conducted a retail hat store. This business he carried on until his death, July 5, 1872, at which time he was the oldest merchant in the borough, with the exception of the late William CAMPBELL. In 1824 he was married to Miss Fanny RAMSEY, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to which union were born four children, as follows: William R., of Butler; Robert, a physician of Oil City; Eliza J., wife of J.C. Redick, of Butler, and Harvey, a merchant of the same borough. Mrs. Colbert died in 1874. Both were life-long members of the Presbyterian church. Politically, he was a Whig, but joined the Republican party at its birth, and was elected by that party treasurer of Butler county.

WILLIAM R. COLBERT, eldest son of Isaac and Fannie COLBERT, was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, January 31, 1825. He learned the hatter's trade with his father, and was connected with him in business until he stopped the manufacture of hats. He then engaged in engineering, which business he has followed up to the present, having had charge of stationary engines at Pittsburg, Butler and other points. He married Jane, daughter of John BADGER, of Centre township, Butler county, and they are the parents of nine children: Isaac N., deceased; Isabel; Ada; William H., deceased; Edwin D.; Henry B.; John L.; Eliza J., wife of C.E. GRAHAM, of Oil City, and Frank. Since 1843 Mr. COLBERT has been a member of the Presbyterian church, joining that denomination at the age of eighteen years. In politics, he was identified with the Whig party up to the formation of the Republican party, since which he has been a supporter of the latter organization.

EDWIN D. COLBERT is the oldest living son of William R. and Jane COLBERT, and was born November 24, 1856, in Butler, Pennsylvania. His primary education was received in the public schools, and he completed his studies at Witherspoon Institute. He then entered the employ of J.& H. SCHNEIDEMAN, of Butler, as clerk, and worked for that firm, Harvey COLBERT and others until 1879, when he was appointed clerk in the United States mail service, which position he held for ten years. In 1889 he formed a partnership with David E. DALE, under the firm name of Colbert & Dale, and they have since carried on one of the leading hat and gents furnishing houses in Butler. Mr. COLBERT is an adherent of the Republican party, and in religion, he is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is connected with Butler Lodge, Number 272, F.& A.M., Butler Chapter, R.A.M., the K.of P., the R.A., and the B.P.O.E.

[p. 752]

DAVID E. DALE, merchant, and ex-register and recorder of Butler county, was born April 18, 1862, in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, son of Rev. Abner and Sarah (ADAMS) DALE, the latter a daughter of James ADAMS of Slippery Rock township. Abner DALE was a native of Dale's Mills, Center county, Pennsylvania, and was educated for the ministry. About 1856 he came to Butler county as pastor of the Sugar Creek and Fairview Reformed churches, where he remained a short time, and then accepted a call to a church in Mercer county. About 1870 he returned to this county to accept the pastorate of the Sugar Creek, Fairview and Millerstown Reformed churches, but subsequently, on account of failing health, he resigned all but the Fairview charge, where he died January 16, 1875. His widow resides with the subject of this sketch in Butler. Their family consisted of four children: David E.; Margaret; James, and Thomas A., all of whom are dead except the first mentioned. After his father's death the family removed to Butler, where David E. attended the common schools and Witherspoon Institute, subsequently spent one year at Thiel College, Greenville, Pennsylvania, and completed his education under private tutors. In January, 1882, he entered the register and recorder's office as clerk under H.W. Christie's administration, and remained in that office until 1887, when he resigned to become a candidate for the office of register and recorder, but was defeated for the nomination. He then engaged in the insurance business until 1889, when he entered the gent's furnishing business with E.D. COLBERT, under the firm name of Colbert & Dale, which is still in existence. In November, 1890, he was elected register and recorder, and retired from office in January, 1894. In politics, he is a Republican, and in religious faith, a Presbyterian. He is a member of the Butler Lodges, Number 272, F.& A.M., and 278, I.O.O.F., and also of the K.of P. Mr. DALE was married October 7, 1891, to Mary, a daughter of Alfred WICK of Butler. He is a popular and enterprising citizen, and stands well in the community where a large portion of his life has been passed.

JOHN CLEELAND, eldest son of Robert and Phoebe (WIMER) CLEELAND, and grandson of Arthur CLEELAND, was born July 16, 1811, upon the old homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He learned the blacksmith's trade, and commenced business in a shop on the home farm, whence he removed to Portersville, where he carried on business fourteen years. In 1854 he located in Perry township, Mercer county, where he conducted business until 1879, and then removed to Sandy Lake, and continued business at that point until March, 1892. At that time he retired from active life, and now resides with his son, David L. of Butler. He has always been connected with the Whig and Republican parties. In religion, he is a Presbyterian, and one of the early members of the Portersville church. Mr. CLEELAND married Betsey, daughter of William MORRISON, of Muddy Creek township. She died in 1883, the mother of eleven children, whose names are as follows: Robert, deceased; William M., a resident of Great Falls, Montana; Phoebe, who married Lewis E. Clark, and after his death J.R. SNYDER; Sarah, wife of Jacob KIBLER; Maria, wife of John PATTISON; Arthur K., who was a member of Company F, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, died from exposure while in the service, and was buried at[p. 753] Harrison's Landing; Isaac, deceased; John S.; Hamilton, deceased; David L., and Lizzie, wife of C.M. FARRAH, of Sandy Lake.

DAVID L. CLEELAND, jeweler, was born in Perry township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, June 4, 1855, and is a son of John and Betsy CLEELAND. After receiving a good English education, he entered the employ of J.R. SNYDER, of Harrisville, Butler county, with whom he learned the watchmaker's trade, and subsequently purchased the business. In 1881 he removed to Butler, where he continued the same business, and in 1888 he became a member of the firm of Cleeland & Ralston. This firm conducted business until the fall of 1893, when Mr. Cleeland opened his present commodious jewelry house, in a building purchased by him in 1890, which he remodeled and fitted up for the purpose. Mr. CLEELAND is a professional optician, and holds a diploma of graduation awarded him June 15, 1889. He was married November 14, 1878, to Miss Flora CUBBISON, a daughter of George CUBBISON, of Harrisville. They are the parents of four sons, as follows: Earl C.; Frank W.; Roy A., and Carl L. Mr. CLEELAND and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Butler, in which body he fills the office of elder. He is connected with Connoquenessing Lodge, I.O.O.F., and in all the relations of life he is one of the respected citizens of the community.

MARTIN J. REIBER was born in Goeningen, Wurtemburg, Germany, and was a dealer in seeds, flowers and fruit trees in his native land. He emigrated to New York City in 1832, where he followed the occupation of a market gardener and importer of seeds, bulbs and flowers. From New York he came to Butler county, and purchased what was later known as the Reiber Hotel, in Summit township, whence he removed to the borough of Butler, where he died in 1865; his wife died in 1860. He was one of the charter members of St. Mark's Luthern church, of Butler, and was an elder in that organization. He also served in the borough council at one time, and was a very worthy citizen. Mr. Reiber married Catherine FETZER, in germany, a native of the same town where he himself was born, and six children blessed this union: Catherine; Martin; George; Barbara, who married H. Julius KLINGLER, of Butler; Jacob, and Margaret, who married Martin LOEFLER.

MARTIN REIBER was born in the same town as his father, and learned the florist business with the latter. He came with his parents to New York, and thence to Butler, where he was married, in 1846, to Mary, daughter of Isaac and Mary YETTER of this borough. He at once purchased the old tavern which stood on the site of the Hotel Lowry, which he conducted until his removal to Millerstown, where he embarked in the mercantile business and carried it on some five years. Returning to Butler he erected the brick store still standing on the northwest corner of Main and Jefferson streets, and establishing the firm of Reiber & Yetter, began dealing in general merchandise. In 1859 he sold out his interest in the store and went into the foundry business, on Washington street, in partnership with H.J. KLINGLER. During this time he also operated a distillery. In 1875 he engaged in the grocery business under the firm name of Mr. Reiber & Son, and in 1880 removed to the George Reiber block. He died in 1882; his widow resides in the old homestead. To Martin and Mary REIBER were born the following children: Ferdinand; Lena; Albert; Martin H.; Emma, [p. 754] who married Charles F. HOSFORD of Wheeling, West Virginia; Howard; Aaron E., and Cora, deceased. Mr. REIBER was a charter member of St. Mark's Lutheran church, and was connected with the I.O.O.F. Politically, he was a Whig in early days and afterwards a Republican. He was one of the charter members of the Bald Ridge Oil Company, and was a successful, enterprising and progressive business man.

FERDINAND REIBER, eldest son of Martin and Mary REIBER, was born at Millerstown, Butler county, June 19, 1847. He received a common school education, entered Washington and Jefferson College in 1863, and graduated in 1867. He then commenced reading law with Colonel John M. THOMPSON, and was admitted to the bar in 1869. In 1871 he was elected to the office of district attorney and filled that position until 1875. He continued to practice law until 1881, when he went into the oil business, organizing the Bald Ridge Oil Company, the pioneer company in the oil development south of Butler. Mr. REIBER was also connected with the Mutual Gas Company, in which he held the position of secretary and director. He is now operating very successfully, and is joint owner of some of the most valuable oil properties in Butler county.

AARON E. REIBER, youngest son of Martin and Mary REIBER, was born in the borough of Butler, April 9, 1863. After receiving a common school education he attended Witherspoon Institute, and subsequently entered Washington and Jefferson College, and Princeton College, New Jersey, graduating from the last mentioned institution in 1882, at the age of nineteen. On his return to Butler he commenced reading law with T.C. CAMPBELL, was admitted to practice in 1885, and in 1889 was elected, on the Democratic ticket, district attorney of Butler county, and served in that capacity until January 1, 1893. Since leaving that office he has devoted his attention to the practice of his profession. He is connected with the K.of P., and is a director in the Y.M.C.A. of Butler. He is a member of the English Lutheran church, and takes an active interest in the prosperity of that organization.

GEORGE REIBER was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, November 23, 1815, son of Martin J. and Catherine REIBER. He was reared in his native land, and in 1834 immigrated to New York, where he joined his father and brother Martin, who had preceded him to the New World. He engaged in the hotel business, and also followed the occupation of a market gardener. In 1839 he came to Butler county and settled in Summit township, where he erected a saw mill. In 1846 he purchased a farm at Hannahstown, removed to Millerstown in 1848, and kept a general store in that borough for several years. In 1856 he purchased a grist mill and 137 acres of the Clymer tract, on the northeastern limits of Butler, and for the past thirty-eight years he has successfully conducted the milling business. He has remodeled and improved the property several times, until it is to-day a comparatively new structure, and contains a full roller process, besides the original buhr system. He also operated a distillery from 1865 to 1873. Mr. REIBER was married in 1842, to Mary RIGGER, a daughter of Jacob RIGGER, of Summit township. Eleven children were born to this union, as follows: Martin G.; Caroline, wife of William F. Miller, of Butler; Henry; Wilhelmina, wife of Rev. MIESER, of Detroit; Mary L.; Anna M.; Elizabeth; George L.; Edward; Ida [p. 755] F., and Agatha, deceased. Mrs. REIBER died on March 3, 1883. Henry, George L. and Edward REIBER, are prominently identified with the natural gas business, as the owners of the Independent Natural Gas Company, of Butler. Mr. REIBER is one of the oldest and best known citizens of the borough, where he has been engaged in business for nearly forty years. Inheriting a robust and vigorous constitution, his whole life has been marked by rigid industry, perserverance and energy. Coming to western Pennsylvania comparatively penniless, he has accumulated through the passing years a large estate, and ranks as one of the wealthiest men of Butler county.

GEORGE REIBER, SR., second son of John M. REIBER, was born in Germany, was educated in his native land, and there learned the blacksmith's trade. In 1838 he emigrated to New York, where he remained about six years, and then came to Butler, Pennsylvania, and became a member of the firm of Walter & Reiber, subsequently changed to Reiber & Boos, and finally to Reiber & Brother. He afterwards engaged in the distillery business, as a member of Jacob Reiber & Company, then in the wholesale liquor business, which he continued until his death, April 10, 1892. He married Margaret, daughter of Michael BURKHALTER, of Alsace, Germany, in 1841. The fruits of this union were nine children, six of whom died in their childhood. Those living are: George J.; Mary, wife of John McCOMBER, and Alfred M., all residents of Butler. Mrs. REIBER is living in the old homestead, which was erected by her husband in 1848. The family are adherents of the Lutheran church, and in politics, Democratic.

GEORGE J. REIBER, son of George REIBER, was born in the borough of Butler, September 22, 1850. He received a public school education, and afterwards spent a year and a half in a grocery store. In 1879 he went to Colorado and was engaged in the silver mining business for eight years. Returning to Butler he clerked in the dry goods store of Alfred M. REIBER a number of years, and is now a member of the firm. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and Democratic in politics.

ALFRED M. REIBER, son of George Reiber, was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, November 22, 1855, was educated in the public schools, and then engaged in clerking for Joseph Horne & Company, of Pittsburg, and afterwards for Horne & Ward, of the same city. In 1886 he returned to Butler and engaged in the dry goods business, which he has successfully continued up to the present. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of the Lutheran church.

JACOB F. REIBER is the third son of John M. and Mary C. REIBER, of Goeningen, Germany, where his father practiced medicine. His parents were married in 1800, and had a family of six children, as follows: John M., and George, both deceased; Jacob F.; Martin; Mary C, wife of Christian HAUBENSAUK, and Barbara, deceased. The parents both died in Germany, the father dying in 1833, and the mother in 1867. Jacob F. was born at Goeningen, November 5, 1828, and there learned the business of a market gardener. He served in the German army, and in 1854 immigrated to the United States and settled in Butler, Pennsylvania, whither his brother George had preceded him. He engaged in clerking for Roessing & Stein, and afterwards for Eli YETTER, then traveled through the south in the wholesale seed business. In 1856 he formed a [p. 756] partnership with his brothers, George and Martin, under the firm name of Jacob Reiber & Company, erected a distillery and operated the same until they went into the wholesale liquor business. The firm was dissolved in 1871, Martin retiring, but the firm continued in the wholesale business. Mr. REIBER was married in 1859, to Melissa, daughter of David HENSHAW, of which union have been born seven children: Jacob, deceased; Annie, wife of Dean CAMPBELL of Millerstown; Margaret; Frederick T.; Mary; Elizabeth, and Bertha. The family are connected with the Lutheran church. In politics, Mr. REIBER is a Democrat, and has filled the offices of overseer of the poor and collector.

FREDERICK T. REIBER, son of Jacob F. and Melissa REIBER, was born in Butler, February 8, 1866. He received a common school education, supplemented by a course at Iron City College and at Witherspoon Institute. He worked first for J.C. Hill & Company, of Pittsburg. He was next employed as a hotel clerk for about six years, two years of which he spent at the Willard Hotel, in Butler, and four years at the Central Hotel, East Liberty. In November, 1891, he went into the grocery business in his present store building, on the corner of Jefferson and McKean streets, Butler, erected by his father the same year. He is a member of the Lutheran church, in politics, is a Democrat, and is connected with Good Will Hose Company.

JACOB KECK, justice of the peace and merchant tailor, was born June 26, 1830, in Baden, Germany, on the River Rhine, son of John George and Catherine KECK. He received a common school education in his native land, and also obtained a good knowledge of the French language, and after coming to Butler he took a course in English under a private teacher. He learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Butler, Pennsylvania, to which place he immigrated in 1850. In 1860 he started in business for himself, and conducted a growing trade until 1883, and from the beginning up to 1892 he was also extensively engaged in the undertaking business. From 1877 to 1883 he carried on a book and stationery store in connection with merchant tailoring, the latter of which he still continues. In 1869 he was elected a justice of the peace, which office he has filled continuously up to the present. He has been a member of the borough council six years, has served on the school board for the same period and is secretary of the Workmen's Building and Loan Association, which position he has filled five years. In politics, he is a Democrat, and one of the active members of his party. Since 1850 he has been a member of the Lutheran church, and has liberally supported that organization. Mr. KECK was married in 1853, to Margaret KRADEL, a daughter of John KRADEL, of Summit township. She died in 1872, leaving three children, viz.: Elizabeth, wife of Louis KECK; Louisa, wife of Harry S. KLINGLER, and George F. He married for his second wife, Louisa, a daughter of Adam TRAUTMAN, of Pittsburg; she died in 1887, the mother of four children: Theodore C.H.; Edward A., deceased; Gertrude Mary, and Walter J., the last deceased. Squire KECK is one of the public-spirited and progressive business men of Butler, and during his residence here of forty-five years he has won the confidence and respect of its best people.

JACOB BOOS, grocery merchant, was born in Hese Darmstadt, Germany, October 21, 1835, and is a son of Charles BOOS, born in the same place March 6, [p. 757] 1800. His father was a blacksmith by trade, and died in 1880, having served as a soldier in the German army. He married Barbara, daughter of John EICH, in 1820, and they were the parents of four children: Barbara, who married John FELL, of Germany; William, deceased; Elizabeth, who married Jacob HAHN, of Germany, and Jacob. The mother died in 1853. Both she and her husband were members of the German Reformed church. The subject of this sketch learned the blacksmith's trade in Germany, and emigrated to the United States in 1853. He settled at Pittsburg, and worked at his trade in that city until September 12, 1854, when he came to Butler and entered the employ of Walter & Reiber, blacksmiths. In 1857 he embarked in the blacksmithing business for himself, and in 1860 he purchased the George EGNER farm in Butler township, upon which he resided ten years. In 1870 he sold the farm and bought the interest of George WEBBER in the farm of Webber & Troutman, which title was changed to Troutman & Boos. In 1872 he purchased a half interest in the flouring mills of Grohman & Walter, which then became Walter & Boos, and he owned a half interest in the property until 1890. In 1881 he embarked in the grocery business on the corner of Main and Wayne streets, which site he purchased in 1889, and afterwards erected his present substantial store building. Mr. BOOS is one of the enterprising and successful merchants of the borough. He was married, October 21, 1855, to Barbara, daughter of Jacob WALTER, of Butler, to which union ten children have been born: Annie M., deceased wife of Adam Hoffner; George, deceased; Louisa, wife of William VOSKAMP, of Pittsburg; Emma, wife of Charles KAUFMAN, of Butler; Augusta, deceased; Charles, deceased; Clara, wife of Charles GREGG, of Butler; William, deceased; Catherine, and Lida. Mr. BOOS is a Democrat in politics, and the family is connected with the English Lutheran church.

THANEUS NIGGEL was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1814, and learned the stone cutter's trade in his native land. He emigrated to America in 1836 and settled in Butler township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He married Julia, a daughter of Frederick STEHLE of Butler township, in 1844, and located at Bald Ridge, whence he removed to the borough of Butler in 1846. He worked at his trade and also ran a restaurant for some years, and then rented the Faller Hotel, which he carried on for two years, and afterwards engaged in operating a restaurant and bakery in Dougal's row. He was also in the stock-raising business for some time. He died in 1862; his widow resides with her son David. They were the parents of five children: Joseph; Thomas F.; John; David, and Rose, wife of S.B. HUGHES of Pittsburg. Mr. NIGGEL and family were early members of St. Peter's Catholic church of Butler.

JOSEPH NIGGEL was born in Butler township, Butler county, August 15, 1845, and is the eldest son of Thaneus NIGGEL. He attended the common schools in boyhood and learned the cabinetmaker's trade, at which he worked until 1866, and then engaged in the restaurant business for one year. He afterwards embarked in general merchandising on the corner of Main and Jefferson streets, which was subsequently changed to the hardware business, under the firm name of C. Koch & Company. In 1872 the firm became Niggel & Brother, and for the past twenty-three years this firm has carried on a successful hardware business. Mr. NIGGLE [sic] was married Ocober 5, 1869, to Barbara, daughter of A. ROCKENSTEIN, Sr., of Butler, to which union have been born six children: Florian T.; Bertha R.N.; Mary D., deceased; Emma C.; Valetta, and Mary. In politics, Mr. NIGGEL is a Democrat, and has filled the office of assessor for two terms. He is a member of the Butler Brass Band, and the Germania Orchestra. He is also connected with the C.M.B.A., and is a member of St. Paul's Catholic church of Butler.

CHARLES KOCH was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1834, received a good education in his native land, and was a clerk in a government office before his immigration to Williamsburg, New York, in 1854. The following year he located in the borough of Butler, where he found employment as a salesman in Boyd's store. In 1868 he engaged in the hardware business, as a senior member of the firm of C. Koch & Company, but in 1872 he sold out and embarked in the grocery business, which is still carried on under the firm name of C. Koch & Sons. Mr. KOCH was married in New York to Cresentia STEGHER, a daughter of Aurelius STEGHER, June 14, 1854. Eight children blessed this union, as follows: Mary, deceased; Frank W.; John G.; Caroline; Charles T.; Stephen A.; Josephine, deceased, and one that died in infancy. Mr. KOCH died at his home in Butler, August 5, 1872. He was a life-long member of the Catholic church, to which faith the family belong. His widow is now head of the firm which he established.

FRANK W. KOCH, eldest son of Charles Koch, was born in Butler June 1, 1858, received a common school education, and afterwards attended St. Vincent's College. He then entered his father's store, where he continued clerking until 1887, in which year he became a member of the firm of C. Koch & Sons. He is a member of St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, a Democrat.

JOHN G. KOCH, son of Charles KOCH, was born in Butler July 12, 1861, was educated in the common school, entered his father's store as a clerk, and became a member of the present firm in 1887. In politics, he is a Democrat, and is a member of St. Peter's Catholic church.

WILLIAM RICHEY was a son of Nathaniel RICHEY, a native of Wales, who settled in Armstrong county, where William was born in 1811. He grew to manhood in that county, and in 1830 came to Butler and was engaged in teaming between Butler and Pittsburg until 1869. He also conducted a store and bakery in the borough for many years. In early life he was a Whig, subsequently a Republican, and later a Democrat, and filled the office of constable in the borough. He was reared in the Lutheran faith, but in later years he united with the Presbyterian church, and afterwards became a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which faith he died. Mr. RICHEY married Amy BRINKER, August 4, 1840, to whom were born five children: Abraham B.; Louisa, wife of Joseph HENRY; John A.; Mary, wife of Edward FLEMING, and one who died in infancy. Mrs. RICHEY died in 1854, and he married for his second wife Mrs. Simon MECHLING, nee ZIEGLER, and had two children: Charley, and Julia. Mr. RICHEY always manifested a deep interest in public matters up to his death, which occurred August 15, 1892.

JOHN A. RICHEY, second son of William and Amy (BRINKER) RICHEY, [p. 759] was born in the borough of Butler, June 13, 1848, received a public school education, and subsequently learned the baker's trade in Pittsburg. In 1869 he established a bakery at Butler, in partnership with his father, but in 1870 he removed to Greece City, Butler county, and remained there three years. In 1873 he was appointed county detective, which position he filled for five years, and in 1879 engaged in the hotel business at Karns City. Three years later he opened a hotel at Renfrew, which he carried on for five years, and then returned to Butler, where he established his present bakery and confectionery and also engaged in the ice business. Politically, he is a Democrat, and was a candidate for clerk of courts in 1874, but was defeated in the convention by only one vote. Mr. RICHEY was married December 28, 1873, to Lydia, daughter of Philip BURTNER, of Saxonburg, and has had one child by this union, which died in youth. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and K.of P., and is an adherent of the Protestant Episcopal church.

A.B. RICHEY was born in Summit township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1842, where he was reared and received a common school education. He learned the shoemaker's trade, at which he worked until his enlistment in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. His company went into camp at Kittanning, where he was mustered into the service, thence to Pittsburg, and down the Ohio to Kentucky. He served in the Greene river campaign under General BUELL, thence to Alabama, and Tennessee, where he participated in the siege of Nashville. He next took part in the battle of Stone River, under General ROSECRANZ, where the Seventy-eighth made one of the grandest charges during the war. The regiment here became a part of the Fourteenth Army Corps, and Mr. RICHEY participated in the following battles in which that corps served: Dug Gap, Chickamauga, Buzzard's Roost, Dalton, New Hope Church, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Atlanta and Jonesboro. In the fall of 1863, at Decker Station he served as provost guard of General NEGLEY's headquarters, and was in charge of the ambulance corps in the Fourteenth Army Corps. Under General ROSECRANZ order, dated at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, February 14, 1863, establishing a roll of honor for the promotion of courage and efficiency in the army, Mr. RICHEY was chosen by his company for that honor. He never missed a roll call, march or battle in which his regiment was engaged during his term of service. When his term had expired he was sent back to Nashville, and volunteered to serve in a raid on General Forrest. Returning to Kittanning, he was honorably discharged, November 4, 1864, whence he came to Butler. Mr. RICHEY was married May 7, 1866, to Amanda, daughter of George Christley of Centerville, and has six children: Harry; Clara, deceased; Leah; William, deceased; Amie, deceased, and Orrie. Mr. RICHEY worked at his trade after the war, but in 1880 he went into the coal business, which he has continued up to the present. Politically, he is a Republican, has served as assistant burgess of Butler, and was postmaster at Centerville from 1866 to 1868. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has been a trustee in that organization. He is connected with the E.A.U., and is a charter member of A.G. Reed Post, G.A.R., of which organization he is now commandant. [p. 760] Mr. RICHEY has been elected three times a delegate to the State Encampment, and in 1893 was a national delegate to the G.A.R. convention at Indianoplis.

CHARLES N. BOYD is a son of W.S. and Margaret (McCAFFERTY) BOYD, and was born at Sarversville, Butler county, Pennsylvania, May 27, 1852. His paternal grandfather, Rev. Abraham BOYD, was a native of Ireland, and came with his father, John BOYD, to Westmoreland county at an early date. Rev. Abraham BOYD was a graduate of Canonsburg College, and for many years was located in Allegheny county. He established the Westminster and Buffalo Presbyterian churches of Butler county, and was one of the well known ministers of pioneer days. He [sic] first wife was Eleanor HILLIS. Some time after her death, he married Mrs. Agnes SCOTT. W.S. BOYD, the father of our subject, was born in Allegheny county in 1818. In 1850 he located at Sarversville, Butler county, where he was engaged in general merchandising until 1854. In that year he settled upon a part of the old homestead, in Allegheny county, and spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church for many years, and died July 25, 1865. By his marriage to Margaret, daughter of James McCAFFERTY, he was the father of three children, as follows: James S.; Mary E., deceased wife of J.S. Christie, and Charles N. The subject of this sketch was reared in Allegheny county, and learned the tinner's trade. In 1874 he formed a partnership with his brother, James S., and established a drug business at Tarentum, removing to Connellsville in 1876, where he remained three years in the same business. He also carried on the drug business in Somerset county. In the spring of 1887 he established his present drug store in Butler, and has since built up one of the leading business houses of the borough. Mr. BOYD was married in 1880, to Della G., daughter of David CARSON, of Connellsville, who died in 1882. His second wife was Agnes, a daughter of the Rev. J.M. BARNETT, of Washington, Pennsylvania, whom he married December 5, 1889. One daughter, Martha Eleanor, is the fruit of this marriage. Mr. BOYD is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is an elder in the Butler organization. He belongs to the Masonic order, and in politics, is a republican. He is one of the public-spirited and enterprising business men of the borough.

JOSEPH KEMPER was born in Westphalia, Prussia, November 16, 1828. In 1844 he immigrated to the United States, and located at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he learned the harnessmaker's trade. After serving his apprenticeship he located in business at Worthington, Armstrong county, in July, 1853, and in October, 1854, purchased a farm in Clearfield township, Butler county, upon which he resided until September, 1865, when he removed to Butler, and established the harness store carried on by his son, Frank, up to 1895. He conducted this business successfully until 1889, when he retired from active life. Mr. KEMPER married Eva, daughter of Andrew KORB of Clearfield township, which union was blessed with five children: Bernard; Frank; Mary; Maggie, deceased wife of Michael DUFFY, of Bradford, Pennsylvania, and Joseph, who is known as Father Peter, of the Capuchin Order. Mrs. KEMPER died in 1865, and he married for his second wife Margaret BRUNER, to which union have been born four children: Anna, wife of Joseph JORDAN; John; Anthony, and Eva. The family are members of St. Peter's Catholic church, and in politics, Mr. KEMPER is a Democrat.

[p. 761]

BERNARD KEMPER, eldest son of Joseph and Eva KEMPER, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1854, and received his education in the public schools and at St. Peter's Parochial school of Butler, and subsequently attended Witherspoon Institute. In 1869 he commenced learning the shoemaker's trade, worked at that business for several years in various places, then embarked in business under the firm name of Kemper & Shank, which lasted for two years. He then continued working at his trade until 1891, when he started a general repair shop, which he has since continued. Mr. KEMPER was married in 1874, to Philomena, daughter of Joseph WEIGAND, of Butler, to which union have been born six children: Frank; Mary; Wilbert; Eleanor; Aloysious J., and Raymond B. The family are members of St. Peter's Catholic church, and Mr. KEMPER is connected with the C.M.B.A., and the B.P.O.E. In politics, he is a Democrat.

FRANK KEMPER, second son of Joseph and Eva KEMPER, was born in Clearfield township, Butler county, February 15, 1856, and received his education in the common and parochial schools of Butler. He learned the harnessmaker's trade with his father, and in 1889 he bought out the latter and up to 1895 conducted business at the old stand. Mr. KEMPER married Lena, daughter of Joseph FISHER of Butler, and they are the parents of three children, all of whom are living: Ernest F.; Anna M., and George M. The family are members of St. Peter's Catholic church, and Mr. KEMPER is connected with the C.M.B.A. Politically, he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM J. AYRES was born in the borough of Butler, in March, 1811, son of Gen. William Ayres, one of the prominent, influential pioneers of the town. He was educated at a subscription school, and followed the manufacture of woolen goods, erecting what was long known as the Union Woolen Mills. In 1836 he married Harriet F. McCARNS, a daughter of James McCARNS, of Fayette county, and to this union were born five children, viz.: Jane E., who married Dr. Thomas McMILLAN; Margaret A., who married William A. JACKSON, of Shenango township, Mercer county; Hugh A.; William H.H., deceased, and DeWitt C. Mr. Ayres died April 9, 1867, and his wife, in October, 1886.

CAPT. H.A. AYRES was born in Butler borough, February 10, 1839, eldest son of William J. and Harriet F. AYRES. He received a common school education, and learned the jeweler's trade with W.W. Wilson of Pittsburg. On the breaking out of the Rebellion his was the first name enrolled in Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, the first company raised in Butler county. He enlisted April 17, 1861, and was mustered into the service at Harrisburg eight days later. His company was commanded by Capt. John N. PURVIANCE, and served three months. When his term of service expired, he and William S. JACK recruited Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, of which he was elected second lieutenant. While serving on Gen. John F. MILLER's staff, he was promoted to captain, for meritorious services in the field and fidelity and judgment in the performance of his duty. He commanded his company until November 4, 1864, when his term of service having expired, he again became a member of General MILLER's staff until the close of the war. Returning to Harrisville, Butler county, he engaged in merchandising, and afterwards went into [p. 762] the oil industry. In 1887 he was elected register and recorder of Butler county, on the Republican ticket, and served in that capacity for three years. Captain AYRES was married on October 17, 1861, to Elizabeth KERR, a daughter of Judge James KERR, of Harrisville, to which union have been born six children, as follows: Priscilla, wife of Thomas H. GREER; Harriet L., wife of John C. GRAHAM; Mary; James K., deceased; John, and Paul, the last deceased. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church.

GEORGE KETTERER is a son of Frederick and Dorothea (HOUSEHOLDER) KETTERER, natives of Germany, where his father was born in 1819. Frederick KETTERER was a farmer, and both he and wife died in Germany, the former in 1882, and the latter in 1891. Their family consisted of the following children: Frederick, deceased; Jacob; Henry, deceased; Dorothea, who married Frederick FOELL; George; Charles; Philip; Sarah, who married Philip HOFFNER; Frederick, deceased, and one who died in infancy. The subject of this sketch was born in Alsace, Germany, September 14, 1854, and in 1870 emigrated to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he learned the upholstering trade. He came to Butler in 1874, and in 1876 embarked in business for himself. He subsequently added the furniture business, which he is still engaged in. He erected the building which he now occupies, also the Western Union Telegraph building, and the City Hall. Mr. KETTERER was married September 30, 1878, to Sophia, daughter of Valentine FEIGEL of Butler. Seven children are the fruits of this union as follows: Frederick; Albert G.; Augusta K.; Edward L.; Clarence H.; John W., and Dorothea M. The family are adherents of the Reformed church, in which body Mr. KETTERER fills the office of deacon. He is a Democrat in politics; is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the A.L.of H. He has also served as school director, and takes a commendable interest in the prosperity of his adopted home.

WILLIAM COOPER was born in Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England, February 6, 1846. His father, John COOPER, was born in the same shire November 5, 1819, and was a merchant tailor and clothier. He was ordained a minister of the Baptist church in 1850, and in connection with his business devoted a portion of his time to preaching the gospel. He married Ann, daughter of John WATTS of the same place, in March, 1843, to which union were born ten children: Mary A., wife of John WARD; Amelia, wife of Richard PALMER; William; Henrietta, wife of Richard WATTS; Emma, wife of Thomas BRIDGE; John; George; Esther; Alfred, and Florence, deceased. The subject of this sketch learned merchant tailoring at Leeds, Yorkshire, England, commencing his trade at the age of thirteen years. He worked as a tailor for several years, and then went to London, where he took a course in the art of cutting, remaining there three years. He then emigrated to Cleveland, Ohio, where he entered the employ of Alfred EYERS, with whom he remained three years and a half, subsequently spent two years and a half with Carson & Company, and three years with Henry Beckman & Company. These were the largest firms in Cleveland at that time. From Cleveland he went to Newburg, Ohio, and worked for George SMALL some two years. Returning to Cleveland he became designer and cutter for S. Mann-Austrian & Company, with whom he remained two years, and for [p. 763] the next eighteen months traveled through Ohio, Indiana and Michigan, working at his trade. Again returning to Cleveland he filled the position of pattern designer for a wholesale house for eighteen months, and afterwards entered the service of the Cherry Valley Iron Company at Leetonia, Ohio, where for three years and a half he filled the position of manager of their merchant tailoring and clothing department. Coming to Butler he filled the position of cutter for William ALAND until January 1, 1894, when he engaged in business as a member of the firm of Young & Cooper. The former retired January 1, 1895, and the firm then became Cooper & Company. Mr. Cooper was married November 27, 1867, to Harriet, daughter of Daniel CHARLES, of Cambridgeshire, England. They are the parents of seven children: Florence; Kate; William; Nellie; John; Peter, and Paul.

JACOB S. YOUNG, merchant tailor and oil operator, was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1856, son of John YOUNG, and was reared on the homestead farm in Butler county. In 1883 he engaged in general merchandising at Brownsdale, which he continued for nearly three years, and was postmaster at that point during this period. He afterwards carried on a store for three years at Dutchtown. Since 1883 he has been an oil producer, and quite successful in that line of business. In 1890 he purchased a residence in Butler, where he has since resided. He embarked in the merchant tailoring business January 10, 1894, as a member of the firm of Young & Cooper, which was dissolved January 1, 1895, Mr. YOUNG retiring. He then established the present store of J.S.& J.P. Young, on the corner of Main and Jefferson streets. Mr. YOUNG was married February 15, 1891, to Nannie P., daughter of William GRAHAM, of Forward township, and has three children: Florence M.; Harry W., and Edna G. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and politically a Republican.

GEORGE MILLER was born near Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in 1799, grew to manhood in his native county, and learned the cabinetmaker's trade. He removed from Virginia to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and thence to Butler, where he purchased property and engaged in the furniture business, which he followed for many years. In 1828 he married Eliza MAHARG, a daughter of John MAHARG of Forward township, Butler county, to which union were born eleven children, as follows: Catherine, who married Dickson BARKLEY; John; Joseph, deceased; James H.; Presley, deceased; Newton, deceased; Eliza J., wife of George McBRIDE of Butler; William A, deceased; Margaret, wife of William DAUBENSPECK; Henry, and Sarah B., who married Clarence BOLTON. Mr. MILLER died January 31, 1873, and his wife in September, 1893. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, and among the pioneers of the Butler congregation, in which he held the office of elder. Politically, he was a Republican, and served as county commissioner and treasurer of Butler county.

JAMES H. MILLER was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, April 18, 1833, was educated in the public schools of the borough, and learned the chairmaker's trade. He afterwards engaged in the furniture business, which he followed until the spring of 1890. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was mustered into the service at Kittanning, [p. 764] and served three years, being honorably discharged in August, 1864. In 1881 he was elected, on the Republican ticket, treasurer of Butler county, and served a full term, and in February, 1890 he was elected overseer of the poor of Butler borough. Mr. MILLER is a member of the United Presbyterian church, is a charter member of the A.G. Reed Post, G.A.R., also of the Union Veteran Legion, and is connected with the K.of H. He has been twice married; first to Miss Mary A. CUNNINGHAM, in 1857, who died the following year. He married for his second wife, Mrs. Harriet MILLIGAN, widow of Joseph MILLIGAN, of Armstrong county, in 1867.

WILLIAM H. RITTER, son of Karl L. RITTER, a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, and Sarah J. (GIBSON) RITTER, a daughter of William GIBSON, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Allegheny City, August 3, 1843, and obtained a common and select school education. He began life for himself as a salesman in Pittsburg, continuing until he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served until the regiment was mustered out, when he returned home. In 1868 he purchased the general store of James R. SAMPSON, at Newport, Pennsylvania, which was carried on until 1870 under the name of Ritter & Ralston. The firm then sold out and located in Butler, where they began business September 20, 1871, and for many years carried on the largest dry goods and millinery business in the borough. Mr. RITTER was married September 4, 1873, to Minnie H. PATTERSON, a daughter of Col. Joseph P. PATTERSON, of Butler, to which union six children have been born, as follows: Charles P.; William H.; Joseph L.; Susan F.; Sarah J., and Edna M. Himself and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church. In politics, he is an ardent Republican, has served as a member and secretary of the state central committee, has been a delegate to party conventions, and is recognized as one of the most active and successful workers in local politics. He is a member of A.G. Reed Post, G.A.R., and also of the Royal Arcanum.

WILLIAM S. GRAHAM was born in New Enterprise, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1855, and is a son of James H. and Susan (SNOEBERGER) GRAHAM of Penn township. He received a common school education and subsequently attended the State Normal School at Indiana, Pa., afterwards teaching for five years. He was a salesman for Berg & Cypher of Butler, and was next appointed agent for the United States Express Company, which position he filled for three years at Butler, and one year at Dunkirk, New York. In 1887 he embarked in the grocery business as junior member of the firm of Bellis & Graham, and was also interested in the oil business. In 1891 he retired from the grocery business, and became agent for the United States Express Company in Allegheny City. In June, 1893, he again went into the grocery business at his former stand in Butler, and still continues the same. Mr. GRAHAM was married September 4, 1881, to Esther, daughter if Israel SEAMAN of Penn township, and has five children: Charles; Dora; Harry; Nanny, and Ethel. In politics, he is a Republican, and in religious faith, a member of the Presbyterian church.

JOHN B. REED was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1832, and grew to manhood in that county. He received a common school education, and [p. 765] devoted a portion of his life to teaching music. He was a boatman on the Pennsylvania canal, and lived at Tarentum, Allegheny county. In 1864 he went into the general merchandising in that town, removed to Riddle's Cross Roads three years after, where he engaged in the same business, and was also postmaster at that point. He afterwards conducted a store at Flick, whence he returned to Tarentum, where he continued merchandising until 1875, when he sold out and retired from business. Mr. REED married Matilda, daughter of John MILLER of Mt. Chestnut, Butler county, to whom were born six children: John M.; Rachel B.; Adam W.; Martha J., who married W.T. McCANDLESS of Franklin township; James H., and Carson N. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, a leader in the choir for many years, and also an elder in that organization. His wife died March 16, 1875; he survived her until June 10, 1890.

JOHN M. REED, eldest son of John B. REED, was born in Buffalo township, Butler county, February 9, 1860, and received a common school education. In February, 1876, he engaged in clerking for Bellis & Gerlach of St. Joe, Butler county. The following June he took a similar position in the store of Ritter & Ralston, of Butler, with whom he remained until July, 1883. He then filled the position of salesman in B.C. HUSELTON's store until December, 1889, when he embarked in the grocery business, which he sold February 1, 1894, and purchased the agency for all the Pittsburg daily papers coming to Butler. Mr. REED was married March 29, 1881, to Elizabeth, daughter of John McFALL of Smith's Ferry, Beaver county, and has five children: Susan M.; Bessie B.; Nellie J.; Endell N., and Ralph E. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Butler, in which he is financial secretary of the official board, and has been secretary of the Sabbath school for seventeen years. He is a Republican in politics, and is connected with Connoquenessing Lodge, Number 272, I.O.O.F., also the P.H.C., and is secretary and accountant of the John S. Campbell Hose Company.

PETER BIEHL was born in Rolenburg, Germany, in 1820, grew to manhood in his native place, and there learned the trade of coppersmith. He immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1848 and located in Butler, where he went into the tin and coppersmith business. In 1859 he purchased the present location of his son Henry, and in 1873 he bought a part of the Millard tract, in the borough of Butler. He married Martha BODESHEIM, a native of Germany, and was the father of five children: Henry; Conrad; William G.; George C., and one that died in infancy. Mr. BIEHL died February 7, 1876; his widow resides in Butler. He was an adherent of the Reformed church.

HENRY BIEHL, eldest son of Peter Biehl, was born in the borough of Butler, July 30, 1850. After receiving a public school education, he took a course in book-keeping at Duff's Commercial College, Pittsburg, and afterwards learned the tinning and roofing trade with his father. In 1875 he obtained an interest in the business, and July 1, 1889, he purchased the interest of all others and has since been sole proprietor. Mr. BIEHL was married May 5, 1885, to Ida B. MAY, a daughter of Rev. Josiah MAY, pastor of Sugar Creek Reformed church, Armstrong county. She died November 23, 1887. He was again married, September 3, 1891, to Joanna M., daughter of Eli NALY, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. One child, Eleanor H., deceased, has been born to this union. Mr. BIEHL is a [p. 766] member of Bethany Reformed church, of which he has been deacon, and is now an elder, and is also librarian of the Sabbath school. Politically, he is a Democrat.

JOHN D. JACKSON was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1845, and is a son of John E. JACKSON. His father was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, August 8, 1812, and was a wheelwright, and carried on business at Springfield, Pennsylvania. His mother was Maria, daughter of Joseph MILNES of Berks county, and his parents were married in 1832. They had seven children: Elizabeth; Joseph M.; David E.; Mary E., and Samuel, both deceased; John D., and Hannah M. The parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and subsequently attended the State Normal School at Millersville, Pennsylvania. He afterwards learned the miller's trade, and in 1870 he entered his brother's store at Freeport, Pennsylvania, as salesman. In 1878 he came to Butler and embarked in the hardware business as a member of the firm of Jackson & Mitchell, which has since carried on business successfully. Mr. JACKSON was married December 16, 1873, to Agnes J., daughter of Judge James MITCHELL, of Summit township, and has one son, John H. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Butler, in which organizaation he has been a steward, and is now one of the trustees. Politically, he is a Republican, and one of the liberal, enterprising citizens of the community.

JOHN MITCHELL, son of James MITCHELL, Sr., was born on the homestead farm in Summit township, Butler county, December 7, 1828, received a common school education, and afterwards attended Witherspoon Institute. He followed agriculture until 1864, and then removed to the borough of Butler where he became a member of the firm of Mitchell & Company, in the livery business. He sold out in 1868 and went into the lumber business in partnership with George WEBBER, but engaged in the livery business again in 1875. He was afterwards assistant assessor in the United States revenue service, and in 1878 he was appointed sheriff of Butler county. Mr. MITCHELL was married June 5, 1856, to Angeline McJUNKIN, a daughter of William McJUNKIN, of Centre township. The following children were born to this union: Margaret H., wife of J.C. McJUNKIN; George, deceased; Sarah E., wife of J.M. GALBREATH; Nancy P., wife of Dr. S.M. BIPPUS; Edith J., wife of L.M. SHIRA, and Orwell H. Mrs. MITCHELL died December 18, 1891. Mr. MITCHELL is a stanch Republican, is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is connected with the Masonic order.

CHRISTOPHER STOCK, SR., was born in Germany, September 16, 1815, received a parochial school education, and was apprenticed to the trade of architect and contractor. In 1847 he married Elizabeth WENTZEL, of Dettinger, Germany, who became the mother of six children, as follows: Mary; John; Philopena; Christopher; Christopher, (2); Margaret, who married J.W. HIGGINS, all of whom are dead, except the two last mentioned. Mr. STOCK immigrated to the United States, and settled in Butler, Pennsylvania, where he purchased property of John NEGLEY. He resided in this borough until his death, June 27, 1859. His widow died December 16, 1881. They were members of St. Peter's Catholic church, to which faith their descendants belong. Politically, Mr. STOCK was a [p. 767] Democrat, but outside of exercising the rights of franchise, he took little interest in political affairs.

CHRISTOPHER STOCK was born in the borough of Butler, April 28, 1855, and was here reared and educated. In 1869 he attended the coal business of James A. NEGLEY, and the following year began learning the tinning and roofing trade with Anthony ROCKENSTEIN, for whom he worked until 1879. He then purchased the business of A.C. NAGGLE, and has been conducting the tinning and roofing business ever since. In 1885 he purchased his present store property, then known as the old Wise stand, which he has since rebuilt. Mr. STOCK was married October 13, 1881, to Elizabeth, a daughter of Anthony ROCKENSTEIN, of Butler, to which union one child, Ernest F., was born, January 13, 1883. Mrs. STOCK died January 22, 1883, and he was again married, October 14, 1884, to Amelia, daughter of Joseph WAGNER, of Butler. Five children have been born to this marriage, as follows: Amelia; Christopher; Mary; Lillian, and Charles Joseph, the two last mentioned being the only survivors. Mr. STOCK and wife are members of the St. Peter's Catholic church, of which he was secretary for two terms, and in politics, he is a Democrat. He is also a member of the Catholic Knights of St. George, of which he is secretary and treasurer. In 1888 he went into the oil business, and is now interested in seventeen producing wells in Butler county. In connection with his tinning and roiofing business, he carries a stock of hardware, glass and paint, and is one of the substantial merchants of the borough.

WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN, plumber, gas fitter, etc., was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1847, son of Samuel and Eliza (DELVIN) O'BRIEN. His grandfather, Michael O'BRIEN was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to which city his father immigrated from Waterford, Ireland. Michael married Margaret HOOK, a native of Philadelphia, December 1, 1801, the ceremony being performed by Dr. CARROLL, the first Catholic Bishop of the United States. In June, 1806, Michael and family came to Pittsburg, where he died in 1816. His widow died at Latrobe, in 1854. He was an architect, but never followed that profession, devoting his attention to mercantile pursuits. Samuel O'BRIEN, father of our subject, was born in Pittsburg, about 1813, grew to manhood in that city, and followed contracting and building. He married Eliza DELVIN, and was the father of the following children: Margaret, widow of James CALL; Joseph, deceased, who served in Company H, Sixty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers; Mary, wife of F.J. TOTTEN; Samuel F., agent of the Humane society, of Pittsburg; William H., and Elizabeth, wife of William KANE. Mr. O'BRIEN died in 1869; his widow is living in Pittsburg. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native city, received a common school education, and at eighteen began learning the pattern-maker's trade, but after a few months changed to the plumbing and gas fitting, at which he worked in Pittsburg for eighteen years. He next spent three years in Oil City, where he carried on business with G.F. SHUTTE. In January 1888, they started in business on Jefferson street, in Butler, and in the spring of 1892 Mr. O'BRIEN bought out his partner, and became sole proprietor, but has since taken in his son Albert F., the firm now being W.H. O'Brien & Son. In 1870 he married Elizabeth WENDLING, a daughter of John WENDLING, of Pittsburg, [p. 768] which union has been blessed with the following children: Albert F.; Stella; Ida; William H.; Bessie; Samuel; Marie; Joseph H.; Camilla; Murry, and two that died in infancy. The family are members of the St. Paul's Catholic church, and Mr. O'BRIEN is connected with the C.M.B.A. He is a stanch Democrat, and is one of the energetic and progressive business men of the borough.

FRANK J. HUFF, son of David and Melinda HUFF, natives of West Virginia, was born at Niles, Michigan, December 29, 1854. After receiving a common school education, he learned the plumber's trade, at Cleveland, Ohio, and subsequently worked in Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., whence he returned to Cleveland. In 1887 he located in Butler, Pennsylvania, where he purchased the plumbing establishment of Jefferson BURTNER, which he has since carried on. In 1882 he married Theresa, a daughter of Henry KLINE, of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, and has two children: Forrest, and Frank H. Mr. HUFF is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

GEORGE C. BELLIS, second son of Sipe and Mary (MYERS) BELLIS, was born in Portersville, Butler county, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1849, and received a common school education in the schools of that vicinity. In 1865 he engaged in the lumber business, which he continued until 1873, and then embarked in merchandising at Greece City, and subsequently at St. Joe. He was also in the oil business during this period. He came to Butler and embarked in the grocery business in 1879, as a member of the firm of Bellis & Miller. They sold out to Mays & Murphy, but continued the business at another point. In 1885 he bought out Mr. Murphy's interest in the old firm, which then became Bellis & Mays, but again sold in 1890. In 1891 he formed a partnership in the grocery business under the firm name of Bellis & Golden, which has since been changed to Bellis & Myers. Mr. Bellis is a member of the United Presbyterian church, is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the K.of P. He was married January 28, 1875, to Grizella, daughter of Josiah MILLER of Mt. Chestnut, and has five children: George F.; Plummer L.; Charles; May, and Blanche B.

RUDOLPH WESER was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1826, and learned the stonemason's trade in his native land. He came to the United States in 1848, and settled in the borough of Butler, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade as a contractor. He built the jail, Jefferson street school building, the Judge McCANDLESS residence and the DOUGHERTY building, and also erected the jail at Greensburg, Pennsylvania. In 1870 he was married to Annie, daughter of Leonard WISE, of Butler, to which union were born five children: Norbert T.; Gertie; Rose; Bertha, and Mark. Mr. WESER died October 7, 1886, in the faith of the Catholic church, to which denomination his family belongs. Politically, he was a Democrat, and a good, industrious citizen. His widow resides with her son Norbert.

NORBERT T. WESER, eldest son of Rudolph WESER, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, January 25, 1871, and was educated in the public schools and at Duff's Business College, Pittsburg. He was then appointed assistant book-keeper at the Butler Glass Works, and afterwards clerked for J.F.T. STEHLE. In the spring of 1887 he opened a stationery and news depot, which he sold to J.S. JACK in April, 1893. He is now manager for the Butler Automatic Machine [p. 769] Company, also district manager for the Metropolitan Loan and Savings Association of Camden, New Jersey, for western Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Catholic church, and is connected with Branch Number 56, C.M.B.A., also the B.P.O.E. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has been elected to office several times. He is a member of Company E, Fifteenth Regiment, National Guard, also of the Good Will Hose Company.

ORIN M. PHILIPS was born in Penn township, Butler county, December 11, 1857, and is the eldest son of John PHILIPS. After receiving a common school education, he found employment in a brickyard, and in 1877 he began clerking for G. Wilson Miller & Brother, of Butler. In 1885 he went on the road as a traveling salesman for the wholesale grocery house of Reeves, Parvin & Company, of Philadelphia, and in 1888 he embarked in the grocery business in Butler, as a member of the firm of Haley & Philips. In 1889 he bought Mr. HALEY's interest, since which time he has carried on the business alone. Mr. PHILIPS married Nettie, daughter of S.C. NICE, of Sandy Lake, Mercer county, and is the father of two children; Lucile, deceased, and Francis. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of the Presbyterian church.

ABSOLOM GROVE was born in New Lebanon, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1836, received a common school education, and learned the carpenter's trade before arriving at maturity. He followed his trade until 1861, when he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Captain DOUGLASS, and participated in all of the battles in which that regiment was engaged down to Gettysburg, where he was killed. In 1857 Mr. GROVE married Anna M. RAMSEY, who bore him a family of three children: Jacob H.; William H., and Odessa G., wife of James L. CANNON, of Clark's Station. Mrs. GROVE resides in French Creek township, Mercer county.

WILLIAM H. GROVE, youngest son of Absolom and Anna M. GROVE, was born in New Lebanon, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1860, and was reared and educated in his native township. He followed agriculture for five years, and then engaged in merchandising at New Lebanon. In 1889 he went to Venango, Crawford county, where he carried on a general store until 1891, then sold out and located in Butler. He established a grocery store in this borough, which he has since conducted successfully. Mr. GROVE is a member of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. On November 10, 1888, he married M. Alice McMULLEN, a daughter of Andrew J. McMULLEN, of Sandy Lake, Mercer county.

MARK SCHNEIDEMAN was born in Transtadt, Germany, in 1820, and learned the hatter's and furrier's trades in his native land. He immigrated to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, in 1846, where he followed his trade for twelve years. In 1849 he married Miss HANNACH, of Pittsburg, to which union were born two children, as follows: James A., deceased, and Hyman. His wife died in 1855. He married for the second wife a Miss ROESENTHAL. To this union was born one child, Jennie, now Mrs. LIPPMAN, of Philadelphia. About two years later he was called to part with his second wife. After the lapse of some years he married a third time, to which union was born one son, Dr. T.B. SCHNEIDEMAN, prominent physician of Philadelphia. Mr. SCHNEIDEMAN came to Butler in 1858 [p. 770] and established a general store, which he conducted until 1871, when he embarked in the clothing business exclusively. In 1877 he sold out and removed to Philadelphia, in which city he still resides.

HYMAN SCHNEIDEMAN was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1853, and is the second son of Mark SCHNEIDEMAN. He was educated in the public schools of Butler and at Witherspoon Institute, and subsequently entered his father's store, for whom he clerked until the spring of 1873, when he embarked in business for himself, as junior member of the firm of J.A.& H. Schneideman. His brother died in 1876, since which year he was sole proprietor until a recent date, when he sold out. On February 18, 1880, he married Ella B. MARTIN, a daughter of Thomas MARTIN, of Jefferson township, Butler county. Three children have been the fruits of this union, viz.: Clara; Martha E., deceased, and Mary L. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum. In 1885 Mr. SCHNEIDEMAN purchased his present business house, and besides his mercantile business he is also extensively engaged in real estate dealing. He is one of the charter members of Rough Run Manufacturing Company, Limited, which was organized in January, 1892. Mr. SCHNEIDEMAN is one of the enterprising business men of Butler.

DANIEL A. HECK, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (ROSE) HECK, was born in Centre township, Butler county, February 18, 1838. He received a good education, and followed school teaching for seven years. In 1864 he entered the store of Charles DUFFY, of Butler, for whom he clerked until 1866. In that year he embarked in business at Apollo, Armstrong county, as a member of the firm of Maxwell & Heck, but returned to his old position in Mr. DUFFY's store in 1868. In April, 1873, he became a member of the firm of Heck & Patterson, which existed until 1883, and he then established his present business. On January 10, 1870, Mr. HECK married Mary J. CHAMBERS, a daughter of J.B. CHAMBERS, of Apollo. To this union have been born six children, viz.: Martha E.; John C.; Elizabeth A., deceased; Mary G.; William A., and Edith R. Mr. HECK and wife are connected with the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He has served in the borough council, and is one of the enterprising business men of the town. He is a member of both the Lodge and Chapter, F.&A.M., is also connected with the A.O.U.W., the K.of H., the A.L.of H., and the E.A.U.

WILLIAM G. DOUTHETT, son of David and Jane E. DOUTHETT, was born upon the old homestead in Forward township, Butler county, March 20, 1862, and received his education in the district school. At the age of sixteen years he took charge of his father's farm, and conducted it until January, 1891, when he removed to Butler, and engaged in the livery business. He carried on the livery down to August 1, 1892, when he sold out. In March, 1893, he formed a partnership with Hart W.F. GRAHAM, under the firm name of Douthett & Graham, and established their present clothing and gent's furnishing store on the corner of Main and Cunningham streets, which is one of the leading establishments of the kind in Butler. Mr. DOUTHETT married Sarah C. BARTLEY, a daughter of Williamson BARTLEY, of Penn township, and has two children: Jennie B., and Elizabeth B. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, has been a Sabbath school [p. 771] teacher since the age of twenty-seven, and is now the assistant superintendent of the Sabbath school of the Butler congregation. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, and is one of the enterprising young business men of the borough.

EBENEZER GRAHAM was born within the present limits of Butler, December 25, 1824, son of Robert and Sarah (BROWN) GRAHAM. His father settled on the site of Butler in 1797, and his mother was a daughter of Robert BROWN, a pioneer justice of the peace of Middlesex township. He was reared upon the homestead farm, and afterwards learned the brickmaker's trade, and manufactured the brick for one of the first houses erected in the borough of Butler. In 1850 he married a Miss THOMPSON, who lived but two months after marriage. October 18, 1853, he married Wilhelmina FETTER, a daughter of Rev. W.A. FETTER, of Butler, to which union were born the following children: Adolphus W.; Salome C.; Louis L., deceased; Edmund T.; Johanna K., deceased; Hart W.F.; Alvin R.; Ernest O., and Andrew I.M. Mrs. GRAHAM died March 20, 1875. Both she and husband were members of the English Lutheran church of Butler, and pioneers of that society.

HART W.F. GRAHAM was born in the borough of Butler, August 20, 1866, son of Ebenezer and Wilhelmina GRAHAM. After receiving a common school education, he entered the Union Wollen Mills, of Butler, where he learned the trade of manufacturing flannels, blankets and yarns, and worked at that business until October, 1883. He then entered the store of H. SCHNEIDEMAN, as a salesman, with whom he remained until January 1, 1893. In the following March he formed a partnership with William G. DOUTHETT, under the firm name of Douthett & Graham, and established a general clothing and gent's furnishing store on the corner of Main and Cunningham streets, where they have since carried on business. Mr. GRAHAM was married October 10, 1887, to Anna J. SHERIDAN, a daughter of Bernard SHERIDAN, of Clearfield township, and has two children: Alvin A.H., and Le Moyne R. He is a member of the English Lutheran church, of Butler, in which he is now deacon and secretary of the church council. He is also connected with Tent, Number 34, K.O.T.M., and is R.K. of that society.

ALEXANDER S. McBRIDE was born near Lowellville, Ohio, March 3, 1814, son of Samuel and Ann (STRUTHERS) McBRIDE, of the same county. His father was born in 1786, and died May 28, 1827. His mother died May 26, 1865. They were the parents of four sons and three daughters. The subject of this sketch was reared upon his father's farm, and attended the pioneer subscription school in boyhood. In 1831, when seventeen years of age, he went to Warren, Pennsylvania, where he learned the printer's trade, after which he located in Butler, Pennsylvania, where he continued at this occupation until his death. Prior to 1851 he was appointed clerk of the House of Representatives, at Harrisburg, which position he filled for several consecutive terms. He afterwards resumed work at his trade, and was at one time editor of the Butler Herald. Mr. McBRIDE was married April 30, 1839, to Maria A. McKEE, a daughter of Hugh McKEE, one of the pioneers of Butler. Seven children were the fruits of this union, as follows: Hugh W., who died in New Mexico, September 20, 1884; Samuel F., who enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and [p. 772] Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, served until the close of the war, and is now employed in the government printing office at Washington; George A., who died in Butler, April 7, 1883, from blood poisoning, caused by an injury to one of his feet while in the silver mines of Colorado; Isaiah J., a resident of Butler; Cooper F., who read medicine with Dr. NEYMAN, graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, March 12, 1875, and is now a practicing physician of Youngstown, Ohio; Robert D., a resident of Hemet, California, and Stephen H. Mr. McBRIDE died September 7, 1865, and his wife, May 18, 1881. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, of Butler. He was a stanch Democrat, in politics, and was a member of Connoquenessing Lodge, I.O.O.F.

ISAIAH J. McBRIDE was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1848, son of Alexander S., and Maria A. McBRIDE. After obtaining a common school education, he learned the painter's trade, which business he has followed up to the present. In April, 1891, he formed a partnership with Charles R. ELLIOTT, and established a wall paper and painter's supply store, and the firm of McBride & Elliott existed until January 29, 1894. Mr. McBRIDE then purchased his partner's interest, and has since carried on the business alone. He was married on July 13, 1871, to Jennie McINTOSH, of Evans City, and has three children, viz.: Hugh A., Mary McKee, and James C. Mr. McBRIDE is a member of the United Presbyterian church, is connected with the A.O.U.W. and is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party.

JOSEPH J. ELLIOTT was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1833, was reared in his native county, and there learned the painter's trade, which he has followed up to the present. In 1856 he married Caroline ROSE, of Monongahela City, and eleven children have been born to this union, as follows: Mary U., deceased; Charles R.; Mary A., wife of W.C. McCANDLESS; Elizabeth, deceased wife of O.P. COCHRAN; Carrie, wife of David SCOTT; Julia, deceased; Loretta; John T.; Joseph; Frank, and Grace. In 1858 Mr. ELLIOTT came to the borough of Butler, where he has since been engaged in working at his business. Politically, he is a Democrat, was doorkeeper in the Senate in 1871, and of the House of Representatives in 1883; has been a member of the borough council, and also burgess of Butler for two terms. He is a member of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal church, and has been a vestryman in that society.

CHARLES R. ELLIOTT was born in Monongahela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania, January 31, 1858, son of Joseph J. ELLIOTT, and came with his parents to Butler in infancy. He was reared in this borough, received a common school education, and learned the painter's trade with his father. In 1891 he engaged in business as a member of the firm of McBride & Elliott, dealers in wall paper, etc. He sold his interest to his partner in January, 1894, and the following month opened a similar establishment on West Jefferson street. Mr. ELLIOTT was married July 10, 1885, to Henrietta FIEDLER, of Harmony, and has four children, viz.: Julia F.; Clifford A.; John J., and Clara. He is an adherent of the Democratic party.

JAMES H. DOUGLASS, son of Samuel and Jane DOUGLASS, was born in Rostraver township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1825, and was reared and educated in his native county. He learned photography at [p. 773] Uniontown, Fayette county, and in the fall of 1857 removed to Kittanning, Armstrong county, and embarked in dentistry. In 1861 he located at Freeport, where he followed the same business. He was appointed postmaster of that place in 1878, and served two full terms. In 1886 he came to Butler, and embarked in the book and stationery business, which he still continues. Mr. DOUGLASS was married on November 13, 1860, to Amanda HENRY, a daughter of Alexander HENRY, of Kittanning, and has three children, viz.: Madge, Harriet L., and Charles H. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which society he fills the office of trustee. In politics, he is a Republican.

WILLIAM MILLER was born in Newport township, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, in 1821, and is a son of John MILLER, a native of this State. He was reared upon his father's farm in Luzerne county, and after arriving at manhood, he settled upon a farm in the same township, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1859. In that year he removed to Butler county, purchased a farm of 150 acres in Butler township, and resided upon it until 1889, when he retired to Butler, where he at present lives. Mr. Miller has been twice married, his first wife being Helena HAUK, who died in 1860, leaving a family of three children, as follows: G. Wilson, of Butler; Henry, of the same borough, and Emmeline, wife of J.F. ANDREWS. His second wife was Miss Emmeline YETTER, who has borne him one daughter, Mary, wife of William W. MANNY, of Butler, Politically, Mr. MILLER is a Democrat, and in religious faith, he is a Lutheran, the family being adherents of the English Lutheran church of Butler.

HENRY MILLER, second son of William and Helena MILLER, was born in Newport township, Luzerne county, September 15, 1851, and received a common school education. In November, 1869, he began clerking for S.R. Dieffenbacher & Company, of Butler, and remained with them and their successors for some two years. He next entered the employ of Charles DUFFY, for whom he clerked for three years. In 1875 he formed a partnership with his brother, G. Wilson, under the firm name of G. Wilson Miller & Brother, which continued until 1890. In 1891 he established his present grocery store and has since built up a good trade. Mr. MILLER is one of the original stockholders of the Citizens' Gas Company, and the Butler Agricultural Association. In politics, he is a Democrat, but takes no active interest in political matters. He was formerly a member of the German Reformed church, but is now connected with the German Lutheran church. He was married July 25, 1875, to Mary, daughter of Henry EITENMILLER, to which union have been born three children: Charles H.; William W., and Alice E., deceased.

HENRY EITENMILLER was born in 1821, in Darmstadt, Germany. He learned the tailor's trade in youth, and early in the forties settled in Butler, where he engaged in that business. In 1869 he opened the Diamond Hotel, now known as the Park, which he carried on for several years. In 1888 he purchased the property now known as the Hotel Butler, which he carried on as the Eitenmiller House until 1892. He then retired from active business, and died May 30, 1893. He married Elizabeth RIMP, of Germany, who survives him. They were the parents of one daughter, Mary, now the wife of Henry MILLER. Mr. [p. 774] EITENMILLER was a stockholder in the Bald Ridge Oil Company, and was quite successful in the accumulation of real estate. He was a Democrat in politics, and was a member of the German Lutheran church.

MARSHALL A. BERKIMER was born in Rochester, Pennsylvania, August 23, 1859, and is a son of George H. BERKIMER. The latter was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1833, and after arriving at manhood, he was a salesman in the dry goods house of John DEAN of that city, also at the Bee Hive. In 1865 he started a general store at Rochester, and then traveled in the wholesale boot and shoe business until his death, which occurred November 12, 1892. In 1856 he married Annie M., daughter of William D. RENNO, Sr., of Rochester, and had two children, Jennie E., and Marshall A. His widow resides with her son in Butler. Mr. BERKIMER was a member of the Royal Arcanum, and also of the I.O.O.F. The subject of this sketch received a common school education and learned the undertaking business with John Murphy & Company, of Pittsburg, with whom he was ten years prior to January 1, 1893, when he established the undertaking business at 251 South Main street, Butler, under the firm name of Berkimer & Taylor. He married Mary J., a daughter of the late Rev. James A. CLARK, of Prospect, Butler county, February 3, 1887. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

JACOB C. BURCKHALTER, son of George and Mary BURCKHALTER, was born in the City of New York, December 19, 1850, received a common school education, and learned the blacksmith's trade with George REIBER, of Butler, where he located in 1867. He followed his trade for many years, and finally went into the undertaking business, purchasing an establishment in 1893, from E.H. ANDERSON, which he sold to Berkimer & Taylor. On December 23, 1873, Mr. BURCKHALTER married Maggie KOCH, a daughter of Fred KOCH, of Butler, and has two children, George N. and Charles J. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Democratic party. He served as constable for two years, and has been a member of the Butler Fire Department since its organization. Mr. BURCKHALTER has recently opened an undertaking establishment on West Cunningham street, in the Troutman block.

ROBERT M. HARPER, son of Thomas and Margaret Harper of Concord township, Butler county, was born in that township, May 9, 1830. He was reared upon a farm, and learned the carpenter's trade. In 1850 he went to California, worked in the gold mines for two years, then returned to Butler county, and embarked in merchandising at North Washington. In 1872 he engaged in the oil industry at Parker, and in 1890 removed to Butler, where [he is at persent residing. He married Eliza J. MECHLING, a daughter of Joseph MECHLING, of Washington township. The following children are the fruits of this union: Alwilda; John H.; Agnes, who married E.H. ANDERSON, of Butler; Elmer, deceased; Josephine; Jessie, and Frederick. Mr. HARPER is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a trustee, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Republican party.

JOHN H. HARPER, son of Robert M. and Eliza J. HARPER, was born at North Washington, Butler county, August 23, 1857, received a common school education, and clerked in his father's store at North Washington for several years. He [p. 775] was afterwards in business at that point as a member of the firm of Harper Brothers. In 1886 he came to Butler and opened a general store, which he has since carried on. Mr. HARPER was married March 20, 1883, to Aggie GRAHAM, a daughter of Malcolm and Mary GRAHAM of Wilkinsburg. They are the parents of two children, Frances L., and Grace K., deceased. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, in politics, a Republican, and has served in the borough council. He is connected with Ziegler Lodge, I.O.O.F., and the K.of P.


[End of Chapter 70-2 (pgs.725-775) - Biographical Sketches, Borough of Butler, History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895.]

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