History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 71 (Pgs. 870-910)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Ed


CHAPTER LXXI

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Butler, Summit, Clearfield, Winfield, Buffalo, Jefferson, Clinton, Penn, Middlesex Townships, and Saxonburg Borough

[p. 870]

JOHN MANGOLD was born in Germany in 1829, there grew to maturity and followed the business of a stonecutter and contractor. He came to Pennsylvania in early manhood, and settled in Buffalo township, Butler county, where he followed his trade until 1870, in which year he embarked in the grocery business at Freeport. He died in that borough in October, 1870, and his wife in 1873. He was married in 1853, and was the father of six children, as follows: Henry W.; Christian; John; Peter; George J., and Louisa, who married J.C. WYLE. Mr. MANGOLD was a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics, he was a Democrat.

JOHN J. RANDOLPH was born in Patterson, New Jersey, in 1816, a son of Samuel F. RANDOLPH, and a descendant of John RANDOLPH of Roanoake. His father married Nancy GIRARD, of New Jersey, and reared seven children, viz.: Abraham; Charlotte; John; Mary; David; Sarah, and William. Samuel F. RANDOLPH was postmaster of Liberty, Pennsylvania, for several years, and in politics, was an adherent of the Democratic party. Both he and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and died in 1872, and in 1882, respectively. The subject of this sketch learned the shoemaker's trade with his father, and in 1841, was married to Mary A. SHAFFER, a daughter of John SHAFFER, of Westmoreland county, where he now resides. He is the father of seven children, as follows: William; Samuel F.; Amanda; John J.; Emma; Charles J., and Nancy. In politics, Mr. RANDOLPH is a Democrat, and is connected with the Methodist Episcopal church.

CHARLES J. RANDOLPH, youngest son of John J. and Mary A. RANDOLPH, was born in Westmoreland county, October 31, 1855, attended the common schools, and learned the printer's trade. On January 21, 1875, he married Henrietta HOFFMAN, a daughter of Philip HOFFMAN of Westmoreland county, to which union have been born five children, viz.: Jacob; Emma; Walter; Ida, deceased, and Grace. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, Mr. RANDOLPH is a Democrat. In September, 1891, he purchased the [p. 871] old JOHNSON farm in Buffalo township, Butler county, containing fifty acres, upon which he has since resided.

PATRICK GRAHAM, a native of Ireland, was no doubt the first settler in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He immigrated to Westmoreland county, there married Elizabeth McKee, came to Butler county in 1796, and erected a cabin upon a tract of land which he had previously selected in what is now Jefferson township. He then returned for his wife, Elizabeth, and three children, Rosanna, Joseph and Daniel, whom he brought on pack horses to his new home in the unbroken forest of Butler county. Including the children born in Westmoreland county, the following are the names of their family: Rosanna, who married Alexander MARTIN; Joseph; Daniel, who settled in Brady township, and there died; Patrick, born upon the homestead May 25, 1798, the first white child born in Jefferson township, and resided upon the same until his death; Elizabeth, who married James PRYOR; James, who settled in Mercer county, and died there; John, who died in Connoquenessing township, was a merchant at Whitestown, and Harrison who located in Beaver county. Though not a large man, Patrick GRAHAM possessed a strong and vigorous constitution, a tireless energy, and wonderful endurance. He died in 1844, at the remarkable age of ninety-seven years.

JOSEPH GRAHAM, eldest son of Patrick and Elizabeth GRAHAM, was born in Westmoreland county, in 1794, and was about three years old when his parents came to Butler county. His youth was passed amidst pioneer scenes, and he grew up inured to the hardships and privations of that period. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and served as a major in the early militia. After arriving at maturity he located upon the farm now owned by H. KIRCHNER. He married Elizabeth FREYER, who died without issue, and he subsequently married Nancy THOMPSON, to whom were born four children, as follows: Robert T.; Elizabeth; James, who served in the Mexican war and also in the Rebellion, and Esther. Mrs. GRAHAM died, and he was again married, to Margaret BALPH, who became the mother of eight children, viz.: William B.; Rebecca J., wife of Thomas McCONNELL; Joseph; George K.; Susan, wife of John M. STARK; Margaret, who married Matthew McKANE; Eli, and Nancy E., wife of William S. BARTLEY. Joseph GRAHAM died May 4, 1880, and his wife August 7, 1890. Both he and wife were members of the Presbyterian church, in which he was an elder. Mr. GRAHAM was a Democrat, served one term as county commissioner, and three terms as a justice of the peace of Jefferson township.

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM, eldest in the family of Joseph and Margaret (BALPH) GRAHAM, was born upon the homestead farm, in Jefferson township, February 2, 1837, was reared a farmer, and subsequently learned the carpenter's trade, which he has followed in connection with agriculture. He was married February 8, 1864, to Eliza J. BARTLEY, a daughter of Joseph BARTLEY, of Penn township, where the family settled at an early day. They are the parents of the following children: Agnes R., wife of James SEFTON; Margaret C., wife of J.H. McKEEVER; Mary E., wife of S.N. SHAW; Emma L., wife of Thomas HARBISON; Joseph L., who married Lizzie COVERT; William F.; George R., and John H. Mr. GRAHAM and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, [p. 872] and in politics he is a Democrat. He has filled the office of school director, and takes a commendable interest in educational affairs.

THOMAS WELSH, SR., was a native of Londonderry, Ireland, and immigrated to the United States about 1798. His father, William WELSH, was a man of wealth and prominence, but in aiding friends he lost the most of his property, and Thomas was obliged to seek his own fortune. He learned the baker's trade in his native land, and upon reaching Philadelphia he readily found employment at his trade. Possessing industrious and thrifty habits, he soon saved sufficient means to start a business for himself, and by strict attention he became in a few years the head of a prosperous business establishment. About 1810 he married Elizabeth WELSH, a native of Derry county, Ireland, and she became the mother of twelve children. After a prosperous business career of twenty years, and having a large family, Mr. WELSH decided to remove to Butler county, where he purchased 4,500 acres of land in Jefferson township, to which he brought his family in 1819, coming the whole distance with a team of horses through a trackless forest. He settled near the southeast corner of the township, on the farm where his grandson, John WELSH, now lives, and resided there until his death, which occurred in 1853, in the eighty-fourth year of his age. He and wife were members of the Presbyterian church, in which denomination he filled the office of elder. He was a man of powerful physique, peaceable and kindly in disposition, and was much esteemed for his charity, and genial, pleasant manner.

GEORGE WELSH was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1812, and was in his eighth year when his parents, Thomas and Elizabeth WELSH, settled in Butler county. He lived at home until the age of twenty-three years, obtaining such an education as the pioneer schools afforded, and then commenced business for himself. In 1845 he built a saw mill on the creek and soon afterwards a gristmill, at what is now known as Frazier's Mill, which he carried on for several years in connection with the lumber trade. In 1835 he married Jane DAVIS, a daughter of John DAVIS, a native of Ireland, who died in Jefferson township, in 1853. Nine children were born to this marriage, as follows: Matilda, wife of Arthur TURNER; Thomas; John; Joseph, who was a member of Company G, One Hundred and Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died in 1872; Eliza, wife of Thomas W. FRAZIER; Emily, deceased; Elvira; Rebecca, deceased, and Sarah, wife of John WALKER. In 1859, Mr. WELSH located in Allegheny City, for the purpose of educating his children, and was employed by the government in the custom house for four years. In 1862, when Governor Curtin called for troops to repel Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania, Mr. WELSH, though exempt by age from military duty, was among the first to respond to the call. He joined the Eighteenth regiment, and went to the front, thus displaying that undaunted patriotism which is a distinguishing mark of the Celtic race. In 1863 he returned to Jefferson township, where he has since been engaged in farming. He owns 450 acres of the original lands purchased by his father and has been one of the most successful agriculturists in the county. Mr. WELSH has been a life-long Democrat, and cast his vote for Andrew Jackson. Like his father, he is a man of powerful physique and robust constitution. He is a genial, pleasant and intelligent gentleman, and has always occupied a leading position [p. 873] among the representative farmers of Butler county. Though in his eighty-third year, he is still hale and vigorous, and with the exception of being afflicted with partial blindness, he is as happy and bright as if in the prime of manhood.

JOHN WELSH, JR., was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, March 4, 1839, and is the second son of George and Jane (DAVIS) WELSH. He has always resided upon his present homestead of 100 acres, a part of the original purchase of his grandfather, Thomas WELSH, excepting the few years his father lived in Allegheny. He was educated at the Pittsburg public schools, and since his father returned to Jefferson township he has been engaged in farming. He was married January 29, 1869, to Sarah Ann WELSH, a daughter of Thomas and Anna Eliza (McKENZIE) WELSH. Her father was an uncle of her husband's, was a farmer, owning 400 acres of land adjoining that of George WELSH, but sebsequently operated a linseed oil mill in Pittsburg for twenty-five years. Her mother was a daughter of Alexander McKENZIE, a Scotchman, who first located on the Island of Jamaica, where he had a sugar and coffee plantation. He sold his property and came to the United States with the intention of buying land, but his family never heard of him again and it was supposed that he was murdered. In 1815 his wife and family came to Philadelphia, where they resided for some time, coming to Butler county about the year 1820. Mrs. Anna Eliza WELSH died in 1850, and her husband, Thomas WELSH, in 1883. Mrs. John WELSH was born December 16, 1837, and is the mother of seven children, five of whom are living, viz.: Charles C.; Jennie F., wife of Theo. H. STEPP; Frank J.; Annie E., and George M. Mr. WELSH is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church.

JOHN WELSH, SR., was a native of Ireland, who immigrated to Philadelphia with his family early in the present century. He had learned the baker's trade in his native land, and soon after coming to Philadelphia he established himself in that business, and carried it on for many years. He was a brother of Thomas WELSH, Sr., and in 1821 came to Butler county and purchased 300 acres of land from his brother, located in what is now Jefferson township. Thomas had settled here two years previous, and bought a large tract of land, a portion of which he sold to John. The latter remained on this farm until his death, and both he and wife are buried in this township. He married Bathia MARSHALL, and reared a family of two sons and five daughters, as follows: William; Thomas; Sarah; Margaret; Rebecca; Elizabeth, and Martha.

THOMAS WELSH, son of John and Bathia WELSH, was born in Ireland, May 5, 1802, and came with his parents to Philadelphia when about eight years old. He was reared in that city, and was nineteen years of age when his father located in Butler county. He married Mary CUNNINGHAM, a daughter of James CUNNINGHAM, of Lancaster county, who settled in Penn township, Butler county, upon a tract of 300 acres, early in the present century. James CUNNINGHAM was a son of Matthew CUNNINGHAM, also an early settler of Butler county. Thomas erected a saw mill in 1830, on Thorn creek, near Jefferson Centre, and continued in the lumber business in connection with agriculture until his death, January 7, 1858. His sons, James C., Loyal Y., and William J., are residents of this township. Both he and wife were consistent members of the Presbyterian church [p. 874] of Butler. He was elected an elder in 1839. Politically, Mr. WELSH was a stanch Democrat, filled the office of school director in his township, and served as commissioner of the county.

WILLIAM J. WELSH was born upon the homestead in Jefferson township, Butler county, September 3, 1847, son of Thomas and Mary (CUNNINGHAM) WELSH. He was reared a farmer, and inherited 120 acres of the old homestead, upon which he now resides. On May 10, 1878, he married Julia A. PATTERSON, a daughter of William R. PATTERSON, of Penn township, and has a family of four children, viz: William P.; Ada B.; Thomas M., and Clarence. Mr. WELSH and wife are members of Jefferson Summit Presbyterian church, in which he was elected an elder in 1894. In politics, he is a Republican, and has filled the office of school director for fifteen years. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., both the Lodge and Encampment.

THOMAS FRAZIER was born in Armagh county, Ireland, in August, 1801, son of James FRAZIER, a native of Scotland, born in 1773. His father married Elizabeth McCARROLL, to whom were born six children: Arthur; James; Archibald; Nancy, who married James TURNER; Thomas, and Mary, who married Arthur FRAZIER. The father died in 1827, and the mother many years before. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native land, and followed farming as a vocation. He married Alice THOMPSON, a daughter of William THOMPSON of Armagh county, Ireland, to which union were born the following children: James; George T.; Samuel J.; Andrew; Thomas W.; David, and Hance M., the last two of whom are dead. George T., and Thomas W., served in the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry. Mr. FRAZIER immigrated to Carroll county, Ohio, in 1832, and some years later settled in Butler township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, resided there until 1857, and then located in Jefferson township, purchasing from George WELSH what is now known as the Frazier mill property. Here he died in April, 1876, and his wife in March, 1871. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, in which he held the office of elder. In politics, he was a Democrat.

JAMES FRAZIER was born in Armagh county, Ireland, October 6, 1828, eldest in the family of Thomas FRAZIER, and came with his parents to Butler county when he was only four years of age. He grew to maturity in this county, received a common school education, and is now engaged in farming in Clay township. He was married April 10, 1851, to Isabella GILLILAND, a daughter of John GILLILAND of Summit township, to which union were born the following children: John G.; Thomas A.; Alice J., who married William STERLING; Elizabeth; Robert A.; Margaret, wife of Henry GEORGE; James E.; Maria A., wife of Edward POGUE, and Isabella, deceased. In 1886 Mr. FRAZIER located in Clay township, where he purchased the BROWN farm. His wife died April 5, 1874, and in 1882 he married Sarah ALLEN, of Lawrence county. Mr. FRAZIER is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Democratic party.

THOMAS W. FRAZIER was born in Carroll county, Ohio, October 25, 1839, son of Thomas and Alice (THOMPSON) FRAZIER. He came with his parents to this county, and in September, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga and [p. 875] Atlanta, was taken prisoner at Thompson Station, October 1, 1864, and confined in rebel prisions for ten months. He returned to Butler county in July, 1865, but his health was so shattered from long confinement that he did not recover for nearly two years. Mr. FRAZIER made a good war record, has always been a stanch Democrat, and gives his unswerving support to the principles of that party. He is a member of the U.V.L., and is also connected with the Masonic order. He was married July 18, 1868, to Eliza WELSH, a daughter of George WELSH. She was born in Jefferson township, September 24, 1844, and has one daughter, Bettie, wife of F.J. BYERS. The family are adherents of the Presbyterian church.

THOMAS A. FRAZIER, second son of James and Isabella Frazier, was born in Butler township, Butler county, April 8, 1852, and has always resided in his native county and in the city of Allegheny. He worked for six years at the milling business, was subsequently engaged, as a contractor, in the plastering business, and for the last nine years he has devoted his attention to operating in oil and gas, his present fields being at Belmont, Virginia, Jefferson Centre and Coylesville, Butler county, and Port Royal, Westmoreland county. He controls 12,000 acres of leaseholds, and is quite an extensive operator. Mr. FRAZIER was married December 22, 1874, to Harriet R. BICKET, a daughter of Matthew BICKET, of Clinton township, and they are the parents of the following children: Nettie J.; Eugene G., deceased; Chauncy E.; Howard M., deceased; Frank; Elva; Bessie; Hazel, and Hattie. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and politically, he is a stanch Democrat. He is now filling the office of school director, and has always taken a deep interest in public affairs.

JOHN WALKER was a native of Scotland, there grew to manhood, and married Esther McMILLAN, and about 1843 they immigrated to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. They lived in that county for several years, and came to Butler county in 1860, where they purchased a farm of eighty-five acres in Clinton township, where Mr. WALKER resided until his death, August 15, 1892. His widow still resides upon the homestead. They were the parents of six children, three of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Mary, who married Jonathan GRINDER, of Venango county, and died September 10, 1878; James, and John, the latter residing with his mother. Mr. WALKER was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which denomination his widow also belongs.

JAMES WALKER was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1857, eldest son of John and Esther Walker. He resided with his parents until 1876, when he purchased his present farm of 100 acres, in Jefferson township, upon which he now resides. He has given considerable attention to the importing and breeding of fine stock, and claims to have imported the first Clydesdale horses from Great Britain brought to Butler county. On December 20, 1879, Mr. WALKER married Harriet MAIZLAND, a daughter of George and Elizabeth (SEIF) MAIZLAND, the former of Scotch and the latter of German descent. Her grandfather, George MAIZLAND, was a native of Scotland, and settled in Butler county in 1857. Mrs. WALKER is the mother of four children, viz.: Alonzo E., born September 17, 1880; Ida Marian, November 20, 1883; Hattie E., November 12, 1887, and Paul M., October 1, 1891. Politically, Mr. WALKER is a Dem-[p. 876] crat, and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Clinton township.

JOHN BURTNER was a native of Clinton township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. His parents came from Berks county late in the Eighteenth century and settled on 200 acres of land, now known as the KRUMPE farm, in Clinton township. The family are of German origin, and were among the organizers of the German Lutheran church at Saxonburg. John BURTNER was the father of five sons and five daughters, viz.: Jacob; Philip; William; Daniel; Andrew; Barbara; Betsy; Catherine; Polly, and Christina. Philip grew to manhood in Clinton township, served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and married Ellen GALLAGHER, a native of Ireland, whose parents were among the earliest settlers of this locality. They reared five children, as follows: John; Peter; Philip; William, and Mrs. Fannie HASLETT. The father died in 1828.

PHILIP BURTNER, son of Philip and Ellen BURTNER, was born July 3, 1820, in Clinton township, Butler county, within one mile of his present residence. When he arrived at the age of twenty years he commenced working on the Pennsylvania canal, and finally became captain of a boat. He afterwards engaged in farming, which vocation he has since followed. In 1842 he married Rebecca SHOBERT, a daughter of John SHOBERT, of Luzerne county, who served as a soldier in the War of 1812. They are the parents of ten children, as follows: Henry; John; Mary; Helen; Eliza; Nettie; Rebecca; Fannie; Anna, and Edward. The last two named are dead. The eight surviving members of this family are heads of families. Mrs. BURTNER is a member of the Baptist church. Since 1847 Mr. BURTNER has been connected with the I.O.O.F., and is one of the highly respected citizens of the community.

ISAAC P. BURTNER was born near Tarentum, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 10, 1849, son of Jacob and Martha (BYERLY) BURTNER, the former a native of Allegheny county, and the latter of Buffalo township, Butler county, where her father, Jacob BYERLY, settled at an early day. Philip BURTNER, grandfather of Isaac P., came from eastern Pennsylvania to Allegheny county in 1802, and located three miles north of Tarentum, in Harrison township, his farm being three miles from the Butler county line. Jacob and Martha BURTNER were the parents of eleven children, eight of whom grew to man and womanhood, as follows: John N., who served in the Rebellion one year; Margaret; Isaac P.; Harmon; Henry; Lavina; Wilhelmina, and Luther. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county, and followed the coal trade for some years. In 1882 he purchased a farm in Jefferson township, Butler county, upon which he has since erected substantial buildings and made many other improvements. He was married July 22, 1874, to Amanda SINGER, daughter of David and Amanda (BOLE) SINGER, of Armstrong county. Her father was a carpenter, and was reared in Armstrong county, where the family were early settlers. He died in 1862, aged fifty-two years. Mr. BURTNER is the father of five children, as follows: Roy; Dorcy; Ethel; Forest, and Claire. Mr. BURTNER is a Republican and is one of the progressive citizens of the township.

[p. 877]

ISAAC LEFEVER, SR., was a native of France, who settled in the present township of Winfield, Butler county, Pennsylvania, early in the century. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving with the troops from western pennsylvania. He reared a family of six children, as follows: Samuel; Isaac; Joseph; Jesse; Nancy, and Mary. The parents and all of their children, excepting Jesse, removed to Ohio at an early day, where they spent the balance of their lives.

JESSE LEFEVER was a native of eastern Pennsylvania, there learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in Pittsburg, whence he came to Butler county and purchased a farm near Hannahstown, in Buffalo township, where he died soon afterwards. He married Catherine STEPP, a daughter of Bernard STEPP, of Buffalo township, and was the father of four children, as follows: John; Levi; Isaac, and Elizabeth, deceased. Mr. LEFEVER died in 1826, and his widow married James MARTIN, of Donegal township.

ISAAC LEFEVER, youngest son of Jesse and Catherine (STEPP) Lefever, was born in Butler county, June 30, 1822, was reared upon a farm, and has always been engaged in agriculture. On November 23, 1845, he married Hannah COOPER, a daughter of William COOPER, a pioneer of Jefferson township, who served in the War of 1812. Seven children have been born to this union, as follows: Catherine, who married Joseph MOSER; William J., and Eliza J., both deceased; Isaac S., who married Maggie SNYDER; Lydia E., wife of James GIBSON; David W., who married Jennie G. NEGLEY, a daughter of Felix H. NEGLEY, and Susan Belle, wife of A.D. SUTTON. In 1846 Mr. LEFEVER purchased the farm upon which he now resides, not an acre of it being then improved, and now owns over 200 acres of land containing first class improvements. He is a Democrat, in politics, and the family are members of St. Luke Lutheran church of Saxonburg.

JOSEPH LOGAN, SR., came to Penn township, Butler county, in 1807, and settled upon a farm of 300 acres purchased from his parents, Thomas and Agnes LOGAN, natives of Ireland, who immigrated to Pennsylvania with their family about 1798, and settled in Lancaster county. Thomas purchased the land in 1804 from Edward BURD, the original owner, but did not settle upon it. Joseph brought his wife, Elizabeth, from Pittsburg to his home in the forest of Butler county, and both resided here until their decease. He died in July, 1839; his wife survived him eleven years, dying in August, 1850. The names of their children are as follows: David; Levi; Joseph; Nancy; Isabel; Mary; Barbara, and Elizabeth.

DAVID LOGAN, eldest son of Joseph and Elizabeth LOGAN, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1802, and came with his parents to Penn township when about five years of age. He grew to manhood in this county, and purchased 225 acres of land in Jefferson township, now known as the LOGAN homestead, upon which he made the first improvements. To this he afterwards added 125 acres, and resided upon this farm the remainder of his life. He married Eliza DAVIS, to which union were born nine children, as follows: Nancy J., deceased; John; Joseph; Levi; Baxter; Samuel; Matilda; Calvin, and Eliza B. Four of the sons, John, Levi, Baxter and Samuel, served in the Rebellion, Sam-[p. 878] uel being killed at Plymouth. Mrs. LOGAN died in 1856, and he then married Mrs. Mary Ann COX, nee SEFTON, who bore him two children, viz.: David H., and Edward P. His third wife was Nancy COX, who died in 1892. Mr. LOGAN was a Whig in early life, and afterwards a Republican, and filled the office of justice of the peace for many years. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and was one of the founders of the Clinton and Shiloh churches. He died February 1, 1878, aged seventy-five years.

JOSEPH LOGAN, second son of David and Eliza (DAVIS) LOGAN, was born upon the homestead farm, in Jefferson township, March 2, 1835, was reared a farmer, and was engaged in agriculture until his death, May 17, 1894. In 1866 he purchased a portion of his late homestead, to which he added, until he owned about 190 acres, containing one of the finest residences in the township, erected in 1892. Mr. LOGAN was married February 23, 1860, to Amelia HARTMAN, a daughter of Joseph HARTMAN, who settled quite early on a part of the homestead. Six children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Clara M., wife of G.W. MAURHOFF; Anna L., wife of George RALSHOUSE; Melinda M., wife of GEORGE BAUGHMAN; Eliza, wife of Amos GRAFF; Emma, and Milton. Mr. LOGAN was a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, to which society his widow belongs. He was a Republican, was tax collector of his township for two terms, and also filled the office of school director.

CALVIN LOGAN, youngest son of David and Eliza (DAVIS) LOGAN, was born upon his father's farm in Jefferson township, Butler county, July 17, 1845. He was reared in his native township, received a common school education, and settled upon fifty acres of the old homestead, which he has since improved, erecting thereon a fine residence in 1887. On October 19, 1876, he married Mary J. HAZLETT, a daughter of Lewis and Vieanna (MOREHEAD) HAZLETT, early settlers of Winfield township. Mrs. LOGAN was born September 26, 1851, and is the mother of four children, as follows: Oro Neta, born July 27, 1878; Elva Vieanna, July 26, 1880; Tillie Zetta, September 6, 1881, and Zella Marie, June 6, 1892. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church, in which he holds an official position. Politically, Mr. LOGAN is a Republican.

DAVID H. LOGAN was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, July 14, 1858, son of David and Mrs. Mary Ann (COX nee SEFTON) LOGAN. He was reared upon his father's farm in his native township and received a common school education. In 1865 his father purchased a part of the old Jacob MECHLING farm, of 125 acres, which David H. now owns. In 1890 he erected thereon a fine residence and has made many other commendable improvements. Mr. LOGAN was married January 20, 1881, to Martha B. COOK, a daughter of 'Squire COOK, of Allegheny county, where she was born April 10, 1859. They are the parents of four sons, as follows: Harvey W., born December 18, 1881; Clifford G., June 14, 1883; Earl R., May 22, 1890, and Elery R., February 5, 1892. Mr. LOGAN is a stanch Republican, and both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.

LEVI LOGAN, second son of Joseph LOGAN, SR., was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and came with his parents to Penn township, Butler county. He learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed in connection [p. 879] with farming in this township. In 1837 he married Mary DAVIS, a daughter of John DAVIS, of Clinton township, to which union were born eight children: Elizabeth, who was twice married, first to William LAMBIE, and afterwards to Mr. McLAUGHLIN; Joseph D.; Sarah, who married James WILLIAMSON; John R.; Benmamin; William; Levi, and David. Mr. LOGAN was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a Democrat. He died August 14, 1871, and his wife, February 10, 1891.

JOSEPH D. LOGAN, eldest son of Levi LOGAN, was born in the borough of Butler, January 22, 1839, received a common school education, and was reared to farm life. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, was mustered into the service at Harrisburg, then went to Washington, D.C., and was stationed at Camp Hammond. From there the regiment proceeded to Antietam, then went into camp at Stony Hill, next to Washington City, was then moved to Benning's Bridge, on the East Branch of the Potomac, and then to Aquia creek, Virginia. The regiment next moved to Fredericksburg, thence to Belle Plain, and served in the second battle of Fredericksburg, where they encamped until mustered out of the service, Mr. LOGAN was married November 24, 1864, to Mary J., daughter of Samuel MARSHALL, of Middlesex township. They are the parents of five children, as follows: Eva, wife of John MONKS; one died in infancy; Clara; Ella, and Bertha. Politically, Mr. LOGAN is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.

BENJAMIN B. LOGAN was born in Middlesex township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1844, and is a son of Levi and Mary (DAVIS) LOGAN, and grandson of Joseph LOGAN, one of the early settlers of Penn township. He was reared upon his father's farm, from whom he learned the blacksmith's trade, which he worked at for twenty years, in connection with farming. In 1869 he was married to Mary BLACK, a daughter of Robert BLACK, of Middlesex township, and is the father of the following children: Robert; Frank H.; Jennie L.; Antoinette; Samuel P.; John, and Jessie, deceased. Mr. LOGAN is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Democrat party. He was supervisor of his township for four terms, and always takes an active interest in public matters.

JOHN KNOCH was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1787, grew to maturity in his native land, and there learned the blacksmith's trade. He married Johannah HARTMAN, a native of the same place, and immigrated to Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1837, settling on the farm now owned by their son Herman in 1838. He built a shop and engaged in blacksmithing and farming. He assisted John A. ROEBLING to make the first wire rope manufactured at Saxonburg, he and his son, John A., being the first and only blacksmiths in the town for many years. His wife died in 1860, aged sixty-five years; he survived until 1862, dying at the age of seventy-five. They were among the original members of the German Lutheran church of Saxonburg. They reared a family of five children, viz.: John A., deceased; Joseph, deceased; Henry; Rachel, wife of Henry STUEBGEN, and Herman.

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HERMAN KNOCH was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1835, and came with his parents to Butler county when a child of two years of age. He was reared upon his father's farm, adjoining the borough of Saxonburg, and was married March 23, 1858, to Amelia ROEBLING, a daughter of Charles F. ROEBLING, a brother of John A. ROEBLING, the celebrated engineer and bridge builder. His mother was Wilhelmina (FILBERT) ROEBLING, and both were natives of Saxony, Germany. They were the first couple married at Saxonburg, where her father died in 1838, when she was only about one year old. Mr. KNOCH is the father of seven children, as follows: Charles, a blacksmith; William H.; Julius, principal of a school in Arkansas; Elvira; Franklin, principal of the West Sunbury school; Edward, a teacher, and Alfred. The family are members of the German Lutheran church. Politically, Mr. KNOCH is a Democrat, and has filled many of the local offices in his township. He served ten months in the Rebellion, as a member of the Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery.

WILLIAM H. KNOCH was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1866, son of Herman and Amelia (ROEBLING) KNOCH, and grandson of John KNOCH. His mother is a niece of the celebrated engineer John A. ROEBLING. He received a common school education, and followed the occupation of a driller for some years. In 1892 he began clerking for Mrs. Theodore HELMBOLD & Son, with whom he remained until March, 1893, when he accepted a position with Thielo KRAUSE, which he filled until February 1, 1894, when he resumed his former occupation of driller. Mr. KNOCH is one of the owners of the new Opera House, Charles REDICK being his partner. He was married April 21, 1892, to Hattie RHEY, and has one child, Harold, born April 25, 1893. Politically, Mr. KNOCH is a Democrat, and has filled the office of Borough auditor. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and is connected with the I.O.O.F., and the K.O.T.M.

JOHN B. CALDWELL was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1844, son of William and Sarah Jane (BEATTY) CALDWELL. His father was a native of Washington county, and a son of Dr. Joseph CALDWELL, for many years one of the leading physicians of that county. Dr. CALDWELL was a native of Scotland. William removed to Armstrong county, where he resided until 1839, and then located on a farm near Frazier's Mills, in Jefferson township, Butler county, where the remainder of his life was spent. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township, and in 1866 settled upon the old ROBINSON farm, containing 120 acres, where he has since lived. In October, 1865, he married Nancy J. ROBINSON, a daughter of Joseph and Hannah J. (RAMSEY) ROBINSON, early settlers of the township. Joseph ROBINSON and wife died upon that farm. Mrs. CALDWELL was born in 1844, and is the mother of six children, as follows: Joseph C.; William Ellery; Sarah Bell, wife of Zeno ZIEGLER; Lynn; Orin, and Leverne F. In 1863 Mr. CALDWELL enlisted in Company B, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and served thirteen months in the Union army. Politically, he is a Republican, has been overseer of the poor in his township, and was the census enumerator in 1890. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.[p. 881]

GOTTFRIED REINHOLD was born in Saxony, Germany, February 10, 1825, son of Godfrey and Augusta (QUASS) REINHOLD, natives of the same place. The subject of this sketch immigrated to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1849, and one year afterwards he went to the gold fields of California, where he was engaged in mining for four years, with much success. In 1854 he returned from California to Saxonburg, Butler county, and purchased the farm upon which he now lives. It then contained fifty-nine acres, to which he has since added seventy-one acres, and is now the owner of a nicely improved place. He also owns forty-seven acres of coal land in Buffalo township and three houses in Butler borough, south side. On February 22, 1855, he married Mary KRUMPE, a daughter of John M. KRUMPE, a pioneer of Clinton township, born in September, 1835. Mr. REINHOLD served ten months in the Rebellion, as a member of Company D, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, his term closing with the end of the war. He is the father of eight children, as follows: W. Godfrey, who married Maria POLTZ; John; Herman; Edward; Mina, wife of George FREITHLY; Louisa, wife of John RIEMER; Emma, wife of Charles BECKMAN, and Tillie. Mr. REINHOLD is a Democrat, and the family are members of the German Lutheran church.

RICHARD SMALLEY was born in Manchester, England, September 3, 1833, son of John and Maria (WESTERMAN) SMALLEY, natives of the same place. His father, who was a shoemaker, was married February 18, 1829, and emigrated to America about 1834, settling in Allegheny, where he continued to follow his trade for about twelve years. He also spent a year or more in East Liverpool, Ohio. He purchased a farm in what is now Jefferson township, to which he removed in 1844, and on which he resided until his death, September 10, 1863, aged fifty-six years. His wife died December 27, 1860, in the fifty-sixth year of her age. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, he being a regular attendant and devout member of the Knox chapel, in Winfield township, during most of his residence in this county. They were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are now living, viz.: Amelia; Elizabeth; Priscilla; Richards; Joseph; Emily; Mary Jane; William, who died in Armory Square Hospital, Washington, D.C., February 18, 1863; John D., deceased, who served three years in the war of the Rebellion; Sarah Ann, and George Henry, a successful contractor of Allegheny. The only surviving members are Priscilla, Richard and George H. The subject of this sketch resides upon the homestead farm, where he has lived since the coming of the family to Butler county. In 1858 he married Helena Hill BICKET, a daughter of Matthew and Jane (SEFTON) BICKET, early settlers of Clinton township, Mr. BICKET being now over ninety years of age. Mr. SMALLEY has a family of four children, as follows: Matthew J., a Presbyterian minister; Ella M.; Mary E., and William H. In politics, he is a Democrat, and both himself and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church of Clinton township, in which society he fills the office of ruling elder.

HENRY J. LONITZ was born in Prussia, Germany, in February, 1847, son of George and Mary (BEYER) LONITZ, natives of Prussia. The family came to the United States in August, 1852, and settled at Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania. There were two children, Henry J., and Hannah, the latter since [p. 882] deceased. The father died in 1882, and the mother in 1890. Both were members of the Evangelical Protestant church. Mr. LONITZ served an apprenticeship to the carriage maker's trade, at Pittsburg, and worked at that business for twenty years. About 1881 he returned to Saxonburg, where he carried on a shop for a time. In April, 1887, he purchased the old Bauman farm, a short distance west of Saxonburg, and the following July one of the finest oil wells in that part of the county was opened up upon his farm. In September a well producing 2,600 barrels per day was brought in upon his mother's place, and altogether there have been about thirteen producing wells upon his farms. This good fortune has made him one of the prosperous citizens of the community. He is the owner of 140 acres of land, in one of the best producing oil belts of the county. On August 2, 1868, he married Caroline J. BUSHMAN, a daughter of Frederick and Catherine BUSHMAN, of Pittsburg. Mr. and Mrs. LONITZ are the parents of two sons and four daughters, as follows: George, born April 13, 1869; Mary, November 23, 1870, wife of William ADERHOLD; William, April 13, 1872; Clara, March 9, 1874; Anna, June 6, 1877, and Florence, December 23, 1887. The family are members of the Evangelical Protestant church, and politically, Mr. LONITZ is a Democrat.

ALPHEUS DARLING, oil producer, was born in the Juniata valley, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1851, son of Thomas J. and Jane (PURVIS) DARLING, the former being at one time an oil producer on Oil creek, Venango county. He died March 22, 1883, aged sixty-six years; his widow still survives. Mr. DARLING has been in the oil business since early manhood, and is the patentee of the Darling Gas Regulator, a well known invention used on gas wells. Since attaining his majority he has been in business for himself, first on Oil creek, Venango county, for thirteen years, whence he removed to Butler county, locating at Criswell, and coming to Saxonburg in 1890. He has been the owner of a number of good wells, one of which produced for a time 1,000 barrels per day, another 500 barrels, and another 100 barrels. Mr. DARLING was married June 27, 1881, to Lydia PARKER, a native of Armstrong county, and a daughter of James A. and Sarah A. (HILLIARD) PARKER, both of whom are living.

CHARLES F. YAEHNIG was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1822, son of Carl YAEHNIG, a native of the same place. Charles F. was the eldest in a family of five chilcren, grew to maturity in his native land, and in 1854 married Christina HEROLD, to which union were born seven children, as follows: Charles F.; Adolph G., deceased; William A.; Mary B.; Adolph G.; Charles, and one that died in early youth. In 1867 Mr. YAEHNIG immigrated to Pittsburg, whence he came to Saxonburg, Butler county, and followed cattle dealing for several years, at the end of which period he purchased the Frank farm, upon which he now resided. The family are members of the Lutheran church, and in politics, Mr. Yaehning is a Democrat.<\p>

CHARLES F. YAEHNIG, JR., eldest in the family of Charles F. and Christina YAEHNIG, was born in Frankenberg, Germany, September 11, 1855, and came with his parents to the United States in 1867. He grew to manhood in Saxonburg, and assisted his father in cattle dealing and farming. On April 20, 1882, he married Hannah B. HELLER, a daughter of George J.C. HELLER of Jeffer-[p. 883] son township, and has four children, viz.: Albert F.; Edmund C.; Clara D., and Emma J. Mr. YAEHNIG came to his present homestead in 1881, and has since devoted his attention to farming. He is a member of the Lutheran church, in which he holds the office of secretary, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

GEORGE J.C. HELLER was born in Germany, December 11, 1811, was reared in his native land, and in 1835 married Sophia NEUBERT. Five children were born to this union, only one of whom survives, Hannah B., wife of Charles F. YAEHNIG. Some years after his marriage Mr. HELLER immigrated to Butler county, purchased a farm in Jefferson township, upon which he resided until his death, July 26, 1894. His wife died in 1881. Both were members of the Lutheran church of Saxonburg, in which he had filled the office of treasurer. Politically, he was a Democrat.

JOSEPH L. BLAKELEY, son of Andrew and Sarah Jane BLAKELEY, was born in Forward township, Butler county, July 22, 1858, and was reared upon the homestead in that township. He followed farming until 1890, and then embarked in the grocery trade in Allegheny, which he followed for two years. In 1886 he purchased the George MECHLING farm, in Jefferson township, containing 123 acres, and in 1892-93 he erected a substantial residence and has also made many other improvements. Mr. BLAKELEY was married May 12, 1887, to Mary A. ZIEGLER, and has three children, viz.: Della E.; Myrtle A., and Alvin W. Politically, he is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.

CHARLES ROETTIG was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 22, 1841, son of William and Caroline ROETTIG nee HOFFMAN, natives of Germany. His father was a tanner, and worked at his trade in Pittsburg until his death, about 1846, and his mother then removed to Saxonburg, with her three sons, William J., Charles and Henry, the last mentioned being killed in 1881. The widow married Charles KOHLER, and had one daughter by this union, Hedwig, wife of John KOHLER, of Pittsburg. The subject of this sketch learned the shoemaker's trade and worked at that business until 1866, when he purchased his present farm in Jefferson township, upon which he has since resided, and is quite a prosperous farmer. He was married December 27, 1867, to Paulina KRAUSE, a sister of Thielo KRAUSE, of Saxonburg. She was born September 4, 1844, and is the mother of four children, as follows: Hedwig, deceased; Clara; Charles R., and Alice. Politically, he is a Democrat, has filled the office of school director, and served seven years as township auditor. He was a soldier in the Rebellion, serving one year. He is connected with the I.O.O.F., being a member of both Lodge and Encampment.

REV. JACOB WILHELM was born in Germany August 13, 1837, and was educated for the ministry and ordained a minister of the Lutheran church. He afterwards went as a missionary to Africa, and in 1868 immigrated to Butler county and settled at Evans City, where he took charge of the Lutheran church. In 1873 he removed to Beaver county, and in 1874 to Green Oak, Allegheny county, having charge of a church in each place. In 1876 he located at White Hall, Allegheny county, as pastor of the Lutheran church at that place, but owing to ill health was unable to continue his pastorate. He then came to But-[p. 884] ler county and purchased the MOSER farm in Jefferson township, but subsequently removed to Sharpsburg, where he died September 8, 1888. His family returned to the homestead in Jefferson township, where they have since resided. Mr. WILHELM was married April 28, 1868, to Fredericka MAIER, a daughter of Gottlob MAIER, of Kornthal, Germany. Nine children were born to this union, as follows: Gottlieb T.; Frederick P.; John P.; Emanuel J.; Clara C.M.; Martha L.D.; Emilie E.L.; Emma M.T., deceased, and Hannah J.F. Emanuel J. was kicked on the head by a horse November 28, 1894, and died December 4, following, never having fully regained consciousness. He was buried in the Hannahstown cemetery.

GOTTLIEB T. WILHELM, eldest in the family of Rev. Jacob WILHELM, was born in Evans City, Butler county, April 9, 1870, received a common school education, and since the death of his father he has been engaged in farming upon the homestead in Jefferson township. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics, a Republican.

REV. FREDERICK WILHELM, director of Concordia Home, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, July 29, 1840, son of Jacob, and Christina (JEUTTER) WILHELM, natives of the same place. He was educated in a school in his native town, and subsequently studied at a Theological Missionary Institution, at Chrischona, Switzerland. He immigrated to Michigan in 1868, and was ordained October 11th of that year. He became pastor at Albion, and subsequently at Kalamazoo, of a German Lutheran church, coming to Butler county in 1870, as pastor of the German Lutheran congregation of Jefferson township, known as St. Lucas Evangelical Lutheran church, of which he had charge for twenty-one years. He also preached at Freeport, Summit, and Little Germany, in Buffalo township, in connection with his regular pastorate. In 1891 he was elected to his present position, where he has charge of the orphans and aged people which this charitable institution succors. Mr. WILHELM's father died in 1877, and he went to Germany and brought his mother to this county, where she spent the remaining years of her life at his home, dying in 1888. He was married June 16, 1870, to Louis KRAUSS, a daughter of William KRAUSS, a German Lutheran minister. She was born May 2, 1837, and although they have had no children, they have reared three from infancy, viz.: Philip WILHELM, a minister of the Lutheran church, now residing in Wisconsin; Edward HAHN, a teacher, and Frederick LANG, of Sharpsburg. In politics, Mr. WILHELM is independent, always casting his vote for those whom he regards as best fitted for the office.

HENRY HARTENSTEIN was a native of Saxony, Germany, grew to manhood in his native land, immigrated to Butler county about 1848, and settled on a farm in Jefferson township. It contained 100 acres, and was located near the center of the township. He resided upon this farm down to his death. He married Augusta LEITHOLD, in Germany, and they were the parents of four children, as follows: Herman, a steel worker in Ohio; Lewis, of Great Belt; Caroline, wife of Fred WETZEL, of Jefferson township, and Henrietta, widow of Jacob BECK. The parents were members of the German Lutheran church, and both died in December, 1892.

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LEWIS HARTENSTEIN, merchant, was born upon the homestead farm, in Jefferson township, Butler county, in 1848, son of Henry and Augusta HARTENSTEIN. He remained with his parents until 1873, when he embarked in merchandising at Great Belt, where he has continued to carry on business up to the present. For the past twelve years he has been postmaster at that point. Mr. HARTENSTEIN was married in 1872, to Caroline E. DIVENER, of Millerstown, whose parents were among the early settlers of that locality. Two daughters are the fruits of this union, viz.: Clara, and Mollie. The family are members of the German Lutheran church of Hannahstown, and in politics, Mr. HARTENSTEIN is a Republican.

HERMAN G. KOEGLER, undertaker, was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, near the village of Hannahstown, April 11, 1865, son of August and Sophia KOEGLER, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1845, and settled in Butler county. His father was an undertaker and cabinet maker, and carried on business in Jefferson township until his death, which occurred in 1887. His mother is living at the age of seventy-two years. They were the parents of eight children, four of whom are living, viz.: Louise, wife of Henry GRIMM, of Winfield township; August F., a resident of the same township; Mary, wife of Albert SLUPE of Jefferson township, and Herman G. The subject of this sketch learned undertaking and cabinet making with his father, and since the death of the latter he has continued to carry on that business. He was married April 15, 1886, to Barbara BOLTZ, a daughter of John BOLTZ, deceased, and has three children, viz.: Clara, born July 9, 1887; Gilbert, January 29, 1889, and George, June 10, 1892. Mr. KOEGLER and wife are members of the German Lutheran church, to which denomination his parents also belonged. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M.

JOHN E. MUDER, retired furniture dealer and cabinet maker, was born at Mielhausen, Prussia, February 12, 1820, son of Henry and Veronica (GERSTING) MUDER, natives of the same place. The family came to the United States in 1832, and arrived at Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania, August 24, of that year. They were among the first settlers of the town, which contained at that time only one house. Henry MUDER was a hotel keeper, but later engaged in farming. He died at Saxonburg in 1854, and his wife in 1864, aged sixty-one years, and sixty-eight years, respectively. They were among the organizers of the Evangelical Protestant church of Saxonburg, and were the parents of three sons, as follows: Godfrey, who died in Pittsburg in early manhood; John E., and Henry, who died while serving as a soldier in the Rebellion, from disease contracted in the service, aged sixty-two years. The subject of this sketch learned the cabinet maker's trade in Pittsburg, and established himself in business at Saxonburg in 1840, where he continued to carry on the furniture trade down to a recent date. Mr. MUDER married Amelia STUEBGEN, to which union were born the following children, viz.: Theodore; Josephine; Charles, and William, all of whom are dead; Matilda, wife of Van Buren SMITH; Robert, and Mary, both deceased; Henry, who succeeded to his father's business, and John E., and undertaker of Saxonburg. Mrs. MUDER died February 12, 1893. She was a life-long member of the Evangelical Protestant church, to which denomination her husband [p. 886] also belongs. Politically, he is a Republican, and has been a member of the borough council, and filled the office of school director for many years. Mr. MUDER is one of the most respected and representative citizens of Saxonburg, as well as the oldest living man of the original settlers of that town.

JOHN G. HELMBOLD was born in Langensalza, Prussia, about 1796, and in early life became a large land owner and sheep grower. Wishing to keep larger flocks than was possible in his native land, he visited the United States in the summer of 1834, and on reaching Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, he concluded to come to Saxonburg, Butler county, where were living many of his friends from the Fatherland. He soon made up his mind to remain in this county, and bought 1,000 acres of land near the village, which he at once began to improve. In 1835 he was joined by his wife, whose maiden name was Amelia F. SPECHT, and their children, named as follows: Ernest A.; Emil; Paulina, who married August NAGLER; Nathalia, who married George SCHMIDT; Bertha, who married a Mr. BETTINGER; Othelia, who became the wife of Gottlieb STARKE; Mina, who married Frederick STARKE; Matilda, who married Charles SCHREPPERD; Emma, wife of Louis BIEHL, and Theodore. In the course of a few years Mr. HELMBOLD became a very extensive farmer, and one of the wealthiest and most prosperous citizens in the county. He resided in Saxonburg until his death, which occurred March 6, 1887, at the ripe old age of ninety years. His wife died February 23, 1876, aged seventy-six years. They were among the organizers of the Evangelical Protestant church of Saxonburg, and always gave liberally of their means towards that society.

ERNEST A. HELMBOLD, eldest in the family of John G. HELMBOLD, was born at Sunthausen, near Langensalza, Prussia, June 18, 1819, and was a college student preparing himself for the ministry at the time his father decided to immigrate to the United States. This changed the course of his life, as he was compelled to abandon his studies and give up his intention of becoming a minister. After locating in Butler county he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and subsequently in merchandising, which became his life vocation. He was married March 28, 1845, to Christine NAGLER, a daughter of John F. and Christina D. (MEYER) NAGLER, natives of Saxony, Germany, where she was born August 31, 1826. Her parents came to the United States in 1837, and settled in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where her father died in 1856, and her mother in 1878, aged sixty-two and seventy-five years, respectively. They were members of the Evangelical Protestant church of Saxonburg, and died in that faith. Mrs. HELMBOLD is the mother of six sons and six daughters, only four of whom are living, viz.: Hedwig; Mina, wife of Thielo KRAUSE, a merchant of Saxonburg; Anna, wife of E.H. HAEPPEL, and Othelia, wife of Christian J. RAABE, of Saxonburg. Mr. HELMBOLD was a very successful farmer for several years, being the owner of six hundred acres of land. In 1847 he engaged in merchandising at Saxonburg, and was one of the successful merchants of the county for a long period. He was an ardent Democrat, and the Democratic candidate for member of the legislature at one time, and though he carried Butler county by a handsome majority, was defeated by the heavy Republican vote of Lawrence county. He was a prominent member of the Evangelical Protestant church of Saxonburg, [p. 887] and a very generous contributor towards that organization. He died May 24, 1885, after a residence in Butler county of nearly half a century. His widow is a resident of Saxonburg, and the whole family are connected with the Evangelical Protestant church.

THEODORE HELMBOLD was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1838, youngest child of John G. and Amelia F. HELMBOLD, early settlers of that village. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and subsequently took a course at a business college in Pittsburg, then entered the store of his brother, Ernest A., as a clerk. At the age of twenty years he embarked in merchandising at Saxonburg, which he continued for over thirty years. On July 17, 1860, Mr. HELMBOLD married Mary E. GRAHAM, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (WILSON) GRAHAM, of Connoquenessing township, where she was born August 4, 1843. Ten children were born to this union, as follows: John R.; Etta L.; Charles R.; Edward F., deceased; Louis A.; Aurelia L., and Maria A., both deceased; Elmer G.; Clarence E., and James A. Mr. HELMBOLD was one of the successful merchants of the county until his death, which occurred November 21, 1891. Throughout his long business career he won and retained the respect and confidence of the people of the community, and accumulated a large fortune by strict attention to his business and judicious investments. His widow and son, Louis A., have continued the business established by Mr. HELMBOLD, under the firm name of Mrs. Theodore Helmbold & Son. Politically, he was a Republican, was burgess of Saxonburg, also a school director for many years, and a prominent and useful member of the Evangelical Protestant church, in which faith he lived and died.

LOUIS A. HELMBOLD was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, June 7, 1869, son of Theodore, and Mary E. HELMBOLD. After receiving a common school education, he entered his father's store as a clerk, and upon the death of the latter he became a member of the firm, and for the past three years he has assisted in managing the business. Mr. HELMBOLD was married August 19, 1891, to Melinda CHRISTIE, a daughter of John and Mary (LAMB) CHRISTIE, and has one son, Theodore Raymond, born December 22, 1892. Politically, he is a Republican, is a member of the I.O.O.F., the K.of P., the K.O.T.M. and the Jr. O.U.A.M.

EMIL MAURHOFF was a native of Hanover, Germany, and immigrated to Butler county, Pennsylvania, about 1832, settling in Saxonburg. He was an engineer and surveyor, and assisted in surveying a large amount of the lands in this county. He married here, Johanna POLLARD, a native of Germany, who came with her parents to this county about 1838. Mr. MAURHOFF embarked in merchandising at Saxonburg, which he carried on down to his death, January 25, 1885. His widow is still a resident of Saxonburg. She and her husband were among the first members of the Evangelical Protestant church. In politics, he was a Republican, was justice of the peace for many years, clerk of the courts of Butler county for one term, and was postmaster at Saxonburg for a long period.

GEORGE W. MAURHOFF, merchant and postmaster, was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, January 16, 1854, son of Emil and Johanna MAURHOFF. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and was subsequently employed [p. 888] as a clerk in his father's store. He soon after engaged in the hardware and tin trade, and in 1881 embarked in general merchandising, which he has continued up to the present time. In 1891 he was appointed postmaster of Saxonburg, which office he still occupies. Mr. MAURHOFF was married October 26, 1881, to Clara LOGAN, a daughter of Joseph LOGAN, of Jefferson township, and grand-daughter of David LOGAN, one of the pioneers of that subdivision. They have three children, as follows: Oliver; Harry, and Ralph. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church, and in politics, he is an ardent Republican.

HENRY F. ADERHOLD was a native of Saxony, Germany, born in 1805, was reared in his native land, and came to the United States in 1831, in the same vessel with John A. ROEBLING. He settled in Saxonburg, Butler county, in 1833, where he erected a hotel opposite the present school building, and was the first hotel keeper in the village. It was known as the Saxonburg Exchange, and will be remembered by many of the early settlers. He married Johanna NAIBA, and to them were born thirteen children, six of whom are living, viz.: Henry; Albert; H. Harmon; Louisa, wife of Frederick BAUMAN; Amelia, wife of Emil PHABE, and Cecelia, widow of Washington WARNICK. The father died January 7, 1879, and the mother, March 3, 1863, aged fifty-seven years.

ALBERT ADERHOLD, second son of Henry F. and Johanna ADERHOLD, was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, June 19, 1842. His birth occurred in the first hotel erected in that village, and he was reared to the duties of hotel life. He also worked upon his father's farm, and has continued to follow agriculture since attaining his majority, being now the owner of a farm containing 120 acres. He has also an interest in several oil wells upon his farm, and is quite a prosperous man. Mr. ADERHOLD was married, February 22, 1870, to Mary SEVERING. Her father, Henry SEVERING, was born February 4, 1802, at Hanover, Osnabrekan, served in the German army, and then immigrated to the United States, enlisted in the army and served under Capt. W.T. SHERMAN, in the Seminole war. He died April 7, 1888. Mrs. ADERHOLD's mother's name was Mary KATEL, also a native of Germany. Three children are the fruits of Mr. ADERHOLD's marriage, viz.: William; Charles, and Anna. His wife died in April, 1885. Mr. ADERHOLD is an adherent of the Democratic party, and has filled many of the local offices in his township. He is a member of the K.O.T.M.

FRANCIS LAUBE, SR., was a native of Saxony, Germany, born February 14, 1819, son of Nicholas and Fredericka (Hoffman) LAUBE, natives of the same place. His father was a brewer, and Francis learned that trade before coming to the United States in 1835. He traveled for two years in this county with a theatrical troupe, settled at Saxonburg, Butler county, in 1837, established a brewery and carried on that business for nearly thirty years. From 1865 to 1869 he was engaged in the hotel business as proprietor of the Union Hotel, and in 1875 he purchased the Michel property, which he rebuilt and remodeled and opened as the hotel LAUBE. He was proprietor of this house until 1885, when he sold it to his son Francis and retired from business. Mr. LAUBE was married in 1850, to Fredericka HOFFMAN, a native of Saxony, born April 1, 1821. Eight children were born to this union, three of whom are living, viz.: Malvena; Ida, [p. 889] and Francis. Josephine died June 18, 1894. Mr. LAUBE died July 31, 1891, and Mrs. LAUBE, October 15, 1893.

FRANCIS LAUBE, only son of Francis and Fredericka LAUBE, was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, April 2, 1852, attended the public schools of the borough, and learned the brewing business with his father. He continued with him in the hotel business down to 1885, when he purchased the Hotel Laube from his father, and carried it on until December, 1890, when he sold it to C.J. RAABE, since which time he has been engaged in contracting for stone paving and sidewalks. In 1892 he removed to Butler, where he now resides. In December, 1893, he became a partner in the Freeport planing mill. On October 8, 1873, he married Mary DUNMEYER, of Punxsutawney, Jefferson county, where she was born January 22, 1855. They are the parents of four children, as follows: Richard; Lydia; Ella, and Josephine. Mr. LAUBE is a Democrat, in politics, and is a member of the I.O.O.F.

ANDREW DRESHER was a native of Saxony, Germany, born in 1813, there married Fredericka SENGLE, a native of the same place, and came to Saxonburg, Butler county, in 1836. They had a family of three children when they came to this county, and three were born after their coming. Their names are as follows: Christina, who married Henry MUDER; Hannah, who married Henry EDGAR; Henry; William; Pauline, the wife of Joseph KOHNFELDER, and Harmon, deceased. Mr. DRESHER was a carpenter, and followed that business until his death, in 1862. His wife survived him until 1886. They were among the organizers of the German Lutheran church at Saxonburg.

WILLIAM DRESHER, second son of Andrew and Fredericka DRESHER, was born at Saxonburg, Butler county, June 15, 1838, learned the carpenter's trade with his father, and also served an apprenticeship to the wagonmaker's trade. He has carried on the latter business at Saxonburg for many years, and has the only wagon shop in the borough at the present time. Mr. DRESHER was married in 1862, to Dora BOHN, a native of Germany, born September 8, 1842. Her father, Christopher BOHN, came to this country in 1848, and is a farmer and a musician. Six children have been born to this union: Ella, deceased; Edmund; Lydia, wife of Henry LANG; Charles; Wanda, and Emma. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, and in politics, Mr. DRESHER is a Democrat. He served in the army during the Rebellion, as a member of Company E, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for ten months. He has been a member of the borough council of Saxonburg, and is connected with the K.of P.

DR. E.B. MERSHON, of Saxonburg, was born at Youngstown, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, May 4, 1849, , son of Daniel H. and Mary (FISCUS) MERSHON, the former of French, and the latter of German ancestry. To them were born two sons and one daughter, all living and prosperous, viz.: Emma H., wife of Thomas McKELVY, a resident of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Dr. H.L. MERSHON, now located at New Kensington, Westmoreland county, and Dr. E.B.   His father was a leading merchant of Youngstown for many years, was prominently identified with the militia of the county and district and took an active part in public affairs. The subject of this sketch received an academical education and engaged in teaching, devoting his spare moments to the study [p. 890] of medicine. In 1868 he abandoned teaching and devoted his whole time to the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. John DICKSON, Sr., a leading practitioner of Pittsburg. In 1872-73 he attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and in 1876-77 at the medical department of the University of Buffalo, New York, graduating from the latter institution in the spring of 1877. He also spent considerable time at several of the city hospitals, and there received much practical knowledge not obtainable from other sources. Dr. MERSHON began his professional career at Youngstown. He also practiced in Buffalo, New York, but his health failing him he was compelled to abandon city life, and about 1877 located at Saxonburg, where for the past seventeen years he has enjoyed a large and lucrative practice, and is recognized as one of the leading physicians of Butler county. He was married September 14, 1887, to Laura H. GRAHAM, a daughter of Robert and Mary (ASH) GRAHAM, natives of Forward township, where the Grahams were among the first settlers. Two children have been born to them, one of whom, a son, Edward B. Jr., is living. Dr. MERSHON is a member of the Butler County Medical Society, and has been very successful in his practice. He is a man of liberal ideas and ranks among the prominent and substantial citizens of the county.

JOHN SACHS, lumber dealer, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1855, son of Frederick and Johanna (GREENERT) SACHS, natives of Saxony, Germany. His father was a carpenter, learned his trade in Berlin, and immigrated to Saxonburg, Butler county, in 1852, where he married Johanna GREENERT, who came to this country with her parents in 1837. In 1857 Frederick SACHS located at Jefferson Centre, in Jefferson township, where he followed farming and carpentering. In April, 1891, he removed to the borough of Saxonburg, where both he and wife reside. The subject of this sketch learned the carpenter's trade with his father, and worked with him until 1876, when he became a partner. In 1878 he formed a partnership with Charles WETZEL, as builders and lumber dealers, which still exists. Mr. SACHS was married July 24, 1877, to Caroline STEINHAUSER, a daughter of Gottlieb STEINHAUSER, of Jefferson township. Her mother was Johanna RAABE, a sister of Christian RAABE, and her parents came from Saxony, Germany, to the United States, in 1849. Her father died July 16, 1890, aged seventy-eight years. Her mother still survives at a ripe old age. Mr. SACHS has a family of four children, as follows: Clara, born May 30, 1878; Amelia, October 1, 1881; Ida, deceased, and Lenetta, born May 24, 1892. The family are members of the German Reformed church. Politically, Mr. SACHS is a Democrat, has served in the borough council and also as chief burgess of Saxonburg, and for several years has filled the office of school director. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., the K.of P. and the K.O.T.M.

FREDERICK OWENS was a native of County Antrim, Ireland, born in 1826, there grew to maturity, and, in 1844, married Mary HARPER, also a native of Ireland, born in 1828. In 1848 they immigrated to New York, thence proceeded to New Orleans, and located in Allegheny City, in 1850, where Mr. OWENS went into the commission business on the site of the West Penn depot. He was one of the first commission merchants in Allegheny, and transacted a large and lucrative business. During the Rebellion he was under a contract to furnish salt and [p. 891] dried apples to the Union army, and amassed a large fortune. He was the first man in Pittsburg to invest his means in government bonds, thus setting an example of confidence in the government during the dark days of civil strife. He owned a fine farm at Saxonburg, Butler county, and much other valuable real estate in various places. Mr. OWENS was a stanch Republican, and although an active member of the party, he had no inclination to hold office. He was a charitable man and contributed freely towards the support of the poor. For twenty-five years preceding his death, he was a member of the North Avenue Methodist Episcopal church. By his marriage to Mary HARPER, he became the father of twelve children, five of whom are living, viz.: Mary Jane, wife of John GALLEY; Lizzie, wife of Samuel MORRISON; Sarah, wife of Ephron BLACK; Bella, wife of E.H. BECKER, and Julia. Mr. OWENS retired from business in 1873, and died at his residence in Allegheny, April 13, 1892. During the war he was imbued with every commendable patriotism. Mr. OWENS was a gentleman widely known and esteemed, and gave liberally of his means towards every worthy object. His summer residence was at Saxonburg, and he thus became interested in Butler county.

JOSEPH W. MCKEE, dentist, was born in Plum Creek township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, September 26, 1843, son of Thomas A. and Jane (GREENLAND) McKEE. His grandfather was born in County Down, Ireland, and came to this country early in the present century, settling in Armstrong county. His father was born in the latter county, where he is still residing, being now almost eighty years of age. The subject of this sketch was reared upon his father's farm, obtained a common school education, and at the age of nineteen enlisted in Company E, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for three months' service. Upon the expiration of his term, he re-enlisted in Company M, Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and served until the close of the war, participating in the many engagements in which his regiment took part. He commenced the study of dentistry in 1869, graduated in 1870, and in 1871 began practice at Elderton, Armstrong county. In 1872 he located at Saxonburg, Butler county, where he has since continued in the successful practice of his profession, being the only dentist in the borough. Dr. McKEE was married March 1, 1866, to Pauline WOODWARD, a daughter of James G. and Lavina WOODWARD, and granddaughter of Judge WOODWARD, of Armstrong county. They are the parents of three children, viz.: Alice G.; Albert T., and Mary P. In politics, Dr. McKEE is an independent voter, while in religion, he adheres to no particular denomination. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. All through life he has been an ardent admirer of secret societies, and at the present time is a member of the I.O.O.F., Jr. O.U.A.M., K.O.T.M., and the G.A.R., and holds responsible positions in most of these lodges.

WESTON W. LASHER, physician and surgeon, was born upon his father's farm in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1870, and is a son of Johnston and Nancy C. (HALL) LASHER, and a grandson of Abraham LASHER, a native of Armstrong county, born about 1809. Abraham was a farmer, married Margaret GOULD, and became the father of twelve children. He died in 1885, and [p. 892] his wife in 1888. They were members of the Church of God, in which society he filled the office of elder. Johnston LASHER was the fifth son in the family of Abraham LASHER; was born upon his father's homestead, in 1849; grew to manhood in Armstrong county, and in 1869 married Nancy C. HALL, a daughter of Weston HALL, of the same county. They became the parents of seven children, four of whom survive, viz.: Weston W.; Annie C.; Clara R., and Lawrence L. In 1883 the family removed to Phillipsburg, Beaver county, where they remained for four years, then located in Allegheny, where Mr. LASHER is engaged in the business of sewer building. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and completed his studies at Tarentum Academy; he afterwards commenced the study of medicine, attended lectures at the Baltimore Medical College and subsequently at West Penn Medical College, graduating from the latter institution in March, 1893. He took charge of the practice of his uncle, Dr. W.T. HALL, of Tarentum, during the latter's absence in Europe, and located at Saxonburg, Butler county, in August, 1893. Dr. LASHER was married December 15, 1890, to Eva FYOCK, of Pittsburg, and has one son, Ralph C. He is a Republican in politics, and takes an active interest in public affairs. Since comming to Saxonburg, Dr. LASHER has succeeded in building up a good practice, and stands well among his professional brethern.

ELMER E. GRAHAM, principal of the Saxonburg public schools, was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, April 19, 1864. He received his primary education in the schools of his native township and subsequently attended the public schools of Butler and the Witherspoon Institute. In 1882, he commenced teaching in Butler, and afterwards taught in Buffalo, Summit and Middlesex townships. In the fall of 1888 he was appointed principal of the Saxonburg schools, which position he has since occupied to the entire satisfaction of the community. Mr. GRAHAM was married May 6, 1891, to Ida RAABE, a daughter of Christian RAABE, of Saxonburg, and has one daughter, Viola, born March 21, 1893. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of Butler, while his wife is an adherent of the Evangelical Protestant church. Mr. GRAHAM has been quite active in local political affairs for several years, is a stanch Republican, and has been a member of the county committee at different times. He is connected with the K.of P., the Jr. O.U.A.M., the K.O.T.M., the O.T.W., and the I.O.O.F.

CHRISTIAN J. RAABE, son of the late Christian and Caroline (SCHROTH) RAABE, was born in Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1867. He received a practical education in the schools of the borough. In 1881 he went to Freeport and learned the barber's trade. In 1883 he returned to Saxonburg and opened a shop of his own, which he carried on until 1891, when he purchased the Hotel Laube, which he still conducts. Mr. RAABE is an active member of several lodges, belonging to the Encampment and Rebekah degrees, I.O.O.F.; K.of P., and W.of W. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, and takes an active part in church affairs. In politics, he is a stanch Democrat. In 1892 he was a delegate to the State convention at Harrisburg, and in 1894 was one of the Democratic candidates for the legislature. June 20, 1889, he married Othelia, youngest daughter of the late E.A. HELMBOLD, of Saxon-[p. 893] burg, to which union have been born three sons, viz.: Herbert, born July 8, 1890; Norman, July 15, 1892, and Ellsworth, December 27, 1893.

FREDERICK PFABE, proprietor of the Saxonburg Hotel, was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, February 20, 1860, son of Henry J. and Wilhelmina (HOFFMAN) PFABE of this township. His father died in 1885, and his mother in 1890, aged sixty-four and sixty-six years, respectively. Frederick was reared upon the homestead farm, and was subsequently employed upon the West Penn railroad. In 1890 he engaged in the hotel business in Saxonburg, since which time he has carried it on very successfully, Saxonburg being quite a well known summer resort for citizens from Pittsburg. Mr. PFABE was married April 18, 1881; to Alwena RUEDIGER, and has three children, viz.: Lydia; Hattie, and Herbert. Politically, Mr. PFABE is a Republican, and is a member of the K.of P., and the I.O.O.F.

FREDERICK BAUMAN, marble dealer, was born in Saxony, Germany, September 19, 1837, son of Christian BAUMAN and J. Christina CORNING, natives of Germany. In 1838 his parents immigrated to Butler county, and settled on a farm in Jefferson township. His father was a carpenter, and worked at his trade in connection with farming, down to his death, October 20, 1883, aged eighty-four years. His mother died April 19, 1886, at the age of seventy-five years. Both were members of the German Lutheran church, and died in that faith. Frederick was reared upon a farm and learned the carpenter's trade with his father. At the age of eighteen he began to learn marble cutting, and engaged in business at Saxonburg in 1858, where he has been the only marble dealer for many years. On November 20, 1860, he married Louisa ADERHOLD, a daughter of Henry F. and Johanna ADERHOLD. She is a sister of Albert ADERHOLD, of Jefferson township, and was born in Saxonburg, July 12, 1840, her parents being natives of Germany, who settled in this locality in 1833. Ten children have been born to this union, as follows: William H.; Aaron L.; Charles E.; Harris E.; Clara E., deceased; Alice A.; Mary Emelie; Robert M.; Louis E., and Walter L. In February, 1865, Mr. BAUMAN enlisted in Company E, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. His brothers, Herman C., and Ernest A., were also soldiers in the Rebellion. John H. was the only brother not in the service. Politically, he is a Republican, and in religious faith, a Lutheran.

WILLIAM J. CHESNEY, contractor, was born in Slippery Rock township, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1843, son of John and Catherine (STONER) CHESNEY. His father was a native of Ireland, and was brought by his parents to Chester county, Pennsylvania, when a year old, there grew to maturity, and removed with his mother to Lawrence county, where she died, his father having died in Chester county. William J. learned the blacksmith's trade from his father, and worked at that business until 1863, when he became employed in the oil fields, first as a laborer and then as a contractor in drilling wells, which business he has since followed successfully. Mr. CHESNEY located at Saxonburg in 1891, where he has resided for the past four years. He married Eunice Elizabeth GRIMM, in February, 1872. She was born January 16, 1847, and is a daughter of Michael and Mary (HAMMEL) GRIMM, of Columbiana [p. 894] county, Ohio, where her father is an oil operator and merchant. She is the mother of five children, as follows: Lloyd, born November 10, 1872; May, October 3, 1875; Kitty, October 18, 1877; Maggie, March 3, 1880, and Willie, March 28, 1884. Mr. CHESNEY is a Republican, is a member of the I.O.O.F., and is connected with the American Legion of Honor.

CHARLES WETZEL, builder, was born in Saxonburg borough, Butler county, Pennsylvania, June 17, 1856, son of Gottfried and Caroline (RAABE) WETZEL, natives of Germany. Gottfried WETZEL came to this country in early manhood with his parents, was a wagonmaker, and among the early settlers of Butler county. He died in 1880; his widow is still a resident of the county. The subject of this sketch learned the wagonmaker's trade with his father, subsequently acquired the carpenter's trade and has been a carpenter and builder for several years, and also a dealer in lumber. He has recently erected for himself one of the most commodious residences in Saxonburg. Mr. WETZEL was married June 19, 1879, to Mary SEIBERT, a daughter of Conrad SEIBERT, a retired farmer. She was born October 3, 1856, and is the mother of four children: Albert, born January 7, 1883; Walter, born June 7, 1886; Howard, born January 31, 1890, and Della, born March 16, 1894. Mr. WETZEL is connected with the I.O.O.F., both Lodge and Encampment, and is also a member of the K.of P.

CHARLES PFEIFFER, merchant and liveryman, was born in Alsace, Germany, August 15, 1851, son of Anton and Elizabeth (GOETZ) PFEIFFER, natives of Germany. His father was a cooper, and died in 1852. His mother died in 1865. In 1872 Mr. PFEIFFER came to the United States and settled in Pittsburg, where he worked at his trade, that of shoemaker, for eight years. He then came to Saxonburg, where he continued the same business until 1890, when he opened a flour and feed store, which he carried on in connection with a livery stable. He also operates the stage line between Saxonburg and the railroad station. Mr. PFEIFFER has been twice married; first to Amelia GLONTZ, to whom were born seven children. She died in 1887, and he was again married, to Mrs. Minnie A. WAGNER, to which union have been born two children. Mr. PFEIFFER is a Republican, and is a member of the K.of P., and the K.O.T.M.

JAMES C. GRAY, gauger, was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1853, son of William and Eleanor (BECK) GRAY, the former of Irish and the latter of German nationality. The family came to Butler county about 1876 and located at Millerstown, where the father died at the age of seventy-two years. Willliam and Eleanor GRAY, were the parents of eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Sarah, wife of William TURNER; Charles C.; Carrie, wife of F.A. SUTTON; William H.; Mary, deceased; Hannah J., wife of Thomas MOORE; John W., and James C. At the age of fourteen the last mentioned began to work in the oil fields, and since 1887 he has been in the employ of the National Transit Company, being now their gauger for the thirty-third district, embracing Jefferson township and some adjoining territory. Mr. GRAY was married August 26, 1875, to Hanna J. RITCHIE, a native of Indiana county. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the A.O.U.W., the I.O.O.F., and the K.of P.

[p. 895]

HENRY LANG, blacksmith, was born in Jefferson township, Butler county October 21, 1863, son of John and Eva (KRONFENSTINE) LANG, natives of Brier, Germany. His father was born July 1, 1815, came to the United States in 1850, worked at his trade of blacksmith, in Pittsburg, until 1857, and then located at Saxonburg, Butler county, where he followed blacksmithing down to 1880, when he retired from business. John LANG is a son of Conrad LANG. Henry learned the blacksmith trade with his father, and assumed control of the business in 1880, upon the retirement of the latter, since which time he has continued in successful business. He has been quite prosperous, and has recently erected for himself one of the finest residences in the township. He is a member of the K.of P., and in politics, he is a stanch Democrat. Mr. LANG married Lydia DRESHER, in April, 1887. She is a daughter of William DRESHER, of Saxonburg, and is the mother of one son, Elmer, born August 8, 1891. Mr. LANG and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church.

HENRY SEFTON was born in Antrim county, Ireland, and was reared to manhood in his native land. He immigrated to Pennsylvania when a young man, and in 1796 purchased a farm, then in Buffalo, but now in Clinton township, Butler county, containing 200 acres of unimproved land. The same year he married Jane Quinn, erected a cabin in the unbroken forest, and there the young couple began their married life. He was offered an adjoining tract for his rifle, but refused the offer, considering the rifle of more value than the land. He became the father of nine children, named as follows: Edward; James; John; Jane, who married Matthew BICKET; Henry; Mary Ann, who married Robert COX, and for her second husband, David LOGAN; Catherine, who married William LOGAN; Ellen, and William, all of whom are dead. Mr. SEFTON and wife were members of the Union church. He died in 1840, his wife surviving him several years. In politics he was first a Whig and afterwards a Democrat, and filled the office of township collector and other minor positions.

EDWARD SEFTON, SR., was born on the homestead in what is now Clinton township, Butler county, September 10, 1802, was educated at a subscription school, and followed farming throughout his life. In 1827 he married Elizabeth THOMPSON, a daughter of Robert THOMPSON, of Middlesex township, who became the mother of eight children, viz.: Edward; Jane; Robert; Esther, who married David CAMPBELL, and afterwards Morris CRAVEN; Eliza, who married John WESTERMAN; Henry, deceased; Isabel, who married David HAZLETT, and William. Mr. SEFTON died in 1869, and his wife, September 12, 1887. They were members of the Seceder church, in which he filled the office of elder for twenty-five years. In early life he was a Whig, and was afterwards a Republican, and filled the offices of school director and assessor in Clinton township.

EDWARD SEFTON was born in Penn township, Butler county, May 9, 1828, and is the eldest child of Edward and Elizabeth SEFTON. He was reared upon the farm, learned the carpenter's trade, and follows that business in connection with farming. On April 20, 1852, he married Margaret HAY, a daughter of James HAY, of Middlesex township, to which union have been born ten children, as follows: Edward; James M.; John; David H.; Eliza J.; Maggie L.; William S.; Joseph M.; Robert, and Thomas. Mr. SEFTON is a member of the United [p. 896] Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He has filled the offices of school director and road commissioner, and is one of the enterprising citizens of his township. On February 14, 1865, he enlisted in Company E, Seventy-eight Pennsylvania Volunteers, was mustered in at Pittsburg, whence he went to Harrisburg, and was sent to Nashville, Tennessee. He remained at the latter point until September 11, and on his way home was taken sick at Cincinnati with typhoid fever, was brought on to Pittsburg, but did not recover for eight months. He was honorably discharged at Harrisburg, and then returned to his home.

WILLIAM LOVE, SR., was one of the early settlers of Clinton township, locating upon the HARVEY farm in 1806. He was a native of Ireland, and came from Delaware to Butler county with his wife and family. He was married in Ireland to Martha SORSON. Several years after his settlement, he purchased 200 acres of land where his grandson, Samuel M., now lives, and here died in October, 1848, his wife having died the previous May. Both were buried in the Westminster graveyard. Their children were as follows: James, who died in early manhood; Samuel, who married Elizabeth HOLSTEN; Rachel, who married George KERNAHAN; Robert, who married Sarah HOLSTEN; William, who married Mary THOMPSON; Martha, who became the wife of James KERR, and Elizabeth who married Samuel TRIMBLE.

WILLIAM LOVE, son of William and Martha LOVE, was born in 1803, and came with his parents to Clinton township, Butler county, when three years old. Here he grew to manhood, and afterwards received 100 acres of the homestead from his father. He erected the brick house now occupied by George WISKEMAN, spent his entire life in farming pursuits, and died on February 27, 1892. He married Mary THOMPSON, a daughter of Robert THOMPSON, who died January 1, 1885. Fourteen children were born to this union, as follows: Samuel M.; Isabel, deceased wife of Robert SPEER; Thompson; Martha, wife of John W. LOECH; Mary, wife of Francis DONALDSON; Ann, wife of John E. THOMPSON; Rachel, deceased; James; William; Elizabeth; Nancy, wife of William PEACO; Robert; George, and Newton. Politically, Mr. LOVE was a Whig in early days, and later a Republican. He was first a member of the Seceder church, but upon the organization of the United Presbyterian denomination, he united with that society.

SAMUEL M. LOVE, eldest son of William and Mary LOVE, was born on April 7, 1830, in Clinton township. He learned the carpenter's trade, and followed that business until 1893, in which year he settled on a portion of the old homestead. He married Mary J. HARBISON, and they are the parents of the following children: H.W.; George H., deceased; Ella M.; Maggie J.; Inez, wife of George WISKEMAN; James T.; Mary E.; Samuel H.; John H.K., deceased and Charles A. Mr. LOVE is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

H.W. LOVE, eldest son of Samuel M. and Mary J. LOVE, was born February 16, 1853, in Clinton township, was reared on the homestead, and at the age of seventeen commenced learning the blacksmith's trade. He afterwards engaged in business at Saxonburg, and followed his trade until the spring of [p. 897] 1893, when he formed a partnership with W.A. KRUMPE, under the firm name of Krumpe & Love, and began the manufacture of brick and tile. Their plant consists of three acres of pits, a building twenty-four by eighty, a brick machine with a capacity of 20,000 bricks a day, and 15,000 tiles, a kiln with a capacity of 50,000 bricks and 20,000 tiles, all operated by a twenty-five horse power engine. They give employment to six men. Mr. LOVE married Lizzie KRUMPE, a daughter of C. KRUMPE, and has two children, Charles and Ira. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, is connected with the Jr. O.U.A.M., and in politics, he is a Republican.

W.A. KRUMPE, son of Charles and Kate (BAUER) KRUMPE, was born December 9, 1869, in Clinton township, and was reared upon a farm. At the age of seventeen he became a salesman for the McCormick Reaper Company, which business he followed until the spring of 1893, when he formed a partnership with H.W. LOVE, under the firm name of Krumpe & Love, and has since been engaged in the manufacture of brick and tile. He is a member of the Lutheran church, is connected with the Jr. O.U.A.M., and is an ardent supporter of the Republican party.

JAMES LOVE a native of Ireland, born in 1790, came to Butler county, in 1816, leaving his wife in Ireland, and settled in Buffalo, now Clinton township. His uncle, William LOVE, had previously settled in the township, and it is believed he induced James to come to the United States. He was a son of Samuel and Betsey LOVE, who came from Ireland with James' wife, some two years later, and settled on a small farm in Clinton township. Two other sons, Samuel and Robert, came with their parents. Samuel located in Jefferson township, and Robert in Washington county. The subject of this sketch was a weaver, and followed his trade in Clinton township, in connection with farming. He first settled on the farm now owned by George MAIZLAND, but in 1824 purchased the property, now comprising the home of W.W. ARMSTRONG, his son-in-law. It contained 200 acres, and was originally settled by John HECKART, and John SNYDER. This farm he improved, and spent the remaining years of his life thereon, dying in 1857. Mr. LOVE, was a very social, genial man, and played on the fiddle for the amusement of his neighbors, having brought the instrument from his native land. He possessed considerable enterprise and took an active interest in the development of his adopted home. His wife's maiden name was Nancy HUTCHISON, who became the mother of the following children: James, born in Ireland, and died on the homestead in 1890; Samuel, who died in 1857; John, a resident of Clinton township; George, who lives on the old farm; William, who died in Missouri; Obadiah, who died in Clinton township, in 1893; Mary Ann, deceased wife of William HECKART; Robert, a resident of Westmoreland county, and Sarah J., wife of W.W. ARMSTRONG, of Allegheny. Mrs. LOVE survived her husband twenty years, and died in 1877. They were members of the Covenanter church, and connected with the Lovejoy congregation. In harmony with his religious convictions, Mr. LOVE took no interest in political matters.

GEORGE LOVE, son of James and Nancy LOVE, was born on the farm first settled by his father, in 1824, but was reared upon the second homestead. He received a common school education, and remained with his parents until their [p. 898] decease. He afterwards purchased the farm, and owned it until 1889, then sold it to his brother-in-law, W.W. ARMSTRONG, and purchased the William WALKER farm, but still resides upon the old homestead. He is a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church, a genial, intelligent gentleman, and one of the enterprising and successful farmers of the township.

JAMES CRISWELL was born in the City of Derry, Ireland, in 1791, there grew to manhood, and in 1819, made up his mind to come to the United States. After a stormy voyage accross the Atlantic in the ship "Constellation," occupying some thirty days, the vessel was wrecked off the coast of Nova Scotia, and the passengers lost everything except the clothes upon their backs. From St. John's,[sic] New Brunswick, Mr. CRISWELL worked his passage to Philadelphia, and walked from that city to Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he was glad to get work on a farm at four dollars and fifty cents per month, and take his pay in trade. Here he met and married, in 1825, Jane BROWNLOW, a native of Derry county, Ireland, born in 1804. She came with her parents to Philadelphia, and thence by wagon to Washington county, Pennsylvania. They had to pay seven dollars and fifty cents in gold per 100 pounds for their baggage transportation from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and she, too, was weighed and charged for at the same rate, her parents walking the whole distance to save expense, and spending fourteen days on the journey. In 1830 Mr. CRISWELL purchased a farm from Hugh DAVIS, of Allegheny, containing "200 acres more or less," lying in Clinton township, Butler county, for which he paid $500. When the tract was afterwards surveyed it was found to contain 240 acres. There were some four acres cleared and a small log cabin, with puncheon flooring and a door made of sawed boards, with wooden hinges, in fact one of those old fashioned structures so common in pioneer days. Mr. CRISWELL resided upon this farm forty years, dying April 30, 1870. His wife died on August 11, 1882. They reared a family of six sons and three daughters, and three children died in infancy. The oldest, William, was born in Washington county, February 13, 1829, learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in Allegheny, and resides in that city; James, born January 27, 1831, resides at Sharpsburg; Letitia, born October 17, 1832, married Moses MARSHALL in 1854, and died in Kansas, March 19, 1894; Thomas, born August 15, 1834, went west with his sister Letitia and her husband, followed the lumber business down to the war, served in the Seventh Minnesota Regiment, and now resides at West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania; Robert, born October 11, 1836; Eliza Jane, born November 28, 1837, married John C. NORRIS, of Clinton township, and died November 8, 1862; Joseph, born April 7, 1840, remained on the homestead with his parents, until August 11, 1861, then enlisted in Captain McLAUGHLIN's company, served until the close of the war, and now resides in Butler township; John A., born February 25, 1842, served in Captain HUTCHISON's Company, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and is now a resident of Washington, Pennsylvania; Robert ROSS, born December 12, 1845, who also served in Captain HUTCHISON's company, and is an inmate of the Soldiers' Home, at Erie, and Susannah Belle, born October 4, 1849, married John BURTNER, and resides in Clinton township. All of the children except the eldest were born upon the old homestead in Clinton township.

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THOMAS WESTERMAN was born in Manchester, England, December 11, 1809, there grew to manhood and learned the machinist's trade. He immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Allegheny City, where he continued to work at his trade. In 1832 he married Hannah TENANT, a daughter of William TENANT, and in 1839 purchased a farm of 100 acres in Clinton township, Butler county, upon which he settled the same year. Both he and wife resided here the balance of their lives. He died August 16, 1887, and his wife, November 9, 1871. They were the parents of ten children, as follows: William T.; John H.; Thomas; Mary A., who married Harrison NORRIS; George R.; Henry J.; Sarah J.; Edward; Hannah B., who married Perry McCALL, and Eliza E., who married Seth MEAD. Mr. WESTERMAN was a member of the Protestant Episcopal church.

EDWARD WESTERMAN was born in Clinton township, Butler county, August 2, 1851, and is the youngest son of Thomas and Hannah WESTERMAN. He was reared upon the farm, assisting his parents with the home duties, and received a common school education. In January, 1875, he married Emma C. BURTNER, a daughter of William BURTNER, of Clinton township, and they are the parents of the following children: Ethel M.; Ella M.; Margaret E.; William P.; Sarah E.; Emily E.; Philip R.; James R.; Hannah, and Cora. Mr. WESTERMAN is a Republican.

STEWART MONTGOMERY was a native of Derry county, Ireland, and immigrated to Pennsylvania, in 1831, and settled in Pine township, Allegheny county, where his son Samuel had preceded him. He subsequently removed to West Deer township, settling close to the Butler line, where he purchased 100 acres of land and spent the remaining years of his life thereon, dying about 1859. He was married in Ireland to Jane PATTERSON, to whom were born the following children: Mrs. Mary STEWART, who lived and died in Ireland; Samuel; John; Archibald; Elizabeth, who married George EWING; Thomas, who died in Allegheny county, in 1894, and Margaret J., a resident of the same county. The others all died in Clinton township. Mr. MONTGOMERY was an early member of Pine Creek United Presbyterian church.

SAMUEL MONTGOMERY, eldest son of Stewart and Jane Montgomery, was born in Derry county, Ireland, in 1803, grew to manhood in his native land, and immigrated to the United States in 1827. The following year he settled in Pine township, Allegheny county, subsequently removing to Pittsburg, where he followed the brickmaker's trade until 1847, in which year he purchased 224 acres of land in Clinton township, Butler county. Here he settled and remained until 1858, when he removed to Pittsburg, and died in that city in 1865. Mr. MONTGOMERY was married in Ireland, in 1827, to Eleanor BARD, who died in Pittsburg, in 1880. Five children were born to this union, viz.: John; Mary J., wife of Thomas WATSON; Archibald, and Samuel, both deceased, and Margaret, deceased wife of James HARRISON. Mr. MONTGOMERY was a member of Pine Creek United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a Republican.

JOHN MONTGOMERY, eldest son of Samuel and Eleanor Montgomery, was born in Philadelphia, December 18, 1827, and was reared in Pittsburg. He was educated in the common schools, and learned the brickmaker's trade, which he followed until 1847, then came with his father to Butler county, and in 1857 [p. 900] located on a farm in West Deer township, Allegheny county. He afterwards purchased 108 acres of the old homestead in Clinton township, erected buildings, and has since been engaged in farming. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, Eighteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served until the close of the war, participating in the following engagements: Bridgewater, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Mount Jackson, and Waynesboro, close to Winchester, Virginia, and was discharged on June 12, 1865. In politics, Mr. MONTGOMERY is a Republican, has served as school director for ten years, and filled other township offices. He is a member of James Harvey Post, G.A.R. He married Catherine FLICK, a daughter of Henry FLICK, who has borne him the following children: Samuel; Henry F.; Emma E.; Mary E., wife of R.E. MORROW; George W.; Albert; Harvey C.; Margaret J., wife of Thomas MORROW; William H., and Bertha E. Mr. MONTGOMERY is one of the enterprising farmers of his township.

HENRY HALSTEAD was born in Lancastershire, England, April 24, 1809, the son of Robert Halstead. He was reared in his native country, and was a calico printer by trade. In 1832 he came to Philadelphia, and thence removed to Pittsburg, where he was engaged in peddling notions until 1838. In that year he purchased a farm at Sarversville, in Buffalo township, where he remained until 1846, and then bought and settled upon the farm where his son John now resides. He developed the coal deposits upon this farm, opening three banks, and carried on an extensive business for some years. He died June 5, 1886. He was married in England to Jane MARTIN, a daughter of James MARTIN, and their children are named as follows: Margaret, wife of Samuel SNYDER; John; Martha, wife of Martin HARTUNG; James, deceased; Jane, deceased wife of William SHEPPARD; Henry H.; Mary A., wife of Jacob HARTUNG; Isabel, deceased wife of Milo JOHNSON, and Samuel M., of Kansas. Mrs. HALSTEAD died on November 5, 1888. In politics, he was a Democrat until 1856, when he became a Republican.

JOHN HALSTEAD, eldest son of Henry and Jane HALSTEAD, was born April 7, 1835, and was reared in Pittsburg, and in Butler county. In 1861 he enlisted in Company C, Eleventh Pennsylvania Reserve, and served three years, participating in all the engagements of his regiment up to the battle of Gettysburg, where he was severely wounded and sent to the hospital at York, Pennsylvania. He was discharged at the expiration of his term of service, and returned to his home in Clinton township. He subsequently embarked in the hotel business in Allegheny, but returned to the farm and is now engaged in farming and mining on the homestead. He married Sarah A. HAZLETT, and their children are as follows: James H.O.; John L.M.; Franklin W.H.; Etta A.M.; Jane E.B.; Sarah M.P., and Samuel E.E., deceased. Mr. HALSTEAD is a member of the Butler Camp, Number 45, U.V.L., also of James Harvey Post, Number 514, G.A.R.

HENRY H. HALSTEAD, son of Henry and Jane HALSTEAD, was born near Sarversville, Butler county, March 18, 1843, was reared upon the farm and educated in the common schools. In October, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. In February, 1864, he again enlisted, in Company F, Independent Light Artillery, and served until June 26, 1865. A few months after his enlistment he was [p. 901] detached for duty under General HUNTER, in the Shenandoah valley, and remained there until the war closed. Returning home, he engaged in droving for the Pittsburg market, was next engaged in coal mining for nine years, and in 1875 purchased his present farm of 107 acres, in Clinton township, upon which he has made all of the improvements. Mr. HALSTEAD was married in November, 1866, to Sarah GRIFFITH, a daughter of Joseph GRIFFITH, of Allegheny county, and has five children, viz.: Eliza J.; James G.; Joseph C.; Albert H.S., and Evert J.H. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, has served as school director for nine years, and is quite an ardent supporter of the public schools. He is a member of the Emery Chapel, Methodist Episcopal church, and is connected with James Harvey Post, G.A.R. He is one of the leading farmers and public-spirited citizens of his township.

WILLIAM MORRISON was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, about 1820, son of Matthew MORRISON, a native of Mifflin county, born March 14, 1797. Matthew MORRISON married a Miss HOWE, who was born in Philadelphia, December 24, 1801. He died September 14, 1867, and his wife, August 26, 1882, in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania. After arriving at manhood, William MORRISON came to Butler county. In 1847 he married Martha STEWART, of Lawrence county, and carried on a wagon factory in the borough of Butler for several years. He finally moved up to Penn township, where he purchased fifty acres of land, and died upon his farm in 1867. During the Rebellion he served in Company B, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and had charge of the magazine. Mr. MORRISON was the father of nine children, viz: Robert A.; John H.; Elizabeth E., who married Robert CRITCHLOW; Charles W.; James C.; Joseph S.; Harriet L., who married William WOOD; Nancy, who married William EMRICK, and William M., deceased. The family were connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, in which society Mr. MORRISON served as Sabbath school superintendent. In politics, he was a Republican.

CHARLES W. MORRISON was born in Butler borough, Butler county, July 27, 1856, son of William and Martha MORRISON. His education was obtained in the common schools, and his whole attention has been devoted to farming. On July 4, 1877, he married Jennie WILLIAMS, a daughter of Morgan WILLIAMS, of Allegheny county. They are the parents of the following children: Martha M.; William M.; Charles R.; Clarence W.; Lila I.; Harry T.; Alti I, and Olive E. In 1889 Mr. MORRISON purchased the CRISWELL farm, containing 145 acres, where he has since resided. He also owns a farm in Penn township, and has been a successful oil operator for many years. In politics, he is a Republican, and one of the enterprising citizens of his township.

CHARLES BOICE was born in Buffalo, New York, October 24, 1840, son of Isaac BOICE, a native of Brunswick, New Jersey. His father was a sailor, and about 1835, was married to Rosanna Rogers, of Buffalo, where he was working at his trade. They were the parents of six children, viz.: Cornelius, deceased; William, a resident of St. Paul, Minnesota; Leonard; John H., deceased; Charles, and Eliza A., deceased. The mother died in Buffalo in 1861, and her husband removed to Pithole, Venango county, in 1864, thence to Hunter's Point, New York, and then to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1880. [p. 902] The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and learned the plumber's and gas fitter's trade, at which he worked in Buffalo until his removal to Plumer, Venango county, in 1863. He afterwards worked at Pithole for six years, and for the following six years had charge of the Empire Oil Works, at Hunter's Point, New York, whence he removed to Etna, Allegheny county. In 1881 he settled in Clinton township, Butler county, where he has since resided. Mr. BOICE has been twice married. In March, 1864, he married Susan OVERHEIM, a daughter of Daniel OVERHEIM, of Plumer, Venango county, who bore him six children, viz.: Sarah F.; William; Daniel; John H., and Elizabeth, both deceased, and Charles. Mrs. BOICE died February 21, 1875, and he was again married, November 29, 1880, to Sarah OVERHEIM, a sister of his first wife. He has been a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and in politics, is a Republican. Mr. BOICE is superintendent of the Natural Gas Company, Limited, which position he has filled for nearly nineteen years.

JAMES SIMPSON, son of William and Mary (MOFFAT) SIMPSON, was born in Antrim county, Ireland, April 6, 1837. He was educated in a private school, and learned the butcher's trade in his native land. In 1853 he immigrated to the United States, and followed carpet weaving in Philadelphia for some years. He then found employment in the iron mills of Pittsburg, which business he followed for sixteen years. In 1878 he moved to his present farm of 100 acres, in Clinton township, Butler county, upon which he has erected new improvements. He married Mary J. PARK, and has four children, viz.: John P.; Hannah Q.; Mary M., and Bessie R. Mr. SIMPSON is a member of Deer Creek United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Republican party.

CHARLES PFABEwas born in Jefferson township, Butler county, October 8, 1846, and is a son of Henry PFABE. He was educated in the common schools, was reared upon a farm, and learned the carriage maker's trade in Pittsburg, which he followed for three years. He then found employment as a tool dresser in the oil fields, which he followed for several years. In 1883 he purchased a farm in Clinton township, containing 116 acres, upon which he has since resided engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. PFABE married Sophia MILLER, a daughter of George MILLER, of Saxon Station, Winfield township, and has five children, viz.: Howard J.; Frank A.; Tilmer H.; Walter W., and Sadie E. In his religious views, he is an adherent of the Lutheran church. His farm is one of the well improved places of the township, and he is a progressive and esteemed citizen.

ROBERT BROWN was the first settler of what is now Penn township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He was born in New Jersey, in 1779, son of Caleb BROWN, who subsequently located near Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, where Robert grew to manhood. In 1797 Robert came to Penn township, Butler county, built a small log cabin in the primitive forest, in the southwest part of that subdivision, and commenced the work of making a home. His parents afterwards came here, and ended their days at the home of their son. Robert was married here to Ruth RATHBUN, a daughter of Clark RATHBUN, also a pioneer of Penn township, and of a family of sixteen children, born to this union, thirteen grew to maturity, as follows: Caleb; Clark; John; Robert; Nathan; Sarah; Abigail; Rhoda; Elizabeth; Ann; Clarissa; Lydia, and Caroline [p. 903] Matilda. The last named is the only one now living. Robert BROWN was a justice of the peace in Penn township for twenty five years, and was a class leader and steward in the Methodist Episcopal church. He died upon his farm in 1853, and his wife in 1850.

NATHAN BROWN was born upon the homestead in Penn township, in 1816, and received a good education. He taught school in early manhood, and was an examiner of teachers for the township. He was also a professor of music, and was one of the well known citizens of that locality down to his death. He married Sarah A. COE, of Portage county Ohio, and became the father of eight children, viz.: Elizabeth C.; Milton R.; Harriet, deceased; Rosaline, wife of William COPELY; Hamlin; Clara, wife of Isaac ANDREWS; Anna, wife of Calvin GLASGOW, and Melissa, wife of Austin MEALS. Nathan BROWN died October 26, 1891, and his wife, October 17, 1889. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he held several offices at different periods. Politically, Mr. BROWN was a Republican, filled the office of school director for several years, and served as prothonotary of Butler county one term, to which office he was elected in 1857.

MILTON R. BROWN, eldest son of Nathan and Sarah A. BROWN, was born upon his father's farm, in Penn township, Butler county, December 9, 1848. He attended common schools in boyhood, learned the stonemason's and bricklayer's trades, and followed that calling for eighteen years. He is now living upon the old homestead; engaged in farming. He married Elizabeth CRITCHLOW, a daughter of John L. CRITCHLOW, of Forward township, and has four children: Ezra F.; Martha A.; Almeda G., and Ruth E. Mr. BROWN is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is now filling the offices of trustee and steward. In politics, he is a Prohibitionist, and has filled the office of township auditor.

JOHN DODDS, a native of Ireland, known for many years as "Squire DODDS," immigrated to Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1800, lived there for eight years, and in 1808 came to Butler county and purchased several hundred acres of land in what is now Penn township. He located near the present site of Brownsdale, but some years later settled on the farm where his grandson, David B. DODDS, now resides. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, was a man of excellent qualities, and served as justice of the peace for many years. His children were as follows: James; John; Joseph; Josiah; Jesse B.; William, and Adam, all of whom are dead. He moved his family and goods from Cumberland county with one horse hitched between two poles, the ends of the latter dragging on the ground. This was known as a "slide car." He brought with him some pits of English cherries, which he planted upon his farm, and thus introduced this fruit into the pioneer settlement. Mr. DODDS was one of the founders of the United Presbyterian church of Butler, as well as the church at Brownsdale. He died in 1862, at an advanced age.

WILLIAM DODDS, son of John DODDS the pioneer, was born on the homestead farm in Penn township, Butler county, April 23, 1814, and died September 21, 1872. Soon after reaching his majority he purchased a farm near Brownsdale, now owned by W.J. BURTON, upon which he erected a brick resi- [p. 904] dence, manufacturing the bricks on his farm. He married Martha J. DOUTHETT, a daughter of Benjamin DOUTHETT, one of the pioneers of Forward township, January 2, 1843, and became the father of nine children, viz.: Emma; William J., who died at Camp Copeland, while serving in the Union army; Mary M.; Benjamin F.; Findley B., of Penn township; Maggie A.; Robert; David L. (the last three of whom are dead), and Joseph. Mr. DODDS was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a Republican. Mrs. DODDS was again married September 26, 1876, to H.B. WEISZ, who died at the home of his daughter in Zelienople. Mrs. WEISZ is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and resides in Butler.

FINDLEY B. DODDS, son of William and Martha J. DODDS, was born upon the homestead farm in Penn township, Butler county, June 3, 1853, was reared a farmer, but subsequently learned the carpenter's and stairbuilder's trade, which he followed for a few years. He then located upon his present farm in Penn township, which contains seventy acres, and has since devoted his attention to agriculture. On March 20, 1879, he married Belle M. WALDRON, a daughter of Hon. W.S. WALDRON, of Forward township. Mr. DODDS is a Republican, and has served as a collector and assessor in his township. Both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, to which denomination his father and grandfather belonged.

ADAM DODDS, youngest son of John Dodds, the pioneer of the family in Butler county, was born April 16, 1816, in Penn township, Butler county, and grew to manhood upon his father's farm. He inherited the homestead, and followed farming the balance of his days, dying in 1887, at the age of seventy-one years. He married Margaret SUTTON, and their son, David B., resides upon the homestead farm. Mr. DODDS was a good neighbor and an excellent citizen, was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and died in that faith. In politics, he was a Republican, though he took very little interest in political affairs.

DAVID B. DODDS, son of Adam and Margaret DODDS, was born upon his present farm in Penn township, September 20, 1850, and has always resided thereon. He received a common school education, and has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. He married Mary M. BARTLEY, a daughter of Williamson BARTLEY. They are the parents of four children, viz.: Adam; Williamson; Clora, and James. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church, and politically, Mr. DODDS is an ardent Republican.

JOHN WELSH was a native of Ireland, came to America about 1770, when a mere lad, grew to manhood in this country, and served as a soldier in the War of the Revolution, being shot through the body at the battle of Brandywine, from which wound, however, he recovered. After the war closed with the triumph of the Colonies and the establishment of independence, he settled in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He came to Butler county about 1800, purchased a tract of land containing 250 acres in what is now Connoquenessing township, built his cabin in the midst of the primitive forest, and began the work of making a home for himself and family. He lived to see the country thickly settled and to enjoy the satisfaction of a well improved homestead, upon which he died at a very advanced age. His children were as follows: William; James; Thomas; [p. 905] John; Mrs. Susan BRANDON; Mrs. Elizabeth SHANNON, and Mrs. MORROW. The sons served in the War of 1812, and like their father, were patriotic and liberty-loving citizens.

JAMES WELSH, son of John Welsh, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, about 1785, and came with his parents to Butler county when he was about fifteen years of age. He grew to manhood upon his father's farm, which he inherited upon the death of the latter, and throughout his life he was one of the well-known farmers of Connoquenessing township. He died upon the old homestead in 1878, at the remarkable age of ninety-three years. He was married three times and had children by each marriage. His last wife was Eliza MALLISON, who died in 1868, at the age of fifty-six years. The parents were consistent members of the Presbyterian church, in which faith they lived and died. Mr. WELSH was a stanch Republican from the formation of that party, prior to which he was a Whig.

HENRY C. WELSH, son of James and Mary (MALLISON) WELSH, was born on the old homestead in Connoquenessing township, and was reared beneath the parental roof. The farm is now the property of Henry C. and an older brother. He has followed farming since early manhood, and has also been interested in oil producing, several wells having been put down on the old farm. In 1891 Mr. WELSH purchased his present farm in Penn township, located upon it in 1892, and has erected a fine residence and other buildings since that time. It was known as the Felix H. NEGLEY farm, contains 100 acres, and is one of the best improved places in the township. Mr. WELSH was married November 14, 1883, to Lizzie S. BROWN, a daughter of Joseph BROWN, of Penn township, to which union have been born four children, viz.: Lucile; Clara B.; Stella E., and James E. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and politically, Mr. WELSH is a stanch Republican.

JOHN KENNEDY, SR., was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1751, and was a son of John KENNEDY, a native of Antrim county, Ireland, born in 1722. His mother was a Miss MURRAY, a relative of Regent MURRAY of Scotland, and soon after their marriage, in 1748, they immigrated to Baltimore. Our subject received a good education, and followed school teaching in early manhood. He enlisted in the Revolutionary war, served under Washington until its close, and drew a pension from the government to the time of his death, in 1835. He was married in 1786, and was the father of ten children, nine of whom are dead, named as follows: Sarah; Hannah; Catherine; James; John; Mary; Jacob; Margaret, and Elizabeth. Jane is the only survivor of the family. He removed with his family from Baltimore to the site of McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and in 1801 settled in what is now Winfield township, Butler county, where the remaining years of his life were passed.

JOHN KENNEDY was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 25, 1794, and came with his parents to Butler county when about seven years old. He grew to maturity upon the old homestead in Winfield township, and endured the trials and hardships incident to pioneer life. He served in the War of 1812, was a justice of the peace, and also filled the office of county commissioner. In 1832 he purchased a farm in Penn township, where he resided until his death. [p. 906] In 1822 he married Ann G. SMITH, of Allegheny county, who bore him nine children, viz.: John Q.A., of Butler; Henry, and James, both deceased; Barbara, deceased wife of Barney STEPP; William; Jacob; Margaret, wife of John C. EMERICK; Nancy, and Hamilton C., who was killed at Fair OAKS. Mr. KENNEDY died January 4, 1869, and his wife, August 12, 1859. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, he was an ardent Republican.

WILLIAM KENNEDY, son of John and Ann C. KENNEDY, was born in Winfield township, Butler county, September 15, 1831, and removed with his parents to Penn township the following year, where he grew to maturity. He learned the blacksmith's trade, and worked at it for twelve years, since which time he has devoted his attention to farming. He married Matilda GRAHAM, a daughter of Robert GRAHAM, of Penn township, and is the father of ten children, viz.: William J.; Ann C., wife of P.E. GAVEREN; Charles; Lulu M., wife of Morris FLACHNER; Clara, wife of E.W. ROBBINS; Clyde; George; Ada; Eva, and Francis M. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, in which society Mr. KENNEDY has served as steward and trustee. He has also served on the school board of his township, and in politics, is an ardent Republican.

ROBERT MARTIN came from Ireland with his parents, William and Elizabeth MARTIN, to Connoquenessing township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1801, where his parents died at ripe old ages. Robert became quite prominent in that locality during pioneer days, was a justice of the peace for nearly forty years, also commissioner and auditor of the county. He served in the War of 1812 under Gen. David MEAD, the founder of Meadville, as captain of a company in the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Pennsylvania Militia. In 1808 he married Kesiah McCLURE, who died in 1843. He survived her four years, dying in 1847. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: William C.; Abdiel C.; Robert; John; James;. Mrs. Jane DODDS, and Mrs. Mary Ann ANDERSON.

JAMES MARTIN, youngest son of Robert and Kesiah MARTIN, was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, in 1818, and died in 1892. He married Margaret ANDERSON, a native of Ireland, who came to the United States with her parents when a child six years of age. Nine children were born to this union, eight of whom are living, viz.: Alice, wife of Samuel DUNBAR, of Pittsburg; William T., who was born in Connoquenessing township, September 9, 1851, and is a farmer in Penn township; Benton O., a contractor and bricklayer, of Allegheny; Jennie, wife of Albert WIBLE, of Penn township; Maggie, wife of Albert STARR, of the same township; Robert H., of Allegheny; Aggie, and Frank C. of Allegheny. Mr. MARTIN removed to Penn township, in 1865, purchasing what was known as the WISE farm, near Maharg, containing 120 acres, where he resided until his death. His widow resides with her son, William T., upon the homestead. The latter is a justice of the peace, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

ROBERT HARBISON was born in Jefferson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1807, son of William HARBISON, a native of Ireland who first located in Middlesex township, Butler county, in the last decade of the Eighteenth century, and later removed to Jefferson township, where he settled [p. 907] and improved a farm. William was a soldier in the War of 1812. He had three sons, viz.: William, who spent his life upon the old homestead in Jefferson township, and filled the office of county commissioner; Robert, who settled on a farm adjoining his father's, and Matthew, who located in Oakland township. Robert received his education in a subscription school, learned the shoemaker's trade in youth, and followed that vocation all his life. He married Susan EKAS, a daughter of John EKAS, of Buffalo township, about 1847, to which union were born ten children, as follows: John; Mary; William; Sarah; Thomas; Daniel; Robert H.; Catherine; Joseph, and Susan. The survivors of this family are William; Robert H.; Joseph, and Susan. Mr. HARBISON died March 28, 1874.

ROBERT H. HARBISON, son of Robert and Susan HARBISON, was born upon the homestead farm, in Jefferson township, Butler county, December 29, 1843. He was reared a farmer, and has always followed that vocation. In 1864 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Twelfth Pennsylvania Volunteers, but the regiment having a surplus beyond the required number, he with the others were formed into a provisional regiment, known as the Second Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, in which he served in Company B. Towards the close of March, 1864, the regiment went to Washington, D.C., thence to Alexandria, where it guarded provision trains to Brandy Station, and there joined the Army of the Potomac, marched to Mine Run, and took part in the first battle of the Wilderness. After the battles of Spottsylvania Court House, North Anna River, Gaines Mill, and Cold Harbor, the regiment crossed the James river, and occupied the first line of works in front of Petersburg, June 16, 1864. It took part in the first attack on the second line of works, on the evening of the 17th, and captured and held that line, until the mine explosion, July 30, 1864. It was in all of the succeeding engagements down to the surrender of Lee, at Appomattox. Mr. HARBISON was honorably discharged from the service, at Philadelphia, June 29, 1865. Returning to Butler county, he resumed his farm duties, and was married February 26, 1867, to Lucinda DIXON, a daughter of James L. DIXON, of Penn township. Six children have been born to this union, viz.: James T., deceased; Albert L.; George C.; Mary A.; Oswell B., and Emma O. Politically, Mr. HARBISON is a Republican.

JAMES L. DIXON was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1818, and is a son of William DIXON, and a grandson of Thomas DIXON, who came from Ireland to Butler county, Pennsylvania, about 1800, and purchased 400 acres of land from the government, located in what is now Penn township. His father was a man of good education, and lived in Pittsburg for many years, returning to Butler county in 1819, and settling on a portion of the land purchased by Thomas DIXON. After coming to Butler county he taught school for many years, and filled the office of justice of the peace for a long period. William DIXON and wife were the parents of nine children, and spent their lives upon the homestead farm where the subject of this sketch now lives. James L. DIXON married Mary McCANDLESS, who died in 1876, at the age of fifty-four years. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which denomination Mr. DIXON also belongs.

[p. 908]

WINFIELD SCOTT DIXON was born in Allegheny township, Butler county, April 17, 1853, son of James L. and Mary DIXON. He was reared upon a farm, and now owns the land entered by his great-grandfather. He married Annie L. BALPH, a daughter of Joseph BALPH, a farmer of this county, April 17, 1877. She was born August 12, 1854, and was a teacher in the public schools for several years. They are the parents of six children, viz.: George Clarence; Winfield Russell; Charles Warren; Homer Scott; Frank Calvin, and Paul Eugene. Mr. DIXON and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which organization he fills the office of trustee. Politically, he is a Republican, has held the offices of justice of the peace and school director for several years each, has filled nearly every local office in the township, and was census enumerator in 1890.

ROBERT GRAHAM was born in the borough of Butler in 1807, son of Robert and Sarah (BROWN) GRAHAM. His father located on the site of Butler in 1797. The subject of this sketch was reared upon his father's homestead, and after reaching manhood he engaged in the manufacture of brick and as a general contractor in the erection of buildings. He married Sarah A. WIGFIELD, whose parents were pioneers of Clinton township, Butler county. Nine children were born to this union, as follows: Eliza J., deceased wife of Theodore HUSELTON, of Butler; James H.; Wilson W.; Mary C., deceased wife of Arthur Hays, of Allegheny; Matilda S., who married William KENNEDY, of Penn township; Thomas J., and three that died in early youth. Mrs. GRAHAM died May 17, 1861, aged fifty-six years, and her husband, in August 1873, aged sixty-six years. They were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mr. GRAHAM was a class leader for a long period. Politically, he was a Whig in early days, and subsequently a Republican.

WILSON W. GRAHAM, son of Robert and Sarah A. GRAHAM, was born in Butler township, Butler county, August 3, 1834, and was reared upon his father's farm. Upon reaching his majority he purchased the Hill farm in the northeast corner of Penn township, containing 160 acres, upon which he now resides. Mr. GRAHAM married Clara J. SCHRADER, a daughter of John S. SCHRADER, an early settler of Jefferson township. Her mother's maiden name was Jane PETERSON. Her parents died in 1875 and 1888, respectively. Mr. GRAHAM has a family of three children, viz.: S. Jennie, wife of W. Elmer BARTLEY; Frank J., and Elizabeth M. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, Mr. GRAHAM was a Republican, but latterly has been a Prohibitionist.

THOMAS J. GRAHAM, youngest child of Robert and Sarah A. GRAHAM, was born in Glenshaw, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1847, received a common school education, subsequently spent two terms at Witherspoon institute and one term at Mount Union College. He has been a farmer since early manhood, and is the owner of a home in Penn township. He married Mary A. PORTER, a daughter of Ross PORTER, of West Deer township, Allegheny county, to which union have been born the following children: Cora C.; Alma F.; Robert W.; Lida M.; James R.P.; Clarissa J., deceased, and one that died in infancy. Mr. GRAHAM is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and has filled the office of trustee in that organization. In politics, he is a Republican.

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JAMES MARSHALL was one of the early settlers of what is now Penn township, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He was a native of Antrim county, Ireland, and there married Jean PEEBLES, in November, 1797. To them were born eleven children before their immigration to the United States in 1822. They first located in Pittsburg, whence, in 1824, they came to Butler county, where Mr. MARSHALL purchased a tract of 300 acres of land in Penn township, upon which he resided until his death, in 1854, aged eighty-six years. His wife survived him nine years, and died in 1863, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. They were adherents of the Covenanter church, and Mr. MARSHALL refused to become a citizen of the United States because of his strong religious convictions that the Constitution sanctioned and protected human slavery. Their children were as follows: Mary, who married Joseph BROWN; Samuel; James; Elizabeth, who became the wife of John DEAN; William; Esther, who married John C. RAINBOW; John C.; David; Archibald M.; Kennedy, and Thomas M., the last mentioned being the well known lawyer of the Pittsburg bar. Archibald and Thomas M. are the only survivors of the family, and both are residents of Pittsburg.

JAMES H. GRAHAM, son of William and Susan GRAHAM, pioneers of Cranberry township, Butler county, was born upon the homestead farm in that township, December 31, 1825. He received a common school education, was reared a farmer, and learned the tailor's trade, which he followed for six years. In 1849 he removed to Bedford county, engaged in business there, and subsequently purchased 124 acres in South Woodbury township, upon which he lived for ten years. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company D, Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He was at the capture of Petersburg, and the surrender of General Lee's army at Appomattox, and was mustered out in June, 1865. In 1870 Mr. GRAHAM returned to Butler county, and purchased a farm of 100 acres in Penn township, upon which he has since resided. In 1852 he married Susan B., a daughter of David SNOEBERGER, of Bedford county, whose ancestors came from Switzerland. Four sons and two daughters survive this union, viz.: William S. and Andrew S., both residents of Butler; Howard, a resident of Pittsburg; Milton J., who also resides in Butler; Mary, wife of H.H. BRICKER, and Susan O., wife of J.M. BROWN. The deceased are David, Charles and Laura. Mr. GRAHAM is a Republican, has taken an active interest in local affairs, and has been elected to the offices of justice of the peace, tax collector and school director in his township. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and was superintendent of the Sabbath school for several years.

JOHN ANDERSON, a native of County Down, Ireland, born in 1783, immigrated to the United States in 1833, and located near Prospect, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm and followed agricultural pursuits the balance of his life. He married Mary DUNN in Ireland, and they were the parents of six children, all of whom were born in Ireland and came to America with their parents. Their names are as follows: Catherine, who married Robert MUNCE; Jane, who married James McCOLLOUGH; Elizabeth, who married William McCOLLOUGH; Margaret, who became the wife of James MARTIN; Samuel [p. 910] D., deceased, and James D., of Penn township. Mr. ANDERSON and wife were life long members of the Presbyterian church. She died in 1859, aged eighty years, and her husband, in 1866, at the ripe old age of ninety years.

JAMES D. ANDERSON, youngest in the family of John and Mary ANDERSON, was born in Ireland, March 11, 1816, and came with his parents to Butler county when he was seventeen years of age. He received a good education, and became a teacher, which calling he pursued for ten winters, devoting the balance of his time to farming. In 1849 he embarked in merchandising at Prospect, later purchased a farm which he soon sold, and then removed to Penn township, where he bought his present homestead in 1865. It contains 133 acres, and is one of the best improved farms in the township. He is also the owner of another good farm near Brownsdale, consisting of 100 acres. Mr. ANDERSON was married May 24, 1842, to Mary Ann MARTIN, a daughter of Robert MARTIN, a native of Ireland, who settled in Connoquenessing township. Mrs. ANDERSON was born January 1, 1822, and is the mother of ten children, eight of whom survive, as follows: Robert M.; John F.; Elzie H.; William C.; Mary; Elizabeth; Emma, and Florence. Mr. ANDERSON and family are members of the Presbyterian church, and are liberal contributors towards that organization. He is a Democrat, in politics, and was elected register and recorder of Butler county in 1876, a tribute to his worth and popularity in a strong Republican county. Mr. ANDERSON is one of the progressive and public-spirited citizens of the community, and gives his hearty support to every worthy object.


[End of Chapter 71-2 (pgs.870-910) - Biographical Sketches: Butler, Summit, Clearfield, Winfield, Buffalo, Jefferson, Clinton, Penn, Middlesex Townships, and Saxonburg Borough
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 71-1 (pgs.831-870) - Biographical Sketches: Butler, Summit, Clearfield, Winfield, Buffalo, Jefferson, Clinton, Penn, Middlesex Townships, and Saxonburg Borough
Continued Chapter 71-3 (pgs.910-944) - Biographical Sketches: Butler, Summit, Clearfield, Winfield, Buffalo, Jefferson, Clinton, Penn, Middlesex Townships, and Saxonburg Borough
Table of Contents

Updated: 25 Sep 2000, 11:14