History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 72 (Pgs. 945-990)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Jim Frison.


CHAPTER LXXII

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township

[p. 945]
CHARLES DUFFY, Sr., was born in County Donegal, Ireland, in 1754, and immigrated to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1793. He resided there until the spring of 1796, when he removed to what is now Butler county, with the advance guard of pioneers, and located upon the farm in Donegal township, known as the DUFFY homestead, where he resided until his death, in July, 1823, aged sixty-nine years. In a notice of his death published in the Repository, August 1, 1823, the following tribute is paid to his memory: "The deceased was among the first settlers of this county; as a father he was tender, as a husband, industrious, careful and affectionate, and as a neighbor he was highly respected and esteemed." His wife, Ellen DUFFY, survived him two years, dying in 1825, aged sixty-five. They were the parents of four sons and five daughters, as follows: Edward, who died in 1799, aged seventeen years, being one of the first persons buried in Butler county; John, who died in 1864, aged eighty years; Peter, who died in 1883, aged eighty-six years; Michael, who died in 1823, aged twenty-one; Barbara, who married Lieut. Neal GILLESPIE, an officer in the War of 1812, and died in 1875, aged eighty-seven years; Bridget, who married Patrick DUFFY, and died in 1855, aged sixty-two; Ellen, who died unmarried, in 1855, aged fifty-nine; Mary, who died in infancy, and Margaret, who married Col. Manasses GILLESPIE, and died in 1871, aged sixty-seven years. Charles DUFFY, Sr., was one of the founders of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and in politics, he was a Jeffersonian Democrat.

PHILIP HARTMAN, a native of Holland, settled near Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, prior to the Revolution. He enlisted in Colonel OGLE'S regiment, of the Pennsylvania Line, and served throughout the struggle for independence. His brother Michael also served in the Continental army, and subsequently settled in Manor township, Armstrong county. Prior to 1796 Philip HARTMAN came to what is now Oakland township, Butler county, and took up 200 acres of land, upon which he lived for several years, dying in Armstrong county. His family consisted of the following children: James; William; Sarah, who married Richard CONNELL; Kate, who became the wife of James COCHRAN; Mary, who married Edward BOLAND; Margaret, who married John BELL, and Elizabeth. The family were adherents of the Catholic church.

WILLIAM HARTMAN, second son of Philip HARTMAN, was born on his father's homestead, in Oakland township, Butler county, July 4, 1796, and is said to have [p. 946] been the first white male child born in the township. He resided with his parents until his majority, then went to Pittsburg, learned the blacksmith's trade and worked there some four years. He married Mary WINTERS, and settled in Armstrong county, but in 1849 they removed to Donegal township, Butler county, where he continued to work at his trade in connection with farming until his death, February 14, 1879. His wife died September 10, 1864. Their union was blessed with the following children: Catherine, who married John HOLOBAUGH; Mary Ann, who became the wife of William HOLOBAUGH; Joseph; James; Margaret A., wife of Silas DUNN; Sarah Frances, who died at the age of eighteen years; Edward F.; William Lawrence, and John Ambrose, the last two of whom died in childhood. The parents were members of the Catholic church, in which faith they reared their children.

ARCHIBALD BLACK, Sr., the progenitor of the BLACK family of this township, was a native of Donegal county, Ireland, and inherited those fundamental principles of industry, economy and determination of purpose so characteristic of the Irish race. Becoming impressed with the bright prospects of the New World, he left the associations of kindred and home, and immigrated to Pennsylvania, where he found employment in the iron mills at Carlisle. There he married Alice HAGGERTY, also a native of Donegal county, Ireland, who like himself, had come to seek her fortune in the New World. In 1798 Mr. BLACK came to Donegal township, Butler county, and located on a tract of land in the southern part of the township, and in 1809 took out a patent, in conjunction with Archibald McCALL, on 400 acres. The young couple located upon their new purchase, and, with hopes bright for the future, set about clearing and improving the place, hewing out from the wilderness which surrounded their humble log cabin, a home for themselves and their children. They were among the first settlers, and bravely endured the privations and overcame the obstacles of frontier life. The pioneers had ample opportunity to indulge their love for hunting, as wild game was plentiful, and roamed at will through the forests. While the husband and father was busy in the clearing, the housewife, when not assisting him by piling the brush, would be working at her loom, weaving the flax and wool into blankets and clothing for the family. Money was a very scarce article in those days, the system of exchange being the basis of nearly every transaction. The products of the farm would be taken to market, many miles distant, on a pack-saddle, and exchanged for salt, sugar and other necessaries of life. Archibald BLACK was a man for the times, one of those ready, earnest souls that a new and wild country always develops, that are equal to any emergency, prepared to face any danger and confront any hardships that may arise. He was a representative citizen of the period, taking an active interest in any public enterprise for the improvement of his county, and the family have been highly instrumental in the development of Donegal township. Mr. BLACK and wife were practical members of the St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and reared their family in the faith of their fathers. He was a stanch Democrat, and took an active and leading part in the public affairs of his day. Both he and wife spent the remainder of their lives upon the homestead in Donegal township, and now lie side by side in the cemetery at Sugar Creek. They reared the following chil-[p. 947] dren: James; Daniel; John; Mary; Ellen; Peggy; Patrick; Nancy; Catherine; Alice, and Archibald. Of this family but two survive, viz.: Catherine, wife of John SHIELDS, of Armstrong county, and Archibald, a resident of Donegal township.

ARCHIBALD BLACK, Jr., youngest son of Archibald and Alice BLACK, was born upon the old homestead in Donegal township, Butler county, in October, 1820, and is the youngest in the family of eleven children. He spent his boyhood days upon the farm, assisting his parents in clearing and improving it, wearing the home-made clothing, and enjoying the limited advantages of the period. For a few weeks during the winter season he attended the subscription school of the neighborhood, held in a little log building, with the rudest furnishings and accommodations. But this school house was a fair sample of the majority of the buildings throughout Butler county during pioneer days. On April 19, 1842, Mr. BLACK married Catherine McBRIDE, a daughter of Connell and Queen McBRIDE, early settlers of Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, where Mrs. BLACK was born in October, 1818. The young couple settled on the old homestead, and two years later rented the farm where they now reside, which they afterwards purchased, to which they have added until the farm now contains 800 acres, all in Donegal township. Upon this farm are located forty-one oil wells, and the small log cabin in which Mr. BLACK and wife first lived has been replaced by a more commodious structure of brick. They are the parents of the following children: Owen F., born May 26, 1844; James, August 13, 1846, died January 5, 1888; John, January 26, 1850; Daniel, February 23, 1853, and Mary A., January 2, 1857. Mr. BLACK and family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek. Politically, he is a Democrat, and formerly took an active part in politics. He has held the offices of assessor, collector and constable, and has always manifested a deep interest in the success of the measures and principles of his party. The family are among the most prominent in the township, and are recognized as progressive, enterprising people.

OWEN F. BLACK, eldest in the family of Archibald and Catherine BLACK, was born upon the homestead farm in Donegal township, Butler county, May 26, 1844, grew to maturity under the parental roof, and received his education in the district school. On June 16, 1868, he married Mary J. MINOR, of Armstrong county, and settled upon a farm in Donegal township. Mrs. BLACK died June 20, 1872, the mother of two children, viz.: Archie, and Stephen, both of whom died in infancy. Mr. BLACK was again married, October 14, 1875, to Theresa BURNS, of Donegal township, to which union have been born three children, as follows: Bessie; Vincent, and Catherine. The family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek. Politically, Mr. BLACK is a Democrat, and is one of the leading farmers of his township.

JOHN BLACK, third son of Archibald and Alice BLACK, was born September 10, 1802, upon the homestead farm in Donegal township, Butler county, and was reared amidst pioneer surroundings. He married Elizabeth McELROY, of Donegal township, and reared eight children, as follows: Alice, wife of Charles WEBBER; Margaret, deceased wife of Joseph HARTMAN; Patrick; Mary J.; James; Archibald; John F., and Matilda, wife of John McLAUGHLIN. Mr. BLACK was a prom-[p. 948] inent citizen of South Buffalo township, Armstrong county, where he settled after his marriage, and spent the remainder of his life upon his farm in that county. He was a member of the Catholic church, and a stanch adherent of the Democratic party.

ARCHIBALD BLACK, son of John and Elizabeth BLACK, was born in Armstrong county, May 16, 1841, spent his boyhood days upon the farm with his parents, and attended the public school of his native township. He married Miss Catherine MALEY, of Armstrong county, and subsequently located in Donegal township, Butler county. They are the parents of six children, as follows: James; William; Stephen; John; Charles E., and Francis, deceased. The family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and in politics, Mr. BLACK is an ardent Democrat. He is one of the leading farmers and oil producers of his section of the county.

JAMES BLACK, son of John and Elizabeth BLACK, was born May 16, 1841, upon the old homestead in Armstrong county, grew to maturity beneath the parental roof, and was educated at the district school. In 1879 he located upon his present farm, a part of the homestead, and has greatly improved it by the erection of substantial buildings. He is one of the leading farmers of his township, and devotes considerable attention to the breeding of fine stock. He is also an oil producer, and is quite a prosperous business man. Politically, he is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek.

JOHN F. BLACK, son of John and Elizabeth BLACK, was born in South Buffalo township, Armstrong county, September 16, 1843, and grew to manhood upon his father's farm. He was educated in the district school of that period, and remained with his parents until November 25, 1879, when he married Mary GRAHAM, a daughter of John and Sarah GRAHAM, of Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, and located on a part of the old homestead. In 1891 he purchased his present fram [sic] of 100 acres, which contains one of the finest residences in the township, finished in modern style and architecture. Mrs. BLACK was born January 13, 1860, and is the mother of seven children, as follows: Jerome, born April 12, 1880; Henry, March 29, 1882; Albertus, September 3, 1883; Joseph, October 27, 1885; Leo, October 7, 1890; John, July 16, 1892, died the following month, and Walter, June 11, 1893. The family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek. Politically, Mr. Black is a stanch Democrat, and is quite active in the interests of his party. Besides cultivating his farm, he is also interested in oil producing, and is one of the substantial citizens of Donegal township.

JOHN SLATOR, the progenitor of the SLATOR family in Butler county, was a native of Alsace (then belonging to France), Germany. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in Rochambeau's army, and came to America to participate in the Revolutionary war. He served in that memorable struggle under Lafayette, for four years, as a cavalry man, his term of service closing with the end of the war. He was present at the framing of the Constitution of the United States, and was one of the few men who witnessed the signing of that famous document. After the close of the war he concluded to remain in America, and some years [p. 949] later came to Butler county and took up a claim of 200 acres, where the station of St. Joe now stands, and now known as the Martin farm. He erected a little log cabin on his claim, and with wild animals and Indians as his nearest and most numerous neighbors, began the work of clearing and improving his place. Mr. SLATOR removed to Clarion county some years later, where he resided a few years, then returned to Butler county, and made his home with his son Henry, near St. Joe, until his death. He was a pioneer member of the Catholic church in Butler county, and is buried in the old Catholic cemetery at Butler. His wife, Catherine, died in Clarion county. Their children were as follows: John; Jacob; Henry; Christopher, and a daughter who died in childhood.

HENRY SLATOR, Sr., third child of John and Catherine SLATOR, was born in Donegal township, (now Oakland), Butler county, and there grew to maturity. He married Susan Ann DUNBAR, a daughter of Samuel DUNBAR, a native of Ireland, who came to Butler county in the last decade of the Eighteenth century. The following children were born to this union: Mary, who married Thomas DODSON, and died in Clarion county; Samuel, of Donegal township; John, deceased; Peter, of Millerstown; Elizabeth, deceased wife of John SAGASER; Susan, wife of Cornelius HALL, of Clarion county; Agnes, wife of James SHERKEY, a resident of New York; Magdalena, wife of Jacob GOODYEAR, of Pittsburg; Margaret, wife of John McCREADY, of Clearfield township, and Ellen, who died at the age of twelve years. Mrs. SLATOR died in Donegal township, where the family had settled soon after marriage, and her husband married Eva KEISTLER. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, in which he served as a corporal in Captain BRINKER'S company. He died in Clearfield township.

SAMUEL SLATOR, eldest living child of Henry and Susan SLATOR, was born upon the homestead farm, July 16, 1817, and was reared during pioneer times and privations. In 1836 he married Margaret RANSIL, a native of Westmoreland county, born October 11, 1819, and a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (TOPPER) RANSIL, both natives of Westmoreland county, and a granddaughter of Valentine RANSIL, a Revolutionary soldier. When three years of age she came with her parents to Butler county and both died here, her father at the age of eighty-four, and her mother aged eighty-two. After their marriage Mr. SLATOR and wife settled on a tract of land in Donegal township, a part of the RANSIL homestead, and have since resided in this township. Six children are the fruits of their marriage, viz.: Henry, who died in infancy; Elizabeth, wife of Sebastian WILSON, of Venango county; Susan, wife of James DELANEY, of Armstrong county; John W., of Donegal township; Mary Ann, and Margaret J., who died at the age of twelve years. Mr. SLATOR and wife are one of the oldest couples in the township, and both are in the enjoyment of good health. They are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and politically, he is a stanch Democrat.

JOHN W. SLATOR, only living son of Samuel and Margaret SLATOR, was born in Donegal township, Butler county, October 25, 1846. He grew to maturity upon the homestead farm, and attended the district school of the neighborhood. On June 4, 1867, he married Sarah F. WILSON, of Donegal township, settled in that township and has since devoted his attention to agriculture. They are the parents of the following children: Samuel M.; Sebastian D.; Emma Isabel; Stephen A.; [p. 950] William J.; Stella M., and Joseph F. The family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and politically, Mr. SLATOR is ardent Democrat.

HENRY SLATOR, son of Jacob SLATOR, and grandson of John SLATOR, was born on the farm yet owned by his descendants, in Summit township, Butler county, in 1816. His father was a native of Clearfield township, and his grandfather was one of the early settlers of the county. Henry was reared on a farm, and after attaining his majority he settled in Oakland township, where he died in 1849, aged thirty-three years. He married Mary O'DONNELL, a daughter of Connell O'DONNELL, an early settler. They had a family of two sons and one daughter, viz.: James, who died at the age of eighteen; Jacob, and Catherine, who married Jacob GRAHAM, and died in 1867. Henry SLATOR's widow married a Mr. CALLEN, and is now living with her son. Mr. SLATOR was a member of the Catholic church, to which denomination his widow belongs.

JACOB SLATOR, son of Henry and Mary SLATOR, was born on his present homestead in Oakland township, and was educated in the public schools and at Witherspoon Institute. He has always followed farming, and inherited the old homestead settled by his father. He married Kate LANGRAFF, a daughter of Conrad LANGRAFF. She was born in Germany, but came to Butler county with her parents in childhood. Four children have been born to this union, viz.: Augusta; Jennie; Charles, and Fronie. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland. Mr. SLATOR is a Democrat, and has filled several of the minor offices in his township.

CONNELL O'DONNELL was one of the first settlers of what is now Clearfield township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he located in 1798. He was a native of Donegal county, Ireland, was there married, and subsequently immigrated with his family to the United States. He erected his cabin in the midst of the primitive forest, his neighbors being principally natives of Ireland. The township in which he lived, upon the organization of Butler county, was named Donegal, because of the large number of its inhabitants who came from that county in their native land. Connell became quite a famous hunter, and supported his family from the fruits of the chase, together with what little he could raise on a small patch of ground which the family cleared the first few years of their settlement. The father died in 1813, leaving to his wife, Mary, the care of a family of eight children. She, however, was equal to the occasion, and with the assistance of her children, cleared and improved the farm, and resided thereon until her death. They were pioneer members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek.

DENNIS O'DONNELL, a younger brother of Connell O'DONNELL, was born in Ireland, and came with his brother's family to Butler county. He married Margaret McAVEA, a native of Westmoreland county, and settled in a small log cabin on a tract of land in Donegal township, where they resided until the death of Mrs. O'DONNELL, about 1821. She left a family of seven children, viz.: Edward, who resides in Venango county; James; Patrick; Connell; John; Michael, and Peter, all of whom are dead excepting Edward and John. For his second wife, Mr. O'DONNELL married Nancy McGINLEY, of Armstrong county, to which union were born seven children, viz.: Charles; Dennis; Ellen; [p. 951] Bridget A.; Frank; Catherine, and one that died in infancy. Frank, of Oakland township, is the only survivor of this family. Mr. O'DONNELL died February 22, 1852, in his seventy-eighth year, and was interred in the Catholic cemetery at Butler, to which church the family belong. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, and a stanch adherent of the Democratic party. His widow died at the age of eighty-four years.

JOHN O'DONNELL, son of Dennis and Margaret (McAVEA) O'DONNELL, was born in Donegal township, Butler county, April 28, 1816, and spent his boyhood days upon the farm, surrounded by the limited advantages which that period afforded. He likes to recall now many incidents of early times, and relates many amusing tales of that period. He wore the coarse homespun clothing, and attended the subscription schools, with rude furnishings, and endured the many privations connected with pioneer life. At the age of sixteen he left home and secured employment upon the canal, then in course of construction, at Franklin, Venango county. At the age of twenty years he went to Allegheny county, where he worked at farming and contracting. In 1840 he purchased and located on a farm in Clearfield township. It was unimproved, and he erected a small log cabin, cutting the timber near its site, and completing it in three and a half days. In 1839 he married Ellen DUFFY, a daughter of Edward DUFFY, who died in 1842, leaving one daughter, Margaret. She afterwards became the wife of James McLAUGHLIN, and has since died. In 1844 he married Catherine SLATOR, a daughter of Jacob SLATOR, to which union was born one son, Michael, who died in childhood. Mr. O'DONNELL resided upon his original purchase until 1857, when he settled upon his present farm, a portion of the original O'Donnell lands, which he purchased after the death of his father. Here he has since made his home, and is one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Donegal township. His wife died in August, 1885. She was a life-long member of the Catholic church, to which Mr. O'DONNELL also belongs, and he has always been a liberal contributor towards its support. In politics, he has been a Democrat since casting his first vote, and has served as supervisor and overseer of the poor.

GABRIEL PONTIUS came to Butler county when a young man, and located in Donegal township about 1803. He was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1786, and after coming to Butler county, he married Mary BARNHART, of Donegal township, subsequently purchased a tract of 200 acres, erected a log cabin and began the work of making a home. The country was then comparatively a wilderness, and some time after settling in Donegal township, Mr. PONTIUS established a small pottery, which business he followed for nearly thirty years, making many of the dishes and much of the pottery used by the pioneers of that locality. His patrons sometimes paid for their ware by working on his farm, while he was engaged in the pottery. He died upon the homestead in 1872, and his wife in 1875, aged eighty-eight years. They were the parents of eight children, as follows: Elizabeth, deceased wife of George ELLENBERGER, of Armstrong county; John, deceased, who resided in Donegal township; William, a resident of Armstrong county; Polly, deceased, who married John F. WILES; Solomon, who lives upon the old homestead; Catherine, deceased, who married [p. 952] Abraham BARNHART; Hannah, deceased wife of Henry WILES, and Phoebe, wife of Charles SCHWARTZLANDER, a resident of Fairview township. Mr. PONTIUS was a prominent Democrat, and held various township offices, such as assessor, supervisor, collector and school director. He took an active interest in educational matters and labored zealously to secure the introduction of the public schools in his township.

SOLOMON PONTIUS, fifth child of Gabriel and Mary (BARNHART) PONTIUS, was born in Donegal township, Butler county, December 13, 1819. He spent his boyhood days upon the farm, assisting his father in clearing the land, and working in the pottery. Dressed in the home-made clothing of the period, he would often pull the flax and break and scutch the same, and then assist his mother in spinning and weaving it into clothing and blankets upon the home loom. The usual mode of going to mill was on horseback, with a pack saddle, across which he would place the sack of grain. He attended for a few weeks during the winter season the early subscription schools, when the little log school house with puncheon floors, and benches split from logs, was the best the times afforded. Mr. PONTIUS remained with his parents until twenty-three years of age, when he took charge of the homestead farm, his parents making their home with him until their death. In 1842 he married Mary KING, a native of Armstrong county. She died in 1843, leaving no children. On April 27, 1845, he married Margaret MYERS, a native of Westmoreland county, born August 22, 1822. Her parents, Frederick and Susannah MYERS, came from Westmoreland county to Sugar Creek in 1826, and resided here the remainder of their lives. She, too, was reared amidst pioneer surroundings, and experienced the usual trials and hardships of that period. Five children are the fruits of this union, viz.: John W., born August 14, 1846, now pastor of the German Reformed church, at Martinsburg, Blair county; Susannah, born June 4, 1848, died in December, 1861; Caroline, born August 23, 1851, died July 29, 1882; Mary Catherine, born May 19, 1856, wife of Dr. C. F. DAUBENSPECK, of Crawford county, and Solomon Isaiah, born October 7, 1861, married Sarah Catherine SOMMERVILLE, of Armstrong county, and has five children. He resides with his parents upon the old homestead. Mr. PONTIUS and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Millerstown, in which he has filled several official positions, and for twenty years was superintendent of the Sabbath school. He was formerly a member of the German Reformed church, and was an elder in that society for a long period. Politically, a Democrat, he has been active in local politics the greater part of his life. For nearly forty years he has served as justice of the peace, and is still holding that office. He has also filled the offices of supervisor, assessor, and school director, the last mentioned for eighteen years, seventeen of which he was secretary of the board. 'Squire PONTIUS owns the old homesterd [sic] of 200 acres, also another farm in the same township of sixty-two acres, besides 111 acres in Trumbull county, Ohio. He is one of the successful farmers of the county, and is an extensive oil producer. Few men in the community have won and retained to a greater degree the esteem and confidence of the people, and throughout his long residence in Donegal township, he has been recognized as a public-spirited and progressive citizen.
[p. 953]

JOHN PONTIUS, eldest son of Gabriel and Mary (BARNHART) PONTIUS, was born in Donegal township, Butler county, December 25, 1812. He was reared upon the old homestead, and married Mary m. WILES, a daughter of Frederick WILES, who came from eastern Pennsylvania at an early day and settled in Donegal township, Butler county, afterwards serving as a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. PONTIUS settled in Armstrong county after his marriage, resided there eight years, and then returned to Donegal township, where he died January 22, 1892. His widow still survives him. She was born July 14, 1820, and reared a family of eleven children, nine of whom are still living as follows: Gabriel, of Donegal township; Susan, wife of John KAYLOR, of Fairview township; Caroline, wife of J. J. CRAWFORD, of Millerstown; Phoebe, wife of William KEPPLE, of Armstrong county; William, a resident of Donegal township; Mary, wife of Robert TAYLOR, of Clearfield county; Samuel W., who resides in Pittsburg; John Henry, and George W., both residents af [sic] Donegal township.

JOHN HENRY PONTIUS, son of John and Mary M. PONTIUS, was born in Donegal township, Butler county, February 5, 1859, was reared upon the farm and received his education in the public schools. On September 1, 1881, he married Ada BURFORD, a daughter of Reuben BURFORD, of Armstrong county. They resided in Beaver Falls for some time, where Mr. PONTIUS worked in an iron mill, and later located on their present homestead in Donegal township. He owns a well improved farm of 100 acres, with oil and gas production. They are the parents of two children: Sidney Easton, and Myrell Reid. Mr. PONTIUS is an active Republican, and, though living in a township strongly Democratic, has been elected to various offices, all of which he filled in a highly creditable manner. Mr. PONTIUS and wife are members of Mt. Pleasant English Lutheran church, and liberal contributors towards that organization. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P., also of the K. O. T. M.

CASPER RITZERT was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, in 1795, grew to maturity in his native land, and there married Margaret REISLER. In 1832 he came to the United States, accompanied by his wife and four children: Harmon, Conrad, Katharine and John. They landed in Baltimore, after a voyage of forty-two days, and, after a short stay in that city, went to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, whence they came to Butler county, the journey being made overland in wagons, camping at night in the forest along the road. Mr. RITZERT purchased a tract of wild land in what is now Oakland township, erected a log cabin and set about clearing off the primitive forest. He resided in Oakland township until his death, in 1860. His wife survived him twenty-four years, dying October 23, 1884, in the eighty-first year of her age. They were the parents of seven sons and five daughters, and the whole family were members of St. Peter's Catholic church, at Butler.

CONRAD RITZERT, the second son of Casper and Margaret RITZERT, was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, June 24, 1825, and was seven years old when his parents immigrated to Pennsylvania. He was reared amidst the privations and dangers of pioneer days, and his first home in Butler county was a small log cabin, built of round logs, and even while he was still a boy he assisted his father in clearing the farm, by piling and burning the brush. His clothes [p. 954] were made of the home-made cloth, and his education was acquired in the subscription school of the neighborhood, held in a small log building, with puncheon floor and benches, and a huge fireplace in one end. The plowing was done with oxen, the grain sown by hand, reaped with a sickle, and threshed with a flail. At the age of fourteen, Conrad went to work in a tannery, grinding bark, and when he reached his eighteenth year he commenced learning the tanner's trade, with Conrad ROESSING, at Butler, with whom he served an apprenticeship, and afterwards worked for Mr. ROESSING for five years. He subsequently went to Brady's Bend, and worked in the iron mills there in various capacities, saving enough from his wages to start himself in the tannery business at Worthington. He sold out the tannery and in 1854 settled on his present farm in Donegal township, Butler county, which he had purchased some time previously while he was following his trade in Kittanning. Mr. RITZERT was married July 15, 1847, to Elizabeth WINDISHEE, a native of Austria, born June 8, 1828. She came to the United States with her sister, when eighteen years of age, and was married the following year. When Mr. RITZERT and wife settled on their farm in Donegal township, the place was comparatively unimproved, their first dwelling being a small log cabin. The times were hard, and they enjoyed but few advantages. Mrs. RITZERT spun the wool and flax used in weaving clothing and blankets for the use of her family, and with the aid of her children conducted the farm while her husband would be away working at his trade. By such industry and rigid economy they accumulated through the passing years a comfortable competence, and now own over 400 acres of fine land containing good oil production, with substantial buildings, and other necessary improvements. They are the parents of six children, viz.: Harmon, and John, both residents of Donegal township; Mary E., wife of Joseph GRAHAM; Joseph G., of Oakland township; Adam, who resides with his parents, and Maggie, wife of Jacob CRAMER. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, at North Oakland, and politically, Mr. RITZERT is an ardent Democrat. Mr. RITZERT is one of the leading farmers of the county, and the family are respected and esteemed by the community. When he commenced farming in Donegal township, his capital was small, but he possessed plenty of energy, a robust constitution, and a rugged determination to succeed. Both he and his wife endured many of the privations of pioneer days, but they have lived to see their family grown up, and are now surrounded by the comforts and enjoyments of life.

JOHN RITZERT, son of Conrad and Elizabeth RITZERT, was born in Kittanning, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1850. He was only four years old when his parents settled in Donegal township, where he grew to manhood, assisting his father in the farm duties. He received a common school education, and at the age of twenty years became an apprentice with Mr. KEMPER, at the harness maker's trade, and served three years. He afterwards followed his trade at Millerstown as a journeyman, and continued at the same business until 1879, when he located on his present homestead in Donegal township, and has since been engaged in general farming. In 1878 he married Catherine CRAMER, a daughter of Jacob CRAMER, to which union have been born the following children: Annie; Albert; Daniel; Barbara; Catherine; Norbert, and Edward. The family are members [p. 955] of St. Joseph's Catholic church, at North Oakland. Mr. RITZERT is a stanch Democrat, and in 1887 he was elected constable, assessor and collector, and still holds the two last mentioned offices.

JOSEPH G. RITZERT, third son of Conrad and Elizabeth RITZERT, was born upon the homestead farm in Donegal township, June 10, 1856. He there grew to manhood, and attended the common schools of his district during the winter seasons. He remained with his parents until his marriage to Philomena CRAMER, February 13, 1877. She is the daughter of Jacob and Barbara CRAMER, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and came in infancy to Clearfield township with her parents, where her father still resides. Soon after his marriage, Mr. RITZERT settled on his present homestead in Oakland township, which is a well improved farm of 209 acres. He is the father of seven children, named as follows: Mary Margaret; Barbara Elizabeth; Emma C.; Louis Joseph; Clara Philomena; William L., deceased, and Esther Ann. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland, and in politics, Mr. RITZERT is a Democrat. He is one of the substantial, enterprising and progressive farmers of the community.

JOHN VENSEL'S biography finds a fitting place among the records of Donegal township, Butler county, for he was one of the most honored and progressive citizens of the community throughout his residence therein. He was endowed by nature with a powerful frame, a strong intellect, undaunted courage, and a spirit of enterprise that fitted him to encounter the perils and hardships of pioneer days. John was the fifth child in a family of twelve children, born to Barney and Hannah VENSEL, of Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, where he was born October 26, 1823. The family were early settlers of that locality, and our subject was schooled in the privations of the times. His boyhood days were spent upon the farm in assisting his parents with the home duties, wearing his coarse, homespun clothing, the cloth for which he would oft times assist his mother to weave upon the little home loom. His educational advantages were limited to a few weeks attendance at a subscription school of his neighborhood, when the log school house, with its rude furnishings of puncheon flooring, slab benches, and huge fireplace, was the only academy the times afforded. Among the incidents of his early days is the fact that he assisted his father in hauling the timber used in the construction of the first iron mill at Brady's Bend. These early struggles of the pioneers made a lasting impression upon their after lives. It was the schooling of nature, the fire that separated the gold from the dross, and it may truly be said, that in the privations endured in his youth by John VENSEL, and in the obstacles he fearlessly met and surmounted, was laid the foundations for the resolute determination, the tireless energy, and the rugged integrity, which marked his after life. On January 17, 1847, he was united in marriage with Catherine DAUBENSPECK, a daughter of John and Mary (KISSENGER) DAUBENSPECK, born October 24, 1824. To this union were born the following children: Alfred; Richard; Mary J., wife of J. J. PORTERFIELD; Charles Finley; Washington H.; Sarah A., wife of A. H. CHRISTY; William M.; Isaiah, deceased, and George. Mr. VENSEL resided in Armstrong county until 1853, in which year he purchased a farm in Fairview township, Butler county, and resided thereon down to 1868, [p. 956] when he bought and located on a farm in Donegal township, which he at once commenced to improve. His efforts were crowned with success, and the little log cabin in which they first resided was replaced by a more commodious and handsome residence. Here he was spending the sunset of his days, surrounded by comfort and enjoyment when death entered the happy home, and on August 3, 1893, Mr. VENSEL was called to a higher and better home. He had long been a faithful member of St. Paul's Reformed church, at Oak Grove, and his life was a good example of christian manhood. He possessed a generous, genial disposition, and won friends wherever he went. As a citizen he was public-spirited, and a champion of every public improvement for the benefit of his county and community. Although denied the advantages of a thorough education, he was a careful reader and a man of sound judgment, and in public affairs his counsel was invited and accepted upon important occasions. He was a man of pronounced opinions, and possessed the courage of his convictions, although towards those differing from him he was considerate, treating them with deference and respect. Politically, he was a stanch Democrat, and served in various positions of trust and honor in his township, all of which he filled to the satisfaction of the community. In his home he was a model father, and as a neighbor, kind and obliging. He left his children the bright legacy of an untarnished name, and died regretted and esteemed by all who knew him.

RICHARD VENSEL is one of the well known producers in the Millerstown field. He is a son of John and Catherine VENSEL, and was born in Fairview township, Butler county, December 16, 1849. He grew to maturity upon the homestead farm, and received a common school education. About 1877 he began as a contractor in the oil region, and has put down and operated many wells in the Millerstown field. He has applied himself diligently to his business, and by energy and shrewd business tact he has acquired a handsome competence. Mr. VENSEL was married June 16, 1873, to Miss Martha P. CHRISTY. She was born November 24, 1852, and died May 16, 1877, leaving one child, Edward C. He was again married, May 3, 1879, to Miss Eva A. DUFF, a native of Winfield township, Butler county, born May 30, 1858. She died November 16, 1884, leaving one son, Howard J. On December 29, 1887, Mr. VENSEL married Miss Mollie MORROW, a daughter, of Robert MORROW of Donegal township. This union has been blessed by six children, three of whom survive, viz.: Ross Alfred; Lena, and Norman Augustus. He and wife are members of St. Paul's Reformed church, at Oak Grove. Politically, Mr. VENSEL is an unswerving Republican, and takes an active interest in political affairs.

CHARLES FINLEY VENSEL, son of John and Catherine VENSEL, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, January 1, 1853, and came with his parents in early childhood to Fairview township, and later to Donegal township, Butler county, where he grew to maturity upon his father's farm. He afterwards engaged in the oil fields as a rig builder, and later as a driller, and followed this business a number of years. In 1889 he located upon his present farm, which he has greatly improved by the erection of a substantial house and other buildings. Mr. VENSEL was for some time engaged in the livery business at Millerstown, and devotes considerable attention to stock raising. In 1875 he married Estella RUM- [p. 957] BAUGH, of Armstrong county, who died in 1878, leaving one son, Charles Leslie. On June 7, 1880, he married Margaret C. RUMBAUGH, to whom have been born six children, viz.: Clarence P., deceased; Malvina E.; Anita G.; Everett A.; Lucillia, and Ivy Irene. The family are connected with St. Paul's Reformed church. Politically, Mr. VENSEL is a Democrat, and in 1891, was elected township auditor. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, K. of P., in which he is vice chancellor. He is one of the well known and popular citizens of Donegal township.

WASHINGTON H. VENSEL, son of John and Catherine VENSEL, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, November 28, 1854, and settled with his parents upon the homestead in Donegal township, where he grew to manhood. In the spring of 1876 he went to Champaign county, Illinois, and engaged at farming, but soon returned to Pennsylvania, where he embarked in the oil industry with his brothers, to which he has since devoted his entire attention. In 1882 he married Ada G. BROOKS, of McKean county, daughter of A. J. BROOKS, a prominent oil producer of that county. They have one son, Harry Ralph. In 1892 Mr. VENSEL removed from Bradford to Millerstown, where he has since resided. He is a member of the K. O. T. M., and one of the enterprising citizens of the borough.

WILLIAM M. VENSEL was born in Fairview township, Butler county, October 27, 1858, son of John and Catherine VENSEL, and was ten years old when his parents located in Donegal township. He grew to maturity upon the homestead farm, received a good common school education, and at the age of twenty-one he embarked in the oil business in McKean county, and has since devoted his attention to contracting and producing, in which he has been quite successful. On December 29, 1887, Mr. VENSEL married Minnia A. BARNHART, a daughter of A. W. BARNHART, of Butler township. They are the parents of three children, viz.: Charles F.; William Arthur, and Nora Florence. In politics, Mr. VENSEL is a stanch Democrat. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P.; also of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M. He is recognized as one of the progressive, public-spirited and enterprising business men of the community.

BARNEY VENSEL was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, second child of John and Christina (RICE) VENSEL, natives of eastern Pennsylvania, who came to Armstrong county at an early day, where they died at a ripe old age. They were the parents of five sons and three daughters, all of whom are dead. Barney grew to manhood in his native county, and married Hannah HARMON, a native of eastern Pennsylvania, who came to Armstrong county with her parents, Peter and Christina HARMON. The young couple settled upon a farm in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, where both resided until their death. Mr. VENSEL died in 1848, aged fifty-nine years, and his wife, in 1867, aged eighty-four years. They were the parents of twelve children, viz.: Christina, deceased wife of Henry HYLE; Polly, wife of Peter HYLE; Catherine, deceased wife of Michael MYERS; Eliza, who died in childhood; John, deceased; Peter, who resides on the old homestead; Susan, wife of Adam MYERS; Joseph, a resident of Donegal township; Sarah, deceased wife of Jacob TROUTMAN; Barney, of Armstrong [p. 958] county; George, who lives upon the homestead farm, and Margaret, also a resident of the old home.

JOSEPH VENSEL, eighth child of Barney and Hannah VENSEL, was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, April 1, 1831, and was reared a farmer. He attended the pioneer subscription schools, in a small log building, with puncheon floor, split log seats, single desk, and a large fireplace in each end of the building. The United States spelling book and old English reader were two of the books used during this period. At the age of twenty-two, Mr. VENSEL went to Brady's Bend, and in 1853, married Lydia MYERS, a daughter of Frederick and Susannah MYERS. She was born in Westmoreland county, October 3, 1825, and was only one year old when her parents located in Armstrong county. Mr. VENSEL rented a farm in Armstrong county, where he resided until 1858, and then settled upon his present homestead in Donegal township, Butler county, which was partially improved. They are the parents of seven children, viz.: Susannah, wife of Lewis SNYDER; Jacob S., of Donegal township; Sarah E.; Margaret, wife of William DAVID; George, who resides at home; Joseph I., of Millerstown, and John, who lives with his parents. The family are connected with St. Paul's Reformed church of Oak Grove. Mr. VENSEL is a Democrat, and has filled the offices of supervisor and director.

JAMES RODGERS, a native of Pittsburg, came to Armstrong county at an early day. He married Nancy McELROY, a native of Clearfield township, Butler county, and a daughter of Hugh McELROY, who came from Donegal county, Ireland, and entered 400 acres of land on the line of Butler and Armstrong counties, where he was one of the first settlers. Mr. RODGERS and wife resided successively in Armstrong county, Beaver county, and Harmony, Butler county, until 1840, when he leased a farm in Donegal township, and later purchased a tract of land upon which he resided down to his death, in 1849. His wife died at Harmony, in 1826, and he married for his second wife Bridget BOYLE. He was the father of four children by his first marriage, as follows: George, of Donegal township; Margaret, deceased wife of Daniel BOYLE; John, and Thomas.

JOHN RODGERS was born in Armstrong county, September 25, 1824, son of James and Nancy (McELROY) RODGERS. At the age of fifteen he began working in an iron furnace, subsequently chopped cordwood upon a farm, and then went to Clarion county, where he worked in the ore mines. He came to Butler county with his father, whom he assisted in clearing and improving a home. When his father died the farm came into his possession. In 1852 he married Elizabeth BURNS, a daughter of Bernard BURNS, of Donegal township. Ten children have been born to this union, eight of whom are living, viz.: Bernard, of Ohio; John F., of Donegal township; Daniel, a resident of Pittsburg; Stephen, and Ann E., who reside with their parents; Rosalie, wife of James RABITT, of Donegal township; Margaret, wife of M. McGARVEY, of Noblestown, and Mary Belle, who lives at home. The family are connected with St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, of which Mr. RODGERS' parents were original members. Politically, he is a Democrat, and one of the enterprising farmers of the township. He is the owner of 230 acres of well improved land, upon which there are several producing wells.
[p. 959]

JOHN MORROW was born near Kittanning, Armstrong county, son of Thomas and Susan MORROW, natives of Donegal county, Ireland. He was reared in his native township, and married Isabella BOYD, a native of Monaghan county, Ireland, who came with her parents to the United States when four years of age, her mother dying on ship-board en voyage. The young couple located on a farm in Armstrong county, where they lived about twenty years, and then removed to Jefferson county. After a short residence in the latter county, they came to Butler county, in 1846, and purchased a farm in what is now Concord township, which they began improving. They spent the remainder of their lives thereon, Mrs. MORROW dying August 8, 1882, aged ninety-four years, and her husband, in November, 1888, aged ninety years. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: James, of Concord township; Susan, wife of James PHILLIPS; Elizabeth, wife of John FORSYTHE; John, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas; Robert, of Donegal township; Eleanor Jane, and William, the two last mentioned being dead.

ROBERT MORROW, youngest living child of John and Isabella MORROW, was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, May 1, 1833, removed to Jefferson county with his parents, and subsequently to Butler county when thirteen years of age. He spent his boyhood days upon a farm in Concord township, their first home in this county being a small log cabin. He wore the home-made clothes of the period, and attended the pioneer school of his neighborhood. On June 3, 1856, he married Eliza Catherine WHITMIRE, a daughter of John and Catherine (PAINTER) WHITMIRE, natives of Butler and Westmoreland counties, respectively. She was born in Centre township, Butler county, February 26, 1838, and was the sixth in a family of eight children. Mr. and Mrs. MORROW resided upon the MORROW homestead until 1870, when they settled on their present farm in Donegal township, which they had purchased the previous year. It contains 146 acres, upon which are located eight producing oil wells. He has erected good buildings, and has otherwise improved the property. They are the parents of nine children, viz.: John M.; Sarah Betty, wife of Z. DOUBLE; Lorenzo; Julia A., wife of John STOOPS; Mary C., wife of Richard VENSEL; Norman; Alice Jane; George, and Laura May. The family are connected with the English Lutheran church, of Millerstown. Although formerly a Republican, Mr. MORROW is now a stanch Prohibitionist. While a resident of Concord township, he served as supervisor, judge of election, and school director. He is one of the prosperous and enterprising farmers of the community.

GEORGE HENRY DIVENER was born in Prussia, Germany, September 3, 1801. He learned the linen weaver's trade in his native land, and followed it there until his immigration to this county. He was married October 25, 1830, to Dorothy Mary KAUFHOLD, a native of the same country, born June 23, 1809. In the spring of 1847 Mr. DIVENER, with his family, consisting of his wife and five children, came to the United States, and settled in Butler county, Pennsylvania, near Saxonburg. He followed farming and weaving for about two years, then went to Brady's Bend, where he continued working at his trade, and also engaged in mining. In March, 1858, he moved to Donegal township, Butler [p. 960] county, settled upon a farm he had purchased the year previous, and engaged in farming. He resided upon this place down to his death, which occurred June 7, 1868. His wife survived him until August 9, 1880. The names of their children are as follows: George H., deceased; John Frederick, a resident of East Brady; Charles, of Donegal township; William Edward, deceased, and Caroline E., wife of Lewis HARTENSTEIN. The parents were members of the German Lutheran church, and died in that faith.

CHARLES DIVENER, son of George H. and Dorothy Mary DIVENER, was born in Prussia, September 21, 1839, and was eight years old when his parents came to Butler county. He enjoyed good educational advantages in the schools of his native land and afterwards in Butler and Armstrong counties. When quite young he worked in the mines at Brady's Bend, and assisted his parents to support the family. After his father settled in Donegal township, Charles devoted his attention to clearing and improving the farm, and after the death of the former he conducted the farm for his mother. He subsequently began farming for himself, and later purchased the old homestead, upon which he now resides. It contains 101 acres of land, with good oil production, upon which he has erected a commodious residence and other buildings. He is one of the active workers in the Democratic party, and has served two terms as overseer of the poor. Mr. DIVENER was married February 22, 1870, to Mary E. FREDERICK, a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, who came to the United States with her parents, Leonard and Elizabeth FREDERICK. He and wife are members of the German Lutheran church, at Millerstown.

ZEPHANIAH DOUBLE, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, came to Butler county with his parents, John and Jane DOUBLE, in boyhood. They settled in what is now Brady township, and there the parents died. Zephaniah was reared in Brady township, and there married Elizabath SNYDER, and settled upon a farm. He subsequently removed to Warren county, lived there three years, and then returned to Bulter [sic] county, settling in Donegal township in 1864. Later he removed to Millerstown, where he died September 9, 1880. After his death Mrs. DOUBLE made her home with her son Joseph, and died October 1, 1887. Mr. DOUBLE was a Democrat, and filled the offices of assessor, collector, constable, and school director at various periods. He was the father of nine children, four of whom are living, as follows: Zephaniah, of Iowa; Prushey, and Joseph, both residents of Donegal township, and Mary Ann, wife of Thomas J. CARNAHAN, of Kansas.

PRUSHEY DOUBLE was born in Brady township, Butler county, March 22, 1835, was reared upon his father's farm, and received a common school education. On January 14, 1858, he married Elizabeth CARNAHAN, a daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth CARNAHAN. She was born in Westmoreland county, October 8, 1841, and is the mother of ten children, viz.: Zephaniah A., born August 20, 1859; Mary E., March 10, 1861; Sarah A., September 12, 1862; James L. January 4, 1865; Lucinda E., July 4, 1868; Prussia A., March 5, 1870; Harriet C., January 31, 1872; Thomas J., September 22, 1873; Annie C., February 9, 1876, died June 8, 1894, and Charles C., born February 1, 1878. After their marriage they located on a farm in Brady township, came to Donegal township in the fall of 1863, [p. 961] and settled upon his present farm in the spring of 1875, which he has since improved by the erection of substantial buildings. He is a stanch Republican, and has held various township offices.

JOSEPH DOUBLE, son of Zephaniah and Elizabeth DOUBLE, early settlers of Brady township, Butler county, was born in that subdivision, August 31, 1840, and remained with his parents, following the usual avocations of a farmer's life, until the Rebellion. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, attached to the First Corps of the Army of the Potomac. He served in the battles of Sugar Loaf Mountain, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, and was honorably discharged June 5, 1862. Returning to his home in Butler county, he was married to Lucinda HILGAR, November 16, 1862. She is a native of Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and the mother of eleven children, as follows: Peter R.; John H.; Zephaniah H.; Elizabeth E.; Joseph E.; William E.; Lucinda A.; James L.; Thomas L.; Jacob O., and Edward E. The family are members of the English Lutheran church of Millerstown. Mr. DOUBLE is a stanch Republican, and has served as school director. In March, 1863, they located upon their present homestead farm in Donegal township, which contains 137 acres of well improved land. For the past eighteen years he has been a contractor in building oil rigs, and has done a large business.

WILLIAM BROWNFIELD was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, April 11, 1833, son of William B. and Mary (QUINN) BROWNFIELD, early settlers of Armstrong county, where they resided until their death. His father died January 4, 1868, and his mother in 1873. They were members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, and are interred in the cemetery near that church. They were the parents of nine children, five of whom are still living. William remained at home until arriving at maturity, working with his father upon the farm during the summer, and attending school during the winter season. At the age of twenty-one he went to Wisconsin, and worked in the Black river pineries for nine years, a portion of which time he was rafting on the Mississippi. In 1864 he returned home, then went to Oil City and engaged in drilling oil wells. In 1872 he again returned to Armstrong county, and in 1875 purchased his present farm and settled upon it[sic] It contains 120 acres, upon which eight oil wells are located. Mr. BROWNFIELD was married November 26, 1868, to Mrs. Ellen Jane GRIFFIN, a daughter of Thomas and Catherine HAGGERTY. She was born in Venango county, December 21, 1841, married John GRIFFIN, and bore him a family of four children, as follows: Francis A.; Mary L.; Sarah Elizabeth, a graduate of the Philadelphia Training School, and now a professional nurse at Pittsburg, and Emma E. Mr. GRIFFIN died September 6, 1866. To William and Ellen Jane BROWNFIELD have been born seven children, viz.: William A., deceased; Martha E.; Margaret C.; Olive M.; James Harland; John Edgar, and Charles L., deceased. The family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek. In politics, Mr. BROWNFIELD is a Democrat, and has served as a member of the school board for three terms.

JAMES BROWNFIELD was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1835, and was one of a family of nine children born to [p. 962] William B. and Mary (QUINN) BROWNFIELD. His boyhood days were passed upon his father's farm, and he dressed in the coarse homespun clothing of the period; while his education was acquired in a small log school house, withrude [sic] furnishings, which he attended only for a few weeks in each year during the winter season. He assisted his father in the farm duties until he reached his maturity, and remained with him until his marriage. On July 7, 1872, he married Hannah CRAWFORD, and they took up their residence in East Brady, Clarion county. While making their home in that town, Mr. BROWNFIELD followed oil drilling in various fields, drilled the first well at Oil City, and later engaged in contracting. Mrs. BROWNFIELD is a native of Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, and a daughter of John and Sarah A. (VASBINDER) CRAWFORD. Her father was a native of Ireland, and came with his parents to America when a young man, settled in Armstrong county, and there married Sarah VASBINDER. Both resided in Armstrong county until their death, leaving a family of four sons and two daughters. Mr. CRAWFORD was a prominent citizen in his community, held various positions of trust, and both he and wife were respected members of the United Presbyterian church, at Middlesex. Mr. BROWNFIELD and wife removed from East Brady to Armstrong county, and in 1872 purchased and settled upon the farm in Donegal township, Butler county, where his widow and family now reside. He devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, was a leading and successful farmer of the township, and brought his farm to a high state of cultivation. In 1886 oil was discovered on this farm, and it now contains seventeen producing wells. Three children were born of his marriage to Hannah CRAWFORD, as follows: Ida; Mary A., and James. Mr. BROWNFIELD died at his home in Donegal township, November 10, 1889. He was a practical member of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, to which congregation his widow and children belong. He was universally esteemed for his sterling manhood and upright character. As a citizen, he was public-spirited and progressive, taking a deep interest in all matters that tended to benefit the community. He was especially active in furthering the schools of his township, and gave an unwavering support to educational and religious institutions. Politically, he was a Democrat, but was broad-minded and liberal in his views on all public matters. He left to his descendants an untarnished name, and died respected and esteemed by all who knew him.

SIMON MONROE WILES, a prosperous farmer and producer of Donegal township, was born near Petrolia, Butler county, July 7, 1857. His father was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county, September 29, 1822, and married Elizabeth DAUBENSPECK, February 9, 1843. She was born in Parker township, Butler county, March 6, 1826. They were the parents of the following children: Mary E., wife of W. J. MYERS, of Donegal township; Catherine Jane, deceased wife of Samuel WAGNER; John Sylvester, of Centre township; Harriet Ann, wife of William THOMPSON, of Bradford, Pennsylvania; Fannie Agnes, wife of Dr. A. K. CARMICHAEL, of Trinidad, Colorado; Simon Monroe, of Donegal township and David Elmer, a physician of Pittsburg. Mr. WILES died April 28, 1892, and his wife in March, 1880. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days upon his father's farm, and attended the common schools of his neighborhood. At the age of seventeen years he engaged as a pumper and tool dresser in the oil [p. 963] fields, and by judiciously investing his earnings in some oil leases he became possessed of a production of his own, and has since continued in that business. Mr. WILES was married August 16, 1877, to Jedidah JENKINS, a native of Armstrong county, born October 22, 1859. Her father, David JENKINS, was born in Wales, in 1826, and was married May 15, 1846, to Jane DAVIS, also a native of Wales, born in November, 1828. Mr. JENKINS died February 7, 1868, his wife surviving him until May 7, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. WILES are the parents of four children, as follows: Clarence Vernon, deceased; Myrtle Clare; Elsie Beulah, and Alta Beryl. In 1879 he purchased and located upon his farm in Donegal township, which is highly improved and contains a fine oil production. He has since erected a handsome residence, large and commodious barns, and devotes particular attention to raising fine pacing horses. He is one of the most successful farmers of his township. Politically, he is a Republican, is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P., also of Blaney Tent, K. O. T. M., of Millerstown.

RUDOLPH BARNHART, SR., was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1775, son of John William BARNHART, a native of Germany, who came to Pennsylvania in 1764, and settled in Westmoreland county, where he died in January, 1822. Rudolph was reared in that county, and in the year 1795 he came to Butler county and purchased 400 acres of land in what is now Fairview township. The following spring he brough [sic] this family to his cabin, which he had erected in the primitive forest, and took up his permanent residence in this county. His wife's maiden name was Christina RICE, and she was a native of eastern Pennsylvania. They were among the earliest settlers in the vicinity of Millerstown, and both spent the remainder of their lives in that locality. Eleven children were born to them, as follows: William; Philip; Susannah, who married Jonathan ANDREWS; Christina, who became the wife of Joseph VENSEL, of Donegal township; Frederick; Elizabeth, who married John ANDREWS; Rudolph; Simon; Andrew; Polly, who married Nicholas KING, and Catherine, who became the wife of John EBERHART. Mr. BARNHART and wife were members of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and died March 21, 1851, and 1854, respectively. He was a man of strict integrity, and was widely known and respected.

ANDREW BARNHART, youngest son of Rudolph and Christina BARNHART, was born upon the old homestead in Fairview township, Butler county, December 12, 1821, and grew to manhood upon his father's farm. When a young man he learned the baker's trade, in Butler, and followed that business for a few years in Millerstown, where he established a bakery and confectionery store in 1843. He subsequently embarked in general merchandising, which he carried on down to the spring of 1873, being for thirty years one of the leading business men of that borough. Throughout this period his character was marked by sterling integrity and diligence, which rendered his business career a most prosperous one. In 1844 he married Priscilla EBERHART, a daughter of Joseph and Catherine (KISTLER) EBERHART, of Mercer county, who subsequently removed to Douglas county, Kansas. She was born in Hickory township, Mercer county, April 25, 1825. Of their nine children, four grew to maturity, viz.: Paul I., of Fairview township; Aaron E., of Millerstown; Sadie C., wife of James GILL, of Ottawa, [p. 964] Kansas and Obadiah F., deceased. Mr. BARNHART died December 26, 1873. He was a life-long and zealous member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, was an ultra Abolitionist prior to the emancipation of the slaves, and an active temperance advocate. His widow resides with her daughter in Kansas.

AARON E. BARNHART, son of Andrew and Priscilla BARNHART, was born in Millerstown, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1851, received his education at the public schools and the State Normal Schools at Edinboro, Pennsylvania, and Lebanon, Ohio, and afterwards taught for two years. He assisted his father in the store, and at the death of the latter was appointed executor of the estate. In 1883 he became a member of the firm of HOCH Brothers & BARNHART, which partnership existed until 1888. Since that time he has devoted his attention to his oil and farming interests, owning 112 acres of the original BARNHART tract. He has been prominently interested in the development and improvement of the borough, was one of the originators and first president of the Citizens Light and Fuel Company, also one of the original promoters and stockholders of the Millerstown branch of the Producers Oil Company, Limited. The BARNHART family have been very liberal in their support of churches, and have donated the following church lots: The Sugar Creek or White Oak church lots, donated by Andrew BARNHART, in 1813; ground for the English Evangelical Lutheran church at Millerstown, by F. W. BARNHART, in 1850; the lot for St. John's Reformed church, by David BARNHART, in 1869, and the Methodist Episcopal church lot, at Millerstown, by A. E. BARNHART, in 1874. Mr. BARNHART was married August 18, 1874, to Catherine FLEEGER, a daughter of Daniel and Mary (KITTERING) FLEEGER, of Butler county, and has one son, Oscar Z. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., the K. of P., and the K. of H. fraternities. He has served a number of terms on the school board and borough council, and one term as burgess of Millerstown.

MARTIN HOCH was born in the City of Genningen, Canton of Tuebingen, Wurtemburg, Germany, February 15, 1818, son of Jacob HOCH. He grew to manhood in his native land, and in 1847, after a few months sojourn in England, he came to New York, journeyed westward by canal to Erie, thence to Pittsburg, and after a short stay in that city, went to Brady's Bend, Armstrong county, were he found employment in the iron mills. By industry and economy he accumulated sufficient capital to start in business for himself, and invested his savings in the erection of a brewery at Millerstown. He at once wrote for his brother, Gottlieb HOCH, an experienced brewer, to join him, and together they conducted the business for many years. Martin finally sold his interest to his brother, and in 1855 opened a hotel in a small building on the site now occupied by the Central Hotel, conducted by his sons, HOCH Brothers. On September 7, 1848, Mr. HOCH was united in marriage with Catherine GEBHARDT, a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, born in the City of Giengen, Canton of Heidenheim, February 28, 1822, who alone and without a protector had come to America in 1847. This union was blessed by five sons and one daughter, viz.: Adolphus A.; Augustus; Jacob, and Martin, both deceased; Albert M., a physician, and Catherine Pauline. Mr. HOCH died at his home in Millerstown, December 18, 1888. During his long residence in that borough he was actively identified with its growth and progress, and was one of its most respected citizens.
[p. 965]

ADOLPHUS A. HOCH, eldest child of Martin and Catherine HOCH, was born in Millerstown, Pennsylvania, April 1, 1850, and obtained his education in the public schools. When sixteen years of age he began a two years' apprenticeship with his uncle at the brewing industry. He afterwards engaged as a pumper in the Venango and Warren oil fields, and when twenty-one years old he returned to Millerstown, and began operating in that field as a producer in 1873. He had previously been interested in the livery business with his brother, Augustus. In the winter of 1877 the firm of HOCH Brothers was organized, and they erected the Central Hotel block at Millerstown. In 1883 they embarked in the hardware business, and now conduct one of the most extensive and completely equipped hardware and oil well supply houses in Butler county. Mr. HOCH is a charter member of the Citizens Light and Fuel Company, is an extensive stockholder in the Producers Oil Company, Limited, and is a trustee of the Millerstown Branch, and a member of the general advisory board. He has been a member of the borough council for eighteen years; is now president of that body, and has also served as burgess, and as a member of the school board. Mr. HOCH was married September 15, 1874, to Miss Nannie CAMPBELL, a daughter of W. H. H. and Lucinda (BOOZEL) CAMPBELL. She was born October 22, 1854, and is the mother of four children, viz.: Harry A., born October 22, 1875; Charles W., August 12, 1877; Earl, July 2, 1879, and Adolphus A., April 2, 1882.

AUGUSTUS HOCH, second son of Martin and Catherine HOCH, was born in Millerstown, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1852, and grew to maturity in his native town, receiving a public school education. At the age of fourteen years he started in life for himself as an oil pumper, and followed that business for six years. He then returned to Millerstown and engaged in the livery business, which he conducted for three years. Disposing of his stock he embarked in oil producing, and has since developed into one of the most extensive producers in the Millerstown field. In 1877 he became associated with his brother, under the firm name of HOCH Brothers, and besides their extensive hardware and oil well supply business, they conduct the Central Hotel, of which our subject has charge. Mr. HOCH is also a member of the firm of Seibert, Hoch & Company, who operate a lumber yard and planing mill at Millerstown. In 1877 he married Miss Elizabeth KRUGH, of Winfield township, Butler county, a daughter of Henry and Barbara KRUGH, and has two children, viz.: Martin G., and Ralph W. E. Mr. HOCH is a Republican, and is a member of Millerstown Lodge, 457, K. of P. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, and are liberal contributors toward every worthy public enterprise.

HENRY L. WESTERMANN, a native of Prussia, came to the United States in 1847, and located at Brady's Bend, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, where he found employment in a store. In 1856 he removed to Millerstown, and engaged in merchandising, which he carried on successfully until 1879, when he retired from business. He was also interested in oil producing, and was one of the leading citizens of this section of the county. While at Brady's Bend, he married Mary FETZER, a native, of Germany, who came to this country with her parents. She bore him a family of five children, as follows: Charles J., of the firm of WESTERMANN Brothers; Jacob J., a member of the same firm; Cassie D., wife [p. 966] of J. C. McKISSON, of Toledo, Ohio; Emma, deceased, and Loretta. Mrs. WESTERMANN died in June, 1871. Her husband married Dora FETZER, who bore him two sons: Henry M., and Richard. He died in October, 1885, aged sixty-three years.

JACOB J. WESTERMANN, of the firm of WESTERMANN Brothers, was born in Millerstown, Butler county, July 5, 1857, second son of Henry L. and Mary WESTERMANN. He was reared in his native town, and was educated in the public schools. In 1875 he entered the Normal College, at Lebanon, Ohio, where he was graduated in 1879. Returning to Millerstown, he formed a partnership with his brother, Charles J., embarked in merchandising and has since continued in that business. They have now the largest department store in Millerstown and one of the largest in the county. They carry a complete stock of dry goods, carpets, and boots and shoes. They are also extensive oil producers, both in the Millerstown field and in Ohio. In 1889 Mr. WESTERMANN married Gertrude McLAUGHLIN, a daughter of John McLAUGHLIN, and has one son, Jacob J. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, and, politically, Mr. WESTERMANN is a stanch Democrat.

CHALES [sic] J. WESTERMANN, of the firm of WESTERMANN Brothers, is the eldest son of Henry L. and Mary (FETZER) WESTERMANN. He was born in Millerstown, Butler county, August 10, 1855, and was educated in the public schools, and at the Normal College, Lebanon, Ohio. In 1873 he was appointed teller of the German National Bank, at Millerstown. In 1876 he commenced operating in the Millerstown oil field, and in 1880, in connection with his brother, Jacob J., became interested in the Millerstown and Butler fields, and has extensive production in this county and in Ohio. He is also associated with his brother in the mercantile business at Millerstown. Mr. WESTERMANN married Emma ZETTLE, and both he and wife are members of the German Lutheran church. Politically, he is an ardent Democrat, is a member of the Masonic order, and is one of the representative citizens of the borough.

JACOB MYERS was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, and immigrated to Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1831. He settled in Summit township, but two years later purchased a farm in Oakland township, upon which he resided down to his death in 1884, at the age of eighty-three years. He was married in Germany to Catherine GINTER, and they were the parents of ten children, four of whom are living. Mrs. MYERS died in 1878. They were members of the German Lutheran church, and died in that faith.

JOHN G. MYERS, fourth child of Jacob and Catherine MYERS, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, November 18, 1828, and came with his parents to Butler county when about three years old. He was reared upon the homestead in Oakland township, and received a common school education. At the age of seventeen he commenced to learn the plasterer's trade, and followed the same in Butler and Brady's Bend until 1867. In that year he located at Millerstown, and engaged in the milling business, under the firm name of MYERS & FETZER, which they still carry on. He has also been interested in oil producing and farming, and in 1887, in connection with his son Henry J., he established the Millerstown Deposit Bank, which has since been in successful operation. Mr. MYERS was [p. 967] married in 1858, to Catherine FETZER, a daughter of Jacob FETZER, and is the father of six children, viz.: Henry J.; Charles L.; Ida, deceased; Estelle D.; Gussie J., and one that died in infancy. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, is one of the trustees of the Millerstown congregation, and has filled the office of deacon in that society. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has served in the borough council, and has filled the office of school director for twelve years.

HENRY J. MYERS, banker, is a son of John G. and Catherine MYERS, and was born in Butler, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1862. He came with his parents to Millerstown when six years of age and has since resided in this borough. He attended the public schools of Millerstown and subsequently spent two years at Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, where he pursued a thorough course of study. He afterwards accepted a position as teller in the German National Bank, of Millerstown, was promoted to cashier, and in 1885, upon the suspension of the bank, he was appointed liquidating officer by the National Bank Commission and filled the position successfully. In 1887 the Millerstown Deposit Bank was organized by Mr. MYERS and his father, and he has since been cashier and had general supervision of that institution. Mr. MYERS is a prominent member of the Masonic order; is W. M. of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M.; is connected with Butler chapter, Number 273, R. A. M.; with Tancred Commandery, Number 48, K. T.; with Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., and Pennsylvania Consistory, S. P. R. S., in which he has attained the 32d degree, the last three mentioned being in Pittsburg. Politically, Mr. MYERS is a Democrat, and aside from his banking interests, he is also interested in the oil industry.

SOLOMON FLEEGER was a native of Centre township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob and Catherine (WHITMIRE) FLEEGER, of Centre township, and a grandson of Christian FLEEGER, who came to America during the Revolution as a cavalry soldier in the German contingent of the English army operating against Washington; but he deserted at Philadelphia, and went to Lancaster county, thence to Westmoreland county, and finally settled in Centre township, Butler county, in 1797, where he died. Solomon was the fifth in the family of seventeen children, born to Jacob and Catherine FLEEGER. His mother was a daughter of Francis WHITMIRE, one of the pioneers of this county. He grew to manhood upon his father's farm, and married Clarinda DAVIS, of Allegheny county. He settled near Millerstown, became quite prominent in that borough, and held the offices of postmaster and justice of the peace for many years. He died February 17, 1892. His widow still resides in Millerstown. Their family consisted of five children, as follows: John; Andrew, and Harriet, who married G. F. FETZER, all of whom are dead. The survivors are Martin, of Fairview township, and Austin, a resident of Millerstown.

AUSTIN FLEEGER, youngest in the family of Solomon and Clarinda FLEEGER, was born in Millerstown Pennsylvania, in 1851, and received his education in the public schools and at a select school in Unionville. At the age of thirteen he went to Brady's Bend, where he served an apprenticeship of two years at the shoemaker's trade. He afterwards located in Butler, and learned the cabinetmakers trade. Returning to Millerstown, he established himself in the cabinetmaking and undertaking business, later engaged in the furniture business, in [p. 968] company with his father, and is now connected with the undertaking trade. About this time he became interested in oil producing, and has since devoted his attention to that industry. Mr. FLEEGER was the originator of the Citizens Light and Heat Company, was one of the largest original stockholders, and is at present one of the principal stockholders in the company, as well as president. Although formerly a Republican, and postmaster of Millerstown during Hayes' administration, he is now an ardent Prohibitionist. He is a member of the borough council, and is connected with Millerstown Lodge, No. 947, I. O. O. F. In 1879, Mr. FLEEGER married Katie NUGENT, a daughter of Morris NUGENT, deceased, of Clearfield township, to which union have been born the following children: E. Luella; Harold L.; Mary C.; George W.; Katie Irene; John T., and Austin O.

JOHN JACOB FREDERICK, son of John Peter and Margaret Elizabeth FREDERICK, was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, May 21, 1824. In 1834 his parents immigrated to the United States, and located in Summit township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, upon the farm now owned by Gottlieb FREDERICK, and resided there down to their death. John Jacob was the second in a family of eight children, and was but ten years old when his parents came to this county. His boyhood days were spent upon the farm in Summit township, and when fourteen years of age he commenced working as a water boy on the Pennsylvania canal. At the age of twenty-one years he commenced learning the blacksmith's trade at Butler, and served three years with George WALTER. He subsequently went to Brady's Bend, where he followed his trade, and later located at Millerstown, establishing himself in business in this borough. He was a good workman and soon won the reputation of being one of the best blacksmiths in the county. After following his trade for many years, he finally retired from active life and devoted his attention to his various business interests. By industry and economy he had accumulated a handsome competence, and, at the time of his death, was one of the wealthiest citizens of Millerstown. Mr. FREDERICK died at his home, October 21, 1890, dying as he had lived a consistent member of the German Lutheran church. He married Christina REMP, a daughter of John and Anna Maria (EBERHARD) REMP, a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, born April 13, 1828. She came to America with her parents when a girl of four years of age, and is still a resident of Millerstown. They reared a family of eleven children, as follows: Elizabeth, wife of James M. BYERS, of Fairview; Edward G., and William L., of Millerstown; Mary Ellen, wife of J. C. GAISFORD, of the same place; Catherine, wife of Philip CALLAGHAN, also a resident of Millerstown; Christina, deceased; Anna D.; Maggie; Sarah M., wife of P. G. FREDERICK, of Millerstown; Minnie, and Agnes.

EDWARD G. FREDERICK, eldest son of John Jacob and Christina FREDERICK, was born in Millerstown, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1850, upon the site of the Central Hotel. He was reared in his native town, at the age of fourteen years began learning the blacksmith's trade with his father, and finally took charge of the business, which he has since conducted. He is also an extensive oil producer. Mr. FREDERICK was married August 19, 1877, to Louisa CAMPHIRE, of Brady's Bend. She is a daughter of Jacob and Christina CAMPHIRE, and was [p. 969] born at Brady's Bend May 22, 1857. Three children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Clarence L., born June 6, 1879; Annita M., May 4, 1883, and Ruth A., October 13, 1893. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, of Millerstown, in which Mr. FREDERICK fills the office of trustee. Upon his father's death he was appointed executor of the estate, and has filled the position with satisfaction to the remaining heirs.

JAMES SEIBERT came with his wife Catherine and family of three children from Armstrong county about 1842, and settled on a farm in Fairview township, Butler county, where he resided down to his death in 1844; his widow survived until September 16, 1891. They were the parents of five children, as follows: Reuben, of Millerstown; Mary S., wife of Samuel BYERS; Bowman B., who resides upon the old homestead in Fairview township; Margaret D., wife of George EMRICK, of Virginia, and Henry H., a resident of Crawford county.

REUBEN SEIBERT, eldest son of James and Catherine SEIBERT, was born in Armstrong county in 1836, and came with his parents to Butler county when a lad of six years old. He spent his boyhood days upon a farm, received his education in the district school, and afterwards learned the wagon-maker's trade. Having a natural aptitude for mechanics, he became quite proficient at his trade. About 1861 he established a wagon factory in Millerstown, as a member of the firm of SEIBERT & CRAIG, which he carried on until his shop was destroyed by fire in 1873. For the next two years he followed pumping, and then various occupations until 1883, in which year he established a lumber yard and planing mill in Millerstown, in partnership with P. G. FREDERICK, under the firm name of SEIBERT & FREDERICK, in which he continued until 1888, when he sold his interest. In 1889 the firm of SEIBERT, HOCH & Company was organized, and has since carried on successfully the lumber and planing mill business. Mr. SEIBERT was married in 1860, to Lavina HEPPLER, a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth HEPPLER, of Fairview township. Politically, he is a Republican, and has served as a member of the borough council. He is a member of the E. A. U., is a good business man, and stands well in the community.

VALENTINE HAYS, a native of Germany, came to America with his parents when twelve years of age. They settled in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, where Valentine grew to maturity. He learned the cigarmaker's trade, and located at Pittsburg, where for several years he conducted a cigar factory. He was married in Pittsburg to Margaret UPPERMAN, a daughter of Conrad UPPERMAN, one of the pioneers of that city. Conrad UPPERMAN organized the first police force of Pittsburg, and kept one of the early hotels opposite the site of the Monongahela House. He took quite a prominent part in the militia, and was familiarly known as Captain UPPERMAN. In 1851, Mr. HAYS and wife came to Butler county, and located at Saxonburg; he engaged in the manufacture of cigars, and resided in that borough for eleven years. In 1861 they returned to Pittsburg, and later located in Armstrong county, where Mr. HAYS died in 1877, aged fifty eight years. His widow now resides at Watertown, South Dakota. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living, as follows: John V., of Washington, Pennsylvania; William H., of Los Angeles, California; E. F., of Millerstown; George W., a resident of Washington, Pennsylvania; Louis E., [p. 970] also a resident of Washington, and Anna A., wife of Frank GRIM, of Watertown, South Dakota.

E. F. HAYS, son of Valentine and Margaret HAYS, was born at Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1851, and was less than a year old when his parents settled at Saxonburg. At the age of thirteen he went to work in Knapp's Gun Works, Pittsburg, then engaged in making cannon for the United States Government, where our subject worked at putting up shells for the navy. He remained there until after the close of the war, and then entered the employ of A. BRADLEY, stove manufacturer, where he learned the moulder's trade, later he returned to Knapp's Gun Works, and while there was seriously burned with molten metal. He subsequently learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for three years. After some time spent at Kittanning and Brady's Bend, he engaged in the oil business at Parker, and also in Clarion county. In the autumn of 1872 he located at Millerstown, and followed the oil business until 1881. In that year he formed a partnership with his brother, George W., and purchased the hardware store of A. SIMPSON, which they conducted, under the firm name of HAYS Brothers, until March 1, 1890, when E. F. became sole proprietor. He was burned out in the fire of June 14, 1892, suffering a loss of $16,000. He immediately commenced the erection of his present substantial building, which is a two-storied structure, forty by eighty, with basement, which he occupied on October 12, of the same year. He has now the largest stock of oil well supplies, buggies, farming machinery, furniture, etc., in this section of the country. Aside from his business he still devotes considerable attention to oil producing. Mr. HAYS was married November 13, 1873, to Margaret C., a daughter of Josiah KLINGENSMITH, of Kittanning, and has three children, viz.: Minnie; Frank, and Clarence. The family are members of the English Lutheran church. Politically, he is a Republican, and has served two years in the borough council, one of which he was president of that body. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, No. 947, I. O. O. F.; also of Millerstown Lodge, No. 340, K. of P., in which he has passed through all the chairs.

CHARLES H. JOHNSON, general hardware, oil well supplies, buggies, farming implements, etc., was born in Nunda, Livingstone county, New York, November 6, 1842, son of Ichabod M. and Mary Ann (COLEGROVE) JOHNSON. His father was a native of Vermont, came to Pennsylvania when a young man, and located at Smithport, where he followed the shoemaker's trade. He was married in Smithport to Mary Ann COLEGROVE; then removed to Livingstone county, New York, where he was lock-keeper on the Genesee Valley canal, and died in that State, in 1889, aged seventy-four years. Mrs. JOHNSON died in 1890, at the age of seventy-two. They were the parents of four children, viz.: Benjamin C.; Charles H., of Millerstown; John T., deceased, and Fred M., also a resident of Millerstown. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days with his parents, and received his education in the public schools of New York. At the age of fourteen he engaged as a driver upon the canal, at seven dollars and fifty cents per month, between Olean and Rochester. He saved his money carefully, and at the age of eighteen owned a boat of his own, and when he retired from that business, he was proprietor of a boat and acted as captain. While [p. 971] his father was lock-keeper, Charles H. tended lock, for which he received one dollar per month. In January, 1865, he came to Petroleum Centre, Venango county, and engaged in teaming in the oil region, and did an extensive business. Later in the same year he built the Pithole Hotel, at Pithole, Venango county, which he carried on in connection with a livery and feed stable and general teaming business. Mr. JOHNSON was one of the first men to locate on the site of Pithole, during the great oil excitement at that point, and slept on the ground for want of better accommodation. He remained there until 1873, having in the meantime engaged extensively in oil producing. In 1873 he came to Millerstown, engaged in teaming, and later went into the oil business, and is now one of the producers of the town. In December, 1889, he established his present mercantile business, and also was in the livery business for ten years. In politics, he is a Democrat, served as chief of police of Millerstown, from September, 1873, to September, 1876, and also filled the offices of burgess, councilman, and member of the school board. In April, 1865, he married Miss Helen PIFER, a native of Hinsdale, New York, and a daughter of John PIFER. They are the parents of two children, viz.: Charles H., and Grace. Mrs. JOHNSON is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and her husband is connected with the Knights of Honor. He is one of the prominent, enterprising and progressive business men of the community.

ALEXANDER H. SIMPSON was born at Newton, New Jersey, June 22, 1837, and was educated at the Newton Academy. At the age of seventeen he commenced to learn the hardware, stove and tin business. During the war he was engaged in the United States Military Railroad Department, with headquarters at Alexandria, Virginia, and was honorably discharged in August, 1865. The following month he located at Pithole, Venango county, where he found employment in the hardware store of F. H. EDDY. After a few months he purchased the stock and building and carried on the business until 1868, when the oil production at that point collapsed. Mr. SIMPSON was married on December 23, 1868, to Helen M. RIDGWAY, a daughter of Charles B. and Sarah RIDGWAY, and sister of Hon. T. J. RIDGWAY, of Lackawaxen, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Four children are the fruits of this union, all of whom are living, viz.: Nellie R.; Harry A.; Edward O., and Blanche. In the spring of 1873, when the oil excitement reached Millerstown, Mr. SIMPSON was one of the first to see the advantages that town offered as a business center, and less than two months from his first visit to the place, he had a store building erected and was engaged in active business. He continued without interruption until 1881, when owing to various oil interests and his connection with the Butler County Bank, he sold his business to Hays Brothers. He is an ardent Republican, and has been president of the common councils for two terms, also a member of the school board. Since 1860 he has been connected with the Masonic order, and is also a member of Millerstown Lodge, K. of H.

J. C. GAISFORD is a native of England, born in Warminster, Wiltshire, February 25, 1840, and received a good education in schools of his native land. At the age of thirteen he engaged as a clerk in a wholesale dry goods establishment, in the City of London, which position he filled for five years. He then went to South Africa, and for the ensuing nine years was employed in the dry [p. 972] goods department of a large wholesale house in Cape Town. During his residence there, he became familiar with many of the strange customs and manners of the native population. In 1871 he immigrated to the United States, and joining his brother, Walter W., in business at Oil City, Pennsylvania, remained in that city until 1873. In the latter year he came to Millerstown and engaged in the oil industry as a producer, to which he still devotes considerable attention. Mr. GAISFORD is a charter member of the Citizens Light and Heat Company, and has officiated as secretary since its organization. He is a stockholder in and secretary of the Millerstown Fair Association, and also secretary of the Producers Protective Association. He joined the latter in 1887, being the first member initiated in Butler county. Mr. GAISFORD is a stanch Democrat, is quite active in politics, and is now serving his second term as justice of the peace. He has also served for four years as secretary of the borough school board. He is connected with Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F., in which he is past district deputy grand master, and is a Royal Templar, and a member of the P. H. C. In 1875 he married Mary E. FREDERICK, a daughter of John Jacob and Christina FREDERICK, of Millerstown.

WALTER A. DENNISON was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1852, son of Garrett and Mary E. DENNISON. His father died when Walter A., was a child, and he grew to maturity in his native city under the care of a devoted mother, receiving his education at Germantown Academy. In 1870 he went to Pittsburg, and engaged as a clerk, but after two years in that capacity, entered into business for himself. In 1876 he came to Butler county and engaged in the furniture business at Millerstown, from which he afterwards retired and engaged in the oil well supply and machinery business, which he conducted for a number of years with marked success. He finally retired from merchandising, his oil and gas interests requiring his entire attention. Mr. DENNISON is one of the largest operators in oil and gas in Butler county. He is president of the Pittsburg Refining Company, and is a gentleman of enterprise and public spirit. A Democrat in politics, he has served on the school board for five years, and always manifests a commendable interest in public affairs. Mr. DENNISON was married May 27, 1877, to Miss Isadore L. RIVENBERG, a native of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Capt. H. W. RIVENBERG, who was killed in the service during the Rebellion. Six children have been born to this union, four of whom are living.

PETER A. RATTIGAN, editor and proprietor of the Millerstown Herald, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, October 25, 1846, son of Peter and Ann (SNEE) RATTIGAN. His father was a native of Longford county, Ireland, came to America when a boy, and followed the carpenter's and builder's trade in Pittsburg. He was quite an extensive contractor of that city, and died there in September, 1862, aged fifty-two years. His widow survived him until April 17, 1892, dying at the ripe old age of eighty-two years. His widow survived him until April 17, 1892, dying at the ripe old age of eighty-two years. She was born in Pittsburg, in a house which stands near the site of the Boyer Hotel, and when a child playing on the river bank at the foot of Seventh street, a band of Indians appeared on the opposite shore and fired at her. Peter A., attended the Pittsburg public schools, and in early life became newsboy. When but nine years of age he obtained a [p. 973] situation in the press room of the Pittsbug Dispatch, and there began his career as a printer. He rose rapidly in the art, and at the age of seventeen was foreman in the printing house of Benjamin SINGERLY, the most extensive establishment of the kind in the city at that time. On August 9, 1862, at the age of sixteen, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He had previously enlisted five times, but was rejected because of his youth. His regiment was assigned to service in the Army of the Potomac, and he participated in the battles of Frederick City, Snicker's Gap, Warrenton, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, etc., and was honorably discharged in 1863. In an engagement near Port Royal, Mr. RATTIGAN was wounded by the concussion of a bursting shell, which destroyed hearing in the right ear, and was also wounded in the left foot at Chancellorsville. Upon his discharge he returned to Pittsburg, but was unable to continue at his trade, and became steward on a boat running between that city and Nashville. In 1868 he went to Oil City, and accepted a position as foreman on the Oil City Times, now the Oil City Derrick. After assisting to establish that paper, he accepted a position as superintendent of the Oil City Herald. In 1872 he returned to Pittsburg, and remained there until February, 1877, when he came to Millerstown, Butler county, and in May of that year purchased the Millerstown Herald, which he has since edited and published. He has enlarged the paper from a five column to an eight column folio, and made it one of the leading Democratic journals of this section. Mr. RATTIGAN is a stanch Democrat, has been active in political matters, and has been a delegate to many State and county conventions. He has served as burgess of Millerstown, also as justice of the peace and a member of the school board, was appointed postmaster in October, 1885, and filled that office until March, 1890. He is a member of Robert McDermott Post, Number 223, G. A. R. in which he is past commander, and is an aide on the staff of the department commander of the Pennsylvania G. A. R. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F., and is past chancellor of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P. Mr. RATTIGAN was married October 25, 1868, to Miss Etta M. BELL, daughter of Wellington and Mary Ann (RYAN) BELL, natives of Queens county, Ireland. She was born in that county December 21, 1847, and came with her parents to Pittsburg in 1863, where both her father and mother died. The following children have been born to this union: Harry T.; Annie M.; Wellington J.; Peter A.; Etta; Howard, and Bessie. The family are members of Mater Dolorosa Catholic church, of Millerstown.

WILLIAM A. BRADEN was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1832, son of Jacob and Mary BRADEN. Jacob BRADEN was a native of Germany, came to the United States when a young man and settled in Crawford county, where he married Miss Mary NORRIS. When our subject was but five years old his father died, and he went to live with a family in Erie, with whom he remained until his fifteenth year. He then found employment elsewhere, and in the meantime obtained a fair common school education. After spending a year in Illinois he returned to Pennsylvania, and engaged in the cherry lumber business, at Waterford, Erie county. In November, 1854, Mr. BRADEN married Miss Sarah A. THOMPSON, a native of Erie county. They resided in Missouri [p. 974] until 1862, and then returned to Pennsylvania, and the following year located in Venango county. In 1872 he came to Millerstown, Butler county, and for three years conducted the Union Pump Station in that borough. He then engaged with a dealer in heavy oils, and erected a refinery in 1877. In 1880 he established an extensive teaming business in connection with the Pipe Line Company, which he still continues. Mr. and Mrs. BRADEN are the parents of five children, two sons and three daughters, as follows: Glenn T., general superintendent of the National Transit Pipe Line; Charlie A., foreman of the Zelienople district of the National Transit Pipe Line; La Verne; Euretta, and Sarah. Mr. BRADEN is P. C. of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P., and is also connected with Rising Sun Lodge, O. O. T., of the same borough.

WILLIAM J. LOGAN, merchant and producer, is a native of Venango county, Pennsylvania, born at Petroleum Centre, June 1, 1867, son of Thomas B. and Mary E. (SAMPSON) LOGAN. His father was a native of New York, and served three years in the Rebellion as a member of a New York regiment. He was married July 6, 1866, at Petroleum Centre, to Mary E. SAMPSON. She was born in Buffalo, New York, November 10, 1850, a daughter of James T. and Jane SAMPSON. Her father was a native of England and served as a soldier in the English army, while her mother was a native of Ireland. Mrs. LOGAN received a thorough educational training in the public schools of her native city, and, in 1865, went to Petroleum Centre, where she was married the following year. In 1876 she embarked in business at Millerstown, where she carried on a restaurant until May, 1880, when she established a grocery and confectionery business, which she successfully conducted until her death. Mrs. LOGAN was a woman of more than ordinary business ability, and by a strict application of business principles, she was prosperous from the start. She was very charitable, and on every Thanksgiving and Christmas the poor of the town were remembered by liberal donations from her store. So unostentatiously was her charity distributed that many of her good deeds remained unknown until after her death. She died at Millerstown, October 7, 1893, and was buried at Forest Lawn cemetery, Buffalo, New York. She was the mother of six children, three of whom grew to maturity, as follows: William J.; Casper T., and Charles G., who died November 17, 1893. The subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of Millerstown and Buffalo, worked as a boiler maker and machinist, and also as a clerk, assisting with his earnings in the support of the family. In 1892 he went to Latrobe, where he followed his trade until the fall of 1893, when he returned to Millerstown. After the death of his mother he took charge of the grocery and confectionery business, which he has since conducted. He is also interested in oil producing. Mr. LOGAN was married September 27, 1893, to Emma HINDMAN, of Millerstown. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F., Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P., and also of Linton Division, Number 59, Uniformed Rank, K. of P., at Latrobe.

FRANCIS MURPHY was born in Drumore, Down county, Ireland, May 25, 1843. He comes of a long line of Irish ancestry who for generations have been members of the Church of England, and prominent Orangemen. When but four years of age he was brought to America by his parents, who located in [p. 975] Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where his mother soon afterwards died. His father engaged in the mercantile business at Pittsburg, later removed to Niles, Ohio, and died there at the age of sixty-seven years. Our subject is one of a family of three children, and received a good education in the public schools of Pittsburg. At the age of eighteen he commenced an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade, and followed this vocation as a journeyman for some years. In 1877 he came to Millerstown, and the following year became a member of the firm of CAMPBELL & MURPHY, which still exists and carries on a general machinist business, with Mr. MURPHY in charge of the works. On December 24, 1866, he married Jennie, a daughter of John FULTON, to which union have been born four children, viz.: Carrie, wife of Dr. A. L. GIBSON, of Millerstown; Francis H., a graduate of Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania; Annie E., a graduate of the Beethoven School of Music, at Meadville, and Agnes May, deceased. The family are members of the Millerstown Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. MURPHY is a stanch Republican, and is a member of the borough council. He is past master of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M.; is a charter member of Butler Chapter, Number 273, R. A. M.; is a member of Mount Calvary Commandery, Number 67, K. T., of Greenville, and of Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Pittsburg.

RICHARD F. WESTERMANN, one of the leading business men of Millerstown, is a native of Sulzbach, Germany, a small town near the River Rhine, born January 4, 1863, son of Charles and Louisa (BUSSE) WESTERMANN, both residents of Germany. His father is a brother of Henry L. WESTERMANN, deceased, for many years the head of the largest mercantile establishment of Millerstown. Richard F. is the ninth in a family of fourteen children, of whom twelve survive. His boyhood days were spent in his native town, where he received a thorough educational training, and at the age of twelve years began a course of study preparatory to entering a university. He continued his studies until he had attained the age of sixteen years, when he decided to try his fortune in the New World. Leaving behind him the tender associations of kindred and home, he embarked at Antwerp, May 20, 1879, and landed at Jersey City, June 1, following. He was met there by his uncle, Henry L. WESTERMANN, who brought him to Millerstown. The appearance of the country and the prosperous towns along the route impressed him with the advantages of this land, and he determined to master the language and familiarize himself with our customs. Upon his arrival at Millerstown, he entered the employ of WESTERMANN Brothers, for whom he clerked seven years. In 1886 he became a member of the firm of R. F. WESTERMANN & Company, dealers in clothing and men's furnishing goods, to which business he has since devoted his attention, and is the only exclusive clothing house in the borough. Mr. WESTERMANN was married January 16, 1889, to Lucinda BURNETT, a daughter of Singleton and Rose (POTTER) BURNETT. She was born on the celebrated Tar farm, in Venango county, October 24, 1866. Her father died while she was quite young, and her mother married B. H. GRISWOLD, a well known oil producer of Millerstown. To Mr. and Mrs. WESTERMANN has been born one child, Karl F., born August 18, 1890. Politically, he is a Democrat, and has voted that ticket since he became a citizen of the United States in 1884. He is secre- [p. 976] tary of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M.; has passed the chairs in Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F., and in Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P.

JOHN SHOWALTER, of Rockingham county, Virginia, came to Fayette county, Pennsylvania, with his family, about 1810, and took up a large tract of land, upon which he spent the remainder of his days. He was widely and favorably known among the pioneers of that county. He reared a family of ten children, viz.: Reuben, and Levi, both deceased; Benoni, a resident of Kentucky; Eliza, and Jacob L., both residents of Fayette county; Sarah, deceased wife of Major I. M. ABRAHAM; Susannah, deceased wife of Hugh GILMORE; John. M., deceased; James W., now the oldest school teacher in Fayette county, and Samuel, deceased.

LEVI SHOWALTER, second son of John SHOWALTER, was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, October 22, 1805, and was about five years old when his parents settled in Fayette county. He there grew to manhood, and in 1839 married Elizabeth BALTZELL, a native of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, born September 12, 1818, and a daughter of Joseph BALTZELL, an early settler of Greene county. Mr. SHOWALTER resided in Fayette county during his lifetime, with the exception of two years spent in Butler county. He died in Fayette county, December 13, 1889. He served in the army as trainmaster during the Rebellion, being too far advanced in years to enlist in the ranks, although he endeavored to do so. He was a strong Whig and Abolitionist, and later a Republican, casting his first presidential vote for John Quincy ADAMS, in 1828, and his last one for Benjamin HARRISON, in 1888. His widow resides in the old home in Fayette county, in her seventy-sixth year. They were the parents of the following children: Mary Catherine, deceased; Sarah E., wife of Prof. Archie WOODSIDE, of Wilkinsburg; Samuel F., of Millerstown; Hattie A., who resides with her mother; John J., and Joseph B., both of whom are residents of Millerstown.

HON. JOSEPH B. SHOWALTER was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1851, and is the youngest in the family of Levi and Elizabeth SHOWALTER. His boyhood days were spent upon his father's farm, and he obtained his education in the public schools and at George's Creek Academy, at Smithfield. When sixteen years of age he commenced teaching school in Preston county, West Virginia, and followed this vocation for some years in West Virginia, Indiana and Illinois. He then returned home and taught for two years in his native county. In 1873 he came to Millerstown, Butler county, and, in company with his brothers, began operating in the Millerstown oil field, striking their first well on Christmas day.[sic] 1873. These operations have been extended to various fields, and the SHOWALTER Brothers are now among the extensive producers of the State. While teaching he began reading medicine, and spent the year of 1883 at Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, New York. He later entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Maryland, where he was graduated, March 4, 1884. He at once commenced practice at Millerstown, and continued his professional duties for six years, retiring from practice in 1890. In 1886 Dr. SHOWALTER was elected, on the Republican ticket, to the legislature, and during his term was a member of the committee on con- [p. 977] stitutional reform. In 1888 he was elected to the State Senate, and served his constituents with ability and fidelity. He was chosen chairman of the committee on health and sanitation, and introduced and secured the passage of the medical examination bill, for which he received a vote of thanks from the Pennsylvania State Medical Society. Senator SHOWALTER entered into his work with determination and good judgment, soon won the respect and confidence of his colleagues, and fully justified the expectations of his many friends. He introduced several bills, all of which were highly beneficial. His oil bill is now generally endorsed by producers as a wise and conservative measure. On March 25, 1879, Mr. SHOWALTER married Ella M. McKEE, a daughter of Hon. David McKEE, of Slippery Rock township, to which union have been born five children, viz.: Levi M. deceased; Genevieve; Pauline; Joseph B., deceased, and Lucile. Mr. and Mrs. SHOWALTER are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Millerstown.

SAMUEL F. SHOWALTER, a son of Levi and Elizabeth (BALTZELL) SHOWALTER, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, August 16, 1845. His early life was spent upon a farm, and his education was obtained in the public schools, supplemented by a thorough course in George's Creek Academy. At the age of sixteen he began teaching in the public schools, and taught in Preston county, West Virginia, where he received the highest remuneration of any teacher in the schools. For seven years he successfully followed his vocation in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Indiana. In 1868 he engaged as a pumper in the Warren county oil field, and later secured some valuable leases and became a producer. In August, 1873, he came to Millerstown and organized the firm of SHOWALTER Brothers, oil operators and producers. Their operations in the Millerstown field have been large and particularly successful, putting down twenty-six wells before striking a dry hole. Their first well in this field came in on Christmas, 1873, at one hundred barrels a day. Mr. SHOWALTER was married September 19, 1877, to Sadie C., a daughter of Isaac LAMBORN, of Centre county, to which union have been born seven children, six of whom are living: Hattie Beryl; Sarah Freda; Blanche Elizabeth; Mary Elva; Jennie R., and Helen Ruth. Mr. SHOWALTER is a trustee in the Methodist Episcopal church, and is a member of Millerstown Lodge, No. 947, I. O. O. F. Politically, a Republican, he was a member of the county committee during the constitutional campaign, and has also served several terms on the school board of Millerstown. He is now a member of the board, and is one of the prominent and respected citizens of his adopted home.

JOHN J. SHOWALTER, son of Levi and Elizabeth SHOWALTER, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1849, received a common school education, and also attended George's Creek Academy. At the age of fifteen years he started in life for himself, engaging as a driller in the oil country. Later, with his brothers, he embarked in the oil business, and in 1873 began operating in the Millerstown field. He is now one of the well known and successful producers of the county. He is a stockholder in the Producers Pipe Line Company. In 1880 Mr. SHOWALTER married Miss Jennie ROBINSON, a daughter of Samuel ROBINSON, of Fayette county. Though this union has not been blessed with children, [p. 978] they have an adopted son, Robert, now seven years old, whom they have reared from infancy. Mr. SHOWALTER is a stanch Republican, and both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

DR. WILLARD L. DeWOLFE, son of E. Darwin and Catherine (CHRISTLEY) DeWOLFE, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, February 25, 1856, and spent his early boyhood upon the farm, and in attending the district school of his neighborhood. When he was in his tenth year his father died, and, the family being broken up, he went to Butler, and found a home with Thomas ROBINSON. He afterwards lived with Samuel L. RIDDLE, of Karns City. After remaining there one year, he went to Mercer county and found employment as a woodsman, working for his board, and attended the district school during the winter. When fourteen years of age, he entered a select school at Grove City, now the Grove City College, then under the principalship of Rev. William T. DIXON, and for two years he devoted himself assiduously to his studies. In the winter of 1871 he entered Allegheny College, at Meadville, where he continued his studies for three years, then, because of failing health, he was compelled to retire from school in his junior year. He spent some time teaching in the public schools, and as a pumper in the oil fields; but, in the meantime, had commenced to read medicine under Dr. RUMBERGER. In 1877 he went to Philadelphia, and continued his studies under the preceptorship of Dr. J. V. SHOEMAKER, now professor of therapeutics and clinical surgery, in the Medico Chirurgical College of that city, and the author of many standard medical works. He attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, and graduated from that institution in 1879. Dr. DeWOLFE commenced practice at North Liberty, Pennsylvania, and two years later located at Coaltown, where he remained until 1886, in which year he removed to Millerstown. He has since won the confidence of the community in his medical skill, and has built up a large and lucrative practice. In 1890 he engaged in the drug trade, and in 1893 he erected his handsome business block in that borough, where he has since carried on business. In 1876 Dr. DeWOLFE married Miss Jennie THOMPSON, a daughter of David and Isabella THOMPSON, of Buena Vista, Butler county, to which union have been born three children, two of whom are living, viz.: Charles L., and Harry R. The Doctor has been highly successful in his many business ventures and is an enterprising, progressive citizen. Aside from his professional duties he is extensively interested in oil producing, and is one of the substantial citizens of the community. He is a prominent member of the Masonic order; is W. M. in Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M.; is a member of Butler Chapter, Number 273, R. A. M.; is a charter member of Mt. Calvary Commandery, Number 67, K. T.; is a member of Pennsylvania Consistory, S. P. R. S., and has attained the thirty-second degree. He is commander of Blaney Tent, Number 123, K. O. T. M., and was elected G. M. E., for the State in September, 1893. He is also connected with the I. O. O. F., and K. of P. fraternities. Dr. DeWOLFE is a member of the Butler County Medical Association, of which he was president in 1887, and is also a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, and the National Association of Railway Surgeons.
[p. 979]

JOHN W. TITLEY, proprietor of Chestnut Hill Stock Farm, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, November 5, 1848, son of Walter and Sarah (BISH) TITLEY. His father was a native of Shropshire, England, where the family lived for generations, and came when a young man to Armstrong county, where he married Sarah BISH, and died in 1872. His widow is still living. They were the parents of eight children, seven of whom are now living, four sons being residents of Millerstown, viz.: John W.; James J.; George A., and William E. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools and at Iron City College, Pittsburg, which he entered at the age of sixteen and completed his course. At the age of nineteen he embarked in the stock business, as a breeder of fine draft horses, and has ever since been engaged in the stock business. In partnership with his brothers, he owned and operated the TITLEY farm, which had a production of 700 barrels per day. In 1887 he came to Millerstown, purchased and conducted a livery stable for a few years, and then disposed of the business. He is the owner of Star Pointer, with a record of 2:11 by Brown Hal, out of the dam of Hal Pointer, whose record is 2:04 ; also Grand View, with a record of 2:21 , by Bay Tom, dam by Tom Hal. He as thirty head of pacing stock, of the Hal strain, and owns a stock farm of 300 acres in Donegal township. Mr. TITLEY was married in 1868, to Lavina STEPHENS, of Armstrong county, to which union have been born four sons and four daughters. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F.

JAMES J. TITLEY was born in Armstrong county, January 28, 1861, son of Walter and Sarah (BISH) TITLEY, and was but ten years of age when his father died. He remained with his mother until his twentieth year, when he purchased a farm and engaged in agriculture. Three years later he sold the farm and became a member of the firm of TITLEY Brothers, oil operators and producers, operating the famous TITLEY farm, in Armstrong county. In 1888 he located at Millerstown, since which time he has continued as an operator in this field. He also devotes considerable attention to raising fine horses, and is the owner of Vespasian with a record of 2:24 . Mr. TITLEY was married March 9, 1882, to Margaret I. McKEE, a daughter of Thomas V. and Mary McKEE of Armstrong county, where her father has served two terms as county commissioner, and is a prominent and leading citizen. Five children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Mary Blanche; James Arthur; Edgar Ralph; Walter, and Leroy McKee. Politically, Mr. TITLEY is a Republican, and is also connected with Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P.

WILLIAM E. TITLEY was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1867, son of Walter and Sarah (BISH) TITLEY. At the age of fourteen years he entered Clarion Normal School, where he pursued a thorough course of study, and afterwards engaged with his brothers in the oil industry on the famous TITLEY farm. He also embarked in the breeding of fine horses, and later became a partner with his brother, John W., in the last mentioned business, which partnership existed until the fall of 1892. Mr. TITLEY is the owner of a fine stock farm of 240 acres in Armstrong county, well stocked with high bred horses. He is a breeder of pacing stock, and the owner of Hal Braden, with a record of 2:07 , by Brown Hal, the fastest horse in Pennsylvania, and with a [p. 980] record of the six fastest heats in one race of any horse in America. Since 1889 Mr. TITLEY has made his residence in Millerstown. He is a member of the Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F., and in politics, he is a stanch Republican.

JOSEPH P. CAMPBELL, son of John and Margaret (BEERS) CAMPBELL, pioneers of Butler county, was a native of this county, and here grew to manhood. He married Margaret Jane VARNUM, also a native of Butler county, and after a short residence here removed to Armstrong county; later returned to Fairview township, Butler county, and thence removed to Lawrence county, where, after a residence of eleven years, Mr. CAMPBELL died, his death occuring December 10, 1888, aged sixty-eight years. His widow now resides in Centreville, Butler county. They were the parents of six sons and six daughters, six of whom survive, as follows: Elvira, wife of H. P. KISKADDON; Joseph L., of Millerstown; George M., of Centreville; Carrie, wife of J. L. McKEE, of Millerstown; Samuel E., of Brady township, and Thomas C., a resident of Centreville.

JOSEPH L. CAMPBELL, physician and surgeon, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, January 10, 1861, and came to Butler county with his parents, Joseph P. and Margaret Jane CAMPBELL. At the age of eighteen years he entered Grove City College, where for three years he prosecuted his studies assiduously. He afterwards remained with his parents on the farm for some time, and, in 1884, engaged in merchandising at Kiester station, where he remained two years. In 1887 he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Baltimore, Maryland, where he attended two courses of lectures, and then began practice in Washingtonville, Ohio. Returning to Pennsylvania in the winter of 1888, he entered the Western Pennsylvania Medical College, at Pittsburg, and graduated from that institution, March 28, 1889. The following June Dr. CAMPBELL located in Millerstown, where he has since won and retained a large and successful practice. Politically, he is a Republican, and the family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. Dr. CAMPBELL was married March 9, 1881, to Miss Sadie F. SETH, of North Liberty, Mercer county, and has three children, viz.: Mary E.; Leonora F., and Claire. The Doctor is a member of Butler County Medical Association, and is one of the well known practitioners of the county.

SAMUEL S. BELL, son of Samuel BELL, and grandson of William BELL, pioneers of Washington township, Butler county, was born about a mile north of North Washington, February 15, 1822, was reared on the homestead and attended the common school of his neighborhood. He learned the blacksmith's trade with H. P. McCLYMONDS, of North Washington, and followed that business, first at Brady's Bend and afterwards at Boydstown, for several years. He subsequently removed to Wisconsin, where he lived from 1853 to 1856, then returned to Butler county and continued working at his trade for a few years at North Washington. Since that time he has been engaged in farming, oil producing and merchandising. On September 15, 1846, he married Margaret McCLYMONDS, a daughter of James McCLYMONDS, of Washington township. The McCLYMONDS family originally came from Scotland, and were among the early settlers of Butler county. Mrs. BELL was born and reared in Washington township, and became the mother of four sons and one daughter, viz.: Sylvester D.; James M; Samuel [p. 981] C., deceased; Perry A., and Zilla, wife of I. B. GILMORE, of Millerstown. Mr. BELL retired to Millerstown several years ago, and here his wife died, June 28, 1885. She became a member of the old Bear Creek United Presbyterian church in 1846, to which denomination he also belongs. Politically, he is a Republican, and is the agent of the Humane Society in Butler county.

FREDERICK WILLIAM PURUCKER, son of Erhardt and Louisa PURUCKER, was born in Bavaria, Germany, August 4, 1844. His father was a manufacturer of uniform and regimental goods for the use of the army, and both his parents died in Germany. At the age of fourteen years our subject became an apprentice at the butcher's trade, serving two years and paying twenty-five florins for his tuition. He then followed his trade as a journeyman in Austria, Russia, Hungary, Turkey, France, Switzerland and Italy. In 1866 he served as a soldier in the Thirteenth German Infantry, and for meritorious service on the field was promoted to the rank of corporal. In 1869 he came to America on a visit and determined to remain in this country. In 1870 he established himself in business at Pittsburg, and in 1877 he located at Millerstown, where he has since conducted a successful business. He was burned out in the fire of 1892, but immediately afterwards erected his present substantial building, which is twenty-four by seventy and two stories high, one of the finest business houses in the borough. In 1871 Mr. PURUCKER was married in Pittsburg, to Miss Louisa STAYER, a native of Baden, Germany, to which union have been born eleven children. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, at Millerstown, and in politics, are adherents of the Republican party. Mr. PURUCKER is a member of the A. O. U. W., and the E. A. U., and is one of the substantial business men of the borough.

P. G. FREDERICK, youngest child of George and Catherine FREDERICK, was born in Summit township, Butler county, in 1851, grew to maturity upon his father's farm, and received his education in the district school. In 1872 he engaged in merchandising at Millerstown, as a member of the firm of B. FREDERICK & Company, and followed the mercantile business for several years, when he sold out and engaged in blacksmithing. In 1883 he embarked in the lumber business, as a member of the firm of SEIBERT & FREDERICK, now P. G. FREDERICK & Company, and conducts a planing mill and general lumber business. On October 3, 1884, he married Sarah M. FREDERICK, a daughter of Jacob FREDERICK, and they are the parents of four children. The family are members of the German Lutheran church. In politics, Mr. FREDERICK is a Democrat, and is connected with the K. O. T. M.

ADAM SCHULTZ, of the firm of P. G. FREDERICK & Company, planing mill and lumber dealers, was born at Brady's Bend, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1857, son of Adam SCHULTZ, who came to Armstrong county from Germany about 1855. His mother died when he was a child, and his father in 1872. Adam was the fourth in a family of five children, and when twelve years of age commenced working in an iron furnace and Brady's Bend, where he continued until he was sixteen years old. He came to Millerstown January 1, 1874, and found employment with H. L. WESTERMANN, clerking and delivering goods. He remained with Mr. WESTERMANN until December 13, 1888, when he purchased an interest in his present business. On May 6, 1879, he married [p. 982] Magdalena FRANK, a native of Alsace, Germany, who came to the United States in 1871. She returned to her native land in 1877, but came back again in the fall of that year. Mr. SCHULTZ and wife are members of the German Lutheran church of Millerstown.

GEORGE P. TADDER was born in Nunda, New York, March 10, 1845, son of James and Margaret (WHEATRICK) TADDER. His father was a native of Massachusetts and his mother a native of Germany. She came to America with her parents at the age of nine years, where she grew to womanhood and married James TADDER, who had served in the War of 1812. He died in 1861, and his widow in 1891. They were the parents of seven children, only two of whom are living: William W., and George P. The subject of this sketch was reared upon the homestead farm in New York, and received his education in the public schools. In 1864 he enlisted in Company E, First New York Dragoons, and served in the Shenandoah campaign, participating in the battles of Winchester and Cedar Creek. He was discharged at Rochester, New York, July 18, 1865. At the battle of Winchester the color bearer dropped the flag and Mr. TADDER picked it up, and for this action was made color bearer, with the rank of corporal. He was captured at Lovettsville, but escaped. After the war he located at Pithole, Venango county, where he followed oil producing. In 1873 he came to Greece City, Butler county, and established a livery and casing business, and also had a similar business at Troutman. In 1882 he located at Millerstown, where he carried on a livery stable until 1894. Mr. TADDER is the inventor of several tools for the removal of casings from wells, which are now being largely adopted. On July 3, 1872, he married Mary J. MARKWELL, a daughter of Stephen MARKWELL. She was born near Toronto, Ontario, and came to Pithole, Venango county, with her parents, who now reside at Greece City. They are the parents of six children, viz.: Frank W.; Florence; Archie; Winifred; George L., and Mabel, deceased. Mr. TADDER is a Republican, in politics, and is a stanch supporter of that party.

JOHN MURTLAND was born in Concord township, Butler county, in 1812, son of Robert MURTLAND, who came to this county about 1803, where he resided until his death. Robert was a soldier in the War of 1812, and reared a family of five sons and two daughters. John grew to manhood upon his father's farm, amidst the pioneer scenes and incidents of the period. He married Margaret FLEMMING, of Butler county, and settled upon a part of the homestead in Concord township, where he remained during his life time. He died in February, 1876; his widow died March 26, 1894. Twelve children were the fruits of this union, seven of whom are now living: Ann E., wife of Simon YOUNG, of Centre township; William F., of Clay township; James H., of Fayette county; John C., of Millerstown; Maggie, wife of James RANKIN, of Penn township; Johanna, wife of C. P. GORDON, of Venango county, and I. P., who resides upon the old homestead.

JOHN C. MURTLAND, son of John and Margaret MURTLAND, was born in Concord township, Butler county, April 1, 1848, and spent his boyhood days upon his father's farm. He received his education at the little log school house not far from the old home, and at the age of eighteen years entered upon an [p. 983] apprenticeship of two years at the stonemason's trade, which business he followed for seven years. In 1873 he engaged in merchandising at Troutman, in Concord township, and continued in the same business in various parts of Butler county until 1883. For the following seven years he conducted a furniture and undertaking business at West Sunbury. In the spring of 1890 he located in Millerstown, where he has since carried on a grocery store. In December, 1871, he married Lizzie HINDMAN, a daughter of John HINDMAN, of Cherry township, and the [sic] is father of eight children. The family are members of the English Lutheran church, of Millerstown. Politically, Mr. MURTLAND is a Prohibitionist, takes quite an active interest in public affairs, and is a member of the Royal Arcanum.

CAPT. JOHN McCOLLOUGH, the progenitor of the family in Butler county, was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. His parents were pioneers of that locality and his father a practicing physician. During the absence of the latter from home, his wife was murdered by the hired man and the cabin burned to the ground. Young John escaped into the woods, and afterwards found a home with a German family, with whom he lived some years and became quite proficient in the German language. He served as an Indian scout upon the frontier during the troubles with the savages, and was afterwards a captain in the War of 1812. As an illustration of the hardships endured by these brave defenders of the nation, he often related how, upon one occasion, the soldiers of his company, worn out by forced marches, stretched themselves upon the damp ground to sleep and in the morning found their clothing and hair frozen fast to the ground. Captain McCOLLOUGH married Elizabeth SPANGLER, a native of Luzerne county, who became the mother of ten children, as follows: William; James; John; Elizabeth, wife of James CRAWFORD, of Concord township; Mary, deceased wife of Daniel KRIDLER; David; Sarah, wife of William WICK, of Concord township; Susan, wife of William TRUXAL, of Butler; Catherine, wife of John MILLER, of Allegheny county, and Phoebe, wife of John GEETS, of Fairview township. Late in the last or early in the present century Captain McCOLLOUGH and wife settled in Fairview township, Butler county, where he entered a large tract of land. He subsequently removed to Butler, resided in that borough for many years, but finally located at Millerstown, where he died in 1847, at the age of seventy-seven years. He was an elder in the English Lutheran church, a man of clear judgment, and took a prominent part in the public affairs of his times.

JAMES McCOLLOUGH, second son of Capt. John and Elizabeth McCOLLOUGH, was born upon the homestead in Fairview township, November 4, 1803. He was reared beneath the parental roof, and married Elizabeth R. SANDERSON, born August 18, 1804, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth SANDERSON. They settled upon a portion of the land entered by his father, in Fairview township, where Mrs. McCOLLOUGH died, July 1, 1855. Her husband survived until May 1, 1889. They were the parents of seven children, only three of whom grew to maturity, viz.: William S., of Fairview township; Eliza, wife of E. CHRISTY, of Oakland township, and Mary Ann, deceased wife of Jacob WOLFORD.
[p. 984]

WILLIAM S. McCOLLOUGH, eldest child of James and Elizabeth R. McCOLLOUGH, was born upon the homestead farm in Fairview township, November 10, 1826. He grew to maturity with his parents, assisting them to clear the farm, and wearing the coarse homespun clothes of the period. His education was obtained in a subscription school, the first school he attended being held in a little log building on the farm he now owns. On June 1, 1854, Mr. McCOLLOUGH was married to Hannah, a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth KAMERER, and settled upon his present homestead. The land was unimproved, and the young couple took up their residence in the little log school house previously mentioned. They are the parents of cleven[sic] children, as follows: James M., born August 14, 1855; Adam M., June 19, 1858; Robert L., January 11, 1861, died April 3, 1865; Henry K., October 29, 1863, died October 15, 1883; Charles P., May 23, 1866; Allan C., August 19, 1868; Elizabeth C., August 12, 1872; William F., July 11, 1875; Frederick H., April 27, 1878; Sarah P., May 29, 1881, and Ralph L., December 2, 1885, died April 25, 1892. The family are members of the English Lutheran church, of Millerstown, in which Mr. McCOLLOUGH has served as elder and trustee. He is a stanch Republican, and has filled the offices of justice of the peace, supervisor, and school director. He is the owner of 400 acres of well improved land, has a good oil production, and is a successful and respected citizen.

JAMES MYLET McCOLLOUGH, son of William S. and Hannah (KAMERER) McCOLLOUGH, was born in Fairview township, August 14, 1855. His boyhood days were passed upon the farm in assisting his parents with the home duties, and he attended the district school of his neighborhood, supplementing this with a course at Edinboro State Normal School and the Prospect Academy, afterwards teaching in the public schools. On May 28, 1877, he married Mary Belle SINGER, and located upon his present homestead. This union has been blessed by four children, viz.: Edmund K.; Kenneth M.; Carrol Wayne, and James Eden. Mrs. McCOLLOUGH is a daughter of David and Amanda (BOLE) SINGER, the former a native of Dauphin county, and the latter of Armstrong county. Her father died in Allegheny county, and her mother is spending her last years with Mrs. McCOLLOUGH. Though now in her seventy-fifth year, she is a well-preserved, hale and active old lady. Mr. McCOLLOUGH is a stanch Republican; a leading member of his party in Fairview township; has filled the various local offices of his community, and was a delegate to the State convention in 1894. He is one of the progressive farmers of the county, and gives a liberal support to every worthy enterprise. He is a member of Derrick Lodge, K. of P.; also of Millerstown Lodge, I. O. O. F., and the Jr. O. U. A. M.

DAVID McCOLLOUGH, sixth child of Capt. John and Elizabeth McCOLLOUGH, was born April 11, 1811, in Fairview township, Butler county. When eleven years of age he removed with his parents to Butler, where he attended the public schools and learned the potter's trade. He married Mary KING, a daughter of Philip KING, born in Armstrong county in 1803. They located upon a part of the McCOLLOUGH tract in Fairview township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Mrs. McCOLLOUGH died July 22, 1863, and her husband December 12, 1880. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: Richard J.; John C.; [p. 985] Sarah, wife of William PONTIUS; Phoebe, deceased; William H.; Diana, deceased, and Margaret M., wife of S. YAGER.

RICHARD J. McCOLLOUGH was born upon the homestead farm, February 14, 1837, and is the eldest child of David and Mary McCOLLOUGH. He grew to maturity in Fairview township and was educated in the little log school house of pioneer days. In 1856 he married Elizabeth KAMERER, a daughter of Daniel and Harriet (DAUBENSPECK) KAMERER, born May 27, 1840. They took up their residence in Fairview township, where Mrs. McCOLLOUGH died, October 12, 1883, leaving two children, viz.: Alvin A., since deceased, and Elmer S., of Fairview township. On August 20, 1884, Mr. McCOLLOUGH married Lavina KAMERER, a sister of his first wife. She was born January 2, 1848. They are members of the English Lutheran church, of Milerstown [sic]. Politically, a Republican, he has held various positions in the township, and is recognized as one of the successful farmers of the community.

ELMER S. McCOLLOUGH, son of Richard J. and Elizabeth McCOLLOUGH, was born in Fairview township, May 13, 1863, was reared upon the homestead farm, and was married January 21, 1885, to Maude HERRON, of Armstrong county. They located in Fairview township, where Mr. McCOLLOUGH devotes his time to farming and stock-raising. He is particularly interested in fine trotting-bred pacers and has some valuable stock in that line, among them being Sandy Wilkes, with a three-year old record of 2:47, sired by Crawford, with a record of 2:07 ¾. He is a stanch Republican, and takes an active interest in the public affairs of his township. To Mr. and Mrs. McCOLLOUGH have been born three sons, viz.: Alvin E.; Richard H.; and Arthur L.

JOHN C. McCOLLOUGH, son of David and Mary (KING) McCOLLOUGH, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, February 25, 1839, and was reared and educated in his native township. In 1861 he married Mary A., a daughter of Daniel and Harriet (DAUBENSPECK) KAMERER, born March 27, 1839. They located upon their present homestead, which they have since greatly improved and brought to a high state of cultivation. Mr. McCOLLOUGH enlisted in Company K, Sixty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, July 16, 1863. His regiment formed a part of the Second Brigade, First Division of the Fifth Army Corps. He participated in the battles of the Rappahannock, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Bermuda Hundred, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Five Forks, Siege of Petersburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. He was transferred to the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth regiment, July 3, 1864, and was honorably discharged June 5, 1865, after having done service in fifty-two battles and skirmishes. He is a member of Robert McDermott Post, G. A. R., of Millerstown. For many years he has been connected with the English Lutheran church of that borough, in which he has filled the offices of elder and treasurer.

SAMUEL W. McCOLLOUGH, county commissioner, is a son of William and Elizabeth (RUMBAUGH) McCOLLOUGH. His father was the eldest child of Capt. John McCOLLOUGH, and was born in Butler county in 1801. He married Elizabeth RUMBAUGH and settled in Fairview township, retiring to Millerstown after attaining old age. Mrs. McCOLLOUGH died in 1878, in her seventy-seventh year, and her husband in 1880. William McCOLLOUGH had been an active, prominent [p. 986] citizen for many years, held various official positions, and accumulated a large amount of property. Four of his children grew to maturity, as follows: Mary, who married George M. CRAIG; David S.; Peter, and Samuel W. The last mentioned was born upon the homestead in Fairview township, March 10, 1844, and grew to maturity beneath the parental roof. On August 6, 1862, he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Col. M. S. QUAY, the regiment forming part of HUMPHREY'S Division, Army of the Potomac. He did good service at Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and followed the fortunes of his regiment down to May 24, 1863, when he was honorably discharged from service. In 1864 Mr. McCOLLOUGH married Catherine KAMERER, a daughter of Daniel L. KAMERER, of Fairview township. She was born June 7, 1846, and is the mother of seventeen children, viz.: Elizabeth C., deceased; George G.; Adrian H.; Louis L.; Mary L.; Emma G.; Maggie J.; John L.; Albert A.; Cora A.; Lillian B.; Florence M.; Merrill; Elmer C., deceased; Clarence B.; Sylvester D. B., and Esther M. In 1869 Mr. McCOLLOUGH located upon his present farm in Fairview township and ranks among the leading agriculturists of the county. He has always been an ardent Republican, has filled various positions in his township, and was elected a county commissioner in the fall of 1893 by a flattering majority. He is a P. C. of Robert McDermott Post, G. A. R., and is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 947, I. O. O. F. Mr. McCOLLOUGH and wife are members of the English Lutheran church, and he is recognized as one of the progressive and successful citizens of the county.

DAVID S. McCOLLOUGH, son of William and Elizabeth (RUMBAUGH) McCOLLOUGH, was born in Fairview township, April 10, 1830. His boyhood days were spent upon the farm, and he enjoyed the meager advantages afforded by the common schools of that period. He was married December 8, 1853, to Mary, daughter of William EMERICK, born in Fairview township, February 10, 1833. She became the mother of seven children by this union, as follows: Elizabeth P., wife of John LEWIS, of Steuben county, New York; Lydia A., wife of David KIRKLAND, of Pittsburg; Anna M., wife of George HAYS, of Washington, Pennsylvania; William W.; Laura A.; Sarah B., and Curtis F. E. Mrs. McCOLLOUGH died, July 5, 1886, respected and esteemed by all who knew her. Aside from his various interests in this community, Mr. McCOLLOUGH has large land interests in Chesterfield county, Virginia. He is a Republican in politics, and is recognized as a prosperous and progressive citizen.

PETER McCOLLOUGH, son of William and Elizabeth (RUMBAUGH) McCOLLOUGH, was born April 10, 1835, upon the homestead in Fairview township. He was reared to farm life and attended the district school of his neighborhood during boyhood. On October 30, 1857, he married Anna Margaret, a daughter of Jacob and Catherine DAUBENSPECK. She was born in Washington township, Butler county, April 19, 1838, and is the mother of eight children, as follows: Catherine E., born August 8, 1857, died February 23, 1861; Rheuemma, wife of R. R. McDERMOTT, of Fairview township; Henry C., a resident of Oakland township; Newton C., a graduate of Grove City College and now county superintendent of schools; Euphema, a graduate of Wooster University, Wooster, Ohio, [p. 987] wife of John STEINDORF, of Madison, Kansas; Clara M., a graduate of the State Normal School, at Centreville; Jacob D., and Jessie Olivia. The family are connected with the English Lutheran church, of Millerstown, of which Mr. McCOLLOUGH fills the office of deacon. He is a member of Millerstown Lodge, Number 457, K. of P., and is a leading citizen of the community. He located on his present farm immediately after marriage, renting it from his father, and has resided upon the same up to the present. He has been quite successful in the accumulation of real estate, and is the owner of much valuable lands in different sections of the county. Politically, he is a Republican, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs.

HENRY C. McCOLLOUGH was born in Fairview township, November 7, 1860, son of Peter and Anna M. (DAUBENSPECK) McCOLLOUGH. He is the eldest son in a family of eight children, was reared on the homestead and attended the common schools of his district. On September 24, 1885, he married Lena MILLER, a daughter of Franklin and Elizabeth (ELLIOTT) MILLER. She is the second in a family of five children, was born in Clarion county, and came with her parents to Butler county in childhood. Her parents are now residing in the borough of Butler. One son, Clarence Campbell, has been born to this union. Mr. McCOLLOUGH has a well improved farm of 123 acres, with substantial and commodious buildings, and is recognized as one of the progressive farmers of the township. In politics, he is a Republican. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church, and the family are highly respected in the community.

DANIEL L. KAMERER, one of the oldest living citizens of Fairview township, Butler county, was born in Armstrong county, July 23[sic] 1811. His parents, Peter and Elizabeth (BUSH) KAMERER, were natives of Westmoreland county, and removed to Armstrong county about 1806, where the mother died, leaving a family six children, viz.: Adam; Daniel L.; Hannah, who married Henry SHAKELY, and lives in Perry township, Armstrong county; Catherine, who married Philip BARNHART; Elizabeth, who became the wife of William RUMBAUGH, and Sarah Ann, second wife of Philip BARNHART. Peter KAMERER married a second time, but had no children by this union. He died in Butler county, March 7, 1860. Daniel L. was reared amidst the scenes of pioneer life, when the coarse homespun clothing, the product of the frugal housewife's labor upon the little home loom, was the only kind in use, and when the hatter and shoemaker came around once a year to manufacture the hats and shoes for the settler's family. During his earlier years he labored many a day in the harvest field, cutting the grain with a sickle, and afterwards threshed the same with a flail. Mr. KAMERER was married October 15, 1833, to Anna Harriet DAUBENSPECK, a daughter of Philip DAUBENSPECK, born in Butler county, February 16, 1812. In 1854 Mr. KAMERER came to Butler county and located upon the farm where he now resides. It was then covered with an unbroken forest, but he went bravely to work to make a home for himself and family. He brought the first threshing machine into this section of the county and operated it a number of years. "Uncle Dan", as he is familiarly known, and his worthy wife still reside upon their original homestead in Fairview township, and are both in the enjoyment of good health and quite active for people of their years. They are the parents of [p. 988] thirteen children, as follows: Peter, born June 3, 1835, who resides in Butler; Margaret Ann, August 31, 1836, wife of M. MYERS, of Armstrong county; John, November 17, 1837, a resident of Concord township; Mary Ann, March 27, 1839, wife of J. C. McCOLLOUGH; Elizabeth, May 27, 1840, married R. J. McCOLLOUGH, and died November 16, 1883; George D., December 8, 1841, a resident of Butler; William, December 17, 1843, died March 28, 1892; Adam, February 2, 1845, who resides in Butler; Catherine, June 7, 1846, wife of S. W. McCOLLOUGH; Lavina, January 2, 1848, wife of R. J. McCOLLOUGH; Lewis, October 7, 1849, a resident of Greenville, Mercer county; Hannah, February 10, 1851, wife of Gilton MYERS, of Armstrong county, and Samuel H.

SAMUEL H. KAMERER was born in Armstrong county, January 25, 1853, and is the youngest child of Daniel and Anna Harriet KAMERER. He was but one year old when his parents located in Fairview township, and here he was reared and educated. On November 29, 1882, he married Nina HINTON, a daughter of Charles HINTON, of Erie county, and they located on their present farm in Fairview township. They have a family of three children, viz.: Ethel L.; Obed G., and Edna B. Besides his farming interests, Mr. KAMERER is also actively engaged in oil producing, having five good wells upon his farm. He is quite an ardent Republican, and gives his earnest support to the principles and measures of that party. He has filled the office of school director and has been treasurer four years. The family are adherents of the Lutheran church.

PATRICK McLAUGHLIN, a native of Donegal county, Ireland, where he married Nancy DOUGHERTY, came to Pennsylvania about the year 1780, and in the last decade of the Eighteenth century located on 400 acres of land in what is now Fairview township, originally Donegal. He erected a log cabin and began clearing and improving his new home. The family was among the first to settle in this part of the county. Mr. McLAUGHLIN resided upon his homestead down to his death, in 1830, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. His widow survived him about ten years, dying at the age of ninety. They reared a family of six sons and one daughter, as follows: Sarah, who married Michael Sweeney; Peter, who served in the War of 1812; John; William; James, who was a[sic] engineer on the Pennsylvania canal; Patrick, and Bernard, all of whom are dead. The family were among the founders of St. Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek, in which faith the parents lived and died.

JOHN McLAUGHLIN, son of Patrick and Nancy McLAUGHLIN, was born in the old log cabin on his father's farm, in Fairview township, Butler county, April 14, 1798. He grew to maturity upon this farm, endured the privations and trials of pioneer life, and was schooled in the dangers of that period. He remained with his parents until his majority, and then married Catherine GREEN, a native of Slippery Rock township, Butler county, born in 1800. She was a daughter of James GREEN, one of the pioneers of that locality. Immediately following their marriage the young couple settled upon 100 acres of the McLAUGHLIN homestead. The land was entirely unimproved, but before his death Mr. McLAUGHLIN had cleared off the forest and brought the farm to a high state of cultivation. They took an active interest in the advancement and improvement of the community, and both spent their entire lives in Butler county. They were members of St. [p. 989] Patrick's Catholic church, at Sugar Creek. Mr. McLAUGHLIN died at his home, April 13, 1872. His widow continued to reside there with her son Henry until her death, November 5, 1875. They were the parents of eight children, as follows: Jane, deceased; Rosanna, deceased wife of Timothy McKEEVER; James; William, who went to Illinois when a young man, enlisted in the Seventy-eighth Illinois Volunteers, in 1861, was promoted to the position of trainmaster, served in that capacity until the close of the war, and died in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, July 23, 1892; Daniel G.; Henry A.; Sarah, deceased, and David, deceased.

DANIEL G. McLAUGHLIN, son of John and Catherine McLAUGHLIN, was born in Fairview township, May 16, 1838, and remained with his parents until of age. On june 16, 1863, he married Eleanor L. BOYLE, a daughter of Hugh and Susan (McKEEVER) BOYLE, born in Armstrong county, November 11, 1838. They resided upon a portion of the old homestead until 1868, and then settled on their present farm. They are the parents of eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: Rosanna; Sylvester Raymond; Jerome A.; David P.; Hugh Leo, and Alice. The family are members of the Catholic congregation, at Millerstown. Politically, Mr. McLAUGHLIN is a Democrat, and has held various township offices. He devotes his attention to farming and oil producing.

WILLIAM W. WALLACE, gauger at Karns City, was born in Butler county, June 22, 1847, upon the homestead entered by his grandfather, Robert WALLACE, in Fairview township. His father, Thomas WALLACE, was born upon this place in 1799, married Margaret HILLIARD, also a native of the county, and resided here until 1863, when they removed to Brady's Bend, where Mr. WALLACE died in January, 1881. His widow still lives there at the age of eighty years. The subject of this sketch is the sixth in a family of thirteen children. He received a common school education, and at the age of fourteen years went to Pittsburg, and found employment in the iron mills of that city, in which he worked for eight years. He afterwards spent some years in clerking in a store at Parker. In 1871 he engaged as gauger with the National Transit Company, and is also an oil producer. Mr. WALLACE was married December 14, 1875, to Alice J., a daughter of John and E. D. SHRIVER, of Forest county. She died September 21, 1882, leaving three children, viz.: Ida D.; Charles C., and Maggie A. He was again married, January 15, 1884, to Minerva, a daughter of Josiah and Rachel BROWN. She was born in Fairview township, and is the mother of two children: Edgar Lewis, and Florella Alberta. Mr. WALLACE is a Republican, and has served in the council and on the school board of Karns City. He is connected with the Masonic order, and is a member of Derrick Lodge, K. of P., also of the I. O. O. F.

JOHN RAY was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1798. His father, William RAY, a native of Ireland, came to Butler county in 1800, and settled about two miles west of the village of Fairview, where he entered a tract of 400 acres of government land. He was one of the first settlers of that vicinity, and resided upon his farm down to his death. He had a family of five children, John being the eldest. The latter grew to maturity upon the homestead farm, and was married in 1825 to Ann SMITH, a daughter of Matthew and Nancy [p. 990] (HINDMAN) SMITH. Her father was a native of Ireland, and settled two miles east of the site of Fairview, at an early day. After their marriage, John RAY and wife took up their home on a portion of the Ray homestead, cleared and improved the same and spent the remaining years of their lives thereon. Mrs. RAY died in 1850, and her husband in 1876. He was for many years a member of Bear Creek church. They were the parents of seven children, six of whom grew to maturity, viz.: William, a resident of Oregon; Nancy, wife of Samuel DONALDSON, of Concord township; Matthew S., of Fairview; Elizabeth, wife of P. B. KELCHNER; John C., of Fairview, and Robert, deceased.

MATTHEW S. RAY was born upon the homestead farm in Fairview township, June 7, 1830. He assisted his father in clearing the land, and his mother in preparing the flax and wool from which she manufactured clothing for the family. His education consisted of a few weeks' attendance at the subscription schools during the winter season. When nineteen years of age he began an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, receiving two dollars per month during the first few months of his service, which lasted three years. He afterwards engaged in business for himself as a contractor and builder, and erected many of the houses and barns yet standing in this locality. In January, 1854, he married Euphema CAMPBELL, a daughter of Archibald CAMPBELL. Three children were born to this union, two of whom are living, viz.: Ophelia J., wife of William FLEMING, of Oil City, and Anna M. In April, 1854, Mr. RAY removed to the village of Fairview, and is to-day one of its oldest residents. The family belong to the Presbyterian church, and he is an elder in the Fairview society. Politically he has always been a stanch Republican, was elected a justice of the peace in 1855, and, with the exception of one term, has served continuously up to the present. He has also held various other positions in the township and borough. He is a charter member of Liberty Lodge, K. of H., of which he has been reporter for many years.

JOHN C. RAY, son of John and Ann (SMITH) RAY, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, January 30, 1836, and spent his boyhood days upon the farm with his parents. On November 21, 1861, he married Tirza McCONNELL, a daughter of John B. McCONNELL, an early settler of Parker township. They located on their present homestead, a portion of the RAY tract, containing 145 acres of well improved land. Mr. RAY is one of the leading farmers of the township, and his improvements are among the best in the locality. He has had fine oil production on his farm, and is prosperous and progressive. Mr. RAY and wife are the parents of four children, as follows: Anna, wife of R. E. ENGLISH; Emma; Charles, deceased, and Daisy. The family are members of the United Presbyterian church, at Fairview, in which he served as elder and trustee for many years, and is at present clerk of the session. Politically, he is a stanch Democrat, has served twenty years on the school board, and twenty-five years as overseer of the poor. Mr. RAY is one of the representative and enterprising citizens of his native township.


[End of Chapter 72-1 (pgs.945-990) - Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 71-3 (pgs.910-944) - Biographical Sketches: Butler, Summit, Clearfield, Winfield, Buffalo, Jefferson, Clinton, Penn, Middlesex Townships, and Saxonburg Borough
Continued Chapter 72-2 (pgs.990-1035) - Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
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Updated: 01 Mar 2001, 07:31