History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 72 (Pgs. 990-1035)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Pat Collins.


CHAPTER LXXII

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township

[p. 990]
PAUL McDERMOTT, a native of Donegal county, Ireland, came to Pennsylvania, and settled in Westmoreland county, where he married Margaret CHRISTIE. About 1796 they came to Fairview township, Butler county, purchased 500 [p. 991] acres of land, erected a cabin near the site of Karns City, and commenced the life of pioneers. Both spent the remainder of their lives upon this property. Mrs. McDERMOTT died in 1830, and her husband, in 1841, the latter living to the advanced age of ninety-three years. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom grew up, viz.: Edward; Mary, who married James McELWEE; Robert; James, and Paul.

ROBERT McDERMOTT, son of Paul and Margaret McDERMOTT, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, May 31, 1798, and was reared upon the homestead near Karns City. During the War of 1812 he ran away from home to enter the service, but was rejected on account of his youth. He afterwards become a captain in an early militia company and took a deep interest in military affairs. He was a great hunter and a splendid rifle shot, and many a bear, deer, etc., fell a victim to his unerring aim. In 1823 he married Jane WILSON, a daughter of William WILSON, who bore him a family of five children, as follows: Mary Ann, who married George EMERICK; William; Jane, who married James RAY; Margaret, and Nancy, all of whom are dead. Mrs. McDERMOTT died after some years of married life, and on February 4, 1841, he married Fannie MARTIN, a native of Fairview township, born February 14, 1818, and a daughter of Robert and Emily MARTIN, early settlers of this locality. They took up their residence on the old homestead, in a little log cabin built in 1823, which is still standing and in a good state of preservation. Mrs. McDERMOTT often clipped wool from the sheep, and carded, spun and wove the same into clothing for her family. She is the mother of eleven children, ten of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, as follows: Emily, wife of D. McLAUGHLIN; Sarah, who died in 1880; Alvira, wife of M. BANKS; James P.; Edward; Robert ROSS; Anita F., who died in 1881; Minerva, wife of F.G. BROWN; Ida, and John C. Mr. McDERMOTT died February 22, 1877. He was a member of Fairview United Presbyterian church, an active Democrat, and held various official positions. He was one of the early school teachers of the county, and a thoroughly progressive, enterprising citizen. His worthy wife still survives and resides upon the old homestead. She too was a teacher in the public schools. In May, 1837, she joined the Fairview United Presbyterian church, and is still a member of that society. Although well advanced in years she possesses a remarkably clear memory, and can relate many incidents of pioneer days and trials.

ROBERT ROSS McDERMOTT, son of Robert and Fanny McDERMOTT, was born on the farm where he now resides, June 9, 1851, and was reared in his native township. He early, became interested in the oil industry, and has followed that business very successfully. In 1884 he purchased the old homestead. On September 9, 1880, he married Rheuemma McCOLLOUGH, a daughter of Peter McCOLLOUGH, of Fairview township. He is an ardent Democrat, and has filled various township offices. Mr. McDERMOTT is a member of Derrick Lodge, Number 456, K. of P., of Karns City, and is recognized as one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of his township.

WILLIAM WILSON, SR., a native of Ireland, came with his wife and family to Pennsylvania after the Revolutionary war, and settled in Lancaster county. In the year 1800 he journeyed across the mountains to Butler county, and pur- [p. 992] chased a tract of 400 acres of wild land from a man named HALL, in what is now Fairview township, the consideration being $150. He cleared a small space, erected a log cabin twelve feet square, where the town of Petrolia now stands, and there this pioneer family took up their abode, being among the first settlers of this part of the county. Their nearest and most numerous neighbors were the wild animals that roamed through the forest and surrounded the cabin at night. Greensburg was the nearest trading point, the trip to that town requiring two weeks to make. Some years later Mr. WILSON erected a log dwelling half a mile west of his first location, where both he and wife spent the remainder of their lives. He died August 31, 1839, aged eighty-six. Mrs. WILSON died April 5, 1838, aged eighty-three years. They were the parents of eight children, all of whom are dead, as follows: Robert; William; Jane, who married Robert McDERMOTT; Nancy, who married Edward McDERMOTT; James; Armstrong; John, and Thomas.

JAMES WILSON, son of William WILSON, Sr., was born in Lancaster county, April 6, 1798, and was but two years old when his parents settled in Butler county. His mother made the trip on horseback, and carried him in her arms the greater part of the way. He grew to maturity in the new country, surrounded by privations and enjoying the limited advantages which fell to the lot of the youth of that period. In 1828 he married Sarah HUTCHESON, a native of Westmoreland county, born September 22, 1798, a daughter of William HUTCHESON, one of the early settlers of Parker township. Having learned the tanner's trade in boyhood, Mr. WILSON located in Lawrenceburg after his marriage, where he engaged in the tanning business, but later settled on a farm in Parker township. In 1843 they took up their residence on a portion of the WILSON homestead, in Fairview township, where Mrs. WILSON died, August 10, 1886, and her husband, September 1, following, their deaths occurring only a few weeks apart. Both were members of the United Presbyterian church, of Fairview, in which he filled the office of elder for several years. They were the parents of the following children: Margaret W., wife of John JAMESON; William; Eleanor J., deceased wife of George H. GRAHAM; Martha, deceased wife of William GIBSON, and James A. of Fairview township. Mr. WILSON was a Democrat until the organization of the Republican party, when he espoused its principles and continued to support that organization until his death. He filled various township positions of trust during his residence therein, and was one of the respected pioneers of the community.

WILLIAM WILSON, eldest son of James and Sarah WILSON, was born in Lawrenceburg, December 7, 1831, came to Butler county with this parents and grew to maturity under the parental roof. His educational advantages were such as the early schools afforded, which he attended during the winter season for a few weeks each year. Until his fifteenth year his clothing consisted of the coarse homespun of the period. After reaching his maturity he commenced working out at ten dollars a month, later engaged at the carpenter's trade, and followed that business as a journeyman for twelve years. He resided some years in Oil City, and was engaged in the oil industry. In 1872 he returned to Petrolia, and conducted the home farm for his father. He now owns 121 acres [p. 993] of the original tract, upon which he resides, and devotes his attention to agricultural pursuits. Mr. WILSON was married, December 31, 1862, to Lucinda SHELL, a native of Clarion county, who died in Oil City, in 1865. He was again married, October 25, 1883, to Emma M. GILFILLAN, a daughter of James G. and Mary A. GILFILLAN, a pioneer family of Mercer county. They have an adopted son, Willie LeRoy, aged six years. Mr. and Mrs. WILSON are members of the United Presbyterian church, of Fairview, in which he has served as trustee. He has always been a Republican, and enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, August 9, 1862. He served in the Army of the Potomac, participated in the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, and the Virginia campaign, and was honorably discharged on June 3, 1863.

JAMES ARMSTRONG WILSON, son of James and Sarah WILSON, was born upon the WILSON homestead in Fairview township, Butler county, December 25, 1839, spent his boyhood days upon the farm and received a common school education in the little log school house of the neighborhood. On June 16, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was mustered into service at Harrisburg. His regiment joined the Army of the Potomac, and he participated in the battles of Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Harrison's Landing, and Malvern Hill, and followed his regiment through all the varying fortunes of war, in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, etc. He was twice wounded, once in a skirmish at Salem Church, and again in the Wilderness. He was taken prisoner before Petersburg, was sent to Belle Island and thence to Andersonville, where he was confined six months. He was then exchanged and returned home on furlough, where he was ill for three months. After recovering he joined his regiment, but the Confederacy had crumbled away, Lee had surrendered and the war was over. He was honorably discharged July 5, 1865, after participating with his regiment in the grand review at Washington. Returning to his home Mr. WILSON engaged in farming, which vocation he has followed up to the present. In February, 1873, he married Martha McGARVEY, a daughter of William McGARVEY, of Fairview township. Two children were born to this union, viz.: Robert N., and Maggie May. In 1878 Mr. WILSON located upon his present homestead at Fairview, a portion of the tract entered by his grandfather. In 1884 he erected a substantial residence, one of the most commodious farm houses in the township. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church, in which Mr. WILSON is superintendent of the Sabbath school, while his wife takes an active interest in woman's work. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, is a member of the borough council and school board, and also fills the office of assessor. He is a member of the Union Veteran Legion at Butler, and is one of the patriotic citizens of the community.

ISAAC REEP, SR., was born upon the site of Philadelphia, and when a lad of ten years of age carried supplies to the soldiers in the Continental army, in which his father was serving. He grew to manhood upon the homestead farm, married a Miss BASH, and in 1801 came to Butler county, making the journey in a wagon, and entered a tract of 400 acres of land on the line of Fairview and Parker townships. It was covered with an unbroken forest, in the midst of which he built a cabin and began the work of making a home. Mr. and Mrs. REEP reared a family [p. 994] of five children, and resided upon their original settlement the balance of their lives.

ISAAC REEP, son of Isaac REEP, Sr., was born near Philadelphia, in 1787, and came to Butler county with his parents when fourteen years of age. He grew to maturity here, and served in the War of 1812. He married Mary PONTIUS, a native of eastern Pennsylvania, and settled on a portion of the REEP homestead, near the village of Fairview, where both he and wife resided until death. Mr. REEP died July 2, 1863, and his wife, March 9, 1880, aged eighty-three years. They were members of the Evangelical Lutheran church, and the parents of thirteen children, only three of whom are now living. The names of their children are as follows: Elizabeth; John; Isaac; Gabriel; Samuel; William; Mary; Jacob; Henry; Lewis; Eli; Catherine, and Solomon. Of these William, Eli and Catherine survive.

ELI REEP, son of Isaac and Mary REEP, was born upon the homestead in Fairview township, June 14, 1832. He was reared upon the farm, assisting his father in the home duties, and obtaining a meager education in the subscription school of the neighborhood, to which he was compelled to walk three miles through the forest. He was afterwards engaged on Oil creek in drilling and operating. He was married, August 22, 1861, to Mary J. BENNINGHOFF, a daughter of John and Elizabeth BENNINGHOFF, of Venango county, where she was born July 24, 1839. They settled on a part of the REEP homestead, where they lived until September, 1884, and then removed to Fairview borough. Mr. REEP still owns 130 acres of the tract entered by his grandfather, on which there are two producing oil wells. Of their six children, four are living, viz.: John W.; Eli E.; Etta A., and Achsah J. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. Though formerly a Republican, Mr. REEP is now a Prohibitionist; has served three years as borough assessor, and has also been a member of the borough council. He has always been active in church affairs, and has served many years as steward, trustee and class leader.

ALEXANDER BAIRD STOREY was born September 1, 1806. His parents, James and Hannah (BAIRD) STOREY, were natives of Ireland and pioneers of Fairview township, Butler county, settling upon a tract of unimproved land near the site of Karns City. James STOREY was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died March 17, 1815. He was the father of four sons and one daughter, all deceased but Thomas, of Worthington, Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch married Juliet CAMPBELL, who was born in Fairview township, November 14, 1820. They resided some time at Brady's Bend, but returned to Fairview township about 1849 and spent the remaining years of their lives upon a farm in this township. Mr. STOREY died June 6, 1882, and his wife, January 2, 1881. They reared a family of eight children, as follows: William C., of Brady's Bend; James B., who enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in 1861, re-enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, was twice wounded at Petersburg, losing his left hand thereby, was discharged from service, took a course at Iron City Commercial College, served one term as sheriff of Butler county, and was subsequently appointed to a position in the auditor general's office, where he was serving at the time of his death, [p. 995] October 28, 1889; Hannah J., wife of J. L. SHANER, of Clarion county; Alexander W., a druggist of North Clarendon; Townsend R.; Juliet A., deceased; Almira M., wife of J. S. JAMISON, of Armstrong county, and Edna C., wife of D. H. WHEELER, of Fairview township.

TOWNSEND R. STOREY was born in Fairview township, Butler county, June 24, 1850, son of Alexander BAIRD and Juliet STOREY. He grew to maturity upon his father's farm, and in 1875 engaged as a pumper and soon afterwards embarked in oil producing. In 1888 he went into the drug business at Edenburg, Clarion county, and in 1892 located at Karns City, where he established and has since carried on the same business. Mr. STOREY was married March 15, 1881, to Elizabeth O., a daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth STOREY, of Parker township. They have one daughter, Juliet Elizabeth. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as a member of the borough council. He is a prominent member of Karns City Lodge, Number 931, I. O. O. F., and of Derrick Lodge, Number 456, K. of P.

DAVID RANKIN, a native of Ireland, immigrated to Pennsylvania at an early day and settled on 200 acres of land in what is now Fairview township, Butler county, which he cleared and improved. He married Elizabeth WALLACE, a daughter of John WALLACE. She was born in Ireland and came with her parents to Maryland when a girl, whence the family removed to Butler county in 1806, and settled in what is now Fairview township. Mr. RANKIN carried on a distillery upon his farm for some years, and died March 15, 1813. His widow survived him more than half a century, dying in April, 1869. They were the parents of four children, named as follows: William; Jane, deceased wife of Josiah SOMMERVILLE; Joseph, and David C.

DAVID C. RANKIN, the only surviving child of David RANKIN, was born upon his father's farm in Fairview township, March 19, 1813, a few days after the death of his father. He grew up under the care of his widowed mother, and enjoyed the limited advantages of pioneer days. In September, 1835, he married Nancy MOORE, a daughter of Andrew and Annie (STOREY) MOORE, who was born in Butler county, September 27, 1817. They lived for some years upon the old homestead, and then removed to the western part of the township, locating upon their present farm, near the village of Fairview, in the spring of 1878. Mr. RANKIN and wife are the parents of sixteen children, six of whom are living, and are among the oldest citizens of the township. They are members of the United Presbyterian church. He has been a Republican since the formation of that party, and has filled various township offices.

BENJAMIN S. RANKIN, son of David C. and Nancy RANKIN, was born near Karns City, December 9, 1842, grew to manhood with his parents and received a common school education. On October 2, 1861, when but eighteen years of age, he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served in the Army of the Potomac, and participated in the Peninsular campaign, and in the battles of Williamsburg, the Seven Days fight before Richmond, on the Chickahominy, at Malvern Hill, etc. In September, 1863, under general orders from the war department, he enlisted in Company L, Fourth United States Artillery, was stationed at Suffolk and Yorktown on garrison duty, [p. 996] and served with Grant at Cold Harbor and the siege of Petersburg. He was honorably discharged on November 13, 1864, and returned to his home. Mr. RANKIN was married May 20, 1868, to Melinda WICK, a daughter of William and Sarah WICK, born in Concord township, May 12, 1849. They settled in Fairview township, and removed to their present farm near the village of Fairview in 1878. Six children have been the fruits of this marriage, as follows: Charles H.; Minnie A., deceased; an infant daughter, deceased; Sadie N.; Amy E., and Gurdon C. The family are connected with the English Lutheran church. Mr. RANKIN is a stanch Republican, and has filled various township offices. He is a member of Karns City Lodge, I.O.O.F., also of Derrick Lodge, K. of P., and is connected with the G.A.R.

WILLIAM RANKIN, eldest son of David RANKIN, was born in what is now Fairview township, Butler county, Februay [sic] 14, 1808. His father died when William was five years old, and he was reared by David McKIBBIN of Clarion county. He there married Sarah LEVIER, and returned to Butler county, settling in Allegheny township. Five children were born to this union, viz.: David M., a Presbyterian minister; Daniel L., of Butler; Rosa S., wife of G. W. AGGAS; Elizabeth A., wife of S. H. BROWN, and Josiah R., a Methodist Episcopal preacher. The parents spent the latter years of their lives in Fairview township. In early life they were Presbyterians, but died members of the Lutheran church. Mrs. RANKIN died August 18, 1882, and her husband, September 26, 1883.

DANIEL L. RANKIN, second son of William and Sarah RANKIN, was born in Allegheny township, Butler county, September 11, 1839, was reared a farmer and obtained a common school education. He remained on the homestead farm until August, 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until January, 1864. He then veteranized, re-enlisting in the same company, and served until mustered out, July 13, 1865, with the rank of orderly sergeant. He participated in the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Seven Days Fight before Richmond, and Kingston, White Hall and Goldsboro. Besides the battles already mentioned, he took part in many lesser engagements and skirmishes. He was taken prisoner at Plymouth, North Carolina, April 20, 1864, and was held in rebel prisons until December 10, following, when he was paroled. He came home on furlough, and was married January 3, 1865, to Maggie RIDER a daughter of Michael RIDER. They are the parents of five children, viz.: Olive L., wife of Sherman SANDERSON; William J.; Elnora A.; Sadie N., and Herbert E. Mr. RANKIN and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. He is an ardent Republican, has always taken an active interest in public affairs, and was a candidate for county treasurer in 1893, but did not receive the nomination.

JAMES GIBSON, a native of Ireland, with his brothers, Alexander, John and Hugh, came from Westmoreland county to Butler county in 1797, where they had selected lands the previous near[sic], in what is now Parker township. Their father, Levi GIBSON, came with them. James married Rebecca KNOX, a native of Scotland, and after some years residence in Parker township, they removed to Armstrong county, where both died. They were the parents of eleven children, as follows: Elizabeth, who married Robert CAMPBELL; Levi; Sidney, who mar- [p. 997] ried Samuel CAMPBELL; George; Esther, who became the wife of William HUTCHINSON; Samuel; John; Eleanor, who married E. WALLY; Houston; Rebecca, who married Solomon GIBBS, and James.

LEVI GIBSON, eldest son of James and Rebecca GIBSON, was born in Parker township, Butler county, September 20, 1804, and was reared beneath the parental roof. In 1832 he married Mary Ann CAMPBELL, born February 20, 1809, and they took up their residence in a log cabin in Parker township. They resided in this township until their death, which occurred in 1867 and 1862, respectively. They were the parents of eight children, viz.: Rebecca J., wife of Sloan COCHRAN; Lewis C.; William; Nancy, wife of Alexander WALLY; James H.; Andrew C.; Mary Ann, and Levi B., the two last mentioned being dead.

WILLIAM GIBSON, third child of Levi and Mary Ann GIBSON, was born upon the homestead farm in Parker township, April 14, 1836, and there grew to manhood. He learned the carpenter's trade in early life, and followed it for some years. On November 4, 1858, he married Martha, a daughter of James WILSON, and located upon a farm now within the borough limits of Petrolia, which he operated and also worked at his trade. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company L, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served in the Army of the Potomac under Sheridan, taking part in the Shenandoah campaign. He was assigned to duty in the quartermaster's department and remained there until July, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. Mrs. GIBSON died January 16, 1886, the mother of the following children: Alfred L., deceased; James A.; William A.; Anna M.J., deceased; Ira C.; George G., deceased, and Sarah May. Mr. GIBSON was again married June 14, 1887, to Nancy McGARVEY, a daughter of William McGARVEY. Her father was born in Donegal county, Ireland, July 17, 1800, came to the United States in 1830, and located in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. In 1835 he married Margaret SMITH, who was born in Butler county, May 23, 1805, to which union were born six children. Mrs. McGARVEY died December 19, 1876, and her husband, March 10, 1885. Mr. GIBSON resided in Petrolia until 1888. In 1882 he was appointed postmaster of the borough, and served for four years, and was also burgess and justice of the peace for many years. In 1888 he took up his residence in Fairview borough, and in 1891 he was appointed oil inspector for Butler county. He and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, of Fairview. He is connected with J. G. CAMPBELL Post, G. A. R., of Petrolia, of which he has been treasurer for many years.

WILLIAM FLEMING, a native of Armagh county, Ireland, was married in his native land to Elizabeth BARTLEY, a native of Tyrone county. In 1798, with his wife and two children, he immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Allegheny county, on Pine run. In 1808 he removed with his family to Butler county, entering a tract of government land on Bear Creek, near where the village of Martinsburg now stands. They were among the first settlers of that locality. Mr. FLEMING and wife were members of the Covenanter church, in which body he filled the office of elder. In 1834 he severed his connection with that organization and became a citizen of the United States. He was a prosperous farmer, [p. 998] and at one time owned 600 acres of land in Parker township. He died in that township, July 19, 1847, in his eighty-fifth year. His widow survived him until May 15, 1851, dying at the age of seventy-two years. They were the parents of the following children: Edward; Hugh; John; William D.; Thomas; Robert; Johanna, who married James JAMISON; Jane, who married Charles ROBERTS; Eleanor, who became the wife of William BARTLEY; Jowanna, wife of John CAMPBELL, and Mary, who died unmarried.

EDWARD FLEMING, eldest son of William and Elizabeth FLEMING, was born in Ireland, October 8, 1798, came to America with his parents in infancy, and grew to manhood in Butler county, amidst the dangers and privations of pioneer life. At the age of sixteen years he went to Pittsburg, where he learned the bricklayer's trade, returning to Butler county in 1820. He was married that year to Margaret KELLY, a daughter of Archibald and Margaret KELLY, early settlers of Parker township, where she was born, June 17, 1803. Mr. FLEMING and wife resided in Parker township until their death, which occurred July 7, 1847, and May 28, 1874, respectively. Both were members of the United Presbyterian church, of Fairview. They were the parents of the following children: Elizabeth, deceased; Margaret, wife of Andrew GRAHAM, of Concord township; William A., of Petrolia; Martha J., wife of William DAUBENSPECK, of Parker township; Thomas S., of the same township; Mary, wife of S. S. REEP, of Fairview township; Johanna, deceased wife of John CRAWFORD; Caroline, wife of Lewis GIBSON, of Parker township; John E., of Oakland township, and Archibald, who died in infancy.

WILLIAM A. FLEMING, eldest son of Edward and Margaret FLEMING, was born in Parker township, June 23, 1826. He was reared upon his father's farm, and attended the subscription school of the period for a few weeks during the winter seasons. At the age of seventeen years he commenced life for himself as a farm laborer, at ten dollars per month. When twenty-one years of age he returned home to assist his widowed mother in carrying on the homestead farm, and remained with her for the ensuing three years. On December 28, 1848, he married Nancy Jane GRAHAM, of Parker township, born in Venango county, August 25, 1830, and a daughter of John GRAHAM. They settled upon a farm in Parker township, but later removed to Maple Furnace, where he spent eleven years in the employ of M. S. ADAMS. He afterwards located at Brady's Bend, and filled the office of market house clerk for six years. At the expiration of this time he returned to his farm in Butler county, removed to Petrolia in 1879, and has since resided in that borough. Mrs. FLEMING died December 6, 1892. She was a consistent member of the Merhodist [sic] Episcopal church for fifty-four years, having joined that organization when eight years of age. She was the mother of six children, viz.: Margaret J., deceased; Edward G., of Petrolia; Flora M., wife of S. G. COFFIN, of Bradford; and John W., Clara J., and George H., all of whom died in early youth. In 1890 Mr. FLEMING was elected justice of the peace, and in 1891 was chosen burgess, which position he still occupies. He is connected with Oil City Lodge, F. & A. M., and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has served as class leader forty-four years.

[p. 999]
SAMUEL GRAHAM was a native of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and a veteran of the Revolution, who settled near Carlisle at the close of the war. The ancestry came from Ireland about 1700, and settled in Cumberland county. Samuel was reared in that county, and in 1797 came to Butler county and purchased a tract of 200 acres in what is now Allegheny township, upon which he built a small cabin. The following year he brought his family to this new home in the forest of Butler county, where they began pioneer life. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at Meadville, in 1813, while in the service. His wife was Nancy Jane GRAHAM, and they were the parents of the following children: Nancy, who married John FORQUER; Rebecca; John; James; Betsey, who became the wife of John BRANDON; Andrew, and Bailey.

JOHN GRAHAM, eldest son of Samuel GRAHAM, was born in Allegheny township, Butler county, May 1, 1800. After he grew to manhood he located at Franklin, Pennsylvania, where he was manager of an iron furnace, later removed to Parker township, Butler county, where he operated the iron mines for Maple furnace. He died in Parker township in 1856. He married Mary HILL, who survived him thirty-four years, dying in 1890. Their family consisted of the following children: Nancy J., deceased wife of William A. FLEMING; Phoebe A., wife of George McMURRAY; George H., of Fairview; Florinda, wife of Edward MORGAN; Mary, deceased wife of James RANKIN; Ruth, wife of Thomas ALSWORTH; Adelaide, who married Reed CAMPBELL, and for her second husband, William HERRON, and Maggie, wife of Thomas BARTLEY, of West Virginia.

GEORGE H. GRAHAM, only son of John and Mary GRAHAM, was born in Franklin, Pennsylvania, March 1, 1833, and returned with his parents to Butler county at the age of eleven years. He obtained his primary education in the common schools, and afterwards attended Allegheny College, at Meadville. He then engaged in teaching, and taught at different periods from 1849 until 1870, being principal of the West Sunbury Academy for three years. He took up mine engineering, and is a practical mine engineer, as well as a surveyor. He has been engaged in mining and oil producing for some twenty years, but has made surveying his principal business. Politically, he is an ardent Democrat, was elected to the legislature in 1878, and has served as a jury commissioner of Butler county. He has filled the office of school director in Fairview borough for fifteen years, and that of burgess for five years. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was commissioned as regimental quartermaster, and later detailed as brigade quartermaster on General PAUL's staff. He was at the battles of Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was discharged from the service in 1863, at the close of his term of enlistment. Mr. GRAHAM married Ella J. WILSON, a daughter of James WILSON, of Fairview township, and has the following children: Clara, wife of J. C. McKEE; Anna, a teacher in the schools of New Whatcome, Washington; John H.; James W., and Ada. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. GRAHAM is connected with the J. G. CAMPBELL Post, G. A. R., of Petrolia. Mr. GRAHAM was initiated in 1880 a member of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A.M., and was W. M. and secretary of the lodge for four years each.

[p. 1000]
JAMES JAMESON was a son of John JAMESON, who came from eastern Pennsylvania to Butler county at an early day, and entered a tract of land in Parker township. The family are of Scotch-Irish extraction, the ancestors coming to America prior to the Revolution. John JAMESON was among the first settlers of Parker township, and reared a family of several sons and daughters, James being one of the number. The latter grew to maturity upon his father's farm, and married Jane SMITH, a daughter of James SMITH, also a pioneer of Parker township. Mrs. JAMESON died upon the homestead in 1835, aged thirty-nine years. Her husband survived many years, and died at the home of his son Thomas, in Fairview township, in 1863, aged seventy-two. They were the parents of eight children, six of whom grew to maturity, viz.: Elizabeth, and John B., both deceased; Ann, deceased wife of William CAROTHERS; James, deceased; Thomas; Margaret, wife of A. H. CAROTHERS; Rachel, wife of James A. PATTERSON, and Hugh, deceased.

THOMAS JAMESON, son of James and Jane JAMESON, was born in Parker township, Butler county, July 31, 1827. His mother died when he was seven years old, and he was taken into the home of Mrs. Margaret COCHRAN, of Venango township, with whom he lived until sixteen years of age, then returned to Parker township and worked by the day or month at whatever he could find to do. He subsequently went to Cherry township, and there engaged at the carpenter's trade, which he followed some years. In December, 1849, he married Polly SMITH, of Cherry township, who died in 1851. In 1852 he was married to Nancy J. McELVAIN, a daughter of George and Mary A. McELVAIN, of the same township. They located on their present farm in Fairview township in March, 1859. Mr. JAMESON purchased seventy-six acres, and their first residence was a small plank house, which has since been replaced by a large and commodious structure. Many other improvements have been made, and the farm increased to 240 acres. They are the parents of eleven children as follows: Almira, deceased; Sarah J., wife of J. H. CHATHAM; George M., of Pittsburg; William B., a practicing physician of Philadelphia; Ella, deceased; M. Alice; Alvin J., deceased; John S.; Emma Z.; Flora J., and Fred H. Mr. JAMESON and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, of Fairview. He is an ardent Republican, takes a commendable interest in public affairs, and has served in the various township offices, and three years as a jury commissioner. Mr. JAMESON is one of the substanial[sic], representative farmers of Fairview township.

JOHN SUTTON was born in the year 1800, and was a son of Joseph and Sarah SUTTON, natives of New Jersey, who came to Butler county at an early day and settled in what is now Concord township, where both resided down to their death. John was reared amidst pioneer surroundings, and endured the hardships and trials of that period. He married Mary SUTTON, a daughter of Platt and Elizabeth SUTTON, and settled upon a tract of land in what is now Concord township, where he resided for many years. He died in Parker township about 1860, and his wife at the home of her son, John, in Oil City, some years later. To them were born eight children, as follows: Joseph, deceased; Jeremiah, who resides in Parker township; Jonathan D., deceased; Eliza J., deceased wife of Joseph RUMBAUGH; James J., of Fairview township; John, of Parker township; [p. 1001] Sarah Nancy, wife of Robert MORROW, of Warren county, and Mary, wife of David MONTGOMERY, of Venango county.

JAMES J. SUTTON, son of John and Mary SUTTON, was born in Concord township, Butler county, January 18, 1834. His boyhood days were passed upon his father's farm, and he obtained a limited education in the log school house of his district, which he attended for a few months in the winter seasons. When about ten years of age he removed with his parents to Armstrong county, lived there about nine years, and then returned to Butler county, where he attained his majority. On January 18, 1859, he married Harriet, a daughter of Matthew and Sarah BROWN, born in Fairview township, March 11, 1837. Matthew BROWN was a son of John BROWN, a native of Ireland, who settled in what is now Fairview township at an early day. In 1861 Mr. SUTTON located at Buena Vista, where he has since resided. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers. His company was assigned to service as a part of the First Division, Ninth Army Corps, of the Army of the Potomac. He served until the close of the war, was with his regiment in the grand review at Washington, and was honorably discharged in June, 1865. He returned to his home, and in 1870 was appointed the first postmaster of Peachville, serving in that capacity until 1888, since which time he has lived a retired life at Buena Vista. He owns a valuable farm of eighty-four acres in Fairview township, and is interested in oil producing. In politics, he is a stanch Republican, and has always taken an active interest in political matters. Mr. and Mrs. SUTTON are members of Zion Lutheran church, in which body he has served as deacon and elder. They are the parents of one daughter, Leni Luemma, wife of W. D. DART, of Buena Vista.

GEORGE KING, one of the well known older citizens of Fairview township, was born in Armstrong county, Mary 3, 1820, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth KING. His father was a native of Westmoreland county, came to Armstrong county with his parents, who settled at Brady's Bend, there married and afterwards served one term as sheriff of that county. At the age of eleven years George was bound out to a family for his board and clothing until his seventeenth year. He then worked by the month as a farm hand, receiving his board and clothes and eighteen dollars in cash for his first season's work. Thus he laid the foundation of an industry and economy which served him well in after years. On November 14, 1848, he married Magdalena KAMERER, a daughter of David and Catherine KAMERER, a native of Armstrong county, born May 24, 1831. They immediately settled upon the farm where they now reside, which was then comparatively unimproved, taking up their abode in a little log cabin surrounded by forest trees. Of the eight children born to them, seven grew to maturity, viz.: John H.; Daniel S.; Catherine A., wife of George HILES; Elizabeth, deceased wife of Louis KIEFFER; Jared D.; Margaret, wife of William CORBETT, and Aaron A. Mr. KING and wife are members of Oak Grove German Reformed church, and in politics, he was originally a Whig and afterwards a Republican.

DANIEL S. KING, second son of George and Magdalena KING, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, March 31, 1852. At the age of sixteen years he went to Brady's Bend, and learned the butcher's trade with Joseph HERTWECK, [p. 1002] who afterwards became his father-in-law, with whom he remained four years. In 1873 he came to Butler county, and in partnership with his brother, John H., engaged in the butchering business. He later became interested in the oil industry as a pumper, subsequently as a producer, and has now a good production. Mr. KING was married November 9, 1880, to Annie HERTWECK, a native of Butler. Her father, Joseph HERTWECK, was born in Germany, October 27, 1833, immigrated to the United States, and October 23, 1854, was married at Butler to Philomina GEISER, also a native of Germany. They resided in Butler some years, thence removed to Brady's Bend, where Mr. HERTWECK died September 12, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. KING have had the following children: Charles Sylvester; Joseph George, deceased; Catherine C.; Cora Maude; Dora Ellen; William John, deceased, and Rose Emma, deceased. Mr. KING is an active Republican, and he is connected with Millerstown Lodge, K. of P.

JOHN H. KING, eldest son of George and Magdalena KING, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, January 21, 1850, and remained with his parents helping them to clear and improve the farm until he attained his majority. He then went to East Brady, and followed the bricklayer's trade four years. In 1873 he engaged in the butchering and meat business with his brother, Daniel S., and later embarked in the oil industry, as a pumper and producer, to which he still devotes his attention. On August 9, 1883, he married Maggie J., a daughter of Leonard and Christina KAYLOR, of Armstrong county, where she was born October 28, 1863. Two children have been born to this union, one of whom is living, Lillie May. Mr. KING is a stanch Republican, and is connected with Derrick Lodge, K. of P., at Karns City.

JOHN ELLENBERGER, a native of Armstrong county, married Elizabeth FAIR, and resided for many years in his native county. He afterwards removed to Butler county, settling on a farm in Fairview township, upon which he resided down to his death, in 1881, aged eighty-one years. His widow died on the old homestead in Armstrong county, in 1891, aged eighty-nine years. They reared a family of seven sons and two daughters, of whom the following survive: Simon, of Armstrong county; William; John; Jacob, and Charles, all residents of Fairview township, and Enos, of Oakland township.

WILLIAM ELLENBERGER, son of John and Elizabeth ELLENBERGER, was born on the homestead in Armstrong county, December 25, 1826. His boyhood days were spent beneath the parental roof, and his education was obtained in the pioneer log school house of the neighborhood. In 1849 Mr. ELLENBERGER came to Butler county and located in Fairview township. On February 14, 1850, he married Harriet REEP, a native of Butler county, and a daughter of Henry and Fannie REEP. Her father came from eastern Pennsylvania to Butler county at an early day, and married here, his wife being a native of Armstrong county. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died upon his farm, one mile north of Fairview, September 9, 1859. His widow died August 19, 1871, in her seventy-sixth year. Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. ELLENBERGER located on a farm in Fairview township. The land was comparatively unimproved, their first home being a little log cabin in which they lived for three years. They then removed to another farm near by, where they resided until 1892, and then located [p. 1003] in the village of Fairview. They are members of St. Peter's Reformed church, of Fairview, in which he fills the office of elder. Ten children have been born to them, as follows: Mary E., wife of Samuel T. DODD; Jemima, wife of W. H. REISINGER; William J.; Henry Isaiah, deceased; Margaret E., wife of J. B. BICKEY; Lucinda C., wife of William C. HART; Fannie J., wife of J. EBERHARDT; Adela Laura, wife of H. W. HAYS; Chambers AUSTIN, and Simon P., deceased. Though formerly a Republican, Mr. ELLENBERGER is now a Prohibitionist. He has served as overseer of the poor and is a member of the borough council. By industry and economy he has accumulated a handsome competence, and is recognized as one of the substantial citizens of the community.

ISAAC ELLENBERGER, a son of John and Elizabeth ELLENBERGER, was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, August 12, 1821, and grew to maturity beneath the parental roof. In 1846 he married Elizabeth REEP, a native of Fairview township, born June 21, 1821. Her father, Henry REEP, married Fannie UTTERMAN, and both he and wife died in Fairview township. The subject of this sketch located in Fairview township, near Buena Vista, after his marriage, but settled upon the farm where his widow now resides in 1853. Here he died on February 1, 1861. He was the father of six children, as follows: John Henry; Fanny, wife of Frederick KAMERER; Isaac, and Mary, both deceased; Amos W., and Walter J., deceased.

AMOS W. ELLENBERGER, son of Isaac and Elizabeth ELLENBERGER, was born in Fairview township, June 16, 1856, and has spent his entire life in this community. He resides upon the old homestead farm and devotes his attention to agriculture, though he has also some oil production. Mr. ELLENBERGER was married June 15, 1882, to Emma D., a daughter of William and Rosa LANGE, of Oakland township, to which union have been born five children, viz.: Mary E.; Walter; Blanche, deceased; Rosa C., and Minnie F. Politically, he is a stanch Republican.

CHARLES SWARTZLANDER was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, in June, 1822, son of Abraham and Elizabeth SWARTZLANDER. When Charles was seven years old his parents removed to Armstrong county, making the trip in a covered wagon drawn by three horses, our subject walking much of the distance. His father purchased a claim in Armstrong county, upon which he subsequently settled, and both he and wife died there. Charles grew to maturity in that county amid the scenes and hardships of pioneer days, attending school in a little log building with the rudest furnishings of the period. When fourteen years of age he worked six months for fifty dollars. In 1843 he came to Butler county and worked at the carpenter's trade, having served an apprenticeship of two years at that business. On May 6, 1847, he married Phoebe PONTIUS, a daughter of Gabriel and Mary PONTIUS. She was born on the PONTIUS homestead in Donegal township, September 23, 1828, and is the mother of the following children: Harvey O.; Amos G., deceased; Samuel M.; William J., and Mary A. M., deceased. In politics, Mr. SWARTZLANDER is a Republican. His wife is a member of the English Lutheran church, and the family are adherents of that faith. Their son, Harvey O., was born April 10, 1848, in Fairview township, and has [p. 1004] always followed the vocation of a farmer. He is a member of Karns City Lodge, I. O. O. F., which he joined September 9, 1876. Politically, he is an ardent Republican.

ISAAC KEPPLE was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1817. His father, Lewis KEPPLE, removed from eastern Pennsylvania to Westmoreland county, in early manhood, and there married Christina KLINE. Eleven children were born to this union, five of whom survive, viz.: John, a resident of Armstrong county; Isaac, of Butler county; Daniel, of Iowa; Jonathan, who resides in this county, and Mrs. Margaret BARNHART, of Oakland township. The subject of this sketch grew to maturity in his native county, assisting in the farm duties, wearing home-made clothing, and helping his mother to prepare the flax and wool from which the clothing for the family was made upon the home loom. He attended the subscription schools of his period, and shared the trials and hardships of pioneer days. When eighteen years of age his father died, and Isaac started out for himself, as a farm hand, receiving for his labor from forty to fifty cents per day. He later found employment upon the Pennsylvania canal, afterwards rented the old homestead in Westmoreland county, which he tilled for a number of years, and then purchased a farm of his own in that county. In 1848 Mr. KEPPLE sold his property, came to Butler county, and located upon his present farm in Fairview township, near Buena Vista. Here he has since resided, but has greatly improved the place during the passing years. Oil was found upon his farm in paying quantities, and at one time there were eleven producing wells upon it. He still has a good production from two independent wells. Mr. KEPPLE was married October 16, 1850, to Mary, a daughter of George and Catherine (BARNHART) THORN, early settlers of Butler county. She was born in Fairview township, September 3, 1828, and is the mother of five children, viz.: Angeline; William; Winfield; Addison, and one who died in infancy. The family are members of the Reformed church, and in politics, Mr. KEPPLE is an ardent Republican.

WILLIAM HERON, a farmer and producer, was born in Toronto, Ontario, May 17, 1837, son of Adam and Hannah (ASHBERRY) HERON, natives of Scotland and England, respectively. They were married in England, thence went to Canada and later came to Pennsylvania, where the father died and where the mother still resides. William began life for himself working upon a farm when twelve years of age. In 1864 he came to Titusville, Venango county, where he engaged as a pumper in the oil fields. In 1873 he located at Karns City, where he followed the oil industry, and afterwards purchased an interest in a well on the J. B. CAMPBELL farm. He followed producing for some years, and in the spring of 1883 purchased the CAMPBELL farm, consisting of 136 acres, upon which he has since resided. Mr. HERON was married in 1866, to Emma HOBBS, a native of Canada, to which union were born six children, viz.: Minnie, deceased; Charles E.; Archie J.; James A.; Cora E., and Belle, deceased. Mrs. HERON died in 1884, and he was again married, February 15, 1887, to Mrs. Ada E. CAMPBELL, widow of James R. CAMPBELL, by whom she had the following children: Nancy Jane, deceased; Cora J., deceased, and Lulu M. Mrs. HERON is a daughter of John and Mary GRAHAM, and a native of Allegheny township, Butler county. [p. 1005] By her marriage to Mr. HERON she is the mother of one daughter, Emma, deceased. In politics, Mr. HERON is a Republican. He is a member of Argyle Lodge, Number 540, F. & A. M.

NICHOLAS PONTIUS, one of the well known and prominent citizens of Fairview township, was born in Prussia, Germany, April 18, 1832, son of Charles and Elizabeth (HARTWICK) PONTIUS, natives of Prussia. Charles PONTIUS was a shoemaker, and came to the United States, with his wife and six children, in 1845, landing at Baltimore, and thence proceeding to Pittsburg, where he followed his trade. Later he settled on a farm in Washington county, Ohio, where both he and wife died. They were the parents of six children, three of whom are living, viz.: Charles, a merchant of Cameron, Ohio; Nicholas, and Caroline, wife of Gottlieb FOX, of Virginia. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days in his native land, where he received a common school education. He was thirteen years of age when his parents came to the United States, the voyage across the Atlantic in a sailing vessel consuming fifty-six days. After arriving at Pittsburg he entered a furniture manufactory, and served an apprenticeship of three years as a finisher, receiving three dollars per week and later four dollars per week during his apprenticeship. He afterwards worked as a journeyman until 1862, in which year he located at Millerstown, Butler county, and engaged in the mercantile business. In 1864 he removed to Buena Vista, where he continued in business until 1878, in which year he retired. In the meantime he had embarked in the oil industry, and now owns 140 acres of good land with a profitable production. He is also interested in the eastern belt, is one of the leading producers of his locality, and at one time owned an interest in fifty-six wells in the Millerstown field. He is a stockholder in the Producers Pipe Line Company, and was one of the original stockholders in the German Oil Refinery at Brady's Bend, which was afterwards purchased by the Standard Oil Company. In 1852 Mr. PONTIUS was married, in Pittsburg, to Christina WOLFE, a native of Saxony, Germany, who came to Butler county with her parents when five years of age. To this union has been born one son, Edward, who died in infancy. Politically, Mr. PONTIUS is a Republican, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1878 he and his wife spent the summer on a visit to their native land, enjoying a portion of the fruits which his industry and economy accumulated. He has been a very successful business man, and is recognized as one of the substantial citizens of the county.

ROBERT O. SHIRA was born in Washington township, Butler county, June 10, 1839, son of David and Maria SHIRA. He was reared upon the homestead farm, and enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, in September, 1861. He served with his regiment in the Army of the Potomac, and participated in the battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks. He was wounded in the latter fight, by a gun shot through the right thigh, and was taken prisoner, but when the rebels were driven back he was left upon the field for dead. He was sent to the hospital at Davis Island, and when sufficiently recovered was granted a furlough. He returned to the hospital and was sent to Bedloe's Island, and honorably discharged, on a surgeon's certificate, for disability. In February, 1864, he re-enlisted in his old company and regiment, was soon promoted to second lieutenant of Company B, Sixth Heavy Artillery, [p. 1006] and did good service until the close of the war. He was honorably discharged in June, 1865, and participated in the grand review at Washington. In 1868 Mr. SHIRA married Clara E. GRAHAM; they resided in Washington township until her death, November 6, 1879. She was the mother of four children, viz.: Flora E., deceased; Victor E.; Edith E., and one that died in infancy. Mr. SHIRA was again married, October 5, 1888, to Margaret HAYS. They removed to Fairview borough in the fall of 1893, where they have since resided. They are members of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican, and a member of the G. A. R.

KENNETH McINTOSH was born in Inverness, Scotland, June 10, 1834, son of William and Isabel McINTOSH. In 1849 he came with his parents to Chautauqua county, New York, and at the age of sixteen years began working on a farm as a laborer, a position affording him much hard work but little pay. About 1857 he went west, and for several years dealt successfully in real estate in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Returning to New York he engaged in farming and the dairy business until 1873, in which year he settled in Butler county, and engaged with the Angell Oil Company, as farm superintendent. In the spring of 1879 he purchased and located upon his present farm of 130 acres, at Fairmont, which he has greatly improved in every way. In 1861 Mr. McINTOSH married Rose A. BELDING, of Stockton, New York, and has three children, viz.: Lizzie M., wife of M. A. LEE; Edward E., and Addie. Mrs. McINTOSH died in 1888. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Karns City. Politically, he is a Republican, and is one of the leading farmers of his township.

PATRICK R. BURKE was born in Brooklyn, New York, March 17, 1848, son of James and Mary Ryan (RYAN) BURKE, natives of Ireland. His father came to Brooklyn in early manhood, where he followed contracting and building, was married in that city to Mary RYAN, and spent the remaining years of his life there. His widow lives in Cleveland, Ohio. They were the parents of two children, Patrick R. being the only survivor. He lived in Brooklyn until fourteen years of age, and attended a private school in that city. In 1862 he removed with his mother to Cleveland, and there entered St. Mary's College where he remained until the spring of 1866. In June of that year he located at Franklin, Venango county, and engaged as a pumper at Coal City. In the spring of 1873 he settled at Karns City, where he accepted the position of bookkeeper with the lumber firm of ROGERS & ALLEN, with whom he remained until May 14, 1875, when he embarked in the mercantile business in that borough, as a partner with H. P. MECLIMANS. In September, 1875, Mr. BURKE became sole proprietor and conducted the business until 1888, in which year he retired because of ill health. He afterwards devoted his entire attention to his oil interests in Butler and McKean counties, and is now the owner of two producing farms in Fairview township. Mr. BURKE was married November 4, 1874, to Ada Z., a daughter of Hugh P. and Margaret (CAMPBELL) MECLIMANS, and of the eight children born to this union, six survive: Franklin K.; Carrie Maude; Cleveland R.; Ellen J.; Eliza, and Eugene. Politically, he has always been an ardent Democrat; was twice a delegate to State conventions; filled the office [p. 1007] of burgess of Karns City, and is now serving his fourteenth consecutive year as a member of the school board. He is a Past D. D. G. M. in the A. O. U. W., and was the prime mover in establishing Karns City Lodge, of which he was elected first officer and is at present treasurer. He was also one of the organizers and first N. G. in Karns City Lodge, Number 931, I. O. O. F., in which he is past D. D. G. M., and treasurer of the lodge for ten years. He is a prominent member of the Masonic order, and is connected with Parker Lodge, also with the chapter, commandery, and consistory, in which he has taken the 32nd degree. Mr. BURKE is a prominent citizen of the community, in which he has extensive business interests, and has done his full share towards building up the social and material prosperity of the borough.

GEORGE E. McGILL, oil producer of Karns City, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, October 1, 1845, son of George and Sarah McGILL. When our subject was five years old his mother died, and his father removed to Chautauqua county, New York, where he died in 1857. At the age of thirteen years, George E. was thrown upon his own resources, but by industry and economy he soon acquired sufficient funds to enable him to enter the academy at Westfield, New York, and graduated from that institution three years later. After a short time spent upon a farm, he found employment in the oil fields of Venango county, as an engineer, but soon acquired some leases and began drilling. His efforts proved unsuccessful, the first seven wells he put down coming in dry, and at the age of twenty years he found himself a bankrupt and $3,000 in debt. This would have discouraged a man of less determination, but with indomitable energy he persevered, and securing a small lease on the Foster farm, soon had a well producing 200 barrels a day. This was the turn of the tide in his fortune, and he subsequently became one of the well known operators in that famous field. He also conducted extensive operations in Warren county, and established the Commercial Club Livery, at Titusville, at an outlay of $22,000. In July, 1872, he came to Butler county and put down the second well on the McCLYMOND's farm, at Karns City, which came in at 125 barrels a day, and he has ever since been prominently identified with the oil industry of Butler county. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as a member of the Karns City council. Mr. McGILL is proud of the fact that he was one of the originators and charter members of the Titusville Oil Exchange, the first established in this country.

GEORGE BECK, proprietor of the Producers Refinery, Karns City, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, February 8, 1852, son of John George and Anna Maria BECK, natives of Wurtemburg, where his mother still resides at a ripe old age. The subject of this sketch grew to maturity in his native land, and there received a common school education. In 1874 he immigrated to Pennsylvania and located at Modoc, Butler county, where he engaged in the oil business with his brother John, who had settled in this county in 1872. He remained at Modoc until 1876, then came to Karns City and operated in that field. In 1878 they purchased the Producers Refinery, and carried on the business until the death of John BECK, in January, 1894, since which event George has been sole proprietor. The works have a capacity of fifty barrels of distilled petroleum a day, all of which is used in this section of the country. Mr. BECK was married in 1879, to [p. 1008] Anna Maria BEZLER, a native of Wurtemburg, and is the father of five children: Annie M.; Minnie B.; Clara K.; John A., and Walter W. He is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of the borough council. He is connected with Derrick Lodge, K. of P., also with Karns City Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. BECK takes an active interest in public movements and is an enterprising and progressive citizen. By close attention to his business affairs he has accumulated through the passing years a handsome competence, the result of his own inherent industry and business ability.

P. D. SHERWIN, proprietor of the Enterprise Coal Works, at Karns City, was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, November 5, 1848. His parents, Samuel and Dinah SHERWIN, natives of England, immigrated to Pennsylvania and settled in Schuylkill county, his father engaging in the coal industry. His mother died in 1857, aged thirty-three years. His father died at Karns City in 1888, aged sixty-six years. The subject of this sketch was the eldest in a family of six children, and gained a practical knowledge of mining in boyhood. In 1866 he went to Richmond, Virginia, and took charge of the Deep Run coal mine in Henrico county, of that State. In 1869, owing to the prevalence of fever and ague, he returned to Elk county, Pennsylvania, and took charge of the King mines under his father. In 1871 he went Monterey, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and with his father leased the Miller Edie mine, and in 1873 they leased the Rattlesnake mine for three years. In 1876 Mr. SHERWIN came to Karns City, and with his father embarked in the coal industry. In April, 1888, he opened the Enterprise Coal Works, the most completely equipped and largest works in this section of the county. In 1894 he leased and remodeled the Standard mine on the Pittsburg, Shenango and Lake Erie railroad, in Clay township. Mr. SHERWIN was married June 28, 1871, to Annie BLACKETT, a native of England and a daughter of John BLACKETT, who came to the United States with his family when she was an infant. Seven children are the fruits of this union, as follws: Samuel; John B.; William E.; James G.; Gracie B.; Charles P.; and Hattie, deceased. Politically, Mr. SHERWIN is a Republican, and is one of the enterprising citizens of the community.

GEORGE STRANCE, engineer in charge of the National Transit Company's pump station, at Karns City, was born at Olean, New York, December 19, 1859, son of John and Catherine STRANCE, natives of Wurtemburg, Germany. John STRANCE immigrated in early manhood to New York, his wife also coming to the same State in girlhood. They were married and resided in New York for some years, but removed to Warren county, Pennsylvania, where Mr. STRANCE died, and where his widow still resides. George is the fifth child in a family of four sons and two daughters, and commenced in life for himself at the age of sixteen years, coming to Petrolia, Butler county, where he entered the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Company as messenger boy, and devoted his spare moments towards acquiring a knowledge of telegraphy. In August, 1879, he was placed in charge of the Western Union office at Karns City, and on Novemer 5 of that year he accepted a situation as operator in the office of the National Transit Company. The following year he was promoted to the position of engineer, which he has occupied for the past fourteen years. He is the architect [p. 1009] of his own good fortune, having commenced at the bottom round of the ladder. When a messenger boy at Petrolia his meager earnings would scarcely make ends meet, but by strict attention to business and a due regard for the interests of his employer, he won the promotion he has since enjoyed. Mr. STRANCE was married November 21, 1893, to Miss Tillie STONE, of Millerstown, and has two children. He is a member of Derrick Lodge, K. of P., also of Karns City Lodge, I. O. O. F., and is connected with the Encampment, at Parker. He is independent in his political views, and has been a member of the school board for six years, during five of which he filled the office of secretary of the board.

JOSEPH EARHART was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1827, son of David and Catherine (ALTMAN) EARHART, pioneers of Indiana county. His father was born December 4, 1789, and his mother in 1788. They resided near Blairsville until 1838, whence they removed to near the town of Indiana. In 1845 they removed to Scott county, Iowa, which they made their home the balance of their lives. David EARHART died in Armstrong county, June 3, 1848, while on a visit to his son, Rev. D. EARHART; his wife died in Iowa at the age of eighty-two years. They were the parents of eleven children, nine sons and two daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, and seven of the number are still living. Joseph was the ninth child, and spent his boyhood days with his parents. The first school he attended was held in a log building twenty feet square, erected by his father, and furnished in the primitive manner of that period. In 1845 he went to Scott county, Iowa, with his parents, who settled on a farm near Davenport. In 1847 he returned to Armstrong county, served an apprenticeship at the tinner's trade, and followed that business for some years. In 1852 he embarked in merchandising, and in 1856 located at Butler as a member of the firm of A. G. BOYD & Company, general merchants. He sold his interest in 1858 and returned to Armstrong county, and the following year entered the mercantile business at Worthington, where he carried on down to 1883. In that year he established a mercantile business at Karns City, Butler county, which he conducted until 1892. He then retired to his present farm, one mile south of Karns City, upon which he has a good oil production. Mr. EARHART was married march 10, 1853, to Margaret J. BOYD, a daughter of John BOYD, Esq., a prominent deceased citizen of Armstrong county. Eleven children were born to this union, as follows: Sarah A., deceased wife of P. M. GRAFF; William P., deceased; Ada F., wife of Rev. C. A. CUMMINGS; Anna M., wife of A. M. McCOLLOUGH; C. Josephine, wife of R. M. HUNTER; Lyda B.; Mary W.; Charles H., a practicing physician; Harry B.; Olve Gertrude, and Frances E. The family are connected with the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. EARHART has filled the office of elder. Politically, he is a Republican, and when Lee invaded Pennsylvania he closed his store and went to Harrisburg as a member of the Home Guards, thus exhibiting his patriotism, love of country, and devotion to his native State, of which he is justly proud.

JACOB W. GLOSSNER was born in Eagleville, Centre county, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1849, son of Jacob and Elizabeth GLOSSNER, natives of Germany, who immigrated to the United States. They were the parents of six children, of whom the following still survive: George, of Clinton county; Christopher; Jacob W., and Elizabeth, wife of John SLOAN, of Harrisburg. [p. 1010] When Jacob W. was about six years of age his father died. His mother subsequently married James SAYERS, and died when our subject was a lad of thirteen. He was then thrown upon his own resources, and found employment as a driver upon the Pennsylvania canal. On August 26, 1864, being then only fifteen years of age, he enlisted in Company D, Eighty-first Pennsylvania volunteers, which was assigned to service in the First Brigade, First Division, Second Army Corp. He participated in the siege of Petersburg, the battles of Gravelly Run, Hatcher's Run, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, and was also with his regiment in the grand review at Washington. He was honorably discharged at Philadelphia, June 8, 1865. His brother Daniel served three years in the Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. After the war closed Mr. GLOSSNER engaged as a lumberman, and in 1871 embarked in the butcher business. In the fall of 1877 he came to Butler county, located at Millerstown, and engaged in the oil business. In 1886 he established a meat market at Karns City, which he still continues, besides being interested in the oil industry as a producer. Mr. GLOSSNER is a Republican, has been quite active in politics, and was elected burgess of his borough in 1888, and has filled that position by successive re-elections up to the present. He has also served upon the school board, and is one of the progressive enterprising citizens of the town. He is a member of Robert McDERMOTT Post, G. A. R., of Millerstown, and is connected with Derrick Lodge, Number 456, K. of P., of Karns City. Mr. GLOSSNER was married September 19, 1882, to Sarah, a daughter of John and Mary A. (DICKEY) WHITE, a native of Butler county. Four children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Harry D.; Frederick L.; Mary Alice, and Grace A. Mrs. GLOSSNER is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Karns City.

GEORGE L. HILLIARD, general merchant, Karns City, was born in Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, November 23, 1861, son of Simon and Lydia HILLIARD, natives of Armstrong and Centre counties, respectively. His father was a blacksmith, and followed that occupation down to his death, in 1885. His mother now makes her home with our subject. George L. is the sixth in a family of seven children. He received a good public school education, and at the age of fifteen years commenced life as a newsboy on the railroad, to which he devoted his attention for two years. He next spent some time in the lumber regions of Pennsylvania, where he experienced the hardships and privations of a lumberman's life. At the age of eighteen he returned to Foxburg, and found employment as a brakeman on what is now the Pittsburg and Western railroad. He rose rapidly, and when he resigned his position in 1888, he was acting in the capacity of passenger conductor. He went to California in that year, and for the following three years was a conductor on the Atlantic and Pacific railroad. In 1891 he returned to Karns City, and established his present mercantile business. Mr. HILLIARD is a member of Fox Lodge, Number 825, I. O. O. F., which he joined when twenty-one years of age, and is also connected with Valley Lodge, A. O. U. W., of Foxburg. He has been a member of Hawkins Division, Number 114, O. of R. C., at Pittsburg, for nine years. In 1890 he married Miss Mary JOY, of Foxburg, a native of Cornwall, England, who came to the United States with her parents when four years of age. Both he and wife are members [p. 1011] of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Karns City, in which he fills the offices of trustee and assistant superintendent of the Sunday school. Mrs. Hilliard takes an active interest in woman's work and is president of the local branch of the Epworth League, in which her husband has charge of the literary work.

CHAMBERS SCOTT, deceased, was a son of Robert SCOTT, a native of Scotland, who came to Butler, Pennsylvania, about 1811, where he spent the balance of his life. The subject of this sketch was born in the borough of Butler in 1829. He learned the saddler's trade, and about 1840 established himself in the harness and saddlery business at Fairview. Being a careful and correct business man, he prospered from the beginning, and finally engaged in general merchandising, which he continued down to his death, August 1, 1887. He was a public-spirited and progressive citizen, and held various official positions in Fairview borough and township. In 1850 Mr. SCOTT married Elizabeth CAMPBELL, born in Derry county, Ireland, in 1830. Eleven children were the fruits of this union, viz.: William H., of Garden City, Kansas; Mary, wife of W. H. JAMESON; Salina; Campbell McK.; Robert C.; Minerva, wife of O. W. AKINS; Laura M., wife of Samuel CAMPBELL; John C., of Chicago; Nora, wife of C. RANKIN; Rhinalda P., and Flossie E. Mr. SCOTT was a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in his political views, a Republican. Mrs. Scott resides in Fairview, and is a respected member of the United Presbyterian church. The business is still conducted by Mrs. SCOTT and her children, being under the personal supervision of her son, Robert C., who, since the death of his father, has carried it on successfully.

JAMES MAXWELL was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1800, and came to Butler county with his two older brothers, William and John L., when a lad of sixteen years of age, settling near the town of Butler. In 1820 he married Rebecca CARSON, a native of Lawrence county, and settled at Mt. Jackson, Lawrence county, where he followed the hatter's trade. In 1831 he removed to Butler, where he continued the same business for several years. In 1838 he lived on the farm now the site of the Orphan's Home, and superintended the erection of the building occupied by that institution. In 1840, after a short residence in Donegal township, he removed to a farm near Middletown, where he died, January 5, 1870. His widow survived him five years, dying in March, 1875. They were the parents of twelve children, only two fo whom are living, viz.: Robert T., of Bradford, and James J., of Fairview.

JAMES J. MAXWELL, son of James and Rebecca MAXWELL, was born at Mt. Jackson, Lawrence county, on the Ohio side of the line, August 18, 1831, came to Butler with his parents the same year and grew to maturity in this county. He was educated in the log school house of those days, walking two and a half miles through the forest to obtain the meager advantages which the schools of that period afforded. When fourteen years of age he commenced to learn the moulder's trade at Fairview, and followed that business as a journeyman for several years. Mr. MAXWELL was married October 25, 1853, to Sarah J. McMURRAY, a daughter of Alexander McMURRAY an early settler of Marion township, Butler county, and a soldier in the Black Hawk war. In 1855 they removed to Harrisville, where Mr. MAXWELL carried on a foundry for three years, then returned to [p. 1012] Fairview and engaged in the same business, which he conducted until 1872, and then sold out. In 1874 he embarked in the livery business, which he has conducted up to the present. Mr. and Mrs. MAXWELL have had a family of six daughters and one son, five of whom are living, viz.: Eliza J.; Mary A.; Margaret E.; Ella and James M. The family are adherents of the Presbyterian church. Politically, Mr. MAXWELL was first a Whig, later a Know-Nothing, and finally a Republican. He has served in the borough council and on the school board. He has been a member of Connoquenessing Lodge, Number 278, I. O. O. F., since 1853, and is connected with Liberty Lodge, K. of H., in which he has passed the chairs and is now financial reporter.

SAMUEL EYKES, retired merchant and farmer, was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1830, son of John and Jane EYKES, both of whom died when Samuel was a child. He was thus thrown upon his own resources, and at the age of fourteen years was working among strangers for his board and clothes. He found employment in the iron mills of his ntaive county, and in the mines at Brady's Bend. Carefully saving his earnings, he was finally able to purchase a farm in Perry township, Armstrong county, upon which he resided many years and still owns. In 1867 he came to Fairview and engaged in merchandising, and conducted a store until burned out, February 20, 1877. He purchased eighty-six acres of valuable land adjoining the borough, upon which he has two oil wells, and devotes his attention to farming. In 1851 Mr. EYKES was married to Catherine REESE, a native of Cambria county, and has one son, Samuel David. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Politically, he is a Republican, and has served in the borough council and on the school board.

ROBERT HAYS was born in Donegal county, Ireland, in 1812, and came to Pennsylvania with his parents when twelve years of age. The family located in Armstrong county, where his parents resided until their death. Robert was reared in that county, his first home being a little log cabin in the midst of a forest, where wolves, bears and deer roamed at will. He married Deborah McKEE, a daughter of Thomas and Margaret (BLAINE) McKEE, and settled upon the HAYS homestead in Armstrong county, devoting his attention to agricultural pursuits. They resided there until 1876, in which year they removed to the village of Fairview, Butler county, where Mr. HAYS died in 1877. His widow survived until 1883, dying at the age of seventy-five. They reared the following children: Eliza, wife of William STOREY, of Fairview; Thomas, of the same borough; John M., of Venango township; Margaret, wife of R. O. SHIRA, of Fairview; James HARVEY, of Burton, Ohio; William G., a resident of Marietta, Ohio; Robert, who lives upon the old homestead; Samuel W., a resident of butler, and David R., of Marietta, Ohio.

THOMAS HAYS, eldest son of Robert and Deborah HAYS, was born in Armstrong county, January 19, 1840, and grew to maturity, upon his father's farm. He attended school in the old fashioned log school building of that period, and subsequently a select school. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, which was assigned to service in CASEY's Division, Fourth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and participated in [p. 1013] the Peninsular Campaign and the battles of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, etc. He was later transferred to the Eighteenth Corps and stationed at Suffolk, Virginia. In November, 1862, under general orders from the war department, he re-enlisted, in Battery L, Fourth United States Artillery. He afterwards served in the siege of Suffolk, at Yorktown, the siege of Petersburg, Cold Harbor, and engagements before Richmond, and was honorably discharged November 13, 1864. Mr. HAYS was married December 21, 1865, to Kesiah J., a daughter of Christopher F. and Isabella FOSTER, of Armstrong county. Six children are the fruits of this union, as follows: Jennie L., wife of Dr. V. F. THOMAS; Christopher F.; Robert N.; Maud B.; Thomas H., and Charles F. W. In the spring of 1867 Mr. HAYS located on a farm in Fairview township, which afterwards became a valuable oil property, and engaged in oil producing. In 1876 he erected his present residence in the borough of Fairview, which has since been his home. The family are Presbyterians, and he fills the office of elder in the church at Fairview. Mr. HAYS is a member of McNair Lodge, A. O. U. W., of which he has been secretary for ten years; has also served eight years as treasurer of Liberty Lodge, K. of H., and for the past five years has been recorder of the E. A. U. He is also connected with Argyle Lodge, F. & A. M. He is an active Republican, and has acceptably filled various positions in the township and borough.

JAMES M. BYERS, producer, was born in Perry township, Armstrong county, December 25, 1847. His father, Henry BYERS, a native of Westmoreland county, came when a young man to Armstrong county and located upon a tract of unimproved land. He married Sarah, a daughter of Michael and Sarah SHAKLEY, born in Perry township, Armstrong county, in 1810. They took up their residence in a small log cabin, and lived upon this farm until Mr. BYERS' death, in 1879. His widow is still living at the ripe old age of eighty-four years. They were the parents of eleven children, the names of those living being as follows: Samuel J.; Lucinda, wife of David BENSON; Fanny, wife of Thomas SNOW; James M.; Rosa, wife of John McELROY; John S., and Wallace H. When James M. was a young man he went to Millerstown and learned the wagon-maker's trade, followed that vocation for some years as a journeyman, and finally established himself in business at Lawrenceburg. In the spring of 1873 he came to Fairview, where he established a wagon shop and also engaged in the oil industry, which he still follows. Mr. BYERS was married June 21, 1871, to Elizabeth, a daughter of Jacob FREDERICK, of Millerstown, and has six children, viz.: Edward W.; William J.; Minnie S.; Pearl; Frederick, and Earl. The family belong to the German Reformed church. Mr. BYERS is a member of the school board, and is connected with McNair Lodge, A. O. U. W.

WILLIAM T. McCOY, deceased, was born in Illinois, June 14, 1852, son of William H. and Nancy J. McCOY, and came to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, with his parents, in boyhood. He was reared in that county, and received a good education in the public schools and at Grove City College. He afterwards taught for a number of years in Mercer and Butler counties, and later located at Fairview, where he engaged in the mercantile business. He afterwards devoted his attention to the management of his farm and other interests until his death. [p. 1014] Mr. McCOY was married October 28, 1879, to Martha SMITH, a daughter of John and Rebecca SMITH, to which union were born five children, two of whom are living, viz.: Martha Alice, and Margaret Isabel. Mr. McCOY died in Manitou Springs, Colorado, where he had gone for his health, March 3, 1889. He was a consistent member of the United Presbyterian church, was a public-spirited citizen, and took an active interest in the advancement and educational development of the community, serving in the borough council and on the school board. He was a man of upright character, and was respected by all who knew him.

WILLIAM C. HAWN, merchant, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1859, son of William Christopher and Louisa HAWN, natives of Prussia and Saxony, Germany, respectively. He came to Butler county when eleven years of age, and settled in Brady township, where his father still resides. He received a public school education in the schools of this county and Pittsburg, and at the age of eighteen he entered the employ of the Pittsburg, Shenango and Lake Erie Railroad Company, at Harrisville, as station boy, and also commenced studying telegraphy. At the end of five months he was promoted to the position of station agent and operator at Harrisville, and two years later was transferred to Mercer, where he had charge of the station for six years, when he resigned. In 1888 he came to Fairview and engaged in merchandising, as a member of the firm of HAWN & BLACK, becoming sole proprietor in 1892. Mr. HAWN is an energetic, successful business man, and takes an active interest in public affairs. He is a Democrat in politics, has served in the borough council, and is secretary of the school board. He is connected with Petrolia Lodge, K. O. T. M. In April, 1884, he married Austa M., a daughter of H. C. BLACK, a merchant of Harrisville. They are the parents of three children, but one of whom, Edith, survives. Mrs. HAWN is a member of the Presbyterian church.

REV. ROBERT M. SHERRARD, pastor of the Fairview United Presbyterian church, was born near Cambridge, Ohio, June 9, 1852, son of James and Elizabeth SHERRARD. The family is of French descent, and traces its ancestry back to the Huguenots. His father was a native of Ireland, came to the Untied States when twenty-one years of age, and died in September, 1876, aged eighty-eight years. His mother died in Michigan, in September, 1886, at the age of seventy-nine. The subject of this sketch spent his early life upon the farm, receiving such advantages as the district schools afforded. When fifteen years of age he went to Cambridge and began clerking in a store, and later purchased an interest in the business. He sold out in 1873, and in the fall of that year entered Muskingum College, at New Concord, Ohio, where he completed a classical course and graduated in 1876. In the fall of the latter year he entered the Theological Seminary, at Xenia, Ohio, and in the autumn of 1877, entered Allegheny Theological Seminary, graduating from that institution in the spring of 1879. Returning to Ohio he was licensed by the Muskingum Presbytery, April 16, 1879, and was ordained by College Springs Presbytery, of Iowa, May 10, 1881. He received a call from the United Presbyterian congregation at Blanchard, Iowa, remained there for five years, thence removed to Commerce, Michigan, and in September, 1890, he accepted a call from the Fairview congregation, with which [p. 1015] he has since been connected. Mr. SHERRARD was married March 31, 1880, to Sarah E. ADAIR, of Delaware county, New York, a daughter of James and Mary ADAIR. Two sons and one daughter are the fruits of this union.

FRANCIS WHITMIRE, SR., came from Berks county to Butler county in 1798, accompanied by his wife and family, and settled on a tract of land near the site of Boydstown, Oakland township, which he purchased of Stephen LOWREY. His wife's maiden name was Catherine RUST, and they were the parents of nine children, all of whom are dead. Among them were Daniel; John; Francis; Julia, and Catherine. Daniel served in the War of 1812, and died on March 21, 1867, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. His wife Susan died May 14, 1861, in her sixty-ninth year. Mr. and Mrs. WHITMIRE spent the remaining years of their lives upon the homestead, where he died in 1832.

JOHN WHITMIRE, Sr., second son of Francis and Catherine WHITMIRE, was born in what is now Oakland township, Butler county, in 1805, and died on October 31, 1891. He was reared in this township, and was known as one of the most industrious and successful farmers of the community. He married Catherine PAINTER, who was born and reared in Westmoreland county, and educated in the typical log school house of pioneer days. She died on February 1, 1882, in her eighty-first year. She was generous, industrious and economical, having a kind word for those with whom she came in contact, and was respected by all as a kind wife and a good neighbor. Nine children were the fruits of this union, six of whom are living, viz.: Peter; Jacob; John; Eliza, wife of Robert MORROW; Mary, widow of Christopher RIDER, and Susan, wife of John BEATTY, all residents of Butler county. The eldest child, Frank, died at the age of twenty-two, and the other two in early youth. Mr. WHITMIRE was a stanch Democrat, took a commendable interest in public affairs, and filled every office in the township with the exception of justice of the peace.

FRANCIS WHITMIRE, third son of Francis and Catherine WHITMIRE, was born in Oakland township, Butler county, April 9, 1809, was reared upon the homestead, and devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits. He settled upon a part of the home farm, where he continued to reside until his death, June 13, 1880. Mr. WHITMIRE was married to Susan OSEMBAUCH, to which union were born three children, viz.: William; Margaret, who married a Mr. WEISENSTEIN, and Anna Lena, who married Jacob PAINTER. William enlisted in Company M, Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry, was taken prisoner at Bristoe Station, August 22, 1862, and confined at Libby prison, and Belle Isle, where is is believed he died. Mr. WHITMIRE's second wife was Anna PAINTER, a daughter of Peter PAINTER. She was born and reared in Westmoreland county, and died May 8, 1893, in the seventy-eighth year of her age. She was a member of the Luterhan church, a kind wife and a devoted mother. Eleven children were born to this marriage, of whom four are living, viz.: Daniel; Samuel W.; Anna D., wife of L. RIDER, and Catherine, wife of John T. BLACK. The deceased are Ellen, who married Joel SHREWSBURY; Caroline; Harper S.; Lewis S., and three that died in early youth. Mr. WHITMIRE was a member of the Lutheran church, and in politics, an adherent of the Democratic party.

PETER WHITMIRE, eldest son of John and Catherine (PAINTER) WHITMIRE, [p. 1016] was born in 1831, on the farm adjoining his present homestead. He resided with his parents until his maturity, and attended school a few months during each winter season. He married Margaret RIDER, of Centre township, to which union have been born six children, all of whom are dead but one, Catherine, wife of James CAMPBELL, of Concord township. The deceased are as follows: Jacob I.; Francis P.; John; Emma Adela, and one that died in infancy. Mr. WHITMIRE settled on his present place in 1845, purchasing then 100 acres, but he now owns between 300 and 400 acres, with good building and under a high state of cultivation. He is one of the leading farmers of his township. In 1862 he enlisted in Company B, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, was taken prisoner and confined for sixty-two days in Libby prison, and was then exchanged. The last summer of the war he spent at Leavenworth, Kansas, and was mustered out at Pittsburg in the fall of 1865. He is a stanch Republican, and has filled the offices of township collector and constable. Mrs. WHITMIRE died, August 7, 1892, at the age of sixty-two. She was a faithful member of the Lutheran church, to which denomination Mr. WHITMIRE also belongs. In the spring of 1894 he married Penninah ALWORTH, of Parker township, Butler county.

JACOB WHITMIRE, second son of John and Catherine WHITMIRE, was born upon the old homestead in Oakland township, March 17, 1833. He attended the pioneer schools of his neighborhood during the winter months, and while living with his uncle went to the Doyle school, in Buffalo township, and spent one winter at the Dugan school, in Slippery Rock township. Returning home, he remained with his parents until the age of twenty-two, and then began in life for himself. On October 6, 1856, he married Isabella G. BROWN, a daughter of Robert BROWN. She was born in Fairview township in 1832, lived there until the age of seventeen, and then removed with the family to Clay township, where she was living at the time of her marriage. Eight children were born to this union, seven of whom survive, viz.: Robert J.; Amanda C., wife of David D. QUIGLEY; Anna M., wife of Perry GOLD; Ollie I., wife of Edward SAYLER; Laura E., wife of Edward BOWERS; Ida May, wife of William AGGAS, and Maggie J., wife of Elgie HUTCHISON. Mr. WHITMIRE and wife are members of Springdale Lutheran church, in which he fills the office of elder. He is an ardent Republican, and has held the offices of school director, assessor, etc.

ROBERT J. WHITMIRE, eldest child of Jacob and Isabella G. WHITMIRE, was born on the homestead in Oakland township, October 17, 1858, and was reared and educated in this vicinity. He married Maggie W. SMITH, a daughter of W. P. SMITH, of Centre township. She was born at Brady's Bend, but removed with her parents to this county when four years of age. Five children are the fruits of this marriage, as follows: Cora M; Alice E.; Belle; Grace E., and Olive C. The family are members of Springdale Lutheran church. Mr. WHITMIRE is a Republican, and has been overseer of the poor and school director in his township. He resided on his father's place for a short time after his marriage, but in 1889 located on his present farm, where he owns 130 acres of well improved land, beside other lands in Concord township.

John WHITMIRE, third son of John and Catherine WHITMIRE, was born March 10, 1835, on the old homestead in Oakland township, where he still [p. 1017] resides. He was educated in the common schools, and adopted farming as his avocation. He was married September 8, 1859, to Jane CAMPBELL, daughter of William and Mattie CAMPBELL, to which union have been born ten children, viz.: Emma Z., who married Alonzo CAMPBELL, who resides on the Bailey farm, near Cooperstown; John E., who resides in Los Angeles, California, and is a cab driver; Charles C.; Harry P.; Everett Benton; Ada Pearl; Frank G., and three who died in infancy and youth. Mr. WHITMIRE enlisted in Company B, Sixth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, September 2, 1864, and served with that command until June 22, 1865, when it was mustered out of service. Mr. WHITMIRE and wife are members of the Lutheran church; in politics, he is a Republican and has held the office of township treasurer one term and of school director and treasurer of the district three years and a half.

WILLIAM NEYMAN came from Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, to Butler county, in 1799, accompanied by his parents, Harmon NEYMAN and wife, both of whom died here. He selected several hundred acres of land near the mouth of Bonny Brook, in what is now Summit township, where he erected a grist mill in the year 1800, one of the first mills built in Butler county. He was twice married, and by his first marriage was the father of three children, William, Henry and Elizabeth, all of whom were reared to maturity. His second wife was Mary SUMNEY, a daughter of Jacob SUMNEY, a leading pioneer of Butler county. He carried on the mill near the mouth of Bonny Brook for many years, and subsequently purchased lands and erected a mill in what is now Oakland township, which property he gave to his sons, William and Henry, and bought the farm now occupied by their sons--John L., and Josiah, with whom Mrs. NEYMAN made her home until her death. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, and always manifested a deep interest in its prosperity.

JOHN L. NEYMAN was born in the borough of Butler, November 4, 1826, son of William and Mary NEYMAN. He was reared upon a part of the farm now owned by his brother Josiah, and received one-half of the homestead. At the age of twenty-two he married Christina SARVER, a daughter of Henry SARVER, who was born in eastern Pennsylvania, but was reared in this county. Five children were born to this union, as follows: Mary Jane; Priscilla E., wife of George McJUNKIN, of Butler; William H., who married Dassie Paulina HUTCHISON, who died March 28, 1889, leaving four children, Jesse Earl, Dassie May, Fred H. and Paul; Angeline, wife of George KEISER, of Pittsburg, and John F., now a resident of New Castle. Mrs. NEYMAN was a member of the Presbyterian church, and died August 1, 1892. In September, 1864, Mr. NEYMAN enlisted in Company B, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until mustered out at Camp Reynolds, in June, 1865. The greater portion of the time his command was on guard duty in and around Washington. Since 1858 he has been an elder in North Butler Presbyterian church, and is a leading member of that society. Mr. NEYMAN is a stanch Republican, and always gives his support to the candidates and principles of that party.

JOHN NEYMAN came to Butler county with his family during the War of [p. 1018] 1812, and settled on what is now known as the MILLINGER farm in Oakland township. He later moved to Centre township, built a grist and carding mill on Stoney run, and afterwards located on a farm later owned by his son John H., in Oakland township, where he continued to reside until his death, in 1847. He was married in Westmoreland county, to Mary MARKLE, a sister of Gen. Joseph MARKLE, of that county. She was a woman of good education, and took a prominent part in social and church matters. She died in 1853, at an advanced age. Eleven children were born to them, viz.: Anna, who married William ROBB; Daniel; Elizabeth, who married John CAVIN; Mary; Abraham M.; Solomon; Sallie, who married John BEATTY; Susan, who married David McGINNIS; John H.; Casper M., and William. Mr. NEYMAN and wife were members of the Presbyterian church, of Butler, in which society he filled the office of elder. He was the contractor and builder of the old stone church at Butler. In 1824 he was elected, on the Whig ticket, prothonotary of Butler county. He was an energetic, successful business man, and did his full share towards the social and material development of his adopted home.

JOHN H. NEYMAN was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 5, 1799, and came with his parents to Butler county. He was reared in Centre and Oakland townships, and obtained his education in the pioneer schools of his period. In 1844 he married Isabel WILSON, a daughter of John and Isabella (GETTY) WILSON, natives of Ireland. At the time of her marriage she was living in Jefferson county, where Mr. NEYMAN was engaged in lumbering. She was born in Indiana county in 1818, her father being a school teacher, which profession he followed until his death. Her parents came to the United States in youth, were married in this State, and reared a family of eleven children, five of whom are yet living. Her mother died at the home of Mrs. NEYMAN in Oakland township, November 27, 1874, at the remarkable age of ninety-one years. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, and took great interest in church matters. In 1848 Mr. NEYMAN and wife settled in Oakland township, where he continued to reside until his death, April 3, 1881. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are living, viz.: Markle J.; Mary, wife of John MONTGOMERY; John Getty, and Margaret, a teacher in the Allegheny public schools. The deceased are Ella and Clark A. Mr. NEYMAN was a regular attendant of the Presbyterian church, and although never uniting with that body, he gave it a liberal support. His wife is an ardent Presbyterian, and is now spending the remaining years of her life with her children.

MARKLE J. NEYMAN was born in Jefferson county, November 17, 1845, son of John H. NEYMAN. His parents removed to Butler county when our subject was about three years old, and settled on the farm where he now resides. He was reared upon this place, received a common school education, and has always followed farming. He married Anna FLEEGER, a daughter of Peter FLEEGER, and has three children, viz.: Roy; George, and Mary. Mr. NEYMAN and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

WILLIAM HUTCHISON was one of the early settlers of Oakland township, a soldier in the War of 1812, and died on May 8, 1814, in the forty-fifth year of his age. His wife, Margaret, died on January 7, 1815. They reared the follow-[p. 1019] ing children: Fergus; Mrs. Esther CAMPBELL; Mrs. Jane SHIRA; Mrs. Effie JOHNSTON; Mrs. Anna JOHNSTON; Mrs. Maria SHIRA; Mrs. Matilda BEATTY; John; George, and William.

GEORGE HUTCHISON, son of William and Margaret HUTCHISON, was born in Butler county in 1803. He was reared upon his father's farm, and in 1836 married Mary LARIMERE, a native of Westmoreland county, where she was residing at the time of her marriage. She became the mother of four sons and three daughters, five of whom are living, viz.: William J.; Thomas S.; Rachel J., wife of Andrew Graham CAMPBELL; Andrew M., and Margaret, wife of Charles GERLACH. The deceased are Theophilus and Mary. Mr. HUTCHISON continued to reside upon his farm until his death, April 17, 1855. His wife died in 1852. He was a man of remarkable size and strength, very industrious, and did his full share towards clearing and improving the township. Politically, he was a Whig, and took quite an active part in political affairs. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church of Butler.

WILLIAM J. HUTCHISON, eldest child of George and Mary HUTCHISON, was born in Oakland township, Butler county, October 14, 1839, and except the period spent in the army, has always lived in this township. He was educated in the common schools, attending the free schools in winter and a subscription school in summer. He served nine months in Company K, One Hundred and Thirth[sic]-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and afterwards re-enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, and served until the surrender of Lee. He participated in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and all the later battles down to Appomattox. After the war he resumed his duties upon the farm, and now owns 184 acres of the original tract entered by his grandfather, upon which is a fine brick residence erected by his father in 1852. Mr. HUTCHISON married Lucinda KUHN, a daughter of Henry and Margaret (HOCK) KUHN, natives of Pennsylvania. She was the youngest in a family of six children, was born in Butler county, and died on February 2, 1893, aged fifty-two years. She was a member of North Butler Presbyterian church. To this union were born five children, viz.: Laura M., wife of W. T. HOON; Maggie E.; Mary A.; Cora E., and Alice. Mr. HUTCHISON is a member of North Butler Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a Republican, has filled the office of school director, and is now acting as justice of the peace, to which position he was elected in 1892.

JOHN HUTCHISON was born in Butler county, in 1806, second son of William and Margaret HUTCHISON. He was reared upon his father's farm, and married Eliza JOHNSTON, whose father was an early settler of this county. They located on a farm in Oakland township, now occupied by their son William M. It contained 200 acres, and he built his cabin in the midst of the primitive forests. He cleared and improved this farm, and a portion of the original log cabin forms a part of the present residence, but it is weather-boarded. Here he resided down to his death, in 1877. His widow still survives and is quite hale and hearty. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and a liberal supporter of religious and charitable institutions. He was a warm friend of education, an industrious, hard-working farmer, and a very worthy citizen. His [p. 1020] family consisted of the following children: Annie, wife of Thomas TEMPLETON; William M.: Euphemia, deceased wife of L. COCHRAN; Matilda, deceased wife of Henry MONNIE; Edasa, deceased wife of Henry NEYMAN; Lizzie, deceased; Kesiah, wife of Sheldon HULINGS; James, and Fergus. The last named was killed in the army during the Civil War.

WILLIAM M. HUTCHISON, second child of John and Eliza HUTCHISON, was born near his present home in Oakland township, in 1832, assisted his parents in clearing and improving the farm, and attended school in the log school house of his neighborhood during the winter season. At the age of twenty-five years he married Angeline B. THORN, a daughter of Joseph THORN, an early settler of Butler county, and settled on his present homestead, where he has since devoted his attention to agriculture. His wife died on March 19, 1865, leaving three children, viz.: Nettie, wife of P. PLAISTED; Milo, a resident of Buena Vista, who married Milzenna E. MINTEER, and Lyda, wife of Campbell DAUBENSPECK. Mr. HUTCHISON married for his second wife Lydia DAUBENSPECK, a daughter of Jacob DAUBENSPECK, of Washington township. Three children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Emma, a teacher; Elgie, a resident of Oakland township, who married Maggie J. WHITMIRE, and Alissa. Mrs. HUTCHISON is a member of North Butler Presbyterian church. He is a Republican, in politics, has filled the office of school director, and takes quite an active interest in public affairs. He is the owner of ninety-four acres of well improved land, on which there is one of the best peach orchards in the county.

WILLIAM ROBB was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1783, son of Isaac ROBB, an early settler of that county, who followed boating and was drowned in the Mississippi, opposite Natchez, in 1809, leaving a wife and five children, all of whom are deceased. William was the eldest son, grew to maturity in his native county, and there married Anna NEYMAN, a daughter of John NEYMAN, January 1, 1805. She was born October 15, 1784, and died in 1838, a consistent member of the Presbyterian church. In 1810, with his wife and three children, Mr. ROBB came to Butler county and purchased 260 acres from Samuel RIDDLE, which had a small clearing and a log cabin. The farm is now owned by the MOORES and LIGHTNERS. He resided on this place until 1837, and then bought the farm now owned by his son, William J. Here he died in 1847, aged sixty-four years. He was an elder in Concord Presbyterian church, and a liberal supporter of that society. In politics, he was a Whig, and soon after coming to Butler county was elected a justice of the peace, which office he held for many years. Mr. ROBB was the father of ten children, only two of whom survive, viz.: Isaac, and William J., both residents of Oakland township. The deceased are as follows: Maria, who married William EAKIN; Hannah; Rebecca, who married John CHRISTIE; John N., a tailor by trade, who married Leah MILLER, and died October 15, 1892; Elizabeth, who married Thomas CAMPBELL; James R., who died in Oregon; Sarah, who married William H. CHRISTIE, and Jemima.

WILLIAM J. ROBB is one of the oldest living citizens of Oakland township, [p. 1021] where he was born on September 6, 1823, the youngest child of William and Anna ROBB. He was reared upon the old homestead, and received his education in the subscription schools and public schools of his district. He came with his parents to his present home, where he has since resided. On January 1, 1846, he married Nancy Ann CHRISTY, a native of this county, born August 9, 1824. Her parents, John and Mary CHRISTY, were natives of Ireland. Her father came to Westmoreland county with his parents in childhood, there grew to maturity, and afterwards settled near North Washington, Butler county. He served in the War of 1812, was an elder in the Presbyterian church for many years, and died on May 29, 1855. His wife was born in 1781, and after his death resided with her daughter, Eleanor CAMPBELL, dying on August 9, 1864. Mr. CHRISTY and wife were the parents of ten children, three of whom are living, viz.: Jennie, widow of Samuel CAMPBELL; Eleanor, widow of William CAMPBELL, and Nancy Ann, wife of William J. ROBB. The deceased are Andrew, who died in Illinois; Sarah, who married Isaac ROBB; Ebenezer, who was mortally injured by being thrown from a buggy while on a trip to Clarion county, and James who died on the old CHRISTY homestead in June, 1893. To Mr. and Mrs. ROBB have been born fifteen children, as follows: James G., a resident of Pawnee City, Nebraska; Abner C., of Indiana county; Selina, deceased; Anna L., wife of Jesse Bell, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Andrew C., of Concord township; Mary C., wife of J. C. HOVIS; Isaac N., an oil operator; Rebecca, wife of John BARR, of North Dakota; Sarah B., wife of William J. CAMPBELL; William J.; Maria J., wife of J. M. HOGUE, of Washington county; Abram M. L.; Ebenezer E., of Washington county; Emma E., and Frank M. In 1864 Mr. ROBB enlisted in Company B, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, served with the rank of corporal, and was mustered out at Pittsburg, in June, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. ROBB are members of North Butler Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He owns a well improved farm of 125 acres, and has always been an industrious, hard-working farmer, giving his whole attention to the duties of his farm.

JOHN McGINLEY was born in Donegal County, Ireland, in 1798, and was the eldest son of John and Grace (CONWAY) McGINLEY. In 1800 his parents immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Westmoreland County. Besides his parents, the family consisted of two sons, John and Michael, the latter of whom as born on the Atlantic, and seven daughters. They resided for a short time in Westmoreland County, then came to Butler county and settled in Clearfield township. In the taxables of old Buffalo township for 1803, John McGINLEY, Sr., is assessed with 300 acres of land, one cow and two oxen. They resided upon this farm until after 1830, when the family were grown to manhood and womanhood and started in life for themselves. Their father served in the War of 1812, and died about 1859, at the remarkable age of ninety-five years. His wife died about 1827. They were pioneer members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of Clearfield township. The subject of this sketch came with his parents to Butler county and here grew to maturity. He married Margaret GILLESPIE, a daughter of John GILLESPIE, one of the pioneers of the county. They settled for a time in Clearfield township (now Summit, on the site of St. Mary's Monastery), but subsequently purchased a farm in Donegal township, containing 212 acres, a portion of which [p. 1022] was cleared. On this place John McGINLEY and family resided up to a few years before his death, when he removed to Butler and made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Ellen McSHANE, where he died July 24, 1885, in the eighty-eighth year of his age. He and wife were practical members of the Catholic church, in which faith they reared their family. She died July 26, 1854, aged sixty-seven. They were the parents of four sons and seven daughters, four of whom are living, viz.: Michael, of Concord township; Mrs. Ellen McSHANE, of Butler; Mrs. Catherine BUTLER, of Ironton, Ohio, and Mrs. Margaret KELLERMAN, of Donegal township. John McGINLEY was an ardent Democrat, and took an active interest in public affairs.

MICHAEL McGINLEY was born in Clearfield township, Butler county, July 4, 1826, son of John and Margaret McGINLEY, pioneers of that locality. His boyhood days were spent upon the farm, and he obtained his education in the old fashioned log school house, where he attended for a few months each winter. He continued to reside with his parents until 1849, when he went to Michigan and worked in the mines of that state for two years, and then returned to Butler county. On April 17, 1855, he married Eleanor O'DONNELL, a daughter of John O'DONNELL, of Donegal township, where they improved a farm. For a few years during the oil excitement, Mr. McGINLEY traveled around in that business, but in 1877 he purchased his present homestead in Concord township, and erected a fine residence, which has since been his home. It is one of the best improved farms in the township. To Mr. and Mrs. McGINLEY have been born six children, two of whom are living, viz.: Jerome, and Mary, who married Peter DILLON, both of whom reside with their parents. The deceased are Francis; Patrick; Ellen Jane, and Theresa. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, at North Oakland, of which Mr. McGINLEY was one of the original members. He has been liberal in his support of that organization, and was a member of the building committee when the present church was erected. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served under Captain BIPPUS. He has always been a Democrat, and was a justice of the peace in Donegal township for ten years. Mr. McGINLEY is one of the enterprising and public-spirited citizens of his township, and gives a liberal support to every worthy object.

MICHAEL McGINLEY, SR., son of John and Grace (CONWAY) McGINLEY, was born upon the Atlantic Ocean in June, 1800, during the passage of his parents to the United States. He was the second son, assisted his parents in clearing the old homestead, and attended the pioneer subscription schools of his day. He married Nancy McBRIDE, eldest daughter of Patrick and Mary (DUGAN) McBRIDE, pioneers of Clearfield township, where Mrs. McGINLEY was born in 1800. They settled on a farm in Clearfield township, whence they removed to Oakland, November 30, 1830, which date Mr. McGINLEY cut on a maple tree that stood near a spring in front of his house. The farm consisted of 240 acres, with a small clearing and two log buildings, one of the latter yet standing on the place. Here he resided until his death, September 27, 1881. His wife died on May 15, 1868. They were members of the Catholic church, and in politics, Mr. McGIN-[p. 1023] LEY was a Democrat. They reared a family of eleven children, as follows: Mrs. Mary BOYLE; Mrs. Bridget SKEERS; Mrs. Ann HANLON; Sarah, and Catherine, both deceased; Margaret; Mrs. Grace BOYLE; Rosinda; Hannah, and Philomena, both deceased, and J.F.P. Mr. McGINLEY always manifested an interest in the welfare of the county, and in its social and material development.

J.F.P. McGINLEY, only son of Michael and Nancy McGINLEY, was born on the farm where he now resides, May 16, 1845, has always lived upon the same place, and has made farming his life's vocation. He purchased the home place in 1866, and now owns 175 acres, with good buildings, and under a fine state of cultivation. On October 22, 1867, he married Bridget A. RODGERS, a native of Armstrong county, and a daughter of James and Bridget (BOYLE) RODGERS. She is the youngest in a family of twelve children, and was reared near the line of Butler and Armstrong counties. Seven children have been born to this union, five of whom are living, as follows: Michael J., who married Martha O'DONNELL; Catherine J.; James A.; Mary, and Daniel C. The family are members of the St. Joseph Catholic church, and in politics, Mr. McGINLEY is a stanch Democrat. He has filled various offices in his township, and is a progressive, public-spirited citizen.

JEREMIAH WICK was a native of New Jersey, and came to Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, with his brother John, in 1796. In 1828 he came to Butler county and purchased 200 acres of land in what is now Clay township, upon which he settled the same year. This farm is now the property of David and Lowry COULTER. He married Isabella BROWNFIELD, to which union were born the following children: Andrew; John; William; Elisha; Jeremiah C.; Mary, who married H. P. CONWAY, and Isabella, who married John COULTER, all of whom are dead; and Rachel, widow of Hugh R. CONWAY; Eliza A., widow of Harrison CONWAY, and Sally, who died unmarried. In 1857 Mr. WICK united with Concord Presbyterian church, and remained a member of that organization until his death. Many of his descendants are residents of Butler county.

ANDREW WICK, SR., eldest son of Jeremiah and Isabella WICK, was born July 3, 1806, in Armstrong county, and came with his parents to Butler county. He engaged in the mercantile business at West Sunbury, later followed cattle droving, and in 1844 he again embarked in merchandising at West Sunbury. In 1854 he settled upon a farm in Clay township, where he died, February 10, 1891. Mr. WICK married Sarah SHRYOCK, a daughter of John SHRYOCK, and their children are as follows: Alfred, of Butler; Richard C., who was a member of Company E, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died in Andersonville prison; John S.; Isabel, deceased wife of J. F. McCLUNG; Andrew C.; William; Ida M., deceased, and four that died in infancy. In early life Mr. WICK was a Whig, and later a Republican. He was a member of West Sunbury Presbyterian church, and died in that faith.

WILLIAM WICK, son of Jeremiah and Isabella WICK, was born in Armstrong county, October 10, 1809, and there grew to maturity. He was twenty years of age when the family came to Clay township, Butler county. He received a good education, and taught school in this county for several terms. At the age of twenty-four he married Sarah McCOLLOUGH, a daughter of Capt. John McCOL- [p. 1024] LOUGH, an early settler of Fairview township, a sketch of whom appears in this work. She was born in Fairview township, August 24, 1813, and became the mother of twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Amanda; Isabella; John T.; Jeremiah H.; William M.; Melinda; Eliza, deceased wife of Rev. Samuel STAUFFER; James M., and Olive P. Mr. WICK settled in what is now Concord township, where he died on May 27, 1892. His widow resides with her children. He never took a very active interest in public matters, was a Republican in politics, and a charter member of the Lutheran church.

WILLIAM M. WICK, was born in Concord township, Butler county, in 1846, son of William and Sarah WICK. He was reared upon his father's farm, and obtained a common school education in the district schools. He married Mattie A. McCLUNG, December 18, 1867, and lived for a time at Buena Vista, where he followed the oil business. He settled upon his present farm in Oakland township, in 1878, and has since devoted his attention to farming. Mrs. WICK is a daughter of William McCLUNG, who came to this township in 1835 and settled on the farm occupied by his daughter. Mr. McCLUNG reared a family of nine children, five of whom are living, and three served in the Union army during the Rebellion. One of the number died in a rebel prison at Florence, while another was killed in the battle of Seven Pines. To Mr. WICK and wife have been born the following children: Harry W.; William P.; Ralph R.; Jessie Olive; Cyrus Clyde; Ora E.; Robert M.; Charles M.; Mildred E., and Mattie L. The family are connected with Zion Lutheran church, of Concord township. In politics, Mr. WICK is a Republican, and has filled the offices of school director, supervisor, etc.

JAMES MARTIN came to Butler county when the lands were covered with the primitive forest and the roads were mere bridle paths between the different settlements. He settled on a farm in what is now Oakland township, built a cabin and began the work of making a home in the wilderness. He married Polly MOSER, a daughter of John MOSER. Her father was a soldier of the Revolution, came from Westmoreland to Butler county with his family in the last decade of the Eighteenth century, and finally settled in what is now Oakland township, where he died at the age of ninety-seven years. To Mr. and Mrs. Martin were born the following children: Mrs. Catherine LOWE; Mrs. Mary Ann BURNHAM; Mrs. Jane MOSER; Mrs. Esther BURFITT; Mrs. Eliza HOON; Mrs. Louisa PILLIFER; Mrs. Grace DUNCAN; Martin; John; Thomas, and Abram, all of whom are deceased except Mrs. DUNCAN and Abram. Mr. MARTIN died at the age of seventy-two years.

ABRAM MARTIN was born in Oakland township, on July 14, 1822, youngest child of James and Polly MARTIN, and has always resided in this county. He obtained his education in one of the pioneer schools, his only book being a United States spelling book. The school house was three miles away from his home, and school was kept only during the winter season. He remained with his parents until his maturity, with the exception of a short time spent at North Washington. He afterwards went to Reed's Landing, Wisconsin, where he worked as a stonemason. While there he entered a tract of land, and was compelled to go to the land office on horseback a distance of sixty miles through an unsettled [p. 1025] country, inhabited principally by Indians and wild animals. On reaching the land office he took his place in line, about seven o'clock in the evening, and stood in line until after four o'clock the next morning, before his turn came. He had only sufficient money to pay for his land, and made the round trip in two days and one night, a distance of 120 miles. On returning he sold his claim for sufficient to clear $275, and with this amount and some more that he made while following his trade at Reed's Landing, he purchased the farm upon which he now lives. He afterwards worked for fifty cents per day, and finally earned from five to eighteen dollars per day. He is one of the most industrious men of the township, and has cleared nearly all his present farm of 106 acres, upon which he erected, in 1870, one of the largest and finest barns in the county. Mr. MARTIN married Rosa J. CAMPBELL, a daughter of Archie CAMPBELL, and has three children, viz.: Margaret, wife of Daniel ANDRES, of Greenville; Mrs. Zillah ATLAS, of Butler, and Linas, who married Mary CAMPBELL, and lives on a part of the homestead. Mrs. MARTIN is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a stanch Republican, and one of the most industrious farmers in the township.

THOMAS BARTLEY, SR., one of the pioneers of Penn township, Butler county, was born in Derry county, Ireland, where he was reared and learned the weaver's trade. He also served six years in the British cavalry. In 1802 he married Margaret LOGAN, and in the fall of that year immigrated to Baltimore, whence they went to Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, and thence to Pittsburg. They lived in the latter city until 1808, in which year they took up their residence in Penn township, where Mr. BARTLEY purchased 150 acres of unimproved land. He was a man of great industry and energy, and soon built up a home for himself and family in the wilds of Butler county, owning before he died one of the best improved farms in the township. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and resided upon the homestead in Penn township until his death, December 1, 1859, aged eighty-five years. His wife died December 6, 1857, at the age of eighty-four. They were pioneer members of the Associate Reformed church, and afterwards of the United Presbyterian church of Butler. In politics, he was a Democrat, and always took a deep interest in local matters. They were the parents of the following children: David, a ship carpenter, who died at the age of twenty-four; Robert, a hatter, who died in Baltimore, November 16, 1891; John L., who died in Oakland township; William L., who died in Butler, February 24, 1893; Thomas, a brick maker, who died in Allegheny, March 14, 1877; Annabell; Abner, who died in Penn township, July 2, 1893, and Joseph L., who died on the old homestead, April 28, 1891.

JOHN L. BARTLEY, son of Thomas and Margaret BARTLEY, was born in the City of Pittsburg, October 23, 1807, and came with his parents to Penn township, Butler county, the following year. Here he grew to manhood, receiving a limited education in the pioneer schools of his neighborhood. At the age of eighteen he started out in the world with thirty-seven and a half cents, and going to Pittsburg, found employment as a gardener for two years, near Manchester. He afterwards engaged in hauling coal from Coal Hill, also worked on the Pennsylvania canal for several years during its construction. On November 17, 1829, he purchased a farm in Oakland township, where he kept bachelor's hall until [p. 1026] his marriage. On November 17, 1835, he married Elizabeth McQUISTION, a daughter of John McQUISTION, one of the first settlers of Butler county. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Isaiah NIBLOCK, of Butler, and the young couple took up their residence in a log house, built for a tavern, which then stood upon the place, December 17, 1835. They lived in this structure until the erection of a brick residence in 1844. A part of the farm had been laid out in town lots about 1807-10, under the name of Somerset, and its original proprietor had hopes that the county seat would be removed to this point, which soon contained three houses, a blacksmith shop, etc. Mr. BARTLEY and wife were the parents of six children, only one of whom, J. Walter, survived infancy. They resided upon the homestead until June 17, 1874, when they removed to Butler, where Mrs. BARTLEY died, June 17, 1876. Her husband returned to the old homestead, where he died, January 20, 1892. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, formerly the Associate Reformed, in which he filled the office of ruling elder for more than half a century. He was one of the most prominent members of that denomination, and was honored and respected for his upright life and strict integrity. He was an ardent Democrat until the Fremont campaign, when he became a Republican, and remained so the balance of his life. He was a very successful farmer, and had one of the first and best grafted orchards in the county.

J. WALTER BARTLEY, only living child of John L. and Elizabeth BARTLEY, was born in the old log house in Oakland township, March 13, 1843, remained with his parents until August 29, 1864, and then enlisted in Company K, Fifth Pennsylvania heavy Artillery. He served until July 4, 1865, on which date he was mustered out at Camp Reynolds. He returned home and has since been engaged in farming. On March 17, 1870, he married Nancy SECHLER, of St. Paul's Orphan Home, of Butler. She is a native of Harmony, Butler county, and a daughter of Abraham SECHLER, born in Montgomery county, in 1793, and died in May, 1872. Her father reared a large family at Harmony, and was well acquainted with Father RAPP, founder of the Harmony Society. Mrs. BARTLEY is the mother of eleven children, as follows: Edwin S., who died may 28, 1894; Winslow, who died September 23, 1878; John E., who died March 4, 1878; William Clyde; Florence Elizabeth; Howard; Edith; Findley; Etta; Oscar, and one that died in infancy. Mr. BARTLEY and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, of Butler.

ANDREW MOORE was born in 1790, and came to Oakland township, Butler county, with his parents at at [sic] early day. They settled on the adjoining farm to that now occupied by his grandson, Andrew G. MOORE, where he grew to manhood. He remained with his parents until his marriage with Ann STOREY, a daughter of Alexander STOREY, a pioneer of Fairview township. She was born in Ireland, and came to Butler county with her parents in girlhood. After marriage they settled in Fairview township, where both resided on the old homestead until their decease. Mr. MOORE died in 1872, aged eighty-two years, and his wife some years before. They were the parents of four sons and two daughters, all of whom lived to maturity. Their names are as follows: James; John; Andrew; William; Nancy, and Elizabeth. William
[p. 1027] is yet living on the old homestead in Fairview township. Mrs. Nancy RANKIN lives in the same township, and Mrs. Elizabeth KINCAID, resides in Illinois.

JAMES MOORE was born in Fairview township, Butler county, in 1825, son of Andrew and Ann MOORE. He was reared upon the home farm, assisted his parents during boyhood and attended school at one of the old fashioned log buildings of pioneer days. At the age of sixteen he commenced working on the canal, then in course of construction, and afterwards went to Allegheny county, where he was employed on a farm until his marriage to Sarah MONTGOMERY, a native of the same county. They resided there until 1852, when he returned to Butler county, and settled in Fairview township. About the close of the war they removed to the farm in Oakland township, now owned by his sons. In 1877 he removed to Crawford county, and died there in 1881. His widow survived until 1888. Both were members of the Lutheran church. They were the parents of fifteen children, four of whom are yet living, viz.: Andrew G., of Oakland township; Mrs. Margaret Wick, of Concord township; J. Emerson, of Oakland township, and David K., who resides in Crawford county.

ANDREW G. MOORE was born in Allegheny county, in 1845, son of James and Sarah MOORE. He was the eldest in the family, and resided with his parents until manhood. At the age of twenty-three years he settled on a part of the old homestead, and is now the owner of 100 acres of well improved land. In 1870 he married Isabella WICK, a daughter of William WICK, of Concord township, to which union have been born five children, as follows: Samuel H.; Charles M.; Alvin C.; Ira C., and John E., deceased. Mr. MOORE and wife are members of the Luthern [sic] church, in which he holds the office of deacon. In politics, he is a stanch Republican, and is one of the progressive farmers of his township.

J. EMERSON MOORE was born in Oakland township, Butler county, in 1866, son of James and Sarah MOORE, and grandson of Andrew and Ann MOORE. He resided with his parents until arriving at manhood, and obtained his education in the public schools. When he was eleven years old his parents removed to Crawford county, and upon the death of his father, four years later, the responsibilities of the farm largely rested upon his shoulders. At the age of twenty-two years he returned to Butler county, and settled on a portion of the original homestead, where he has since resided. In 1889 he married Altie C. ELLIS, a daughter of Abner and Margaret ELLIS, of Crawford county. She was born in that county, and is the sixth in a family of ten children. Three children are the fruits of this union: Ellis and Edward, both deceased, and Edna Esther. Mrs. MOORE is a member of the Lutheran church. Politically, Mr. MOORE is a Republican, and was elected to the office of school director in 1893. He is the owner of 100 acres of well improved land, which is under good cultivation and contains first class buildings.

CAPT. JOHN G. BIPPUS was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, January 31, 1830. His parents, Matthias and Agatha (HERMAN) BIPPUS, were natives of Wurtemburg, and died in their native land in 1846 and 1870, respectively. His father was a lumber dealer, and also a contractor and builder, and had four children, viz.: Jacob; John G.; Barbara, and Anna Mary. In 1842 Jacob and John G. immigrated to Pennsylvania and settled at Hollidaysburg, Blair county, [p. 1028] where they followed contracting and building. In 1847 John G. removed to Butler county, and soon after established himself as a carpenter and builder near Fairview. Later he purchased seventy five acres of land in what is now Oakland, to which he soon added eighty-seven acres. Here he devoted his energies to agriculture, until November 20, 1862, when he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was commissioned first lieutenant, and served as such until his promotion to the captaincy of his company, December 24, 1862, which rank he held until mustered out on July 25, 1863. In September, 1864, he assisted in recruiting the One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served as a captain in that command until wounded in the assault on Fort Gregg, before Petersburg, Virginia, April 2, 1865. After four months spent in a hospital, he returned to his command, and was detailed as assistant inspector general on the staff of General BRISCOE, First Brigade, First Division, of the Twenty-fourth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and held that position until the close of his services, June 2, 1865. Captain BIPPUS is a member of A. G. REED Post, Number 105, G. A. R., and is popular among the veterans of Butler county. On July 1, 1851, he married Rachel MYERS, a daughter of Jacob MYERS. She, too, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, and at the age of seven years accompanied her parents to Pennsylvania and resided with them in this county until her marriage. There were eight children born to this union, viz.: Katie, who married Clarence BOOTH, and died on January 23, 1890, leaving a family of five children; John, a resident of Butler; Jacob, and Matthias, of Oakland township; Samuel, a physician of Butler; Christie C., a physician of Allegheny; Lyda, and Emma, both residing with their parents. The family are members of the Lutheran church. Captain BIPPUS is an unswerving Republican, and gives his earnest support to the principles and measures of his party.

ROBERT WILSON came from eastern Pennsylvania with his parents to Butler county in boyhood. They settled on a farm in Centre township. His father, James WILSON, died in middle age, leaving a family of three sons and several daughters, all of whom are dead. Robert was the eldest son. He married Barbara CRAVNER and settled on a farm in Clay township, where he died in 1870, at the age of seventy-seven years. His wife died the same year. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, while she was a Lutheran. They reared a family of seven children, two of whom are living, George and James. The deceased are Nancy, who married Robert BARKLEY; Eliza Jane; Margaret, who married John McKISSICK; Ellen, and Jemima. Mr. WILSON was a veteran of the War of 1812.

GEORGE WILSON was born in Clay township, Butler county, in 1825, son of Robert and Barbara WILSON. He grew to manhood upon the old homestead, assisting his parents in the farm duties, and attended a subscription school during boyhood days. In the fall of 1847 he married Elizabeth WONDERLY, a native of Oakland township. Her father, Christopher WONDERLY, was a pioneer shoemaker of this vicinity, and died in 1889, aged ninety-two years. He reared a large family, five of whom are living, viz.: Joshua; William; Nancy; Jemima, and Elizabeth. In 1848 Mr. WILSON purchased a small tract of land from his father, to which he has added until he is now the owner of 115 acres, nearly all [p. 1029] under a good state of cultivation. He has reared four children, three of whom survive: John; Mary Elizabeth, and Etta J. Emma married Nelson DAVIS, and died in 1878, and her husband in 1879, leaving one son, Newton, who lives with his grandfather. In the fall of 1862, Mr. WILSON enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. In 1864 he re-enlisted in the Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and was mustered out of service in July, 1865. Returning to his home he resumed farming, which he has since followed. In politics, he is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

PETER HECK, a native of Lorraine, France, there grew to manhood, and married. In 1833, with his wife and four children, he immigrated to the United States, and after a voyage of sixty-two days landed at Baltimore. They immediately came westward to Butler county, Pennsylvania, to which county his brother Daniel had preceded him, and settled near Prospect. Mr. HECK rented the SULLIVAN farm for a few years, and in 1841 purchased a farm of 150 acres in Oakland township, upon which his son Daniel now lives. It was then covered with the primitive forest, in the midst of which he erected a log cabin and began the work of making a home for himself and family. Here he continued to reside until his death, October 31, 1879, in his eighty-fourth year. He and wife were members of the Lutheran church, in which he held an official position. He was first a Whig and afterwards a Republican, and filled the office of school director, etc. He belonged to the militia of the county for many years, and took a leading interest in public affairs. Mr. HECK was the father of eight children, as follows: Henry, a resident of West Virginia; Caroline, wife of George LOHRY, of Oakland township; Margaret, deceased wife of Henry DIERKIN; Christina, wife of Adam NOHE, of West Virginia; Peter, deceased; Catherine, widow of Henry GROSSHEIM; Daniel, and George, a resident of Freeport.

DANIEL HECK was born seven miles northwest of the borough of Butler, on the old SULLIVAN farm, in 1840, son of Peter and Mary HECK. He attained his majority upon the homestead in Oakland township, assisting his parents during boyhood to clear the farm and support the family. He has resided upon the old homestead up to the present, engaged in farming and producing. In 1863 he married Catherine LIGHTNER of Allegheny county. Her father, George LIGHTNER, came to Butler county with his family in 1859, and settled in Oakland township. Mrs. HECK died in 1873, leaving a family of six children, as follows: George W.; Catherine E., who died on December 25, 1892; Emma C.; Rebecca J., wife of Grant CROFT; Mary L., deceased, and Bertha, wife of J. H. KEPPLE. She was a member of North Butler Presbyterian church. Mr. HECK married for his second wife of Louisa KAMMERDINER, a daughter of J. P. KAMMERDINER, a native of Lorraine, France, and a resident of Armstrong county, where he is yet living. She is the eldest in a family of twelve children, and was reared in Armstrong county. Mr. HECK and wife are members of the Lutheran church. He is a stanch Republican, and has filled the office of school director for several years.

IGNATZ NEFF was born in the district of Unterfranken, village of Muenchberg, Bavaria, Germany, January 28, 1800, there grew to maturity and married Mary Ann BAUER, who was born in the same place on February 2, 1802. Mr. [p. 1030] NEFF followed farming in his native land and carried on an earthenware business. In May, 1845, with his wife and seven children, he set sail from Antwerp, and after a voyage of fifty-two days arrived in the City of New York. From there they proceeded by water to Albany, thence to Syracuse and Buffalo, and to Erie, Pennsylvania. From the last mentioned point they came down the canal to Greenville, Mercer county, and thence by wagon to Butler county, arriving in what is now Oakland township, on All Saints Day, November 1, 1845, at the home of Wendell SCHOLL, who kept an inn at Oakland village. Soon after arrival, Mr. NEFF purchased a tract of sixty-six acres of land from Mr. SCHOLL, which had a clearing of some fifteen acres, a log house, and a log barn. Here by hard toil and careful management he made sufficient to purchase another tract of seventy-five acres, in 1852, and in 1858 bought an additional tract of seventy-five acres, making in all 216 acres. He devoted his time and attention to improving these lands, on a portion of which he resided until his death, July 30, 1871. His wife survived him until 1885. The old homestead is still in possession of the family. Mr. NEFF was the prime mover in the erection of St. Joseph's Catholic church, at North Oakland, and walked over the county to raise money for that purpose, accepting whatever he could get in money or produce. He was also a liberal contributor towards the building of the English Catholic church, at the same village. He was an active supporter of the Democratic party, and quite prominent in local affairs. Strictly honest and honorable in all his dealings, he was well liked by the people, and his death was regretted by the whole community. Mr. and Mrs. NEFF were the parents of nine children, three of whom died in early youth. The names of the others are as follows: Josefa Theresa, wife of Basilius BERNINGER, of Centre township; Egid, of Oakland; Gabriel, who served in Company K, One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and died some years after the war; John, of Oakland; Pius, a resident of Illinois; Helena, wife of Lawrence WITT, of Oakland, and Charles, who died in Illinois, leaving a wife and three children.

EGID NEFF, eldest son of Ignatz and Mary Ann NEFF, was born in Bavaria, Germany, September 1, 1830, and was fifteen years of age when his parents settled in Oakland township. He received a fair education in his native land, and learned to read and write the English language after coming to Butler county. He assisted his parents in clearing and improving the farm until 1847, when he went to Brady's Bend to learn the saddler's trade. He remained there and at Pittsburg for seven years, and spent another year at his trade in Illinois. On the breaking out of the Rebellion he returned to Pittsburg and was employed by the government in the manufacture of cartridge boxes. Later he established a shop in Butler, carried on afterwards at Oil City for a short time, and then disposed of his business and returned to the old homestead, where he has since devoted his attention to farming, having now one of the best equipped farms in the township. There are five oil sells on his farm, four of which were producers, but only two are now working. Mr. NEFF was married in November, 1859, to Josephine MAISCHEIN, a daughter of Michael A. and Regina (LINK)MAISCHEIN, who came from Bavaria to this county some years before the NEFF family. Eleven children have been born of this union, seven of whom survive, viz.: [p. 1031] Michael J.; Anthony C.; John; Emma; Magdalene; Wendelin and Francis. The deceased are Frankie, Ignatius, Patrick and Cecelia, all of whom died in early youth. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland, and Mr. NEFF was one of the building committee in the erection of the English Catholic church at that place. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of supervisor, school director, overseer of the poor, etc. He has always taken a commendable interest in matters pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the community.

CHARLES OSWALD, a native of Bavaria, Germany, there grew to manhood and learned the dyer's trade. He married Genevieve OTT, and in 1840 immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled on a farm in Centre township, Butler county, where he resided for about five years. He afterwards worked in the iron mills of Brady's Bend for some ten years, then returned to North Oakland and purchased the farm now occupied by his son Philip. His wife died here in 1866, and himself, in September, 1882, at the age of seventy-eight years. They were members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland and among the organizers of that congregation. Their family consisted of three sons and one daughter, viz.: Charles, a resident of Minnesota; Mary, deceased wife of Michael DESSING; Philip, and Joseph, the latter residing in the west. Mr. OSWALD settled in the woods in a small cabin built of round logs, in which he lived until he was able to erect a more commodious home. He was a very industrious, hard-working man, but enjoyed the best of health up to a few days of his death. He cast his first vote for General TAYLOR, but later became a Democrat, and afterwards supported that party.

PHILIP OSWALD came with his parents to Butler county, grew to manhood on the home farm, and assisted his father to clear off and improve the same. He attended the common schools during the winter months, and the balance of the time he devoted to the home duties. Throughout his boyhood days he wore the home-made clothing manufactured by his mother on the home loom, and endured the privations and hardships of that period. He afterwards went to Butler and learned the saddler's and harness-maker's trades, spent four years in that borough, and subsequently was connected with his brother-in-law, Michael DESSING, in the manufacture of soft drinks at Kittanning about two years. He then engaged in the dairy business in Pittsburg, for three years, was next in the dry goods business in the same city for about ten years, but his health failing he sold out and returned to Butler county, purchased the old homestead from the heirs, and has since made it his residence. In 1870 Mr. OSWALD married Mary MEYER, a daughter of Philip J. MEYER, a dry goods merchant of Pittsburg. Ten children are the fruits of this union, named as follows: Minnie M., wife of Joseph BALL, of Donegal township; Charles Joseph, a resident of Illinois; Philip J., a member of the Capuchin order; Albert G.; Theodore W.; M. Clementina; Paul R. E.; Harry A.; Eugene I., and Clarence E. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland, and in politics, Mr. OSWALD is a Democrat. He is the owner of sixty-three acres of well improved land, is an industrious farmer, and a worthy citizen.

JOHN BALL was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1830, son of John and Mar- [p. 1032] garet (OSTHEIMER) BALL, of that Kingdom. His parents reared four children, viz.: Elizabeth, who died in Germany; George, who came to the United States in 1848, and is now living in Pittsburg; John, and Joseph, a resident of Butler. The mother died in 1848, and the father some years later. They were members of the Catholic church, and reared their children in that faith. At the age of eighteen the subject of this sketch immigrated to New York city, taking passage on the sailing vessel "Columbus." From New York he came to Pittsburg, where he found employment in a tannery for several years as an engineer. In 1862 he came to Oakland township, Butler county, and settled on the site of the brick church, where he purchased twenty-six acres of improved land. He lived there for a few years, then removed to Allegheny, and thence to this county. In 1865 he returned to Butler county a second time, and bought forty-two acres of land, on which he resided until 1870, when he sold out and bought the old THORN place. Here he remained until 1872, when he purchased the old homestead, and the HILL place, holding the latter until 1879, but not living on it. He now owns sixty acres in Donegal township, and twenty-five acres in Oakland township, on which he has lived since 1872. He also owned two other farm comprising about ninety-four acres. Mr. BALL was married in 1863, to Susanna GRAHAM, of Donegal township, where she was born and reared. Nine children have blessed this union, eight of whom survive, viz.: Joseph, a resident of Donegal township; George, a merchant of North Oakland; Margaret Susanna, a Franciscan Sister in a Pittsburg convent; Philip, who died in early youth; Mary Ann; Gertrude; Frances Eve; Anna Ursle, and John Anselm. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland, and in politics, Mr. BALL is a Democrat. In 1862 he joined the Home Guards, and assisted in the defense of Pennsylvania.

JOHN BENSON was born in Armstrong county in 1821. His father, Peter BENSON, was a native of this State, and a farmer by occupation. He reared a large family, all of whom were members of the Catholic church, in which faith they were reared. John was the second child, and attained his majority on his father's farm in Armstrong county. He married Mary RANSEL, a native of Butler county, born in 1817, and a daughter of Henry RANSEL. Mr. BENSON and family came to this county in 1852, and located in Donegal township, where he resided until his death in 1890. His widow still survives, and resides with her children. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom grew to maturity, and are yet living, viz.: William F.; Joseph, a resident of Oakland township; James, who lives upon the old homestead in Donegal; Elizabeth, wife of Matthias BLATT, of Brady's Bend, and Tillie, wife of Arthur SLATOR, of Clarion county. Mr. BENSON was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic church, of North Oakland, and a liberal supporter of that congregation.

WILLIAM F. BENSON, eldest child of John and Mary BENSON, was born in Armstrong county, in 1845, came with his parents to Donegal township, and there grew to manhood. He attended the common schools of his district, and at the age of eighteen started in life for himself in the oil regions, which business he has followed ever since. He settled upon his present farm in 1872, and has since been engaged in farming, although devoting the greater portion of his time [p. 1033] to the oil industry. He has charge of a number of wells located on and near his place. In 1870 he married Elvira O'DONNELL, a daughter of John and Mary (DUFFY) O'DONNELL, natives of this county. She was born in Oakland township, in September, 1843, and became the mother of ten children, as follows: Augustine, who died May 14, 1891, in his nineteenth year; Alphonsus; Laura; Ida; William; Gertie; Mary; George; Jerome, and Anna, all of whom reside with their father. Mrs. BENSON died September 16, 1891. She was a practical member of the Catholic church, a kind wife and a devoted mother. She reared her family in the same faith, and all are members of St. Joseph's Catholic church, at North Oakland. Mr. BENSON is a stanch Democrat, and one of the enterprising citizens of his township.

STEPHEN LANE was born in France, there married Jane RAPPIN, and immigrated to the United States in 1832, landing at Baltimore after a voyage of forty-two days. They remained about six months east of the mountains, thence removed to Pittsburg, where Mr. LANE found employment in a candle factory. He afterwards removed to this county with his family, and settled in Summit township, on a farm which he rented from John POTTS. In a few years he purchased the farm in Oakland township now owned by his son Joseph, where he resided until his death. The only improvements were a small clearing and a log cabin, in which the family lived for several years. Mr. LANE was a weaver, but devoted his attention after coming to this county to agriculture. Both he and wife were practical members of the Catholic church, and in politics, he was an adherent of the Democratic party. He died on June 5, 1869, aged seventy-three years, and his wife June 20, 1860, at the age of sixty-eight. They reared a family of three children, as follows: Joseph, known as "Big Joseph," born in France, who served in the Rebellion, and died at East Brady, Clarion county, in October, 1893, leaving a family of six children; Francis, who was killed in the battle of Second Bull Run, and Joseph, known as "Little Joseph."

JOSEPH LANE was born in Summit township, Butler County, in 1836, son of Stephen and Jane LANE. He was reared on the homestead in Oakland township until his majority, receiving a limited education in the district school. He worked for a time in a rolling mill at Brady's Bend, and while there was taken sick with typhoid fever. Returning home he engaged in carpentering and building, which he has followed more or less down to the present, in connection with farming. In 1857 he married Catherine KIRK, a daughter of John KIRK, one of the early German settlers of Oakland township. Six children were born to this union, three of whom are living, viz.: Joseph; Mrs. Catherine LEIBLER, and Mrs. Mary McCOOL. The deceased are: Anna; Barbara, and Elizabeth. Mrs. LANE died in 1866, and he married for his second wife, Margaret WITT, a daughter of John and Christina WITT, who has borne him five children, as follows: John; Francis; Mrs. Susie STAIN; Peter, and Charles. The family are members of the Catholic church, and in politics, Mr. LANE is a Democrat. He is the owner of a well improved farm of eighty-five acres, while his wife owns a fine farm in Clearfield township. He still uses a threshing machine built by himself twenty-three years ago, which is as good to-day as when it was constructed.

[p. 1034]
JOHN FELGES, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, grew to manhood in his native land, and followed the trade of a carpenter and builder. He there married Elizabeth WINDER, and in 1861, with his wife and two children, August and Catherine, immigrated to the United States, arriving at Baltimore after a voyage of five weeks. They came westward to Pittsburg, and thence to Butler county, settling in Summit township on a farm of 119 acres of unimproved timber land. Mr. FELGES built a small house of round logs, which he cut near the site of his cabin, in which the family lived for five years. They labored industriously on this place, clearing off the forest trees and tilling the land, for six years, being the term for which he had leased the property. He continued to reside in Summit township until 1884, in which year the family settled in Oakland township. Here Mr. FELGES died on September 30, 1893, aged seventy-three years. His wife died in August, 1876, at the age of fifty-six. They were members of the German Lutheran church, in which he held official position while a resident of Summit township. In politics, he was a Democrat, and was highly respected by those who knew him best. Their daughter Catherine is the wife of George EISLER, of Summit township.

AUGUST FELGES was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, in 1850, son of John and Elizabeth FELGES. He was reared in Summit township, and received his early education in the schools of his native land. Though only eleven years old when his parents came to Butler county, he was compelled to remain at home and assist his father in clearing the farm, and attended school only a few months during the winter seasons. He remained with his parents until their decease, and inherited the old homestead in Oakland township. In 1877 he married Caroline KEHM, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, who came to America in childhood with her parents, Bernard and Christina KEHM. They settled in Summit township, Butler county, where they died, leaving two sons and two daughters, viz.: Mary; John; Henry, and Caroline, all residents of Summit township. Mr. FELGES and wife are the parents of five children, as follows: Paulus; George; Mary; Caroline, and Harry. The family are members of the Lutheran church, and in politics, Mr. FELGES is a Republican. He is the owner of 100 acres, with good buildings and in a high state of cultivation.

DANIEL ANDRE was born in Concord township, Butler county, October 21, 1820, and was the sixth in a family of ten children. He is a son of Michael Andre, a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and a grandson, of Nicholas Andre, a native of Zweibrucken, Germany. Michael ANDRE and one brother left their father in Northampton county, and came to Westmoreland county. The brother settled in Columbiana county, Ohio, and Michael settled in Centre township (now Concord), Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he cleared himself a farm in the wilderness. He afterwards removed to Fairview township, where he took up another claim and resided down to his death, at an advanced age. Daniel grew to maturity in this county, learned the carpenter's trade, later went west on foot and horseback, and took up a claim near Warsaw, Indiana, but the country the being infected with malaria, he was obliged to sell his claim and return to Butler county. He followed his trade till 1864, when he purchased a farm in Fairview township, two miles northwest of Millerstown, [p. 1035] where he still resides. In vigorous manhood he was very strong and robust, and is now (August, 1894,) quite hale and hearty. He married Jane DAVIDSON, a native of Venango county, born December 25, 1826, and they are the parents of five children, two of whom survive: Samuel M. and William J., the former of whom resides with his parents in Fairview township, and is widely known as a dealer in and breeder of fancy poultry.

WILLIAM J. ANDRE was born in Fairview township, Butler county, September 7, 1866, son of Daniel and Jane ANDRE. He was reared upon the home farm, and educated in the public schools, and sold books to attend the West Sunbury Academy. He took an active interest in the country literary societies and became quite a debater. In 1886 he went to Washington, Pennsylvania, to sell books, but after traveling two weeks and making the discovery that there was not enough money in his pocket to buy a postage stamp to mail a letter home, he went to work in an oil country boarding-house for his board, till he could find something better. In a few days he found employment with the Forest Oil Company, as gauger, at sixty dollars a month, and continued in their employ till the spring of 1888, when he went to New York to attend the American Institute of Phrenology, graduating therefrom the same fall. He then lectured for a short time on that science. In 1889 he came to St. Joe Station, Butler county, where he embarked in general merchandising with W. E. BLANEY, whose interest he purchased three years later, and has since continued the business alone. In 1892 they started a store at Oil City, but dissolved partnership a few months later, Mr. ANDRE retaining the store at St. Joe Station. Soon after coming to this point he joined the K. O. T. M., in which he has taken an active interest. He has filled the office of deputy supreme commander, and organized many tents in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the tent at New Cumberland being the first one organized in the latter State. He was a delegate to the State conventions at Erie and Warren. Mr. ANDRE married Mary E. CATE, a daughter of H. S. CATE, of Greer, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1892. She was born at Neilltown, Forest county, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1872. Mr. ANDRE was appointed postmaster at St. Joe Station, December 23, 1893, and elected justice of the peace February 20, 1894, which positions he still occupies.


[End of Chapter 72-2 (pgs.990-1035) - Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 72-1 (pgs.945-990) - Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
Continued Chapter 72-3 (pgs.1035-1083) - Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
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Updated: 02 Mar 2001, 10:40