History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 73 (Pgs. 1083-1130)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Cindy Baughman.


CHAPTER LXXIII

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Zelienople, Harmony and Evans City Boroughs; Jackson, Forward,
Adams, Cranberry, Connoquenessing and Lancaster Townships

[p. 1083]

DR. LORING LUSK was born in Ontario county, New York, in 1799, and was reared in Hudson, Summit county, Ohio, where his parents settled at quite an early day. He studied medicine under his brother-in-law, Dr. COSSITT, of Mercer, Pennsylvania, and there married Mary, daughter of Joseph SMITH, one of the pioneers of that borough. Dr. LUSK commenced the practice of medicine at Harmony, Butler County, in 1823, removed to Beaver county in 1829, and continued in practice there for a few years. He next engaged extensively, as a contractor, in the construction of the Pittsburg and Erie canal, but returned to Harmony in 1844, and resumed the practice of his profession. In 1854 he removed to Canton, Lewis county, Missouri, where he practiced until 1861. He was then appointed surgeon of the Twenty-first Missouri Volunteers, remained one year in the service, and again returned to Zelienople, where he established a drug store, which he carried on until his death, in 1878. His children were as follows: Joseph S., and Amos, two of the well remembered physicians of Butler county; Mary, who married Dr. F. S. DODDS, and Imelda, who married J. P. COOKSEY, all of whom are dead.

DR. AMOS LUSK, second son of Dr. Loring LUSK, was born in Harmony, Butler county, May 31, 1828, but spent most of his boyhood day in Mercer county. He was educated in the schools of Mercer and New Brighten, read medicine with his father, and began practice in 1849. He attended lectures at the Medical Department of the Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, where he was graduated in 1854. In 1853 he was appointed surgeon at the United States Marine Hospital, Pittsburg, which position he held for four years. In 1857 he removed to Canton, Missouri, where he practiced his profession until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when the disorganized state of society in Missouri caused him to return to Butler county, and, in 1861, he located in Zelienople, where he continued to practice medicine for over thirty years. Throughout his long and varied career, he enjoyed the fullest confidence [p. 1084] of the public, and built up through the passing years a large and lucrative practice. In 1883 he and his son, Amos M., purchased the bank established by Nicholas DAMBACH, and the banking house of Amos Lusk & Son proved a financial success. Dr. LUSK was an excellent financier, and with the assistance of his son he built up a solid and substantial business. After his death his son sold an interest in the bank to John A. GELBACH, and subsequently sold the remaining interest to the latter's brother, and the firm then became Gelbach Brothers. Dr. LUSK was a celebrated linguist, was master of twelve languages, and spoke fluently, Greek, Latin, Spanish, Hebrew, French, German, Italian, English and other tongues, and had studied in all twenty-five different languages. He was perhaps the most proficient linguist in the State, was a gentleman of fine classical taste, and devoted his leisure moments to the perusal of the choicest literature. He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church of Zelienople, and for many years had rendered professional services gratuitously to the Orphan's Home near that borough. Dr. LUSK married Agnes S. CLOW, daughter of James S. CLOW, of Westmoreland county, who survives him. Six children were born to this union, all of whom are living: William H., attorney at law, of Butler; James L., a captain of engineers in the United States army; Joseph R., chief train dispatcher of the Pittsburg and Western railroad at Allegheny; Amos M., of Zelienople; Mary V., wife of John A. GELBACH, of the same borough, and Julian. Dr. LUSK died November 17, 1891, his death occurring very suddenly, while on his way to attend a patient. In politics, he was a Republican, but took little interest in political affairs. He was a pioneer member of Harmony lodge, F. & A. M., and was buried by the Masonic order. Few men in Butler county stood so high in the estimation of their fellow citizens as this pioneer physician, most of whose long and varied career was spent in the place of his death.

AMOS M. LUSK, fourth son of Dr. Amos LUSK, was born in Zelienople, January 14, 1863, and received his education in the public schools and under the private instruction of his father. He studied civil engineering, and followed that profession until 1883, when he engaged in the banking business with his father. Soon after the death of the latter he sold an interest in the bank to John A. GELBACH, and subsequently disposed of the remaining interest to Mr. GELBACH's brother. Since retiring from the bank Mr. LUSK has devoted his attention to oil producing. In 1884 he was married to Laura, daughter of George STAHL, of Zelienople, to whom have been born three children: Eva Elizabeth; George Amos, and Herbert. In politics, Mr. LUSK is a Republican, has served as president of the Zelienople council, and also as burgess of the borough. He is a member of the Masonic order, also of the I. O. O. F., and Jr. O. U. A. M.

CHRISTIAN BUHL was born in Germany, in 1776, came to the United States in 1800, and in 1802 settled in Zelienople, Butler county, Pennsylvania, were he was married the following year to Dorothy GOEHRING, also a native of Germany. He was a hatter, and conducted that business in Zelienople for many years. He possessed a good education for that period, served as justice of the peace for many years, and was an associate judge of Butler county for one term. In politics, he was a Democrat, and in religious faith, a member of the German Lutheran church, and helped to build the old stone church at Zelienople. Mr. [p. 1085] BUHL died in 1864; his wife survived until 1868, living to the ripe old age of ninety years. They were the parents of eleven children, six of whom are living: George, and Christian H., both residing in Michigan; Charles, a resident of Danville, Illinois; Henry, of Zelienople; Jane, wife of Robert HAY, of Allegheny, and Elizabeth, wife of Robert KING, of Detroit, Michigan.

HENREY BUHL was born in Zelienople, Butler county, August 13, 1813, son of Christian and Dorothy BUHL. He was reared in his native place, became a builder of steam engines, and was an engineer on the river for many years. In 1843 he married Christina W. C., daughter of Fredrick C. SPEYERER, of Cranberry township. After marriage the located on a farm in Forward township, residing there until 1891, and then took up their residence at Zelienople. Mr. BUHL also conducted a grist mill in connection with his farm for twenty-five years. Politically, he has always been a stanch Democrat. He is the father of seven children, as follows: Marie Christina, wife of Russell H. BOGGS, of the firm of Boggs & Buhl, Allegheny; F. C., of Evans City; Henry, a member of Boggs & Buhl; Fredericka J., wife of Jacob GELBACH, of Evans City; Emma, wife of Ferdinand WINTER, of Altoona; Matilda, and Benjamin S. who resides on the farm in Forward township. Mr. BUHL and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Zelienople.

A. V. CUNNINGHAM, M. D., was born in North Sewickley township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1887. His father, Robert CUNNINGHAM, also a physician, was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. He came to Beaver, were he met and married Jane ALLISON, a daughter of Hon. James ALLISON, a leading lawyer of western Pennsylvania, in 1832. Her father represented his district in Congress two terms, as did also her brother, Hon. John ALLISON. The subject of this sketch was reared in Beaver county, and was educated at the North Sewickley and Beaver Academies, but was prevented from taking a collegiate course because of an injury. He read medicine with Dr. GOUCHER, of Pittsburg, and commenced the practice of his profession at Wampum, Lawrence county, in 1863, thence removed to Poland, Ohio, and in 1867 located in Zelienople, Butler county. He is the oldest physician in that borough, and during the past twenty-seven years he has built up a lucrative practice. He is a graduate of Jefferson Medical College of that city in May, 1894. During his early life he studied dentistry, under Dr. M. E. GILLESPIE, of Pittsburg, and was thus enabled to conduct the dental business in connection with his regular profession. Dr. CUNNINGHAM has been identified with the oil interests during the past few years, and was the pioneer in the Harmony and Zelienople fields, where he was quite successful. In politics, he has been a Republican, and acted with that party up to within a few years, since which time he has been an independent voter, casting his ballot in favor of those who in his judgment would add dignity to the office to which they aspired, claiming that it is better to swear allegience to principle than to party. Consequently he associated himself with the Prohibition party for a time, received the nomination of his district for Congress, and, as anticipated, was defeated. He has recently been acting with the Republican party, except when the other parties presented better material. He [p. 1086] has always voted for the presidential nominee of that party since casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. Dr. CUNNINGHAM was married, September 16, 1869, to Jane B. WALLACE, a daughter of Francis WALLACE, of Zelienople, to whom have been born eight children, viz.: Nora Viola; Francis W.; A. Vincent; Jennie W.; Lee Smith; Walter C.; Ralph, and Adaline F. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, while his family are identified with the Presbyterian church. Dr. CUNNINGHAM was appointed on the board of examining surgeons of pensions for Butler county, August 1, 1894, without solicitation on his part.

SAMUEL YOUNG, the founder and late editor of the Connoquenessing Valley News, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 29, 1821. After receiving a common school education, he entered the book binding establishment of L. LOOMIS, of that city, and later took editorial charge of the American Eagle, of Pittsburg, published by Arthur A. ANDERSON. At the same time he was a correspondent for the Philadelphia and New York papers. He was the author and publisher of two books entitled "The Smoky City, a Tale of Crimes," and "Tales and Sketches," which found a ready sale and proved for the times a profitable enterprise. In 1847 he moved to Franklin, Venango county, and took charge of the stock department of the iron mills, then owned by Henry COULTER. He later became connected with the Conneautville Courier, as associate editor, and was afterwards associated with A. J. GIBSON, as editor and publisher of the Clarion Banner, with which he was connected until June, 1868, when they sold the paper. In 1869 Mr. YOUNG started the Independent, at East Brady, which proved a good investment, and in 1871 he erected a residence at East Brady, at a cost of $5,000. He afterwards sold the Independent, and in 1878, at the solicitation of some of the prominent business men of Zelienople, he stared the Connoquenessing Valley News, his son, J. R. YOUNG, becoming associated with him. The News soon gained a fair circulation throughout Butler county and surrounding territory, and he continued in editorial charge until his death. The News has since been edited and published by his son J. R. YOUNG. Mr. YOUNG was married December 3, 1844, to Miss Mary W. ARMSTRONG. The surviving children of this union are: Belle A., wife of W. H. TAYLOR, of Centre county; J. R., of Zelienople, and Mary C., wife of S. F. BOWSER, of Butler. Mrs. YOUNG died June 20, 1881. He was again married, June 27, 1882. To Miss Emeline G. BOGGS, who became the mother of one son, Samuel W., of Zelienople. Mr. YOUNG died at his home in Zelienople, March 27, 1891. Politically, he was a Republican, and was one of the well know citizens of the county. Shortly before his death he published an autobiography, which contains many interesting references to Butler county and her people.

LEWIS DINDINGER was a native of Alsace, France, where he met and married Christina MILLER. In 1830 they immigrated to Franklin township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, where they purchased and improved a farm. Mr. DINDINGER was also engaged in the construction of the canal from Pittsburg to Erie. They reared a family of ten children, seven of whom are living as follows: George, of Lancaster township; Jacob, a resident of Wampum, Lawrence county; John, of Zelienople; Caroline, wife of Lewis KERL, of Allegheny; Christina, wife of Henry BLOOM, of Portersville; William, of Harmony, and Henry. [p. 1087] of Allegheny. The parents removed from Beaver county to Zelienople, where they united with the Lutheran church. Mr. DINDINGER died in that borough, and his widow subsequently returned to the homestead in Beaver county, where she spent the remaining years of her life.

JOHN DINDINGER, merchant, was born in Franklin township, Beaver county, December 26, 1839, and is the third son of Lewis and Christina DINDINGER. He was educated in the public schools of his native township, and in 1861 began clerking in a store. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months, at the expiration of his term of service he returned to Beaver county, and, in 1864, engaged in merchandising, in Perry township, Lawrence county, where he continued until 1872, when he sold his store and purchased a farm in Franklin township, Beaver county. In 1874 he came to Zelienople and established his present mercantile business, also erected his store building. He has built up a large trade and is one of the representative business men in that section of the county. Mr. DINDINGER is also interested in oil production, and was one of the organizers and a director in the National Bank of Harmony. He was married in December, 1863, to Miss R. T. PYLE, daughter of Caleb PYLE, of Lawrence county. Seven children have been born to this union: C. L., who is in partnership with his father; Leuis Wilber, deceased; Franklin Howard, deceased; Ada, deceased; Eva Leola; Estella, and Norman Roy. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, Mr. DINDINGER is a Republican. He served as postmaster under Garfield's administration, and he is a member of Wilson Post, Number 469, G. A. R., of Zelienople.

WILLIAM DINDINGER was born in Franklin township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, September 1, 1850, son of Lewis and Christina (MILLER) DINDINGER. He was reared in Beaver county, received a common school education, and was engaged in farming until 1884, when he came to Zelienople and embarked in the hardware business. In January, 1886, he became a member of the firm of W. A. Goehring & Company, the largest dealers in hardware, agricultural implements, and oil well supplies in the borough. Mr. DINDINGER is a member of the Breackneck Oil Company. He was married March 13, 1873, to Mary L., daughter of Justus ALBORN, of Franklin township, Beaver county, and is the father of four children: Lewis A.; Charles H.; Walter A., and Arthur William. The family are members of the German Lutheran church, of Zelienople, in which body Mr. DINDINGER has served as trustee and superintendent of the Sunday school, and is also a member of the church council. In politics, he is a Republican, and is recognized as one of the enterprising business men of Harmony.

JOHN REED was born near Steubenville, Ohio, and married Elizabeth RANDOLPH, born at Elizabeth, Allegheny county Pennsylvania. Mr. REED came to Harmony, Butler county, in 1819, and carried on the Abraham Ziegler tannery until 1821, and then removed to Zelienople, where he and his wife resided until their death. They reared a family of eight children, as follows: Mary Jane, deceased; W. A., of Washington county; Lewis of New Brighton, Beaver county; J. V., deceased; Edward, who died in infancy; Louisa, deceased; Margaret, wife of Milton HENRY, of New Castle, and Charles E.

[p. 1088]

CHARLES E. REED, druggist, was born in the borough of Zelienople, June 3, 1843, and is the youngest son of John and Elizabeth REED. He attended the public schools until the age of thirteen years, and then entered a drug store in Allegheny City, where he learned the drug business. In 1865 he formed a partnership with his brother, and established a drug store in Allegheny City, which they continued for six years. In 1882 he opened his present drug store at Zelienople, where he has since continued in the same line. Mr. REED was married in 1864, to Mary S., daughter of John BLAIR, of Allegheny City. She died in 1884, leaving five children, as follows: W. A., an employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Oakdale; J. B., train dispatcher at New Castle Junction; C. L., who is operating a sheep ranch in Montana; Mary F., and Elizabeth. In 1885 Mr. REED married Jeannette E. MCCLURE, daughter of John MCCLURE of Lancaster township. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church at Zelienople, in which body he fills the office of trustee. Politically, he is Democrat, and was postmaster of Zelienople under Cleveland's first administration. He has been president of the Zelienople school board, and is now filling the office of notary public. He is a member of Harmony council, Number 698, Royal Arcanum.

ALBERT WINTER, jeweler, was born in Phillipsburg, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, February 16, 1850, son of Rev. E. F. and Johanna (SWARTZ) WINTER, natives of Germany. His father was educated in Germany, and became a noted divine in the Evangelical church, having charge of four churches in Beaver county for a period of twenty-five years, during which time he erected eleven church buildings. He was pastor of the Evangelical church at Zelienople for twenty-five years. He was also pastor of the Burry church for forty-four years, and was organist for all the churches for which he was pastor. He died May 22, 1884. After his death his widow resided in Rochester, Beaver county, until December, 1893, when she moved to Zelienople. Her death occurred July 15, 1894. They were the parents of nine children, and are kindly remembered in Butler county. The subject of this sketch is the sixth child and was reared at Phillipsburg. He received a public school education, and conducted his father's farm for several years; afterwards learning the jeweler's trade at New Brighton, Pennsylvania, and commenced working at the bench in 1868. In 1869 he established his present business house at Zelienople, where he has since enjoyed a lucrative trade. Mr. WINTER is also interested in oil producing, and was associated with Dr. CUNNINGHAM in drilling the first well in the Zelienople field. In December, 1875, he married Annie C., daughter of Daniel BRENNER, of Beaver county, and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Zelienople, in which body he holds the office of elder. He has also served as teacher and superintendent of the Sunday school. In politics, Mr. WINTER is a Prohibitionist, and has served as school director in the borough.

REV. J. A. KRIBBS, superintendent of the Orphan's Farm School at Zelienople, was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and was educated in the district schools, and the Zelienople Academy. He graduated from the Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, in 1868, and for ten years was pastor of the Lutheran church at Kittanning. In 1878 he came to Zelienople, Butler county, [p. 1089] and had charge of two churches for three years. In the same year he became connected with the Orphan's Farm School, as superintendent, and has since filled that position with great satisfaction to the many friends of the institution. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, composed of two companies from Clarion county, one company from Armstrong county, and seven companies from Pittsburg and Allegheny county, under Colonel Allen, but afterwards commanded by General Pierson. The regiment was organized at Pittsburg, September 2, 1862, and Mr. KRIBBS participated with his command in the great battles fought by the Army of the Potomac. He was commissioned first lieutenant of his company, and commanded it at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, the Richmond campaign and Petersburg. Mr. KRIBBS was married in 1872, to Miss M. A. DINWIDDIE, of Philadelphia, In politics, he was a Republican, and is one of the highly respected citizen of Zelienople.

HENRY STOKEY was born in 1821, in Alsace, France, and immigrated to the United States in 1847, and settled in New Orleans. He remained there for two years, and returned to his native country in 1849 for the purpose of settling up his business with a view of making America his home. He returned to the United States in 1851, and again located at New Orleans, pursuing his trade, that of blacksmith and machinist, until 1852, when he located at Pittsburg, where, in the year 1853, he married Margaret BAER, also a native of Alsace, France. In 1856 he removed to Evans City, Butler county, and engaged in farming in Adams township, and also owned a farm in Jackson township. In 1864 Mr. STOKEY became proprietor of a hotel in Evans City, which he conducted until 1868, when he resumed farming in Jackson township. In 1878 he purchased the Eagle Hotel, at Zelienople, which he carried on until his death, in 1883. His widow resides on the homestead in Jackson township. He was a member of the German Reformed church, while his widow is connected with the Lutheran denomination. Their family consisted of five children, as follows: Henry W.; Charles; Jacob; Lewis, and Theodore, who was drowned when sixteen years of age, Mr. STOKEY was a Democrat, in politics, and served in the Zelienople council. He was a member of Connoquenessing Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Butler, which he joined in 1866, and was also a charter member of Harmony Lodge, I. O. O. F.

HENRY W. STOKEY, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel, Zelienople, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1854, and is the eldest son of Henry and Margaret STOKEY. He was educated in the common schools, and has always followed farming and hotel keeping. In 1881 he became proprietor of the Central Hotel at Evans City, and afterwards purchased the Stokey House, in the same place, and conducted it until 1888. In that year he removed to Zelienople, and shortly afterwards purchased the Bastian House, which he has rebuilt and named the Grand Central. It is a first-class hotel, and finished in modern style. Mr. STOKEY was married May 5, 1881, to Amelia, daughter of Lewis TEETS, of Beaver county, and has one child, Caroline Matilda. He and wife are adherents of the German Lutheran church. Politically, he is a Demo- [p. 1090] crat. He is a member of Harmony Lodge, F. & A. M., and is one of the well know citizens of Zelienople.

CHARLES STOKEY, proprietor of the Stokey House, Zelienople, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, April 22, 1856, son of Henry and Margaret STOKEY. He received a common school education and remained on the homestead farm until 1874, when he embarked in the harness business at Evans City, which he continued until the spring of 1878. At that time he removed to Zelienople with his father, who conducted the Stokey House until his death, when our subject became proprietor, and has carried on that hotel successfully up to the present. Mr. STOKEY was married in 1875, to Susan, C., daughter of William ALLEN, Sr., of Zelienople, and has five children: Leila A.; Ellsworth B.; Russell L.; Herschel, and Karl Sidney. Mrs. STOKEY is a member of the English Lutheran church. A Democrat, in politics, Mr. STOKEY has taken very little interest in political matters for some years. He is a member of Harmony Lodge, F. & A. M., also of Butler Chapter, R. A. M.; of Tancred Commandery, Number 48, of Pittsburg, and of Syria Temple, A. A. N. O. M. S.

SAMUEL E. RALSTON, physician and surgeon, was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1863, son of William and Hannah (RIDDLE) RALSTON, both natives of Butler county, and now residents of Prospect. His grandfather, William RALSTON, was a native of Philadelphia, and by trade a miller. In 1815 he located in New Castle, Lawrence county, where he erected the first grist mill in that town. He later built a mill at Slippery Rock, Butler county, and another on the Connoquenessing creek, in Butler township, which he operated for many years. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township, learned the milling business with his father, and followed that business for four years. He received his literary education at Mt. Union College, Stark county, Ohio, read medicine under Dr. Joseph LUSK, of Butler, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1889. Dr. RALSTON began practice in Harmony, where he remained until January, 1892, when he removed to Zelienople. Since commencing practice he has built up a lucrative business, and is recognized as a progressive physician. Politically, he is a Republican.

H. G. McKIM, insurance and real estate agent, is a son of R. A. and Ellen (GOULD) McKIM, natives of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and was born at Mercer, July 9, 1860. He was educated in the public schools, and at the age of nineteen entered the store of J. G. MOORE of Mercer, as salesman and book-keeper, where he remained five years. He next accepted a position as traveling salesman for a Pittsburg house, with which he remained five years. In 1886 he came to Zelienople, Butler county, to accept the position of book-keeper for A. SEATON, which he filled for three years, and then established his present insurance and real estate business. Among the companies represented by Mr. McKIM, may be mentioned the New York Life, The United States Accident, of New York city, the German Fire, of Pittsburg, the North American of Philadelphia, and many other old and prominent fire and life insurance companies. In 1893 he was elected a justice of the peace for the borough of Zelienople, and has also filled the position of borough clerk. He is a Republican, in politics, and is a [p. 1091] member of Evans City Lodge, K. of P., Zelienople Lodge, K. O. T. M., and Connoquenessing Council, Jr. O. U. A. M.

GEORGE STAHL, distiller, was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1889, son of Jacob and Magdalene (VOCHT) STAHL. His father was a native of Jackson township, Butler county, was a member of the Economite Society, and moved with that organization to Freedom, Beaver county. George received a common school education in the district schools of his native township, and in 1870 moved to Zelienople, where he engaged in the distilling business, which he has since conducted successfully. In 1862 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham ZIEGLER of Harmony, and has four children: Laura, wife of Amos M. LUSK of Zelienople; John Abraham; Janet, and George Washington. Politically, Mr. STAHL is a Republican, and he and family are members of Grace Reformed church of Harmony.

WILLIAM EICHHOLTZ was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 1853, son of Conrad and Elizabeth (HOLTZER) EICHHOLTZ, natives of Germany. His parents immigrated to Allegheny City in 1838, subsequently removed to Beaver county, and settled upon a farm, where his mother died in 1886, and his father in 1891. Soon after locating in Beaver county, Conrad EICHHOLTZ engaged in huckstering, which business he followed for fifteen years, shipping his produce to Pittsburg. About 1860 he became interested in oil producing at Pithole and Petroleum Centre, Venango county, and was quite a successful operator for about fifteen years. He then returned to Beaver county, and retired from active business. Conrad and Elizabeth EICHHOLTZ, were the parents of eleven children, viz.: Margaret, wife of Nicholas GARDNER; Fredrick; John; Catherine; Lewis; George; Louisa, wife of John KOCHER; Mary, deceased; William; Edward, and Frank. The parents were members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. EICHHOLTZ was connected with the Masonic order. The subject of this sketch worked upon the homestead farm until he became of age, when he married Louisa LUTZ, a daughter of William and Fredericka LUTZ, of Butler county. After his marriage his father gave him the homestead of 160 acres, upon which he lived twelve years. He then purchased and settled upon his present farm of 112 acres, situated near Harmony, in Lancaster township, Butler county. This farm has proved a profitable oil producing property, and now contains fifteen wells, operated by J. Q. A. Kennedy, of Butler county, Guckert & Steel, and M. L. Lockwood, the total output being about 1,000 barrels per day. Mr. EICHHOLTZ was formerly engaged in the dairy business, and shipped as high as 1,600 gallons of milk to Allegheny each month. Mr. EICHHOLTZ has a family of seven children, viz.: Frank; Nettie; Albert; Hiram; Conrad; Annie, and Omar. His wife died in 1892. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which denomination her husband belongs. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

ABRAHAM ZIEGLER was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, May 4, 1774. He learned the blacksmith's trade in his native county, and was also an extensive farmer there. In 1814 he purchased the entire property of the Harmony Society from Father RAPP, and in 1815 brought his family to this county and took possession of his purchase. He went into merchandising quite exten- [p. 1092] sively, which he carried on in connection with his farm. He died in 1836, at Harmony. In religious faith, he was a Mennonite, erected the church of that denomination at Harmony, in 1816, and was its principle support for twenty years. He was interred in the graveyard attached to this church. Mr. ZIEGLER was twice married; his first wife was Catherine BOEHM, to whom were born the following children; Maria; Abraham, and Anna. His second wife was Elizabeth EUSTANDIRE, who became the mother of eleven children, as follows: Catherine; Andrew; Jacob; Samuel; Jonas; David; Michael; Susannah; Elizabeth; Barbara, and Joseph, all of whom are dead except the last mentioned.

JOSEPH ZIEGLER, youngest son of Abraham and Elizabeth ZIEGLER, was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1815, and came with his parents to Butler county, where he grew to manhood. He then purchased his present farm of 200 acres, which was part of the original Rapp property, and has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. ZIEGLER was reared in the Mennonite faith, and has been minister of the Harmony church for nearly forty years. He married, in 1839, Mary, daughter of George BOYER, of Lancaster township, Butler county, of which union were born ten children; Abraham, deceased; Sara, deceased wife of Jacob WISE; George, deceased; Joseph, of Beaver county; Aaron A.; Samuel; Jonas; David B.; Elizabeth, and Catherine. Mrs. ZIEGLER died in April, 1892

SAMUEL SWAIN was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1800, and was a son of Jacob SWAIN, a native of Maryland, who first settled in Westmoreland county, whence he removed to Butler county in 1816. He was a hatter by trade, and followed that business in connection with farming. Samuel was twice married, his first wife being Sarah BROWN, a native of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, whom he met and married in Butler county. Their children are as follows: A. A., who resides on the old homestead farm; G. D., a merchant of Harmony, and one deceased. Mrs. SWAIN died in 1854, and he subsequently married a Miss EMERICK, to whom was born one daughter, Maria, wife of Joseph T. DONLEY. Mr. SWAIN died in 1882; his widow removed to Butler, and died at the home of her daughter at Etna, Pennsylvania. Mr. SWAIN lived at Whitestown for a period, and later purchased a farm in Jackson township from the ZIEGLER estate, upon which he spent the remaining years of his life. He was Democrat, in politics, and was an elder in the Lutheran church for many years. He contributed towards the erection of both the German and English Lutheran churches at Zelienople.

G. D. SWAIN, a leading merchant of Harmony, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, and is the fourth son of Samuel and Sarah (BROWN) SWAIN. He received his primary education in the public schools of Jackson township, subsequently attended Zelienople Academy, and later was engaged in teaching for twelve years. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Quay, and served nine months, participating in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, besides several skirmishes. In 1871 he embarked in merchandising at Harmony, where he has since built up an extensive business, one of the largest, [p. 1093] if not the largest, in this part of the county. In 1865 he married Harriet, daughter of Abraham MOYER, of Lancaster township, Butler county, and has two children: Mary, and Laura. He and family are members of the Lutheran church, in which organization he fills the office of deacon, and he is also a member of the standing committee. In politics, he is a stanch Democrat, and has always taken an active interest in political matters. He has been a school director for twenty years, has been burgess of Harmony for ten consecutive terms, and has served as a delegate to the State conventions. In 1886 he was the Democratic nominee for the legislature, and though he made a splendid race, he was defeated, as the county is strongly Republican. Mr. SWAIN is a progressive and enterprising business man, and has won the respect and confidence of the best people of Butler county. He was one of the leading spirits in the erection of the soldier's monument at Butler, and is recognized as a patriotic and representative citizen.

JACOB F. WISE was a native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and moved with his father, John WISE, to Beaver county. He married a daughter of Abraham ZIEGLER and settled in Jackson township, Butler county, where he cleared and improved a farm. He afterwards moved to the Ziegler farm, on Connoquenessing creek, and thence to Harmony. He was a member of the Mennonite church. By his marriage to Miss ZIEGLER he was the father of five children: Abraham, deceased; Nancy, deceased wife of Jacob W. RICE; John; Jacob, who died at the age of twenty-eight years, and Mary, wife of C. NICKLAS, of Petersville. Some years after the death of his first wife he married Sarah, daughter of Benjamin MOYER, of Lancaster township, to which union were born ten children: Alfred M., and Henry M., both residing at Harmony; Benjamin, of New Brighton; Susannah, wife of Jacob FIEDLER, of Harmony; Levi M., an attorney of Butler; Israel, who resides upon the homestead farm; Sarah, wife of James R. MOORE, of Allegheny; Jeremiah, deceased; Catherine, deceased wife of Edward STAUFFER, of Harmony, and Noah, who resides at New Brighton. Mr. WISE was a Republican, in politics.

HENRY M. WISE, of the firm of H. M. Bentle & Company, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, January 1, 1854, and is the second son of Jacob F. and Sarah (MOYER) WISE. He received a good public school education, afterwards engaged in the distillery business with his father, and in 1878 he became cashier of the Harmony Savings Bank, which position he filled until 1884. In 1882 he became a member of the lumber firm of Wise, Lytle & Haim, but withdrew in 1884, and the following year became a member of the present firm. Mr. WISE married in 1877, to Jeannette L., a daughter of the late Dr. Joseph S. LUSK, and has one son, Howard Beach. The family are connected with the Presbyterian church of Harmony, and he is a trustee in that body. He is a member of Middle Lancaster Lodge, I. O. O. F.; Harmony Council, R. A.; Tent, Number 13, K. of M., and the Jr. O. U. A. M. Politically, he is a Republican, and has served as burgess and member of the borough council, also as school director of the Harmony public schools. He was at one time the choice of the Republicans of his section for register and recorder of the county, but failed to receive the nomination.

ALFRED M. WISE, proprietor of livery stable, Harmony, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, August 6, 1852, son of Jacob F. and Sarah (MOYER) WISE. He attended the public schools and worked upon the homestead farm until twenty-one years of age. In 1876 he engaged in the livery business at Harmony, where he has since enjoyed the leading trade of the borough. He was married in 1874, to Ada COVERT, daughter of Samuel COVERT, of Harmony, and has four children: Charles; Annie; Clyde Delmar, and Florence Genevieve. He and his wife are members of the Church of God. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of the Royal Arcanum.

ERANIOUS BENTLE was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and for many years was a successful merchant of Zelienople, where he died in 1858. He married Rebecca MARQUIS, and was the father of four children, three of whom are living, as follows: Mary, wife of M. S. NOCHTRIEB, of Wooster, Ohio; Lavina, and Howard M. His widow married Edward MELLON, and resides in Zelienople.

HOWARD M. BENTLE, of the firm of H. M. Bentle & Company, was born in Zelienople, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1856, and is the only son of Eranious and Rebecca BENTLE. He was reared in his native town, and received his education in the public schools, and at Ironton, Ohio, and Beaver, Pennsylvania. In 1877 he was elected teller of the National Bank of Harmony, and filled that position until the bank ceased operations. In 1880 he engaged in merchandising at Harmony, which he continued until 1885, and then became a partner in the present lumber firm and planing mill of H. M. Bentle & Company. Besides their mill at Harmony, they have also a mill at Zelienople, and conduct quite an extensive business. Mr. BENTLE was married in 1882, to Lillian H., daughter of John TITE, of Allegheny, and has two children: Laura Elizabeth, and Lydia Rebecca. He and wife are members of the English Lutheran church. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has served as school director, and overseer of the poor in Harmony. He is a member of the R. A., the Jr. O. U. A. M., and Middle Lancaster Lodge, I. O. O. F.

WILLIAM STIVER was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and married Jane ORR, a native of Ireland. They were among the early settlers of Jefferson county, Ohio, where Mrs. STIVER died in 1846. Of a family of four children born to this union, three are living, as follows: Jane, wife of J. M. BRIGGS; F. B., and Henry. Mr. STIVER married for his second wife, a Mrs. COVERT, of Butler county, and resided in Harmony about seven years. He was a cabinet-maker, and died at West Carlington, Ohio, in 1887. His widow resides at Harmony. Both she and her husband were members of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

F. B. STIVER, dealer in flour and feed, was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, June 11, 1842, eldest son of William and Jane (ORR) STIVER. He lived in his native county until he was nine years old and then went to West Virginia. At the breaking out of the Rebellion, he enlisted in Company A, Second West Virginia Volunteers, and served three years in that command. In September, 1864, he re-enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, participating in most of the battles, marches and campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. After the war he [p. 1095] located in Harmony, Butler county, and in 1879 engaged in buying and shipping hay, feed, etc., in which he has continued up to the present. Mr. STIVER was married in 1883, to Jennie MCCONNELL, of Lancaster township, Butler county. She is a member of the English Lutheran church, while he belongs to the Baptist church. Politically, a Republican, he has served in the council, also as constable of Harmony, and has been a member of the county committee. He is a member of Captain Wilson Post, G. A. R., of Zelienople, and is a charter member of Evans City Lodge, A. O. U. W.

JOSEPH SIDNEY SEAMAN was born in Harmony, Butler county, Pennsylvania, April 14, 1839, the third child of Elias and Margaret SEAMAN. His mother was a daughter of Charles GOEHRING, and was born in Cranberry township, Butler county, September 11, 1814. In 1834 she married Elias SEAMAN, and became the mother of five children, as follows: William Henry; Elias Jefferson, who died July 1, 1859; Joseph Sidney; Edward M., and Elias Francis. The father was born February 20 1812, in Berks county, Pennsylvania, and died August 24, 1842. Mrs. SEAMAN afterwards married George GIESS, in 1848, which union was blessed with four children: Charles P.; Henrietta: Charlotte, who died in infancy, and Emma, wife of Jonas ZIEGLER. Mrs. GIESS, who is still living at the ripe age of eighty years, retains all her mental faculties, and is a very intelligent woman. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Zelienople, to which village his parents removed when he was quite young. At the age of seventeen he went to Pittsburg, and served an apprenticeship of three years at roll-turning. By his energy and close application to business, he advanced step by step, until he became a member of the firm of J. B. Young & Company. This firm was prosperous and successful from its inception, and after some changes it was recognized as one of the most important manufacturing establishments in Pittsburg, and is now know as the Phoenix Roll Works, of Seaman, Sleeth & Black. Mr. SEAMAN was elected the first president of the company, which position he still occupies. He is a stanch Republican and has been president of the Lincoln Club since its organization. For the past twelve years he has been president of the school board of his ward, and takes a deep interest in educational matters; is a charter member and director of the Pennsylvania National Bank and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He is a prominent member and trustee of Grant Street Lutheran church, and is a member of the building committee of that and the East End Mission church. Mr. SEAMAN was married March 22, 1863, to Miss Alice H. SLATER, to which union have been born three children: Charles B.; Grace, and Joseph, all of whom are living. He has always taken a deep interest in religious matters, and has contributed to the support of everything pertaining to the advancement and development of his home.

FREDERICK HALLSTEIN was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and immigated [sic] to Utica, New York, from which place he came to Zelienople, Pennsylvania, in 1852. He was married October 30, 1852, to Catherine KING, also a native of Hesse-Darmstadt. They remained in Zelienople until 1857, when they removed to Middle Lancaster. Mr. HALLSTEIN was a shoemaker, and followed his trade at Zelienople and Middle Lancaster. He died December, 1889. His widow resides with her son Henry A., at Harmony. He was a [p. 1096] member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, filled at different times various church offices, and was superintendent of the Sunday school for twelve years. They were the parents of four children: J. F., of Butler; John W., a resident of Allegheny, Henry A., and Elizabeth A., deceased wife of C. W. BURRY.

HENRY A. HALLSTEIN, station agent at Harmony, was born in Middle Lancaster, Butler county, September 11, 1856, son of Frederick HALLSTEIN. After receiving a common school education, he learned the shoe-maker's trade with his father, at which he worked for several years. On September 8, 1882, he was appointed station and freight agent for the Pittsburg and Western Railroad Company, at Harmony; also agent for the United States Express Company, and manager for the Western Union Telegraph Company at the same point. In connection with these offices, he is agent for the Standard Life and Accident Insurance Company, of Detroit. Mr. HALLSTEIN was married May 26, 1887, to Lettie M., a daughter of Samuel SCHULER, of Harmony, and has three children: Boneta Beatrice; Harold Arthur, and Grace. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Harmony, and is a trustee and recorder of that organization. Politically, he is a Democrat, is now auditor of the borough and secretary of the school board, and secretary of the board of health. He is a member of the R. A., K. O. T. M., and Jr. O. U. A. M., also of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Beneficial Association.

DR. ADAM WEISER was born in Prussia, in 1823, son of Adam and Katherine WEISER, natives of that country. His grandfather, Adam WEISER, was a physician, and a graduate of the Medical College of Berlin. He was the father of three children: John; Adam, and Gottlieb. His father, Adam WEISER, was born in Prussia, graduated from the Medical College of Berlin, married Katherine HARTUNG, and had four children, as follows: William, deceased; Adam; Casper, and Margaret, who married Ambrose HELLER. His father died in 1831, and his widow came with her daughter to Wisconsin, where she died in 1859. The subject of this sketch began his medical studies when fourteen years of age, at the Medical College of Berlin, where his father held a professorship, and after seven years spent in that institution was graduated. When the revolution of 1848 broke out in Germany, he became a surgeon in one of the commands. In 1852 he married Louise WANNER, of Prussia, and they became the parents of seven children, viz.: Samuel; Tricot: Philip: Adam: William A.; Susan, and one that died early in youth. In 1853 Dr. WEISER immigrated to New Jersey, remained in that state on year, then came to Pittsburg, and from there to Zelienople, Butler county. He afterwards located at Middle Lancaster, where he practiced his profession until the fall of 1893, when he located at Evans City, and later removed to Harmony, where he is now engaged in practice. Dr. WEISER enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was appointed surgeon of the field hospital in that command, and was discharged from the service in 1863. He is a member of the G. A. R., is a Lutheran in religious faith, and in politics, a Democrat.

ROBERT BOGGS was one of the earliest settlers of Butler county. In 1796 he located on a tract of 400 acres of land, upon which the borough of Evans City now stands, and built his cabin in the midst of the wilderness. He was the second [p. 1097] son of James BOGGS, a native of Ireland,, who removed from the vicinity of Philadelphia, about the year 1760, and settled on forty acres of land on the north bank of the Allegheny river, which now forms a part of Allegheny. Robert BOGGS was one of a family of four children, as follows: Andrew; Robert; Nancy, who married Samuel DUNCAN, and Martha, who became the wife of Mr. MOORE. Their father was killed by a falling tree while clearing a small patch of land in Allegheny county, and his widow subsequently married a man named ROBINSON. Gen. William ROBINSON was the fruits of this union; he was for many years one of the wealthiest and most prominent men of Allegheny City. Robert BOGGS learned the millwright's trade, and operated a mill prior to his settlement in Butler county. He married Martha, daughter of John CRAWFORD, a pioneer of Crawford county, Pennsylvania, before settling in Butler county. He opened a tavern for the accommodation of the settlers and immigrants looking for homes, which stood upon the site of the present store of Boggs & Kline, of Evans City. Some years later he erected a grist mill, a very necessary improvement for that period, which stood upon the site of the present brick steam mill in Evans City. It was a log structure, and he operated it continuously until about 1836, when he sold the mill and 200 acres of land to Thomas B. EVANS, who laid out the borough of Evans City, then called Evansburg. Mr. BOGGS resided in that village until his death, in 1845, aged seventy-two years. Politically, he was a Jackson Democrat, filled the office of justice of the peace for many years, and also transacted much of the legal business of his neighbors, such as writing deeds, wills, etc. He always took an active part in political campaigns and wielded considerable influence in the councils of his party. Mr. BOGGS was one of the original members of Plains Presbyterian church, and was buried in the cemetery near the church building of that organization, a plain stone marking his last resting place. By his marriage to Martha CRAWFORD, he was the father of the following children: James, who married Nancy RICHARDSON, and lives in Adams township; Elizabeth, who married Daniel GRAHAM, after his death a Mr. EVANS; Margaret, who married Reese EVANS; Mary,. who became the wife of a Mr. HILL; Samuel, who married Jane RICHARDSON; Andrew who married Mary Ann IRWIN, and after her death Rachel HAZLETT; Robert, who married Mary Jane MCCANDLESS, and Martha, who became the wife of Sylvester ASH. Robert BOGGS second wife was Mrs. Margaret MCDONALD, a sister of Angus MCLEOD of Forward township, and their children, were as follows: William, who first married Cynthia MCDONALD, and for his second wife Mrs. John WELSH; Thomas W., who married Mary E. LEMMON, and after her death Elizabeth LYONS; Nancy, who died unmarried, and Daniel, who married Sarah HUMMEL, and is the only living child of Robert BOGGS, Sr.

ANDREW BOGGS, sixth child of Robert and Margaret (CRAWFORD) BOGGS, was born January 6, 1806, on the site of Evans City, Butler county, Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood under the parental roof, learned the miller's trade, and succeeded his father's business in the old mill. In 1836 he purchased seventy-six acres of land in Forward township, where he died April 10, 1886. He was a Democrat until 1855, then joined the Republican party, and was quite active [p. 1098] in the political circles of his time. He was a school director for many years, and filled the office of county commissioner from 1855 to 1858. He was an elder in the Plains Presbyterian church for half a century, being on of the original members of that society. Mr. BOGGS was twice married, his first wife being Mary Ann, daughter of Archibald IRWIN. Their children were as follows: Robert Irwin, of Allegheny; William F., of Pittsburg; Dr. Crawford A., deceased; Matilda, deceased wife of Capt. E. L. GILLESPIE, and James P. His second wife was Rachel HAZLETT, who died in 1880, leaving one daughter, Mary A., wife of Daniel DUNBAR of Forward township.

CAPT. JAMES P. BOGGS, youngest son of Andrew and Mary Ann (IRWIN) BOGGS, was born August 12, 1839, upon his present homestead. He received a common school education and learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed until April 26, 1861, when he enlisted in Company D, Eleventh Pennsylvania Reserve, and served until 1864. He participated in the battles of Mechanicsville, Gaines Mill, Second Bull Run, Gettysburg, Mine Run and the Wilderness. He was severely wounded in the left temple at Second Bull Run, and at the battle of the Wilderness he received a wound from a minie-ball in the right thigh, and was laid up in the hospitals at Fredricksburg, Georgetown, and Philadelphia. He was taken prisoner at Gaines Mill, together with his entire regiment, by Stonewall Jackson, and sent to Castle Thunder, and then to Belle Isle, at Richmond, Virginia, where the men were exchanged and returned to their regiment. When his regiment was mustered into the service he was made corporal, was soon promoted to first sergeant, in January, 1863, to first lieutenant, to captain May 1, 1864, and was mustered out of the service as brevet major. In 1865 he went into the oil fields of Venango and McKean counties, and was engaged in oil producing until 1881. In 1869-70 he was United States store keeper at Harmony, and is now engaged in farming upon the homestead, which he purchased several years ago. Mr. BOGGS married Melissa J., daughter of Joseph CAMPBELL, of Warren county, Pennsylvania, of which union have been born six children: Mary W.; Nettie; Frank W.; Carrie E.; Grace, and Zora G. A Republican, in politics, Captain BOGGS has filled many of the offices of his township, and takes an active interest in political matters. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and he is connected with Capt. William Stewart Post, G. A. R., of Evans City, also with Camp 45, U. V. L., of Butler.

THOMAS W. BOGGS was born on the site of Evans City, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in February, 1813, and died in March, 1885. He was the second son of Robert BOGGS, by his marriage with Mrs. Margaret MCDONALD, a sister of Angus MCLEOD. He learned the carpenter's trade and followed the same for many years. He was twice married. His first wife was Mary E. LEMMON, a daughter of Robert LEMMON, of Butler township, were she was born. Mrs. BOGGS died in 1849, leaving one child, Henry C. Her husband was again married, to Elizabeth LYONS, to whom were born four children: J. E., of Massachusetts; Eva L., wife of J. D. TURNER, of Phillipsburg, Allegheny county; Myra B., a resident of Allegheny, and C. L., who resides in the west. Mr. BOGGS was a stanch Republican, and served as justice of the peace at Evans City [p. 1099] for fifteen years. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian church of Evans City, and was recognized as a worthy and honorable man.

HENRY C. BOGGS, of the firm of Boggs & Kline, merchants, Evans City, was born on the site of Evans City, Butler county, December 21, 1847, and is a son of Thomas W. and Mary E. (LEMMON) BOGGS, and a grandson of Robert BOGGS, one of the pioneers of Forward township. He was reared at Evans City, and received his education in the district school. In 1870 he engaged in merchandising at Evans City, and has continued in that line up to the present. In 1888 he formed a partnership with John W. KLINE, since which time the firm of Boggs & Kline has carried on the business. Mr. BOGGS was one of the organizers of the Long Oil Company, is treasurer of the same, and is interested in several other oil productions. In 1865 he enlisted in Company I, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served seven months. In 1870 he married Mary E., daughter of William LIKEN, of Jackson township, and has five living children: Flora L.; Harry G.; Iva L.; William Lee, and Margueretta L. Earl Wallace was accidentally killed by the discharge of a gun, February 25, 1892. Mr. BOGGS is a Republican in politics, was appointed postmaster of Evans City by President Grant, and served twelve years. He was again appointed by President Harrison, in 1889, and served his full term. He has filled the office of school director, and has also been a member of the borough council. He is a member of Captain Stewart Post, G. A. R., also of Evans City Lodge, I. O. O. F., and the Select Knights, and the A. O. U. W. He and family are members of the Baptist church of Evans City, in which he has served as treasurer, and took quite an active part in the erection of the present building.

JOHN W. KLINE, of the firm of Boggs & Kline, was born in Forward township, Butler county, August 13, 1861, son of Nicholas and Elizabeth (BARRINGER) KLINE, now residents of Forward township. Mr. KLINE received a good education in the district and select schools, and taught for ten years in the public schools of Forward and Cranberry townships, and Evans City. In 1888 he became a member of the present firm, and has since devoted his attention to merchandising. He was married in September, 1888, to Maggie, daughter of Christian TEXTOR, of Jackson township, and has two children: Grace, and Roscoe T. His wife is a member of the German Reformed church. In politics, he is a Democrat, and is a member of the school board of Evans City.

LEWIS GANSZ, SR., was born in Germany, in 1803, and immigrated to the United States in 1831. A few years later his parents came to this country and settled at Zelienople, Butler county, whence they removed to Pittsburg. Mr. GANSZ remained in Butler county, and became foreman of the Harmony tannery. In 1844 he located in what is now Evans City, later purchased the McIlwain tannery, and operated it for many years. Politically, he was a Democrat, and filled the office of justice of the peace for fifteen years. He was a prominent member of the German Reformed church, and assisted in the erection of the church building of that denomination at Evans City. He married Margaret TEXTOR, and they were the parent of five children: Martin, who died in infancy; Susan, who married John ASH; John, of Fayette county; Lewis, of Evans City, [p. 1100] and Mary, widow of Dr. Thomas KERSTING, of the same place. His wife died in 1876; he survived her until September 7, 1885.

LEWIS GANSZ, oil producer, was born at Harmony, Butler county, March 26, 1839, son of Lewis and Margaret GANSZ. He was reared in Evans City, and received a common school education. He learned the tanner's trade with his father, succeeded him in that business, and was also engaged in the boot and shoe trade at Evans City for some years. Mr. GANSZ retired from business in 1883, began operating in oil in 1887, organized the Gansz Oil Company, of which he has been president up to the present, and is one of the most extensive and successful operators in Butler county. In 1864 he enlisted in Company E, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers and served until the close of the war, holding the rank of lieutenant. Mr. GANSZ was married in November, 1879, to Lizzie, daughter of Sylvester ASH, a native of Forward township, Butler county. Mrs. GANSZ is a member of the United Presbyterian church and takes a deep interest in the prosperity of that organization. Politically, he is a Democrat, but his extensive business interests have prevented him from taking any active part in political matters.

DR. WILLIAM IRVINE, of Evans City, is one of the oldest and best know citizens in Butler county. He is a native of Adams township, where he was born February 17, 1828. His parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (RICHARDSON) IRVINE, were natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Irish and the latter of Scotch ancestry. His grandfather, James IRVINE, settled in what is now Adams township towards the close of the Eighteenth century, and was one of its pioneer school teachers. Dr. IRVINE'S boyhood was spent midst pioneer surrounding, and his education was obtained at common and select schools. He taught a few terms in early manhood, and supplemented his knowledge by diligent study during his spare time. He finally made up his mind to enter the medical profession, and commenced reading medicine under Dr. William STERRETT, the first permanent physician of Evans City. He attended lectures at the Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, and subsequently at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and graduated from the latter institution in March, 1855. Two years prior to his graduation he begun practice at Evans City, and has thus been in the active duties of his profession for the past forty-two years. Throughout this long and eventful period he has ministered to the people of his community in such a creditable manner as to win the respect and confidence of a large clientele. Dr. IRVINE was married October 13, 1853, to Elizabeth FIFE, a daughter of Maj. John FIFE, of Allegheny county, where Mrs. IRVINE was born and reared. Of the seven children that blessed this marriage, six grew to maturity, as follows: Belle, wife of Dr. J. M. LIST, of Evans City; Elizabeth, wife of William H. GELBACH, of Zelienople; Henrietta, deceased wife of Prof. M. A. SUTTON; Annie, wife of Prof. A. BROWN; S. J., and Margaret J., who died April, 1893. Mrs. IRVINE died November 13, 1894, after a happy married life of over forty-one years. She was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, a faithful and affectionate helpmate, and a fond and loving mother. The Doctor is an elder in the Presbyterian church of Evans City. Politically, he has been a Republican since the organization of that party. In 1863 he was appointed by Governor [p. 1101] Curtin an examining surgeon, to examine recruits for military service, and was a loyal supporter of the government throughout the war. IN 1876 he was elected to the legislature, and served in the sessions of the 1877 and 1878, performing his duties faithfully and well. He yet takes a deep interest in public affairs, and is recognized as on of the leading citizens of his native county.

JOHN N. MILLER was born in Alsace, France, July 26, 1823, son of Peter and Margaret MILLER. He immigrated to the United States in 1853, and located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but the same year he came to Evans City, were he worked at the shoemaker's trade for seventeen years. In 1868 he embarked in the hotel business, and continued to conduct the same until 1891, when he was succeeded by his son, Charles H. He erected the Miller House in 1876. In 1853 he married Christina RAPE, a daughter of Adam RAPE, a native of Germany, and by this union six children were born to him: Sarah, wife of S. A. BEAM, of Harmony; Margaret, wife of Edward DAMBACH, of Evans City; Charles H., proprietor of the Miller House, Evans City; Emma C.; Matilda S., and Lewis T., deceased. Before coming to America, Mr. MILLER served seven years in the Marine Corps of the French army, and visited Mexico, California, the West Indies, Brazil, Spain, Chili and Australia. He died at his home in Evans City, January 26, 1894. He was a member of the German Reformed church, to which denomination his family also belongs. He was a stanch Democrat, in politics, and was a member of Evans City Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. MILLER was largely interested in farming and oil property, and by strict attention to his business he had accumulated through the passing years a handsome competence.

JOHN ROHNER, cashier of the Citizens Bank, of Evans City, was born in Bavaria, Germany, February 16, 1830, and is a son of John and Margaret ROHNER. His father died when our subject was a child, and his mother immigrated to the United States in 1843. She located in Adams township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where John grew to manhood. She married John CROFT, and died in Forward township in 1889. By her second marriage she became the mother of the following children: John and Andrew, both deceased; Samuel, of Forward township; George, a resident of Mt. Chestnut, and Margaret, wife of Taylor MARTIN. The subject of this sketch attended the common schools in Germany, and the public schools of Butler county. He afterwards engaged as a farm laborer, and by strict economy saved enough to purchase a farm. In 1854 he married Margaret L., daughter of David DUNCAN, of Cranberry township and resided upon a farm in that township until 1883. In that year he located at Evans City, and became a partner in the banking house of Jacob Dambach & Company, now an incorporated State bank. Mr. ROHNER being one of the incorporators and now cashier. Mr. ROHNER is one of the incorporators of the Evans City Cemetery Company, and is a stockholder and director in the same. He was also one of the early oil producers in the Harmony field. In politics, he is a Republican, served ten years at justice of the peace in Cranberry township, several years as school director, and has been justice of the peace in Evans City since 1890. He is the father of three children, as follows: Sarah Olive, wife of Frank P. CONFER, of Allegheny; Luella, a teacher in the public schools of Evans City, [p. 1102] who married Samuel C. CRIDER, of Cranberry township, in January, 1894, and David Elmer, who died when twenty-seven years of age. Mr. ROHNER and family are members of the United Presbyterian church of Evans City, and he is now a trustee in that body.

JOHN BARKEY, SR., was a native of Butler county, and a merchant in Evans City for several years. He married Deborah DAVIDHEISER, to which union were born eleven children, five of whom are living, as follows: Susan, wife of Frederick ROHISER; John; Enos; Lizzie, wife of Richard ALLEN, and Sarah, wife of William STEWART. Mr. BARKEY died in 1869. He was a member of the Mennonite church, and a very worthy citizen. In politics, he was a Democrat, but took no active interest in such matters. His widow resides in Evans City.

JOHN BARKEY, coal dealer, Evans City, was born in that borough, May 10, 1854, and is a son of John BARKEY, Sr. He received a common school education, and for many years was local agent for the Singer Sewing Machine Company. In 1890 he joined his brother, Enos, who had been in the coal business since 1887. The business was a success from the beginning, and they now enjoy an extensive trade. He was married in 1889, to Ida E., daughter of Thomas WILSON, of Jackson township, and has three children: Charles Spurgeon; Ray Edison, and John Wilson. Both he and wife are members of the Evans City Baptist church, in which organization he is a trustee and a teacher in the Sunday school. He is one of the active and energetic workers in the chruch. He is an advocate of temperance principles, and in politics, he is a Prohibitionist.

ENOS BARKEY, coal dealer, Evans City, was born in that borough, February 15, 1863, son of John BARKEY, Sr. He attended the public schools until the age of fifteen years, after which he worked on a farm for five years. In 1887 he engaged in the coal business, conducting it successfully until 1890, when he admitted his brother, John BARKEY, as a partner. The firm now does a very large and successful business, and is one of the leading coal dealing firms of the township. In 1883 Mr. BARKEY married Annie E. BARTO, a daughter of Daniel and Catherine (WIMER) BARTO, of Beaver county, parents of eight children, six of whom are living. The following children, all living, have been born to Mr. And Mrs. BARKEY: Mary Ethel, born February 25, 1884; Clara Blanch, November 4, 1886, and Anna Luella, December 1, 1891

EDWARD WHITE was a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Matthew WHITE, who moved from Allegheny county, to Connoquenessing township, Butler county, in 1799, where the balance of his life was passed. Edward was a farmer and hotel keeper, and carried on a hotel at Whitestown, which became a well know stopping place for travelers between Pittsburg and Franklin. He married Elizabeth SULLIVAN, a daughter of Charles and Susannah SULLIVAN, pioneers of Butler county, to who was born eight children. Six of these are now living, as follows: Eveline, who married John MARTIN, of Prospect; Charles M., a resident of Peebles, Ohio; James Madison, who resides at Braddock; Susan E., wife of Joseph ASH, of Evans City, and Benjamin F., and John M., both residents of Evans City. Mr. WHITE died in 1844, and his widow married William C. MARTIN, and died in 1876. The were members of the [p. 1103] Presbyterian church. He was a stanch Democrat, and filled various township offices, and was also captain of a militia company for fifteen years.

JOHN M. WHITE, boot and shoe merchant, of Evans City, was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, May 25, 1841, and is the youngest living child of Edward and Elizabeth WHITE. He received his education in the township schools and at Prospect and Sunbury Academies and afterwards engaged in teaching. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served eighteen months. He re-enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Eighty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, participating in all the battles in which those regiment took part during his term of service. After the war he embarked in merchandising at Allegheny and later at Evans City, where he still carries on business. Mr. WHITE was married in 1868, to Mary S., daughter of Jacob STAMM, of Butler county. They had one daughter, who died at the age of thirteen years. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a Democrat, and is the present postmaster of Evans City, to which office he was appointed in November, 1893.

GEORGE IFFT, SR., was born in Germany, in 1815, and at the age of seventeen years, in 1832, he immigrated to Pennsylvania, and found employment with his uncle, Peter IFFT, in Beaver County. In 1838 he married Sophia REEB, and located on his father-in-law's farm in Cranberry township, Butler county. In 1841 he purchased a farm in Jackson township, and in 1850 removed to the present homestead in Jackson township, near the limits of Evans City. He died there April 19, 1891. His wife was born in Germany, in 1822, and came to the United States with her father, Nicholas REEB, in 1827, and settled in Cranberry township, Butler county the same year. Her father served in one of the great Nepoleon's cavalry regiments for twelve years. He finally retired from his farm to Evans City, where he died in 1869, dying as he lived, a member of the Lutheran church. To George and Sophia IFFT were born eight children, seven of whom are living: George, of Jackson township: Catherine, widow of Peter PEIFFER, of Forward township; William, of Zelienople; Sarah, wife of George LOTZ, of Forward township; Henry J., of Evans City; Nicholas, of the same place, and Lewis, of Washington, D. C. Politically, Mr. IFFT was a Democrat, and filled a number of the township offices. He gave liberally towards the erection of two Lutheran churches at Evans City, and was an elder in the church for many years.

HENRY J. IFFT, merchant, Evans City, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, May 1, 1849, and is a son of George and Sophia IFFT. He was educated in the public schools, and in 1866 he went to Pittsburg and became a clerk in a grocery store. In March, 1868, he embarked in merchandising at Evans City, in partnership with his father, the firm name being George Ifft. The firm was composed of his father, himself, and his brothers, William, Nicholas and Lewis. In 1872 William retired from the firm, Nicholas in 1883, and Lewis in November, 1890, but William afterwards repurchased a quarter interest, which was recently purchased by the subject of this sketch, who is now the sole owner of the business. This is the oldest mercantile establishment in Evans [p. 1104] City, and carries on an extensive trade. In 1872 he married Agnes A., daughter of John LYON, of Penn township, and sister of ex-mayor Robert W. LYON, of Pittsburg. The are the parents of four children, as follows: Carrie Leona; Charles W.; Mary Josephine, and Frances B. Mr. IFFT and family are connected with the United Presbyterian church of Evans City, in which organization he holds the office of trustee. In politics, he is a Democrat, has served in the borough council, has been a member of the school board for several years, and has been president of the board for one term.

GEORGE IFFT is the eldest son of George and Sophia IFFT, and was born in Jackson township, Butler county, August 26, 1839, where he was also reared and educated. At the age of twenty-two he located upon a rented farm, and subsequently entered the employ of Frazier & Matzgar, paper manufacturers of Pittsburg, with whom he remained fifteen years. In 1875 he purchased his present farm, erected buildings thereon, and otherwise improved it. He was married in 1861 to Miss Amelia SHILLING, who died in 1890. She was the mother of the following children: Sophia, wife of Herman DREBERT; Emma, wife of George TWENTIER; William; Jennie, wife of John BANDY; Sarah, wife of J. E. BROWN; George; Alexander; Lydia; Herman, and John. In politics, Mr. IFFT is a Democrat, has filled the offices of supervisor and overseer of the poor for twelve years, and is one of the present school directors of the township. For twenty years he has been an elder in the Lutheran church.

JOHN N. IFFT, son of George and Sophia (REEB) IFFT, was born July 23, 1853, in Jackson township, Butler county, and received a good public school education. Upon the death of his father he purchased the homestead, and is operating a stock farm of 125 acres. He is engaged in the breeding of French Norman, English Shire and Cleveland Bay coach horses. Among his horses are the following registered stock: Barton Boy, Number 6,680, sired by Charleston, dam Brown Bonny, imported by Bell Brothers, of Wooster, Ohio; Reigning Monarch, Number 6,235, bred by John Robinson, of England, sired by Lincoln , Number 1,351, grandsire Bold Lincoln, Number 231, dam Rival, Number 2,885, imported by Bell Brothers; French Norman stallion, Hercula, Number 4,320, bred by J. B. Kale, of Normandy, France, sired by Brenus, Number 1, 958, dam Ulina, Number 2,763, imported by Isaac Dreifoos, of Pittsburg; also Noble Prince, Number 924, bred by William Rook, of Rooksborough, Kirby Moorside, Yorkshire, England, imported by the Cleveland Bay Horse Company, of Paw Paw, Michigan, foaled in 1890, sired by Prince George, Number 235, dame Rose, Number 250. He is also engaged in the breeding of high grade cattle, and devotes much time to the growth and development of the stock interests in Pennsylvania. Mr. IFFT was married August 24, 1882, to Mary L., daughter of George DATT, of Richland township, Allegheny county. Three children are the fruits of this union, as follows: Maggie, Mabel, and Omer. In politics, Mr. IFFT is a Democrat, and in religious faith, he is connected with the Lutheran church.

JOSEPH ALLEN was a native of England, and came to the United States in 1818, with his wife, Jane (SLEE) ALLEN, and two children, Elizabeth and William. The family located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where our subject found [p. 1105] employment, under Colonel Watson, in paving the streets of that city. Being a butcher, he afterwards engaged in that business in Pittsburg. In 1836 he came to Butler county, and located on a farm in Jackson township. Here he remained eleven years, and then returned to Allegheny county, and located on a farm near Pittsburg, where he died September 25, 1865. His wife died October 12, 1832, and he married a Mrs. POLLIETT, who died in 1865. By his first marriage, he was the father of eleven children, seven of whom are living: Elizabeth, who married Washington WATSON; William; Ann, wife of Charles CHENEY, of Beaver county; Richard, a resident of Pittsburg; Susan, wife of James REYBURN of the same city; Sarah, wife of Jesse JOHNSON, of Mt. Chestnut, Butler county, and John, who resides in Pittsburg. Mr. ALLEN was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Protestant Episcopal church of Pittsburg, up to his death.

WILLIAM ALLEN SR., was born in Northumberlandshire, England, April 11, 1817, and is the eldest son of Joseph and Jane (SLEE) ALLEN. He came with his parents to America in 1818, and in 1836 removed with them to Butler county. In 1839 he married Catherine, daughter of Anthony BYER of Zelienople, to which borough he removed from the farm in 1845, engaged in butchering and continued in the same line of business until 1880, when he retired. He is the father of eight living children, as follows: Joseph, and Richard, both residents of Pittsburg; William, of Zelienople; Anthony, of Butler; Emma, wife of William FIDELL, of Allegheny City; Barbara, wife of Henry SCHAFFER, of Harmony; Susan, wife of Charles STOKEY, of Zelienople, and Mary. The family are adherents of the English Lutheran church of Zelienople. Politically, Mr. ALLEN is a Democrat, and has filled several offices in Jackson township.

WILLIAM ALLEN JR., of the firm of Allen & Dambach, Zelienople, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, May 17, 1845, and is the third son of William ALLEN Sr. He received a common school education, and learned the butcher's trade with his father. In 1867 he commenced buying produce from the farmers, and continued that business for twenty-three years, making weekly trips by wagon to Pittsburg. In 1889 he became a member of the present firm of Allen & Dambach. Mr. ALLEN was married in 1873, to Mary, daughter of Henry FRANK, of Jackson township, and to this union have been born six children: Harry H.; Frank; Jennie; Mary; Elmer, and Earl. Mrs. ALLEN is a member of the German Reformed church of Zelienople. Politically, Mr. ALLEN is a Democrat, has served in the borough council, also on the school board, and has filled the office of constable in his township.

FREDERICK BURRY was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 1823, and was a son of Frederick BURRY, Sr., a native of Germany, and one of the pioneers of Beaver county. Burry church in that county was named in his honor. Our subject married Catherine PHILLIPS, and they located in Franklin township, Butler county, about 1850. They cleared a farm and resided there until 1876, when the removed to Butler, where Mr. BURRY died in 1882. His widow still resides in that borough. The were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are living: Louisa, wife of Samuel CROUP, of Butler township; Frederick, of Franklin township; Margaret, wife of Adam RENNO, of Butler; Catherine, who married Henry WAGNER of the same place; Mary Ann, wife of Philip SMITH of Butler; [p. 1106] Phoebe, wife of Eli MAY, also a resident of that borough, and Lewis N., a resident of Evans City.

LEWIS N. BURRY, dealer in hardware, stoves etc., Evans City, was born in Franklin township, Butler county, March 10, 1862, and is the youngest son of Frederick and Catherine BURRY. He was reared in his native township, and attended the public schools there and in Butler. He learned the tinsmith's trade at Evans City, where he located in 1879, and in 1887 he established his present business. In 1887 Mr. BURRY married Mary, daughter of Edward ZEHNER, of Zelienople, and has three children: Ina, Alma, and Grace. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Evans City. He is a member of Harmony Lodge, F. & A. M., Evans City Lodge, K. of P., and Evans City Council, Jr., O. U. A. M. In politics, he is a Republican.

ANDREW DOUGLASS was born in Brady township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, August 14, 1810, and was a son of Edward DOUGLASS, a native of Scotland, who settled in what is now Brady township in May, 1797, where he took up 400 acres of land, and cleared and improved a farm. Edward DOUGLASS was a wagon-maker, and was quite a handy man in the community. He was a member of Wolf Creek Seceder church. He married Hanna KELLY, a native of Ireland, and died in 1847, aged seventy-eight years. His wife survived him until 1861, living to the ripe old age of eighty-six years. They reared a family of nine children, Andrew being the third child. He was educated in the common schools of pioneer days, learned the tanner's trade, and after his marriage located in Portersville, and later removed to Prospect, where he owned and conducted a tannery. He was married twice, his first wife being Catherine, a daughter of Capt. John BOSTON, to which union two children were born: Edward E., and John A., the latter deceased. He married for his second wife Ellen DOUGLASS, to whom were born five children: John, Andrew, and Lewis, all deceased; William C., and Margaret, wife of Harry BLOOM, of Beaver Falls. Mr. DOUGLASS and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, he was a Democrat. He died in 1878; his widow resides in Beaver Falls.

WILLIAM C. DOUGLASS, harness-maker, Evans City, was born in Portersville, Butler county, April 12, 1851, son of Andrew and Ellen DOUGLASS. He was reared under the parental roof and learned the harness-maker's trade at Indiana, Pennsylvania. In 1873 he commenced business at Prospect, Butler county, removed to Edenburg, Clarion county, in 1876, and in 1882 located at Evans City, where he has since carried on business. He was also identified with the Wahl and Bishop Oil Company. In 1874, he married Annie K., daughter of Henry GRINE, of Prospect, who has had three children: Charles C., who graduated at the Slippery Rock State Normal School in the class of 1894, taught school for a short time and died, after a week's illness, October 27, 1894; Milton H., and Russell W. Mr. DOUGLASS is a Democrat, is now serving his third term as a school director in Evans City, and has also served as burgess of the borough one term. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P., and Evans City Lodge, A. O. U. W. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and has been a trustee in the Evans City organization.

[p. 1107]
PHILIP RIPPER is a native of German, and came to the United States in 1850. He learned the tailor's trade in his native land, which he followed in Germany and the United States. In 1852 he brought his family to this country and located at Zelienople, Butler county, where he resided until 1867, engaged in the brewery business, tailoring, and dealing in coal. In that year he located on a farm in Forward township, and has since resided in that subdivision and Jackson township. He marred, in Germany, Elizabeth DOERR, and they are the parents of seven children, as follows: John A.; J. P.; P. H.; George; Lizzie, wife of Adolph KOBER; Leonard, and John. Mr. RIPPER and wife belong to the German Lutheran church, of which he became a member in the year 1852.

JOHN A. RIPPER was born in German, October 26, 1850, and is the eldest son of Philip RIPPER. In 1865, at the age of fifteen years, he commenced to learn the shoemaker's trade at Butler, and worked there about six years, and about five years in Pittsburg. He then located at Petersville, Butler county. He was married in 1876, to Margaret, daughter of Leonard KROOP, of Allegheny City. In 1877 he removed to Evans City, worked his trade there until 1888, and then engaged in the news and stationery business. He was elected justice of the peace in 1884, has since filled that office, and has also been burgess, tax collector and assessor of the borough. In politics, he is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the German Lutheran church, in which body he was trustee, also secretary, and is now treasurer, which position he has held for four terms. He has a family of five children, as follows: Lizzie; Charles J.; Bertha M.; William A., and Nora M.

DR. H. M. WILSON was born at Luthersburg, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, son of Dr. George and Anna (HUBER) WILSON. He received a public school education, read medicine with his brother, Dr. C. A. WILSON, and graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Maryland, at Baltimore, in 1887. He commenced practice at Stanton, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, the same year, and remained there until January 15, 1891, when he located at Evans City. In October, 1892, he formed a partnership with his brother, Dr. J. C. WILSON, under the firm name of H. M. & J. C. Wilson, and has built up and enjoys a large practice. He is a member of the Butler County and Jefferson County Medical Societies; also of the State Medical Society, and the National Association of Railway Surgeons. He is surgeon for the Pittsburg and Western Railway Company at Evans City, and is recognized as one of the leading physicians of that part of the county. Dr. WILSON is a member of the K. of P., and the I. O. O. F., and takes a deep interest in the growth and prosperity of his adopted home.

DR. JOSEPH C. WILSON was born in Luthersburg, Clearfield county, March 12, 1854, son of Dr. George and Anna WILSON. After receiving a public school education, he entered the State Norman School at Edinboro, and was graduated from that institution in 1879. He then taught for three years, and filled the position of principle of the public schools of Reynoldsville, Jefferson county. He read medicine with is father, Dr. George WILSON, and his brothers, Dr. C. A. WILSON, and graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Maryland, Baltimore. He commenced practice at Sigel, Jefferson county, whence [p. 1108] he removed to Evans City, Butler county, in October, 1892, and formed the present partnership of H. M. & J. C. Wilson, physicians and surgeons. He was married in 1884, to Ratie A., daughter of John F. HUMMER, of Titusville, Pennsylvania, and has one daughter, Anna. He is a member of the Jefferson County Medical Society; also of the State Medical Society, and is connected with the K. of P., and the Masonic order.

REV. JOHN M. DIGHT, of Evans City, is a son of Richard W. and Matilda (DOWNS) DIGHT. His mother was a descendant of an old and prominent family that settled at an early date at Redbank, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, His parents removed to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, where John M. was born, May 30, 1843. His primary education was obtained at the old Stokley school house, two miles from the town of Mercer, on the Franklin pike. He grew to manhood on his father's farm, following the usual avocations of a farmer's life. He taught school when nineteen years of age, as an introduction to an extensive experience in school work. When he was twenty-one years of age he removed with his parents to Sandy Lake township, where he lived until the age of twenty-four. In 1869 he entered Westminster College, at New Wilmington, Lawrence county, and subsequently attended Allegheny college, at Meadville, and graduated June 26, 1874. In the spring of 1875, Mr. DIGHT was elected county superintendent of schools of Mercer county, which office he filled for three years. He then entered the United Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Allegheny City, and graduated from that institution in 1880. He was at once called to his present charge, was ordained June 9, 1880, and has been the continuous pastor of his present charge, consisting of the United Presbyterian churches at Evans City, and Mount Pleasant, Allegheny county, during the past fourteen years. Mr. DIGHT was the originator of the Evans City Cemetery, and is president of the Evans City Natural Gas Company, which he re-organized and placed upon a paying basis. Politically, he is a Republican, and while not a Prohibitionist, he is a warm friend of the temperance cause. Mr. DIGHT was married August 24, 1875, to Martha, daughter of John RICHEY, of Sunville, Venango county, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents of four sons and one daughter, as follows: John C.; Herman H.; Howard W,; Alice, and Eugene K. Mr. DIGHT early learned the useful lesson of self-dependence. He made his was through college and the theological seminary unaided, and his success in life has been the result of his own untiring efforts.

REV. LOUIS WAGNER, son of Nicholas H. and Catherine (KUNTZ) WAGNER, was born in Bavaria, Germany, August 24, 1857. His father was a professor of classics at St. Wendenlinus College, of the City of St. Wendenl, where our subject received his preparatory education, and graduated in 1880. He afterwards attended the University of Leipsic, where he was graduated in 1882. He came to the United States the same year, entered the theological department of Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, and graduated from that institution in 1885. He then commenced teaching classics in the German and English College at Wheeling, West Virginia, was called as pastor of St. John's church, Perryville, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1885, and was ordained in 1885, in which year he accepted the pastorate of his present church at Evans City. [p. 1109] Mr. WAGNER was married in 1886, to Sophia, daughter of Rev. C. F. W. BRECHT, of Perryville, where the latter has had charge of a church for forty years, and has also preached in Butler county for twenty-four years. Two children are the fruits of this union: Tabitha, and Theodosia. Mr. WAGNER is a member of the Joint Synod of Ohio and other States, and is one of the well-known ministers of his denomination. Politically, he is a Republican, is one of the enterprising citizens of the county, and takes a deep interest in all public matters.

JOHN HAZLETT was born in County Down, Ireland, August 12, 1783. At the age of twenty-eight he came to America, and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. On the 12th of May, 1806, he was married to Mary CAMPBELL, who came to this country a year or two before her husband. In 1828 they removed to the town of Allegheny, Allegheny county, and soon afterwards to a farm near the site of Evans City, Butler county, now owned by James SUTTON and Joseph ASH. Mr. HAZLETT subsequently removed to Allegheny City, where he established the first white lead works west of the Allegheny mountains. In 1844 these works were incorporated under the firm style of Fahnestock, Hazlett & Schwartz, which later became Schwartz & Hazlett, but are now known as the Pennsylvania Lead Works. Mr. HAZLETT died March 9, 1869, aged eighty-seven years, at the residence of his son, John, in Allegheny City. His wife died April 10, 1824. Their family consisted of ten children, as follows: The two oldest who died in infancy; Mary; Robert, deceased; Martha, who is in her eighty-fourth year and resides in Wilkinsburg; Annabell, deceased; Sarah, a resident of LeClair, Iowa; Rachel; John, and Joseph, the last deceased.

ROBERT HAZLETT, eldest son of John and Mary HAZLETT, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, April 20, 1809. He removed with his parents to Butler county, and afterwards to Allegheny City, where he was engaged with his father in the manufacture of white lead. He was married, October 21, 1834, to Janette MCKEE, of Allegheny City, to whom were born eight children, viz.: John M., deceased; Robert C.; James, deceased; Joseph E; William J.; Samuel W.; Andrew N., and Anna M. J., wife of William S. WATT, who resides near Wilkinsburg. Joseph E. and William J. were missing from their home at the lead works one evening in December, 1852, and were never heard of again. They were supposed to have been drowned in the Allegheny river, as the works were situated on the river bank. Mr. HAZLETT died on his farm near Evans City, November 8, 1866. His wife died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. S. WATT, of Wilkinsburg, May 14, 1881.

SAMUEL W. HAZLETT, fifth son of Robert HAZLETT, was born in the old log house on the homestead of his grandfather, John HAZLETT, near Evans City, Butler county, December 28, 1847, obtained a common school education and has since been employed in the mercantile business. In the fall of 1868, he and two companions went to the head waters of the Sioux river, Dakotah (sic) Territory, for the purpose of securing government land for settlement, and were the only white men who remained in that valley after the Sioux massacre of 1862. The hunted and trapped, and were pursued by Indians several times, but escaped. Mr. HAZLETT returned to Allegheny City, where he was married in May, 1877, to Maggie [p. 1110] M. Stewart, daughter of David and Eliza (SCOTT) STEWART, of the same place. Three children are the fruits of their union, viz.: Percy S.; Mabel S.; and William E., deceased. In 1878 Mr. HAZLETT returned to Evans City, and sold goods on the road during the year that the Pittsburg and Western railroad was opened. He has since been engaged in clerking, with his residence at Evans City. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, has filled the office of trustee, and is now an elder. In politics, Mr. HAZLETT is a Republican, and has served in the borough of Evans City for two terms.

JEREMIAH SUTTON, a native of New Jersey, settled in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, about the close of the Revolutionary war, having served through that struggle as a member of a New Jersey regiment. About 1800 he came to Butler county, settled in Concord township, and purchased 100 acres of land, which he cleared and improved, and spent the balance of his life thereon. He married in New Jersey, and had one daughter, Polly, who became the wife of a man named Voorhes, and had three sons, Platt, Joseph, and Jeremiah.

PLATT SUTTON was born in New Jersey, and came to Butler county for his father on a tour of inspection, selected the land which his father afterward purchased, and, after the death of the latter, he bought it, and resided upon it to the time of his death. He married Elizabeth STERLING, of Westmoreland county, to whom were born the following children: Mary, who married John Sutton; Nancy, who married John HARPER; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Andrew BOWMAN; Jeremiah, and Joseph, both of whom are dead; Phoebe, who resides on the homestead; Margaret, wife of Scott JAMISON; Platt, and James. Platt SUTTON, Sr., served in the War of 1812, and died in 1852, aged seventy-seven years. His wife died in 1843. They were members of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a Democrat.

JAMES SUTTON, youngest son of Platt and Elizabeth SUTTON, was born upon the homestead in Concord township, Butler county, October 21, 1821. He received a meager education in the log school houses of pioneer days, inherited the homestead, and lived thereon until 1873. In that year he purchased the Robert KINNEAR farm in Forward township, consisting of 156 acres, upon which he resided until 1891, then erected his present home in Evans City, and retired from active business. Mr. SUTTON was married in 1860, to Dorcas, daughter of Mordica GRAHAM, of Forward township. They are the parents of six children, five of whom are living, as follows: Mordica; Alva; Elmer P.; Mary E., wife of John IRWIN; Ora, and Harry W. Mr. SUTTON is a member of the Presbyterian church, and although in early life a Republican in politics, he is now independent.

GUSTAVE GRIESBACH, oil producer, was born in German, October 3, 1849, son of Christian and Hanna GRIESBACH. He immigrated to the United States in 1873, located in Pittsburg, and worked at butchering for four and a half years. In 1877 he married Catherine, daughter of John DOMBART of Forward township, and in 1879 located in Evans City, engaged in the butchering business, and followed it for eleven years. In 1889 he embarked in oil producing at Bakerstown, and in 1890 he organized the Griesbach Oil Company, which has since been one of the heavy producers in this field, operating largely on the Little Connoquen- [p. 1111] essing creek. Mr. GRIESBACH is a Republican, and has served on the school board of Evans City. He is a member of the Reformed church of Evans City, and is a trustee in that organization. Seven children are the fruits of his marriage to Catherine DOMBART, as follows: Annie M.; Albert G.; Walter C.; Amanda L.; Clyde G.; Clara P., and Gustave A. Mr. GRIESBACH is one of the solid and substantial oil producers of Evans City.

REV. HENRY VOEGELE was born in Jackson township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1842. His parents were Frederick and Catherine (SWEITZER) VOEGELE, natives of Alsace, Germany, who immigrated to Pennsylvania about 1833, and settled at Harmony, Butler county. His father was a weaver, and followed that business here about two years, then purchased a farm, in Jackson township, where Philip VOEGELE now lives, upon which he resided down to his death, in 1876. His widow survived him until the spring of 1886. Their children were as follows: Philip and Frederick, both of whom are dead; Catherine, wife of Philip WOLFE; Margaret, wife of Gottlieb HENZEL; Philip, and Henry. His was a member of the Lutheran church, and contributed towards the erection of the first building at Zelienople. The subject of this sketch received his primary education in the public schools, subsequently attended Union College, Queensburg, Ohio, and studied theology with the Rev. Lewis TROUTMAN, of Canton, Ohio. Mr. VOEGELE was called to the Boliver charge, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, in 1868; was licensed at Ashland, Ohio, the same year, and in 1869, was ordained at Wooster, Ohio. He spent two years at Bolivar, and then became pastor at Canton, where he continued as pastor for thirteen years. His next charge was St. John's German Lutheran church, Pulaski county, Indiana, were he remained two and a half years, and then became pastor of St. Martin's church, LeRoy, New York, where he continued to preach for three years. IN 1890 he accepted a call from St. Peter's Evangelical Union church, of Evans City, and also of Zion Evangelical Lutheran church, at Mount Hope. Mr. VOEGELE was married in 1869, to Lydia, daughter of Samuel Weidm??, of Stark county, Ohio. In 1887 he was married the second time to Lucindy D. SAILER, of Le Roy, New York, which union has been blessed by three children: Elizabeth C.; Charley F., and Margaret Mary. He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod, of Pittsburg, and is well know in his church throughout western Pennsylvania. He supports the Republican party, and takes quite and active interest in public affairs.

ZENO MARKEL was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, November 1, 1815, son of Daniel and Hannah (HARTZELL) MARKEL, natives of Montgomery and Bucks counties, respectively. His father was a major in the War of 1812. Mr. MARKEL is the youngest of seven children, all of whom are dead except himself and Lydia, wife of Philip KLEIN, of Montgomery county. At eighteen years of age he removed to Montgomery county, there learned the carpenter's trade, and in 1838 came west to Beaver county, where he worked at his trade for two years. In 1839 he married Susannah STAMM, a daughter of David STAMM, of Beaver county, and in 1840 he located in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, where he continued farming for eight years. He removed from Muddy Creek to Forward township, and resided in the latter until 1889, when he retired to Evans City to spend the [p. 1112] remaining years of his life. He is the father of three children, as follows: Maria, wife of John WEAVER, of Penn township; Hannah, and Daniel. Mr. MARKEL and wife are members of the Reformed church, and in politics, he is a Democrat.

DANIEL MARKEL, only son of Zeno MARKEL, was born in Forward township, Butler county, May 7, 1854, and was reared and educated in his native township, where he has always been engaged in farming. IN 1879 he married Mary A., daughter of John HELM, of Evans City, and located on a farm in Forward township. He resided there until 1889, and then removed to Evans City. Mr. MARKEL was one of the organizers of the Rough Run Manufacturing Company, Limited. He has a family of eight children: Lawrence O.; Flora T.; Emma; Amanda D.; Lewilla C.; Iva Marie; Karl H., and Zeno H. He and wife are members of the English Reformed church, in which body he fills the office of trustee. Mr. MARKEL is a stanch Democrat, has served as burgess of Evans City, and also in the borough council.

JAMES BEERS was born in Down county, Ireland, in June, 1807, and was reared to farm life, and also followed boating. He married Jane, daughter of Samuel FERGUSON, of the same place, to which union were born eleven children: Ellen, and Sarah, both deceased; Catherine, wife of John CASHDOLLAR, of Adams township; Samuel; John; Ellen, wife of J. M. LITTLE, of Callery; James; Margaret, wife of Robert MCKEE, of Fayette county; Alexander M.; Robert, and Eliza, wife of R. J. PARK, of Adams township. Mr. BEERS came to the United States in 1827, first settled in Missouri, then removed to Louisiana, and from there to Pittsburg, whence he came to Butler county. He purchased the Patterson farm in Adams township, also the Johnson farm, and part of the Patton farm, making in all 106 acres. He also bought mining property in Fayette county, where he mined fire clay and quarried rock. He owned property at Dunbar, Fayette county, and was quite a prosperous business man down to his death, in July, 1886. His widow survived until March, 1888. The were members of the United Presbyterian church. In politics, Mr. BEERS was a Democrat, filled the office of school director for several years, and took an active interest in public affairs.

ALEXANDER M. BEERS, fourth son of James BEERS, was born upon the BEERS homestead, in Adams township, Butler county, December 18, 1850. He received a common school education, and followed farming until 1877, when he removed to Dunbar, Fayette county, and went into the coal mining business, and afterwards carried on a general store. In 1882 he returned to Callery Junction, Butler county, where he carried on merchandising, during which time he was appointed postmaster at that point by President Arthur. In 1887 he was appointed a railway postal clerk by President Cleveland, and afterwards embarked in the oil business, in which he has continued up to the present. He is now senior member of the firm of Beers & McKee, who are operating in the Evans City field. Mr. BEERS was married January 26, 187, to Emma, daughter of John LLOYD, of Adams township, and has six children, as follows: John A.; Mabel M.; Sarah B.; Walter L.; Clare, and one that died in infancy. Politically, Mr. BEERS has always been a Democrat, was mercantile appraiser of Butler county in [p. 1113] 1884, and was a Democratic nominee for register and recorder in 1893. Both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.

DANIEL FIEDLER, a native of Brandenburg, Saxony, Germany, was born in 1764, and immigrated to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, about 1798. About the year 1803 he was induced by Dr. Muller to come to Butler county. He settled on the site of Zelienople, just below where the stone Lutheran church now stands. He was a shoemaker, but after coming to Zelienople he worked for Dr. Muller at his furnace for a number of years. He then purchased a farm of 140 acres, where Jacob Guthenkunst now lives, in Jackson township, which he cleared up and lived upon until 1839, when he sold it and removed to Harmony, Butler county, November, 1840. He married Catherine FIRESTONE, in 1802, at Darlington, Beaver county, to whom was born one son, Jacob. Mr. FIEDLER was a man of find education, and one of the most intelligent Germans of this locality. He was a member of the Lutheran church, one of the founders of that denomination at Zelienople, and did much towards the erection of the old stone building still standing at Zelienople. He was also one of the early elders of the church. Though a Democrat, in politics, he cast his last vote for Harrison, in 1840.

JACOB FIEDLER, only son of Daniel and Catherine FIEDLER, was born in 1803, on the banks of the Connoquenessing, in Jackson township. He was reared on a farm, and after arriving at his majority he purchased a tract of 232 acres, where George Lotz and Adam Mickly now live, in Jackson township. Here he resided until 1838, when he sold out and removed to Harmony, purchased a hotel, which stood on the site of G. D. Swain's store, and carried on the hotel business until his death, which occurred September 14, 1842. He was a Democrat until 1840, in which year he joined the Whig party, and supported Harrison for the presidency. He was a member of the Lutheran church at Zelienople, and an earnest supporter of that organization. Mr. FIEDLER married Susannah, daughter of Jacob GOEHRING, of Beaver county, to which union were born seven children: Daniel; Jacob; Caroline, wife of Abraham ZIEGLER, Sr.; Louisa, deceased wife of Gottlieb PEFFER; George W., a resident of Ohio; Melissa, wife of Eli ZEIGLER, of Harmony, and William H., a resident of Ohio. His widow married Abraham ZEIGLER, and died in 1887. She is buried in the cemetery near the Mennonite church, in Jackson township.

DANIEL FIEDLER, oldest in the family of Jacob FIEDLER, was born upon the farm settled by his father, in Jackson township, Butler county, August 19, 1828. His primary education was obtained in the common schools, and he finished his studies at Columbus College, Columbus, Ohio. After his father's death he assisted his mother in conduction the hotel at Harmony, until her second marriage in 1845, when he engaged in various occupations until 1851. He then purchased a farm in Cranberry township, lived upon it six years, and in 1861 he bought his present homestead, which then contained sixty-eight acres. He has since added thereto 175 acres, erected a substantial brick house, and made other good improvements. Mr. FIEDLER entered politics when a young man, being a Whig until the formation of the Republican party, when he joined that organization, and was one of its active and leading members for many years. After filling [p. 1114] nearly all of the township offices, he was elected associate judge in 1871, and filled that office until 1878. In 1884 he was a delegate to the State Convention in the interest of James G. Blaine, was a member of the county committee for years, but has finally retired from taking any active part in politics. In connection with his farm, he has been engaged in coal mining thereon for nearly forty years. Mr. FIEDLER married Magdalene, daughter of Jonas ZIEGLER, and has five children living: Jacob; Jonas; Dr. D. W.; Benton, and Louisa, wife of George WALKER. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church, and he is recognized as one of the representative citizens of Butler county.

THOMAS WILSON, a native of Down county, Ireland, immigrated to the United States in 1793, with his wife and three sons, Andrew H., Thomas, and James. In 1827 the family came from Mifflin township, Allegheny county, where the settlement was first made, and the father and sons each took up a track of 400 acres in what is now Jackson township, Butler county. Andrew H. located where John M. and George W. WILSON now reside; James, immediately south of his brother, and Thomas immediately west of James. The mother died in Allegheny county, and her husband died upon the farm settled by his son Thomas, and was buried in the cemetery at Plains church. Thomas WILSON, Jr. married Betsy WHITE, and died upon his farm, leaving no children. James WILSON married Nancy COOPER, to whom were born eight daughters and five sons, all of whom are dead.

ANDREW H. WILSON, eldest son of Thomas WILSON, Sr., was born June 24, 1766, in Down county, Ireland, and on May 1, 1790, he married Mary HENDERSON, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland. He was a shoemaker, and after settling in Jackson township worked at his trade for the pioneers, in connection with the cultivation of his farm. His wife died May, 1837; he survived her until May 4, 1847. Both were buried in the cemetery at the Plains church. Their children were as follows: John, who died in Ireland; Elizabeth, deceased wife of William MARTIN; George, deceased, born November 27, 1796; Mary, who died unmarried, born February 22, 1799; Nancy, born February 24, 1802, deceased wife of James GARVIN; Rebecca, born April 14, 1805, deceased wife of George COOPER; Ellen, born January 29, 1807, who resides upon the homestead, and John, deceased, born July 15, 1809. Mr. WILSON was a member of the Masonic order in Ireland, but after coming to this county he dropped his associations with the fraternity. He was one of the pioneer members of Plains Presbyterian church, and died in that faith. At his death he divided his farm of 400 acres equally between his sons George and John H. Politically, he was a Jacksonian Democrat, and took a deep interest in the success of the party.

JOHN H. WILSON, youngest son of Andrew H. WILSON, was born in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, July 15, 1809, and came to Jackson township, Butler county, with his parents at the age of sixteen years. He was reared a farmer, and his whole life after coming to Butler county was spent upon a portion of the homestead farm in Jackson township. He married Margaret, daughter of Jonathan HAUK, June 20, 1848, and they were the parents of six children: Andrew H., who resides in Ohio; Jonathan; Mary E.; Sarah E., wife of Samuel BRENNEMAN; John Milton, and Jennie T., wife of George W. NIXON, of [p. 1115] Jackson township. Mr. WILSON died November 29, 1883; his wife survived him until January 28, 2893, and both are buried in the cemetery at Plains church, Cranberry township.

JOHN MILTON WILSON, youngest son of John H. and Margaret (HAUK) WILSON, was born September 20, 1855, upon the homestead farm in Jackson township. He was reared a farmer, and received a public school education. He resides upon the 200 acres which belonged to his father, and has always followed farming. Mr. WILSON takes an active interest in political matters, and is a stanch supporter of the Democratic party. He was reared in the Presbyterian faith, was originally a member of the Plains church, but now belongs to the church at Evans City. He and his sister, Mary E., reside upon the old homestead. He is a member of Harmony Lodge, F. & A. M., and Evans City Lodge, I. O. O. F.

JONATHAN WILSON, second son of John H. and Margaret WILSON, was born upon the homestead in Jackson township, February 5, 1851, and received a common school education. He resided at home until 1880, and then purchased his present farm of eighty acres, which he has since improved. He married Susan, daughter of the late Jacob STAMM, and has one daughter, Margaret B. In politics, Mr. WILSON is a Democrat, is a member of Evans City Presbyterian church, and is one of the well know citizens of his native township.

GEORGE WILSON, son of Andrew H. WILSON, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 27, 1796. His parents removed to Butler county in 1827, and settled in what is now Jackson township, where the subject of this sketch was reared. He inherited one-half of the homestead farm, and erected the brick residence where the heirs of Thomas I WILSON now live. He was one of the leading citizens of Butler county, was a Democrat in politics, and filled most of the township offices. He married Rebecca, daughter of James WILSON, of Allegheny county, but no relation to his family. Their children were as follows: James G., who died in 1868; Andrew H., of Harmony; Mary J.; Ester M., wife of R. H. BROWN; Elizabeth E., and Thomas I., both of whom are dead; George W.; John M., deceased, and one who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. WILSON were members of the United Presbyterian church at Evans City, and died in 1863, and 1860, respectively. They are buried in the Evans City cemetery.

GEORGE W. WILSON, fourth son of George WILSON, was born February 5, 1840, upon the homestead in Jackson township. He was reared to farm life, and after his father's death he inherited one-half of the farm and erected his present residence thereon. He has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits, and is one of the well know farmers of the township. Mr. WILSON was married November 26, 1864, to Harriet, daughter of Thomas DONALDSON, and their children are as follows: Ada I., wife of U. G. EVANS; Alvin L., who married Maud HUDSON; Thomas A., and Anna L. Politically, he is a Democrat, and one of the leading members of his party. In 1893 he was elected a county commissioner of Butler county, which office he is now filling. He has occupied at different times most of the offices of his township, and has been a school director for eighteen years. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and for some years he has been an elder in that organization.

ALEXANDER RAMSEY, SR., the progenitor of the Ramseys of Butler county, was born in Down county, Ireland, in 1776, and came to America prior to the year 1786. He remained in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, for some years, and in 1796 he settled on a tract of government land in what is now Cranberry township, Butler county, containing 400 acres, built a cabin in the midst of the forest, and began the work of clearing a farm. Returning to Westmoreland county, he married Grace SMITH, and brought his young bride to his home in Butler county. She was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1776, a daughter of James SMITH, who served in the Revolutionary war, and fell at the battle of Brandywine. They reared a family of seven children, as follows: Mary, deceased wife of Isaac YOUNG; Hannah, who married Joseph ROBINSON; James; John; William; Alexander, of Cranberry township, and Anthony, all of whom are dead except Alexander. Mr. RAMSEY and wife are members of White Oak Springs United Presbyterian church, and died in February, 1840, and 1845, respectively. Politically, he was a Democrat, and throughout the pioneer days was influential in the local councils of his party.

ALEXANDER RAMSEY, only living child of Alexander and Grace (SMITH) RAMSEY, was born upon the homestead in Cranberry township, Butler county, August 1, 1817. He grew to maturity amidst the dangers and privations of pioneer days, and on July 3, 1845, he married Sarah Ann MCGEORGE, a native of Butler county, and a daughter of John and Elizabeth MCGEORGE. She was born December 8, 1820. Her father was a native of Scotland, came to the United States in youth, here married, and settled in Butler county in April, 1815. Mr. RAMSEY first located in Cranberry township, and later removed to a tract of land in the southern part of Jackson township, which he had purchased in 1841. Here he has resided up to the present time. To Alexander and Sarah Ann RAMSEY have been born five children: John Alexander; William S.; Elizabeth; Mary Ellen, and Samuel C., all of whom are dead except William S. and Samuel C., both of whom reside in Jackson township. Mr. RAMSEY and wife have been members of the United Presbyterian church of Evans City since its organization, and he has been a stanch supporter of the Democratic party since he cast his first vote.

WILLIAM S. RAMSEY, son of Alexander and Sarah A. RAMSEY, was born upon the homestead in Jackson township, October 15, 1847. He received a common school education, and remained with his parents until reaching his majority. On April 2, 1868, he married Miss Nancy DUNN, the ninth in a family of twelve children, born to Thomas L. and Mary DUNN, who came from eastern Pennsylvania and settled in what is now Jackson township early in the present century. Mr. RAMSEY located on his present farm, then in woodland and unimproved, and their first home, a log cabin, is still standing close to their present commodious residence erected in 1884. His farm is now one of the best in the township, and he is one of the leading and influential farmers of the community. Six children have been the fruits of his marriage, as follows: Ida, M., wife of George W. SCHANEY, of Beaver Falls; Della, wife of J. J. HELM, of Evans City; Susan A., wife of W. B. EVANS, of the same borough; Emma J., and Charles S., both of whom are dead, and Byan L, who lives with his par- [p. 1117] ents. Mr. RAMSEY's farm of 121 acres is located one and a half miles from Evans City, where he follows stock-raising and general farming. In January, 1865, he enlisted in Company E, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, attached to the Army of the Cumberland, and assigned on detached duty in Tennessee. He was honorably discharged in September, of the same year. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of Capt. William Stewart Post, G. A. R., of Evans City. He and wife are members of the Evans City United Presbyterian church, and the family are among the most respected in the township.

JAMES RAMSEY, son of Alexander and Grace (SMITH) RAMSEY, was born in Cranberry township, Butler county, June 5, 1805, married Annie COVERT, who was born March 4, 1812, and by her became the father of the following children: Mary Ann, who married W. H. HOHNODDLE, who enlisted in the Union army and was killed in front of Fredericksburg; Nancy, and Elizabeth, who reside at Beaver Falls; Alexander C., and William H., both residents of Jackson township, and James, deceased. Mr. RAMSEY was an elder in the United Presbyterian church for many years, and died June 19, 1869. His wife survived him until October 7, 1891. She, too, had been a life-long member of the United Presbyterian church.

ALEXANDER C. RAMSEY, eldest son of James and Annie (COVERT) RAMSEY, was born upon the homestead in Jackson township, Butler county, January 10, 1843. He was reared upon the farm, and received a common school education. In 1867 he married Sophia POWELL, a native of Butler county, and a daughter of Samuel and Nancy (COOPER) POWELL, and located upon a part of the homestead, where they have since resided. Eight children are the fruits of this union, as follows: James H.; Lulu M.; Lewis E.; Annie J.; Alice N.; Wade E.; Flora E, deceased, and Nellie G. Mr. RAMSEY and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church at Evans City. He is a Democrat in politics, and is recognized as a public-spirited and progressive citizen.

ANTHONY RAMSEY, son of Alexander and Grace (SMITH) RAMSEY, was born in Cranberry township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, November 20, 1820. He married Elizabeth MCGEORGE, also a native of this county, born November 17, 1822. They resided in Cranberry township throughout their married life. Mr. Ramsey died January 31, 1880, and his wife December 18, 1884. They were the parents of eight children, as follows: Elizabeth, deceased wife of Joseph CASHDOLLOR; Mary Jane, deceased; Addison, of Cranberry township; John, a resident of Evans City; Euphemia A., of Allegheny; Ella, deceased; Edwin, who resides in Jackson township, and Baxter R., of Cranberry township. Mr. RAMSEY was one of the best know and most highly respected citizens of the community, and a descendant of one of its oldest families.

BAXTER R. RAMSEY, son of Anthony and Elizabeth RAMSEY, was born upon the farm were he now resides, in Cranberry township, August 30, 1865. He has always resided in this township, and is one of its leading young farmers. He was married May, 25, 1893, to Maggie, daughter of Newton and Margaret GARVIN, of Cranberry township. Both he and wife are members of Evans City United Presbyterian church. He is one of the leading Democrats of his community, and is also a member of Cranberry Grange, Number 908, P. of H.

[pg, 1118]
THOMAS HARPER was born June 30, 1799, on New creek, six miles north of where the present town of Steubenville, Ohio, now stand. He came of Irish ancestry. His father was a scout in General Wayne's army during the campaign against the Western Confederacy of Indian tribes. About 1793 the latter married a lady who lived in Virginia, and settled on the site of Wheeling, whence he removed to a farm on New creek, in what is now Jefferson county, Ohio. Three sons and four daughters were born to him of this union. After reaching their majority, two of the sons, James and Andrew, moved farther west, while Thomas remained in the vicinity of Steubenville, and followed boating on the Ohio, Kanawha, and other rivers. In 1819 Thomas visited Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he met Margaret SWARTZ, whom he married in January, 1820. She was born in eastern Pennsylvania, and was of Pennsylvania Dutch parentage. Her father was a man of considerable means, kept a hotel, and also operated a saw and grist mill on his farm. At the age of six years she was left an orphan by the death of her parents, and was practically reared among strangers. In the spring of 1821, Thomas HARPER and wife, and two children, came to Butler county. They settled in what is now Jackson township, and lived there until the fall of 1842, when they removed into Cranberry township, where Mrs. HARPER died in September, 1873, aged nearly seventy-five years. Her husband survived her until June 30, 1876, dying on the seventy-seventy anniversary of his birthday. Both were endowed by nature to endure the trials and hardships of pioneer life, and they were upright and industrious to a remarkable degree. They were the parents of fifteen children, thirteen of whom grew to maturity, and eleven of the number are now living, six sons and five daughters, the oldest seventy-four and the youngest fifty-four years of age. The parents were Methodists and reared their children in that faith. Originally a Jackson Democrat, Mr. HARPER was carried away with the Know-Nothing craze, and subsequently drifted into the Republican party.

ANDREW HARPER, son of Thomas and Margaret HARPER, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, April 19, 1832, and has spent his entire life in his native township amid the peaceful scenes of agricultural pursuits. On March 24, 1859, he married Barbara TINSTMAN, and is the father of eleven children: Josephine; Asa A.; Clarissa; Cyrus B.; Sarah E.; Anzie E.; Oliver T.; Albert E.; Annie May; Charles E., and William W., all of whom are living in Jackson township. Mr. HARPER has always been an adherent of the Democratic party, but supported Lincoln in 1860, and 1864, since which time he has voted the Democratic ticket. In 1883 he was elected a county auditor, and has filled the office of justice of the peace ten years. During the past thirty years he has occupied at various times most of the public offices in his township. Mr. HARPER is a member of no church or society, nevertheless he is one of the most respected citizens of the community, and his long and busy life has been marked by the commendable virtues of honesty, industry and sobriety.

CYRUS B. HARPER, miller, was born on the homestead farm in Jackson township, Butler county, September 18, 1866, son of Andrew and Barbara HARPER. He received a common school education and lived with his parents until 1886, when he became connected with the Zelienople flouring mills. In [p. 1119] 1889 he formed a partnership with C. W. Keefer, purchased the mill, and operated it until March, 1892, when Mr. HARPER bought out his partner, and has since been sole proprietor. In 1890 he married Carrie, daughter of Tobias MEEDER, of Cranberry township, and has two sons, Harvey E., and Curtus L. Politically, Mr. HARPER is a Democrat, and he is connected with the English Lutheran church of Zelienople.

JOHN BEHM, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, immigrated to the United States about 1835, and located at Unionville, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was a blacksmith, and followed his trade after coming to this county, but later purchased a small farm close to Evans City, Butler county. He subsequently bought the farm where his son Casper now lives, in Jackson township, consisting of ninety acres, upon which he resided down to his death. He married in Germany, Margaret LONG, to which union were born the following children: Margaret, who became the wife of Peter BURNS; Catherine, who married Henry WOLFE; George L; Casper; Henry; Lizzie, who married Philip HENSEL; Mrs. Mary SNAUFFER, and John, of Jackson township. Politically, he was a Democrat, and a member of the German Reformed church of Evans City.

GEORGE L. BEHM, eldest son of John and Margaret BEHM, was born at Unionville, Beaver county, January 15, 1839. He grew to manhood on the homestead farm in Butler county, and at the age of nineteen purchased a farm at Whitestown, containing 180 acres, where he lived for five years. He then bought the Jacob ZEIGLER farm of 220 acres, in Jackson township, upon which he has since lived. He now owns eighty-four acres of his original farm, and thirty-six acres in Lancaster township. In 1859 he married Catherine, daughter of Jacob ZEIGLER, and is the father of six children, five of whom are living: Henry, of Harmony; Jacob, a resident of Allegheny county; Lizzie, wife of William STAMM; Charles, and Bertha. In politics, Mr. BEHM is a Republican, and is an elder in Grace Reformed church of Harmony.

ADAM ENDRES was born in Germany, and is a son of Adam ENDRES, who was a native of Alsace, Germany, and immigrated to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 1837, settling on Brush creek, close to Unionville. About 1860 he removed with his son Adam to Jackson township, Butler county, where he died. He was buried in the cemetery at Burry church, in Beaver county. He married in his native land, and had two children: Adam, and Caroline, who married Lewis TEETS. The subject of this sketch resided in Beaver county until 1860, when he purchased the farm upon which his son Jacob now lives. He cleared and improved it, and followed farming until 1875, when he built a residence close to Zelienople, and retired from active business. Mr. ENDRES was one of the original stockholders in the Pittsburg and Mercer Plank Road Company. He has been more or less connected with oil producing, and has accumulated a comfortable estate. Before removing to Butler county, Mr. ENDRES was a member of the Burry Reformed church, but after his settlement in Jackson township, he joined St. Peter's Reformed church, in which he has filled the office of elder. Mr. ENDRES married Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob WOSTER, of Beaver county, and their children are as follows: Daniel; Caroline, wife of George B. BASTIEN; Jacob; Catherine, deceased; Sadie, wife of Herman J. [p. 1120] SPEYERER; Lena, deceased; Charlotte; Sophia, deceased; Hanna, wife of W. H. LUSK, attorney at law, of Butler; George, and Clara, both of whom are dead. The eldest son, Daniel, removed to New Brighton in 1876, when he is now engaged in the butchering business. Mr. ENDRES has filled several of the minor offices in Jackson township, and is one of the old and respected citizens of the community.

JACOB ENDRES, youngest son of Adam and Elizabeth ENDRES, was born in Beaver county, June 1, 1850, and received a common school education. He grew to manhood on the homestead farm in Jackson township, and in 1875 assumed control of the farm, his father retiring. In 1874 he married Mary E., daughter of George TEETS, of Beaver county, and their children are as follows: George A.; Altha E.; Eva B.; Clara: Bertha M., and Howard J. Politically, Mr. ENDRES is a Republican, and has filled the office of school director. He is also a director in the German Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Zelienople, and is a member of the Farmers' Alliance. Both he and family are connected with the Evangelical Lutheran church of Zelienople.

GEORGE WELSH, farmer and oil producer, was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, December 4, 1862, son of James and Susan (BOLTON) WELSH, of Zelienople. He received his education in the district schools, learned the carpenter's trade, and worked for the Pittsburg and Fort Wayne Railroad Company, as a bridge carpenter, for three years. In 1886 he located upon his present farm in Jackson township, and for the past four years he has also been engaged in oil producing. There are seven wells upon his farm, two of which he owns. In 1885 he was married to Mary Jane, daughter of John MAGEE, whose father was one of the pioneers of Butler county. Mr. WELSH is a member of the Presbyterian church of Whitestown, and in politics, his is a Republican.

JOHN VOEGTLY was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1834, son of Jacob VOEGTLY, a native of Switzerland, who came to the United States, with his father at the age of twenty-one years. He married Elizabeth BOYER, who resided near Pine Creek, and in 1852 he purchased a farm in Ross township, Allegheny county, where he and wife spent the balance of their lives. They had a family of fourteen children, of whom they reared six: Elizabeth, wife of Henry SCLAG, of Allegheny; Maria, wife of Adam ENDRES, of Zelienople; John; Andrew, a resident of Allegheny county; Esther, wife of William MILTNER, of the same county, and Matthias, who resides in Allegheny county. The subject of this sketch was reared in Allegheny City, and attended the public schools of that place. In 1867 he married Elizabeth, daughter of William MILTNER, of Allegheny county, and settled upon a farm in Ross township. In 1886 he purchased his present farm in Jackson township, Butler county, upon which he settled the same year. He is the father of five children, as follows: William J.; John M.; Maria H.; Henry and Charles Frederick. Mr. VOEGTLY is a Republican, in politics, and is a leading member of the German Lutheran church, of Zelienople.

H. W. FANKER was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1851, son of Henry W. and Louisa (BOREMAN) FANKER, natives of Hanover, Germany, who immigrated to Pittsburg in 1849. H. W. was reared at Wilkinsburg, and [p. 1121 received his education in that borough and at the German parochial school of the East End, Pittsburg. After he grew to manhood he engaged in the butchering business with his father at Wilkinsburg, and later entered the employ of H. N. Lytle, of Braddock, where he remained until 1878. He then embarked in the same business for himself, and carried it on at Braddock until 1890, when he purchased his present farm of 196 acres, in Jackson township, Butler county. Upon this he erected one of the finest residences in the county, a three story brick structure, fifty by sixty, standing on an elevation about 300 feet above the roadway, and facing a wide, handsome lawn, with spacious driveways and walks. The residence contains sixteen rooms, is heated with steam and fitted up with every modern convenience. In 1889 Mr. FANKER organized a company for the production of oil upon his farm. They developed ten wells, some of them averaging as high as 150 barrels a day. He sold his production in 1893, and his interest now embraces only the royalty. He has improved his farm in many ways, and has nearly 100 acres under cultivation. In 1876, Mr. FANKER married Annie, daughter of Adam SHAFFER, of Jackson township, and has a family of five living children: Harry; Clara; Frank; Charley, and Paul. He started in life with less than $200 capital, and his business success is the result of his own industry. Besides his beautiful farm and oil properties, he is the owner of much valuable real estate at Braddock. Both he and wife are adherents of the Lutheran church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

W. A. NICKLAS is a son of Charles and Catherine (BURR) NICKLAS, and was born in Forward township, Butler county, January 28, 1868. His mother is a daughter of Peter BURR. He received a common school education, followed farming for several years, and afterwards engaged at the butcher's trade. In 1893 he formed a partnership with G. F. NICKLAS, and embarked in the livery business, at Evans City. He married Allie FAHEL, and resided in that borough conducting the livery until his removal to his present farm. He has since devoted his attention to agriculture.

JOSEPH DOUTHETT, SR., was a native of Armagh county, Ireland, and immigrated to the United States at an early date, taking up his residence in Washington county, Pennsylvania. About 1799 he came to Butler county, and located upon the farm in Forward township where David DOUTHETT'S heirs now reside. He married in Ireland, and was the father of the following children: Joseph; Alexander; Charles; Jacob; Benjamin; Martha, who married Robert MAGEE, and Rosanna, who married Robert FOWLER. Mr. DOUTHETT and his wife, Rosanna, died upon the farm which they settled, and are buried in the cemetery on the same place. In the same burial ground lie the remains of his sons, Joseph, Jacob, and Benjamin.

BENJAMIN DOUTHETT was the fifth son of Joseph and Rosanna DOUTHETT, and was born in Armagh county, Ireland, in 1772. He came with his parents to Pennsylvania, and throughout his life followed agricultural pursuits. He married Jane SMITH, and by this marriage they were the parents of the following children: Joseph; John; William; David; Benjamin; Alexander; Samuel; Mary, who married James MAGEE, and Martha J., who married William DODDS, all of whom are dead except Alexander and Martha J. The mother died in 1847, [p. 1122] and the father in 1850, and both are buried in the DOUTHETT family cemetery upon the old homestead. Mr. DOUTHETT owned 500 acres of land, which he divided among his children, but the old homestead is that now owned by Samuel DOUTHETT'S heirs.

JOSEPH DOUTHETT, eldest son of Benjamin and Jane (SMITH) DOUTHETT, was born October 6, 1807, upon his grandfather's farm, in what is now Forward township. His education was obtained in the old log school house near where he was reared, but after reaching manhood he was a constant reader and a student, and thus became self educated, and taught for many years. He settled in Penn township, and became one of its extensive farmers. He learned the stonemason's and bricklayer's trade, in youth, and followed them in connection with agriculture. Politically, he was a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and was recognized as an influential member of his party in the county. He was a justice of the peace for Penn township, was elected county commissioner in 1847, and was a school director for many years, always taking a deep interest in the prosperity of the public schools. He married Rebecca, daughter of James MAGEE, a resident of Jackson township, and they were the parents of seven sons and one daughter who grew to maturity, as follows: Benjamin, of Kansas; James M., of Jackson township; John who resides in Pittsburg; Robert, a resident of Illinois; David B., of Forward township; Joseph, of Penn township, and Jane, widow of Robert MILLER. In early life Mr. DOUTHETT was a member of the Covenanter church, but later joined the United Presbyterian church. He died July 23, 1884; his widow survived until August 17, 1885, dying at the ripe old age of eight-two years.

DAVID DOUTHETT, fourth son of Benjamin and Jane DOUTHETT, was born July 4, 1814, on the farm now owned by Samuel DOUTHETT'S heirs, in Forward township. Here he grew to manhood, but subsequently settled upon the farm where his grandfather located in 1799, and in the old log cabin erected by his grandfather were born and reared his family. This building is standing to-day, and occupied by Walter S. DOUTHETT, one of David's sons. Mr. DOUTHETT followed farming until arriving at old age, then retired to Brownsdale, where he died May 23, 1885. He married Jane E., daughter of Joseph BROWN, one of the pioneers of Forward township. She survives him and resides at the village of Brownsdale, in Penn township. This union was blessed with the following children: Agnes J., wife of J. B. DODDS; Benjamin W.; Joseph P., deceased; James M.; Walter W., deceased; David K., a physician residing in Iowa; Delorma M., a resident of Nebraska; Mary E., wife of J. F. BRITTAIN; William G., of Butler; Adam M., a merchant of Brownsdale; Walter S., of Forward township, and Braden G., deceased. Mr. DOUTHETT was the first postmaster of Brownsdale, and was one of the early school directors of his locality. In politics, he was a Whig until the formation of the Republican party, when he became a member of that organization, and was quite an influential man in local political matters. He was one of the founders and original members of the United Presbyterian church of Brownsdale, and throughout his long and useful life contributed liberally toward the support of that congregation. He was a man of strict integrity, upright and straightforward in all his dealing with his fellow man, and won the respect and confidence of the best people of Butler county.

[p. 1123]
JAMES M. DOUTHETT, JR., was born in Forward township, Butler county, January 15, 1850, son of David and Jane E. (BROWN) DOUTHETT, and grandson of Benjamin DOUTHETT. He was reared upon his father's farm, and received his education in the public schools. He was married December 31, 1873, to Elizabeth CROWE, a daughter of David B. and Sarah J. (DODDS) CROWE, both members of pioneer families of Butler county, and of Irish decent. Her parents are residents of Forward township. Mr. DOUTHETT located upon his present farm in 1891, which contains 102 acres, and is well-improved. He is quite an active worker in the Republican party, and is an earnest member of, and a liberal contributor toward the United Presbyterian church.

JAMES M. DOUTHETT was born in what is now Forward township, February 1, 1831, and is the second son of Joseph and Rebecca (MAGEE) DOUTHETT. He was reared principally in Jackson township, and educated in the district schools. He married Lucinda MAGEE, a daughter of Robert and Martha MAGEE, of Jackson township, settled upon his present farm, in the same township, and has since resided upon it. Three children were born to this union: Allison J., of Evans City; Martha, wife of Frank KELLY, of Jackson township, and Rebecca. Mr. DOUTHETT is a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church at Mars, and is an elder in that society. He is one of the representative farmers of the community.

ALLISON J. DOUTHETT, son of James M. and Lucinda (MAGEE) DOUTHETT, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, July 27, 1856, received a good common school education, and grew to manhood on the homestead farm. In 1878 he engaged in drilling water wells, and 1882 he became a tool dresser for Charles Neely, and subsequently followed the same business with Johnson Brothers, J. P. Fishel, and others. In 1888 he commenced drilling and producing in the oil fields of western Pennsylvania, and has operated in Armstrong county, and in Petersville and Callery fields, Butler county; Duff City and Wildwood, in Allegheny county, and also the Harmony field, in Butler county. He was a member of the Evans City Oil Company, and is now connected with the Boggs Oil Company, operating in the Brownsdale and Evans City fields. Mr. DOUTHETT was married October 25, 1877, to Letitia, a daughter of David B. CROWE, of Forward township, and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Scott H.; James C; David D., and Orrin R. In politics, he is a Republican, but devotes little attention to political matters. In February, 1894, he was elected a member of the borough council, and also of the school board of Evans City, which offices he is now filling.

HON. DAVID B. DOUTHETT, fifth son of Joseph and Rebecca (MAGEE) DOUTHETT, was born in Forward township, Butler county, October 12, 1840, and was educated in the common schools and at Witherspoon Institution. He was engaged in teaching in the public schools of the county from 1857 to 1861, when he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served in the Army of the Potomac until the close of the war, under McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, Meade, and Grant. The principle battles in which he participated are named as follows: Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, White Oak Swamp, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, [p. 1124] Antietam, South Mountain, Williamsport, Second Fredericksburg, Salem Heights, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run and the Wilderness. He was wounded at Williamsburg, a minie-ball passing through his hat at Fredericksburg, and at the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, he was severely wounded, being shot through the left thigh with a minie-ball. He was sent to Findlay Hospital, Washington, D. C., afterwards to McClellan Hospital, Philadelphia, and then to Pittsburg, whence he returned to his regiment before Petersburg. He took part in the final campaign under Grant, and was mustered out of the service near Washington, D. C., June 28, 1865. Returning to his home Mr. DOUTHETT was elected justice of the peace of Forward township, and filled that position ten years. He also served as school director for twelve years, and was president of the Butler County School Directors for a long period. He was postmaster at Brownsdale for three terms, was mercantile appraiser in 1890, and in 1891 was appointed by Governor Pattison a delegate from Pennsylvania to the Farmers National Congress, at Sedalia, Missouri. In 1892 Mr. DOUTHETT was elected, on the Republican ticket, to which party he has always belonged, a member of the legislature, receiving 225 more votes than any other candidate on the ticket, and running 100 votes ahead of the national ticket. While serving in in (sic) the House he secured the passage of a bill to regulate and establish uniform fees to be charged by the justices of the peace, alderman, magistrates, and constables in Pennsylvania. In November, 1894, he was re-elected for a second term. He is a member of Capt. William Stewart Post, G. A. R., of Evans City, and of Encampment, Number 45, U. V. L. For many years he has been one of the leading members of the United Presbyterian church, and has been foremost in his community in every good work. He was married in 1864, to Sarah B., a daughter of Joseph BROWN, of Forward township, and has two children. Ida, wife of Dr. H. S. McCLYMONDS, of Renfrew and Marshall B. Mr. DOUTHETT has been an active participant in local politics for many years, and his rewards by popular vote attest to the estimation in which he is held.

MARSHALL B. DOUTHETT, son of David B. and Sarah B. (BROWN) DOUTHETT, was born upon the homestead in Forward township, Butler county, December 29, 1870. He obtained a common school education and afterwards attended Slippery Rock State Norman School, and Actual Business College, graduating from the last mentioned institution in 1886. He taught school four years, and in January, 1891, he was appointed deputy sheriff, and reappointed January, 1894. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, a Republican. Mr. DOUTHETT is a charter member of the Lincoln League, of Butler county, and has always been an earnest worker in his party.

JOSEPH ASH was one of the early settlers of Forward township, Butler county, coming hither from Kentucky. He is supposed to have been a native of Wales, or of Welsh parentage. About 1804 he settled upon a tract of 212 acres, where his grandson, James A. ASH, now resides. He cleared a farm here and lived upon it until his death. Mr. ASH was one of the pioneer mail carriers between Pittsburg and Erie, and it is said that a pocket handkerchief did duty as a mail bag. He died in 1813, and was buried upon the homestead farm. In [p. 1125] 1893 the remains of himself and wife were removed to the Evans City cemetery. In his religious belief, he was a Baptist. His children were as follows: Rachel, who married Robert MCKINNEY; Sylvester; Elizabeth, who married Joseph DODDS, and Isaac, who died at Evans City.

SYLVESTER ASH, eldest son of Joseph ASH, was born in 1808, upon the homestead farm, in what is now Forward township, Butler county. He grew up amid the scenes of pioneer days, and obtained such education as the schools of that period afforded. He learned the carpenter's trade and followed that business in connection with farming. He built the first farm house upon the homestead, on the site of the one now standing, adding fifty-two acres to his father original purchase, and owned other properties in Evans City. In early life he was a Whig, but afterward joined the Republican party, and took quite a leading part in political affairs in this vicinity, but would never accept any public office. He was reared in the Baptist faith, and though a regular attendant and a liberal supporter of that denomination, he was not a member of the church. Mr. ASH married Martha, a daughter of Robert BOGGS, the first settler on the site of Evans City. Seven children were born of this union, five of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Joseph, of Evans City; Isaac, a well know lawyer of Oil City; Robert, of Allegheny; Lizzie, wife of Lewis GANSZ, and James A. Mr. ASH died in 1882; his widow survived until 1886.

ARCHIBALD IRWIN was a native of Pennsylvania, and came to Butler county about the year 1810. He had lived in Crawford and Allegheny counties prior to coming here, and followed the trade of blacksmith. He located upon the farm in Forward township where his grandson, John A IRWIN, now resides. He was a man of good education, and one of the pioneer school teachers of the township. In 1845 he removed to Pittsburg, and died at the home of his son Thomas in that city. In a letter written by George W. IRWIN, in1853, to his son, John A., we find the following record of the IRWIN genealogy: "In your last you wished to know something of your ancestry. My great-grandfather IRWIN was an Episcopalian preacher in Ireland. My grandfather was his eldest son, and came to this country when young, married in Pennsylvania, and had two sons and one daughter, my father being the eldest. My grandfather served in the Colonial forces under General Grant, and was present at the battle between the English and French, known as Braddock's defeat. For his services in the army he was granted a tract of land in the vicinity of Fort Pitt, now Pittsburg, but allowed the grant to go by default, as land was then of little value. He afterwards served under Washington in the Revolution. My father being young then had his share of the difficulties of the Revolutionary period. He learned the blacksmithing trade with a Mr. Porter, at Redstone, Pennsylvania. He assisted in electing General Washington as first president of our country. His last vote was cast for James K. Polk for president. He claimed to be a Democrat all his life, and was eighty-three years of age when he died. My maternal grandparents, Thomas FLETCHER and wife, came from Scotland to Pennsylvania, and became wealthy farmers. They were of the Seceder persuasion, and were well thought of. Your maternal grandfather, W. M. HANNA, came from Ireland, settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and was a wealthy farmer. Your [p. 1126] grandmother HANNA, was the daughter of W. M. THOMPSON, a native of Scotland, who settled in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, was justice of the peace, and a prosperous farmer. They were all Presbyterians in religious faith."

GEORGE W. IRWIN, son of Archibald IRWIN, was born near Meadville, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1800, removed to Pittsburg with his parents in 1806, and thence to Butler county. In 1812 he went to Pittsburg for the purpose of learning the blacksmith's trade, and at the age of nineteen years was employed in one of the iron works of that city as superintendent of the blacksmithing department. He was later engaged as an engineer on the Ohio river. He afterwards embarked in the manufacture of boilers at Pittsburg, and also carried on a paper mill in Ohio. In 1847 he engaged in the manufacture of boilers at Nashville, Tennessee, where he remained until the war commenced. When the Federal troops captured Nashville they took charge of his plant and thus destroyed his business. In 1868 he returned to Pittsburg, and thence to Butler county, where he engaged in farming until his death, May 18, 1878. Mr. IRWIN was prominent in the iron industry of Pittsburg for many years and was well know among the manufacturers of that city. Politically, he was a Republican. He married Ozilla HANNA, a daughter of W. M. HANNA, of Lancaster county. She died at Nashville in 1868. Their family consisted of ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity.

JOHN A. IRWIN, fourth son of George W. IRWIN, was born at Cadiz, Ohio, April 21, 1832, and was reared in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He obtained a common school education, learned the book-binder's trade, and embarked in business at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1852. He later went into the book-binding business at Memphis, Tennessee, where he remained until the breaking out of the Rebellion. Being a Union man, he came north to escape service in the Southern army, and became employed with Wells, Riddle & Company, of Pittsburg, which position he filled from 1861 to 1867. In 1868 he established a book-binding house in Pittsburg, which he has since carried on successfully. His homestead in Forward township is one of the richest oil properties in this part of the county, and is one of the best improved farms in the township. Mr. IRWIN married Margaret P. COLVIN, to which union have been born the following children: Ozilla; Sarah; William; George; Robert, and Margaret. Politically, he is a Republican, and in religious faith, an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church. For over forty years Mr. IRWIN has been a member of the I. O. O. F., and is State manager of the Odd Fellows Endowment Association. He has also been connected with the A. O. U. W. for more than twenty-one years, and is a member of the Heptosophs.

THE WALDRON FAMILY of Butler county are descendants of Baron Resolved Van WALDRON, a native of Harlam, Holland, who immigrated with Peter STUYVESANT, one of the early governors of New York, in 1647. Baron Von WALDRON was born in 1608. He obtained a patent from the Dutch government for the land that now embraces what was originally Harlem, New York. He served as magistrate for seventeen years, and laid out that part of the City of New York, know as Harlem, extending from Seventy-fourth street, on East river, to One Hundred [p. 1127] and Thirtieth street, North river, consisting of 10,000 acres. In 1660 he built Waldron Hall, one of the early buildings of Harlem, which was occupied by his descendants down to 1800. He was a lineal descendant of Baron Rudolph Van WALDRON, who was granted a coat of arms in 1128, by the government of Holland, for valor on the plains of Palestine, and in the capture of Jerusalem, in 1099. Baron Resolved Van WALDRON married Lady Taneka Van NAGLE, April 10, 1653, and was the father of four sons and four daughters. The fourth son, Samuel, was born in New Harlem, October 10, 1670, and married Lady Margaret BLOODGOOD, of Flushing, Long Island, in March 1692, to which union were born nine children. The second son of Samuel Van WALDRON, Francis B., born November 10, 1697, married Catherine BRUNNEAL, of New Harlem, December 21, 1721. In 1730 Francis B. removed to Clover Hill, Hunterdon county, New Jersey. He was the father of ten children, the fourth son being Samuel B., born at New Harlem, March 3, 1729. Samuel B. married Catherine Van NESS, of Hunterdon county, New Jersey, in 1751, to which union were born eight children. The eldest, Samuel V., born August 10, 1752, served five years under Washington and Marion, and was at the battle of Brandywine, and other historic engagements of the Revolution. He married Magdalena SIMPSON, of Morris county, New Jersey, April 26, 1774, and lived near Trenton until 1795, when he removed to Washington county Pennsylvania. In 1796 Samuel V. WALDRON, removed to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and settled upon the farm in Wolf Creek township, now owned by Simeon D. WALDRON. He died upon that farm in January, 1849. He was a millwright, and erected one of the pioneer mills in that locality.

JOHN WALDRON, second son of Samuel V. and Magdalena (SIMPSON) WALDRON, was born near Trenton, New Jersey, April 17, 1785, and grew to manhood on his father's farm in Mercer county, Pennsylvania. He was twice married, his first wife being Maria, daughter of Alexander LINDSEY, of Crawford county, Pennsylvania, to whom were born the following children: Margaret; Isabella; Jemima; Alexander; Samuel; John L.; Susan, and William W. His second wife was Jane DAVIDSON, of Venango county. Mr. WALDRON served in the War of 1812, in Perry's Lake Erie squadron. In 1816 he came to Butler county, and purchased a farm where his son, William S., now lives. He was engaged in farming nearly all his life, but was also one of the pioneer teachers, and a good mechanic. He died April 5, 1863. For forty years he was an elder in the Presbyterian church.

WILLIAM S. WALDRON, youngest son of John S. and Maria (LINDSEY) WALDRON, was born upon his present homestead in Forward township, June 23, 1823. He received a good English education, and taught for several years in the public schools. In 1848 he was principal of one of the public schools in Peoria, Illinois. In 1852 he purchased the old homstead, (sic) and two years afterward remodeled and improved the buildings. Mr. WALDRON was married September 3, 1846, to Eliza M., daughter of John and Susan (KLINE) BELLIS, of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, who settled in Butler county in 1842. Their children are as follows: O. K., a dentist of Butler; Susan O., wife of Nelson B. DUNCAN; Theodore C.; William S., deceased; Laura H., wife of R. M. KINNEAR; J. C.; [p. 1128] Eva M., wife of J. B. EVANS; Reuben O.; Maria B., wife of F. B. DODDS; Fred V.; Elizabeth A. J.; Ulysses S. G.; Ada M., wife of B. S. BUHL, and Leota E., wife of O. S. SUTTON. In politics, Mr. WALDRON was first a Whig, and since the formation of the Republican party he has been prominent in the local councils of that organization. For fifteen years he was one of the school directors of Forward township, and served three years on the school board of Evans City. In 1856 he was elected a county auditor, and in 1872 was elected to the legislature, both of which positions he filled with credit. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is connected with Harmony Lodge, F. & A. M., is past master of that lodge, and its only living charter member in the county. He is also a charter member of Evans City Lodge, I. O. O. F., and connected with the encampment of that fraternity. Mr. WALDRON is a man of broad views and liberal opinions, who keeps well up with the progressive spirit of the age. Through the passing years he has accumulated a goodly share of this world's riches, and can be safely classed as one of the substantial, enterprising and public-spirited citizens of his native county.

ADAM BROWN, SR., a native of Germany, was a son of Adam BROWN, who immigrated to America prior to the Revolution, and served as a packhorse driver in the Continental army. His father located at Big Spring, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, after the war, where he resided until his death. Adam, came to Butler county in the last decade of the Eighteen century, and located in what is now Middlesex township. He subsequently settled upon a 400-acre tract of land near the site of Brownsdale, which he cleared and improved. He married Agnes HOLMES, a native of Ireland, and resident of Cumberland county. Both died early in the present century. Their children were as follows: John, who died upon a portion of the original farm; Adam; Joseph, who also died upon a part of the old homestead; Thomas R., who died in Pittsburg; Elizabeth, who married James MCCANDLASS, and died in Butler county; Martha, who became the wife of Johnson WHITE, and also died in this county, and Margaret, who married William WHITE, and died in Ohio. Adam BROWN Sr., was one of the early constables of the county, and in politics, he was an adherent of the Whig party. He was a Presbyterian, in religion, a man of fair education, in both English and German, and wielded considerable influence among the pioneers. He was interred in the old Presbyterian cemetery in Middlesex township.

ADAM BROWN, JR., was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm in Butler county. He was the second son of Adam BROWN, Sr., and at the death of his father he was appointed executor of the latter's estate. He received the homestead as his share of the estate, and lived upon it until 1833, when he purchased the mill and farm where his son Robert H. now resides. The mill was an old frame structure, but he tore it down, and rebuilt a new frame mill, and added a saw mill, which he conducted until 1861. In that year he retired from active business and settled upon a farm he then owned, but now the property of Walter C. Boggs, in Forward township. He married Sarah, daughter of ‘Squire Robert BROWN, to whom were born thirteen children, the of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Nancy, who married James HAMMEL; Robert H.; Adam; Ruth, who married C. E. [p. 1129] ANDERSON; Sarah, deceased wife of Asa LEASON; Margaret, deceased wife of Wesley HENDERSON; John, and William C., both deceased; Joseph, who married a daughter of Thomas GRAY, and is now residing in Penn township, and Nathan, who married a daughter of Mr. EMERY, and who now resides in Harrisville, Butler county. Thomas R., Betsey and Nelson, died in infancy. His second wife was Mrs. Elizabeth JOHNSON, who survives him. Politically, he was first a Whig and afterwards a Republican.

ROBERT H. BROWN, eldest son of Adam and Sarah BROWN, was born September 12, 1824, in Middlesex township, Butler county. He was reared on the homestead farm, and received his education in the district schools. He learned the milling business with his father, and purchased the mill and farm from the latter, which he conducted until 1880. In that year he bought a farm in Cranberry township, resided upon it until 1891, and then returned to his original homestead, where he engaged in farming and operating his flour and saw mill. In 1863 the old mill was destroyed by fire, but was rebuilt by himself; his farm contains some five producing oil wells, and is thus quite profitable. In 1850 he married Margaret E., daughter of George WILSON. His second wife was Cynthia F., daughter of Jesse MILLER, of Forward township, to which union have been born six children, four of whom are living, as follows: Sarah E.; Mary L.; Robert L., and Nora B. Politically, Mr. BROWN is a Republican, and in religious faith, he is an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church.

JOHN CROWE, son of Francis CROWE, came with his parents from Ireland some time in the last century, and settled upon the Susquehanna river in eastern Pennsylvania. He was one of three brothers, two of whom settled in Indiana and Kentucky. He had four sisters, as follows; Ellen, who married a man named ANDERSON; Margaret; Mary, who married Alexander DOUTHETT, and one whose name is not remembered. About 1812 John CROWE located on the site of Petersville, Butler county, removing later to Breakneck, in Forward township, and soon afterwards he settled upon a 200-acre track of land where John and David CROWE now live. Here he spent the remaining years of his live. Here he spent the remaining years of his life. He was married three times. His first wife was Jane POLLOCK, and their children were as follows: Mary, who married David DOUTHETT; Grizella, who married Nathaniel WALKER; Samuel; William, and John, all of whom are dead except the last mentioned. His second wife was Nancy BOYLES, who bore him one son, David B., who resides upon a part of the homestead farm. His third wife was Elizabeth ROBB, but no children were born to his union. John CROWE resided in Forward township until his death, and was one of the leading members of the old Covenanter church in this locality. His father, Francis CROWE, also came to Butler county, where he resided with his son John until his death.

WILLIAM P. CROWE, second son of John and Jane (POLLOCK) CROWE, was born in 1813, upon the old homestead in Forward township, and received his education in the pioneer log school house of the neighborhood. He learned the tanner's trade in Pittsburg, but later took up the bricklayer's trade, which he followed through life. He settled upon the farm where his son, George W., now resides, which he purchased some years before retiring from active business, and died there in 1871. He married Sarah J., daughter of John HAYS, of [p. 1130] Middlesex township, with union was blessed with eleven children: William J., of Butler; George W.; Benjamin F., of Beaver county; Ellen; Milton; Nelson M., a minister of De Haven, Allegheny county; Mary, wife of John TRESS; James M., deceased; Lizzie, wife of R. O. KNOX; Calvin, and Albert. Mr. CROWE was one of the leading Republicans of Forward township, and took a deep interest in political affairs. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and died in that faith. His widow resides in Beaver county.


[End of Chapter 73-1 (pgs.1083-1130) - Biographical Sketches: Zelienople, Harmony and Evans City Boroughs; Jackson, Forward, Adams, Cranberry, Connoquenessing and Lancaster Townships
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 72-3 (pgs.1035-1083), Biographical Sketches: Donegal Township and Millerstown Borough; Fairview Township and Karns City, Fairview and Petrolia Boroughs; Oakland and Concord Townships; Clay Township and West Sunbury Borough; Centre Township
Continued Chapter 73-2 (pgs.1130-1175) - Biographical Sketches: Zelienople, Harmony and Evans City Boroughs; Jackson, Forward, Adams, Cranberry, Connoquenessing and Lancaster Townships
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Updated: 04 Apr 2001, 11:13