History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 74 (Pgs. 1203-1243)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Judy Lockwood


CHAPTER LXXIV

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough

[p. 1203]
ZEBULON COOPER, SR. was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1778, a son of Zebulon COOPER, a native of New Jersey, who removed to Washington county at an early day. The subject of this sketch grew to maturity in his native county, and in 1796 accompanied his uncle, Nathaniel COOPER, to Butler county. They purchased a tract of 500 acres of land in what is now Slippery Rock township, situated on both sides of Wolf creek, upon which they settled in 1798. Zebulon retained 390 acres, and his uncle the balance. He built a log cabin on the site of the residence of his son, Sylvanus COOPER, and later in life erected the present home. The old log house was moved back, and is still doing service as an out-building. Upon this farm he spent the remaining years of his life. After making his settlement and erecting a cabin, he returned to Washington county and married Sarah BEAN, to whom were born the following children: Elizabeth, deceased wife of T.J. McNEES; John, who died near Whitestown; Mary, deceased wife of Thomas McNEES; Rebecca, who died May 31, 1894; Anna; Sarah, deceased wife of Robert S. ANDREWS; Zebulon, of Worth township; Jerusha, wife of William BIGHAM; Hannah, deceased wife of Sylvester CAREY, and Sylvanus. Mrs. COOPER died in 1830, and her husband, August 24, 1864. They were members of Plain Grove Presbyterian church, and are buried in the graveyard belonging to that society. In politics, he was a Whig in early life, and afterwards a Republican.

SYLVANUS COOPER, youngest child of Zebulon and Sarah COOPER, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, August 10, 1822, and has spent his entire life upon the old homestead. He obtained his education in the common schools, and has made farming his life vocation. In 1853 he married Susannah THORPE, who died in 1864, leaving a family of six children, viz.: Oliver N.; John A.; Charlotte M., wife of Prof. William McGEE; George W.; Mary J., wife of Lee MUSICK, and Ida A. Mr. COOPER married for his second wife Mrs. [p. 1204] Sarah R. CUMMINGS, a daughter of John NEAL, deceased. Both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He has filled several of the township offices, and is one of the leading and enterprising farmers of the community.

JOHN NEAL was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, November 27, 1801, son of John NEAL, a native of Germany, and one of the pioneers of that county. He grew to manhood in Erie county, and in 1820 came to Butler county and settled near Centreville, in Slippery Rock township. His father also settled in this township, upon 200 acres of land, where he died in 1847, aged eighty years, leaving the following children: Catherine; Ann, who married Joseph McDERMOTT; Elizabeth, who married Enoch PERRINE; Nancy, who married Joseph McCOY; John; James, who married Eliza McCALLAN, and Smith, who married Mary McCONNELL, all of whom are dead. John NEAL, Jr., married Johanna STILLWAGON, in December, 1825, and their children were as follows: Alexander; Mary; William; Smith; George W.; Oliver P.; Joseph M.; Johanna E.; Lewis J.; Vance R.; James; Margaret; John, and Sarah R., wife of Sylvanus COOPER. Mr. NEAL moved to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, in April, 1850, where his wife died in 1859. He married for his second wife Mrs. Mary Ann DAVIS, who became the mother of two children, David Alfred, and Nancy Jane, both of whom are residents of Wisconsin. Mr. NEAL was one of the early justices of the peace, a Democrat, in politics, and a member of the Seceder church. He died in Wisconsin, in 1874.

ZEBULON COOPER was born in the old log cabin on his father's farm in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, April 14, 1816, a son of Zebulon and Sarah COOPER. He was reared upon the homestead, and attended the pioneer schools of his neighborhood. He remained with his parents until he was thirty years of age, assisting his father on the farm, and in 1846 settled on 109 acres of the same tract, which his father gave him. He resided on this place for nine years, then sold it and purchased 120 acres in Worth township, to which he later added 180 acres, which includes the site of his present home. Here he has resided for nearly forty years engaged in farming. Mr. COOPER was married on July 2, 1857, to Amanda LESLIE, a daughter of Francis LESLIE, of Slippery Rock township. She was born October 15, 1827, and was the second youngest in a family of ten children, four of whom are living. Seven children have blessed this union, viz.: Francis M., who lives upon a part of the homestead, married Jane HENRY, and has three children, Pearl A., William Z., and Minnie I.; Sarah E., wife of J.G. GROSSMAN, of Worth township; William E., who married Mary ALLSWORTH, and lives on a part of the home farm; Hannah E., who died at the age of twenty-six years; Thomas U.; James H., and Joseph H. The family are members of the Presbyterian church, with the exception of Thomas, James and William, who belong to the Baptist denomination. Mr. COOPER is one of the oldest and most prosperous citizens in the township, and is highly respected by the community at large.

NATHANIEL COOPER, SR., was one of the first settlers of Slippery Rock township, Butler county. He was a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and in 1796 came with his nephew, Zebulon COOPER, to Butler county, and to- [p. 1205] gether they purchased 500 acres of land lying on both sides of Wolf creek. Nathaniel owned 110 acres of this tract, and here he erected his cabin and spent the remaining years of his life. He married a Miss TURNER, and was the father of four sons, viz.: Lot, a physician, who died in Cincinnati; Nathaniel; William, and Stephen, and one daughter, Polly, who married John McGOWAN. All of these are dead, but numerous descendants of the family are still living in Butler county.

NATHANIEL COOPER, son of Nathaniel COOPER, Sr., was born in Washington county, May 16, 1795, and came to Butler county with his parents in infancy. He was reared upon the farm in Slippery Rock township, and after arriving at maturity, he settled on the land where his grandson, Joseph COOPER, now resides, near the borough of Centreville. He married Sarah HUNTER, a daughter of Ephraim HUNTER, and was the father of the following children: Harvey; Lemuel; Munson; Martha; Jane; Lewis; Milton; William: John R.; Sarah, and Clarissa, all of whom are dead excepting Harvey. Mr. COOPER was one of the well known justices of the peace of his township, and filled that office some ten years. He was a member of Plain Grove Presbyterian church, and one of the original members of Centreville Presbyterian church. He was an elder for nearly half a century, and died in 1880. His first wife died June 13, 1838, and he was afterwards married to Mrs. Jane DUNLAP, nee WALKER. In politics, he was a Whig during his early life, and afterwards became a Republican.

HARVEY COOPER, only living child of Nathaniel and Sarah COOPER, was born in Slippery Rock township, May 9, 1817, and was reared upon the old homestead. In 1851 he removed to Mercer county, lived there ten years, and in 1861 purchased his present farm of 160 acres, in Slippery Rock township, upon which he has since resided. He was married in 1851, to Lucinda LESLIE, a daughter of Francis LESLIE, of Jackson township, Butler county, and has two surviving children, viz.: Andrew L.; Sarah E., who married G.W. HINES, and died August 9, 1894, and Mary I., wife of Ashley GROSSMAN. In politics, Mr. COOPER is a Republican, and is one of the oldest citizens of the township.

ANDREW L. COOPER, son of Harvey COOPER, was born in Mercer county, February 26, 1855, and was reared in Slippery Rock township, where he is now engaged in farming on the old homestead. He married Mary E. FULKMAN, a daughter of David FULKMAN, of Brady township, and has three children, viz.: Earl G.; Edward I., and Howard V. Mr. COOPER is connected with the I.O.O.F., and Jr. O.U.A.M., and is a member of the Presbyterian church. Politically, he is a Republican, and is one of the leading farmers of the township.

MILTON COOPER, son of Nathaniel and Sarah (HUNTER) COOPER, was born on September 5, 1829, upon the farm where his father settled and where his widow and family now reside, in Slippery Rock township, Butler county. He was reared a farmer, and received such an education as the times and circumstances afforded. He spent his entire life upon the farm, and died in 1876. In 1858, he married Maria HILL, a daughter of Daniel K. HILL. Eight children were the fruits of this union, viz.: Mary E.; Joseph L.; William D., deceased; Sarah B., wife of William CHRISTLEY; Clarissa C.; Francis N.; Harriet F., and Salina C. Mr. COOPER was one of the pioneer members of the Centreville Presbyterian [p. 1206] church, and was buried in the new cemetery in that borough. In politics, he was an ardent Republican, and a very worthy citizen.

JOSEPH L. COOPER, eldest son of Milton and Maria COOPER, was born in 1861, upon his present homestead, which he took charge of at his father's death. He is one of the energetic and enterprising farmers of his township, a leading member of the Republican party in Slippery Rock, and has served on the school board for two years. He is one of the original stockholders of the State Normal School, also of the Centreville Creamery Company, and gives a hearty support to every worthy enterprise. He is a member of the K. of P., of Centreville, and takes an active interest in the social and material prosperity of the community.

THOMAS BIGHAM was born near Gettysburg, Adams county, Pennsylvania, in 1782, a son of William BIGHAM, who served in the Revolution, and came of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Thomas grew to manhood in his native county, and in 1806 accompanied his father and brother Hugh to Slippery Rock township, Butler county. His father purchased 400 acres of land and gave each of the sons 200 acres, and then returned to his home in Adams county. Hugh stayed about two years and then disposed of his land and went back to his early home. Some two years after making his settlement, Thomas married Elizabeth WALKER, a daughter of John and Caroline WALKER, of Slippery Rock township. William BIGHAM, the son of Thomas, now resides upon the farm settled by his father, while the lands belonging to Hugh form a part of the borough of Centreville. To Thomas and Elizabeth BIGHAM were born the following children: William; Ann Eliza, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Catherine M., deceased wife of Jonah HODGE; Margaret J., deceased wife of James DAVIDSON; John, deceased; Asenath, who married Eli BECKWITH, and Minerva, who married Alexander DAVIDSON and died in Iowa. Mr. BIGHAM was one of the enterprising farmers of his time. He was a Whig in early life, and afterwards a Republican. He served in the War of 1812. In religion, he was an adherent of the Presbyterian church. He died in February, 1864, and both he and wife are buried in the old cemetery at Centreville.

WILLIAM BIGHAM, the only surviving child of Thomas and Elizabeth BIGHAM, was born on the farm where he now resides in Slippery Rock township, September 19, 1809, and has spent his entire life in tilling the old homestead. His opportunities for obtaining an education were confined to a few months each winter at the pioneer subscription school of his neighborhood. Upon the death of his father he inherited the homestead farm, having worked, per agreement with his father, twenty-one years to pay for the same. He subsequently built the present improvements, and cleared the forest off a large portion of the land, and has to-day one of the best improved farms in his locality. On December 12, 1848, Mr. BIGHAM married Jerusha COOPER, a daughter of Zebulon COOPER, one of the first settlers of Slippery Rock township. Both he and wife are pioneer members of the Centreville Presbyterian church. He has been prominent in church and Sabbath school work, and has been treasurer of the society for many years. Politically, he is a Republican, and has filled the offices of school director, [p. 1207] assessor and collector. Mr. BIGHAM is known for his benevolence, and has always been ready to extend a helping hand to religious and charitable purposes.

JOHN RALSTON, SR., was born near Greensburg, Pennsylvania, in 1776, son of William RALSTON, there grew to maturity, and subsequently settled in Lawrence county. In 1801 he traded his land in Lawrence county for 300 acres in Brady township, Butler county, upon which he built a cabin and settled the same year. Some time after effecting a settlement he erected a grist mill, also a saw mill, and operated them until his death, in the spring of 1850. They are now known as CROLL's mills. Mr. RALSTON owned 800 acres of land, which his children inherited at his death. He married Betsey SHARP, a daughter of James SHARP, who founded the village of Sharpsville, Mercer county, and their children were as follows: William, who built Ralston's mill, and died in Centre township; Jane, deceased wife of William HOGE; James, who died in Venango county; John, who died in Iowa; Elizabeth, who married John SNYDER; David, a resident of Nebraska; Polly, wife of Henry HILGER; Elim, who died in Iowa; Susan, who married Henry WOLFORD; Samuel, who died in Slippery Rock, and George, who died in Clay township. Mr. RALSTON was a soldier in the War of 1812. His descendants are numerous in Butler county, and may be found among the leading professional and business men of the community.

SAMUEL RALSTON, son of John and Betsey RALSTON, was born in Brady township, Butler county, in 1813. He learned the miller's and millwright trades and was connected with his father's mill for many years, and throughout his life was more or less engaged in milling and in the erection of mills in this and adjoining counties. In 1839 he received from his father the farm now owned by his son John W., upon which he settled. He married Elizabeth WOLFORD, a daughter of Henry WOLFORD, who is still living at the age of eighty-four years. Their children are as follows: Salina B., deceased wife of Lewis WINTER; Mary J., deceased; John W.; Henry, who enlisted in Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed at Fort Steadman; Sarah E., wife of L.S. HALL; George, deceased; Minerva, deceased; Zachariah, deceased; Samuel, and Lewis, both residents of California. Mr. RALSTON died in 1865, and is buried in the old cemetery at Centreville.

JOHN W. RALSTON, eldest son of Samuel and Elizabeth RALSTON, was born September 16, 1839, in Slippery Rock township, Butler county. He received a common school education and learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until 1870, and then located upon the old homestead farm, where he has since been engaged in cultivating and improving the property, which contains 100 acres. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, participating in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Petersburg, etc., and witnessed the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. In politics, he is a staunch Democrat, and gives an earnest support to the measures and principles of his party. In 1876 he married Sarah M. DICKEY, a daughter of John DICKEY.

JOHN RALSTON, JR., third son of John RALSTON, Sr., was born in Brady township, Butler county, and after reaching manhood settled on 127 acres of land in that township, given to him by his father. He afterwards purchased a farm [p. 1208] in Slippery Rock township, and five years later removed to Iowa, where he died in 1852. He was twice married; first to Susan MAWHA, of Slippery Rock township, who died in 1832, leaving two sons, Robert and John. His second wife was Nancy McLANE, to whom was born the following children: William Nelson; Susan; Caroline; Elvira; Mary; Alexander, and Margaret. Mr. RALSTON took an active interest in educational matters, erected the first school house in Slippery Rock township, and served as school director of Brady and Slippery Rock for many years. His eldest son, Robert, is a retired carpenter and builder, and lives with his brother John in Slippery Rock township.

JOHN RALSTON, second son of John and Susan RALSTON, was born on the old homestead in Slippery Rock township, September 9, 1831. He learned the carpenter's trade, and in the spring of 1861 settled on his present farm. He is the owner of valuable farm lands in Butler county, and is one of the leading farmers of Slippery Rock township. Mr. RALSTON was married in 1853, to Hannah, daughter of Alexander McCOY of Worth township, Butler county, and their children are as follows: Everett L., an attorney of Butler; Frank C., and William A., also a member of the Butler bar.

BENJAMIN CAMPBELL, deceased, son of Samuel and Mary (GRAHAM) CAMPBELL, was born in 1809, in Lawrence county, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm. His father was a native of Londonderry, Ireland, immigrated to America prior to the Revolution, and while working at the blacksmith's trade near Baltimore, Maryland, joined Washington's army, and served throughout the Revolution. About 1796 he entered 400 acres of land in Plain Grove township, Lawrence county, upon which he settled and spent the remaining years of his life. His family were as follows: Alexander; James; William; Mark; Samuel; Sarah, who married Andrew TURK; Jane, who married Daniel McMILLAN, and Benjamin. The last mentioned settled in Mercer county, where he resided until 1850, in which year he located upon his late farm in Slippery Rock township. He married Nancy CRAIG, a daughter of William CRAIG, of Mercer county. She died on June 21, 1893, the mother of ten children, viz.: James, deceased; Josephine, wife of James CLARK; Adeline, wife of Col. N.J. MAXWELL; Jane, wife of C.S. GRACE; Milton, who enlisted in Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed at the Wilderness; Agnes, widow of Newell GLENN; Ellen, wife of G.W. WOOD; Martha; Mark, and William. Mr. CAMPBELL was an elder in the Presbyterian church of Centreville, and in politics, he was a supporter of the Republican party.

SAMUEL WEAKLEY was a native of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, of English ancestry, the family being among the first settlers of that county. After reaching his maturity he removed to Mercer county, with his brothers, James and Robert, and about 1817 purchased 200 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, Butler county. He built his cabin on the farm now occupied by Mrs. Jane BROWN, and spent the remaining years of his life on that property. He married Sarah HOGG, and reared three children, viz.: Robert; Jane, who married Matthew BROWN, and Samuel, who married Susan RIGBY, and lived and died in Slippery Rock township. Mr. WEAKLEY was a soldier in the War of 1812. He [p. 1209] was a member of the Covenanter church, and is buried in the Harmony church graveyard.

ROBERT WEAKLEY, eldest son of Samuel and Sarah WEAKLEY, was born in Mercer county, September 21, 1816, and was reared in Slippery Rock township. He settled on seventy-five acres of the homestead farm, upon which he developed a coal mine, and engaged in farming and mining. He married Martha WATT, a daughter of Hugh WATT, a native of Ireland, but a resident of Slippery Rock township. To this union were born the following children: Hugh A., born January 17, 1841, served in Company I, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, was wounded at Fair Oaks and taken prisoner, spent nine months at Andersonville, was then exchanged and died at Annapolis, December 21, 1864; Sarah J., born July 9, 1843, died April 27, 1848; Samuel S., September 24, 1845, died April 5, 1848; Margaret, October 28, 1847, died December 26, 1854; Maria A., January 18, 1852, died January 4, 1855; Mary S. April 19, 1854, died January 4, 1872; John F., August 12, 1856, and Martha, June 11, 1859. Mr. WEAKLEY died April 14, 1885, and his wife, December 24, 1892. He was a member of the Associate church, of Centreville, and in politics, he was a Republican.

JOHN F. WEAKLEY, son of Robert and Martha WEAKLEY, was born upon the homestead in Slippery Rock township, August 12, 1856, was reared upon the farm and received a common school education. In 1880 he opened a coal mine on his farm, and carries on mining in connection with agriculture. Since purchasing the old homestead he has made many improvements, and erected his present residence in 1893. On June 11, 1885, he married Olive ATWELL, a daughter of Robert T. ATWELL, of Venango county, and has two living children: Mary E., and Gertrude. Mr. WEAKLEY has been a Prohibitionist since 1885, before which year he was a Republican. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville, and is a member of the session.

PHILIP KIESTER was one of the early settlers of Slippery Rock township, and a son of Philip KIESTER, a native of Holland. His father came from Holland with his parents when three years old. They settled in Northampton county, where he grew to manhood, and removed to Westmoreland county prior to the Revolution, where the subject of this sketch was born and reared. The family of Philip, Sr., consisted of the following children: John; Philip; Daniel; Jacob; Peter; Michael; Elizabeth, and Katie. Philip was born in 1780, and served in the war of 1812. He was married in his native county to Margaret SHAFFER, and in 1818 came to Butler county and purchased 200 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, where his son Paul now resides. Here he spent the remaining years of his life, clearing and improving his land, and died in 1863. His wife died in 1872, and both are buried in the old cemetery at Centreville. Their children's names are as follows: Jesse, and Jacob, both deceased; John; Leah, who first married George CHRISTLEY, and after his death, Thomas WILSON; Sarah, deceased wife of Williamson CHRISTIE; Abraham, deceased; Paul, and Mahala, who married James CHRISTLEY. Mr. KIESTER was a Republican, in politics, and in religion, an adherent of the Presbyterian church.

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JOHN KIESTER, third son of Philip and Margaret KIESTER, was born in Westmoreland county, July 10, 1812, and was about six years old when his parents settled in Slippery Rock township. He here grew to manhood, and obtained his education in the old log school house of pioneer days. After reaching his maturity he purchased the farm where his son George now resides, cleared and improved it, and lived there until 1864. In that year he bought 500 acres of land, including the mill property, where he has since resided. He cleared 140 acres of the tract, and built the residence now occupied by him. Besides his original purchase, Mr. KIESTER owns two other farms, each containing 200 acres, and is the most extensive land owner in Slippery Rock township. He was at one time an extensive oil producer in Venango county. The Union Coke and Coal Company are now mining on his land, which brings him in a considerable income. He retired from active farming business some years ago, but devotes his time to the management of his mills and other interests. Mr. KEISTER has been twice married. His first wife was Sarah WOLFORD, whom he married about 1836. She was a daughter of Henry WOLFORD, and died June 30, 1866, leaving the following children: Adaline, wife of Amos DUNBAR; Monroe; Susannah, wife of John FIELDING; Josiah; Margretta, wife of Jacob GROSS; Sophia, deceased wife of Leach KELLY; George; John B.; Miami, wife of Jeremiah GROVE; Elmina, deceased; Harner, and Amanda, wife of Frank ALTIS. Mr. KEISTER was again married, to Mrs. Maltida HAYS, a daughter of Thomas ARMSTRONG, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland. In politics, he was first a Whig and later a Republican, and has always taken an active interest in the success of his party. Kiester station and postoffice were both named in honor of this family.

JACOB KIESTER, son of Philip and Margaret (SHAFFER) KIESTER, was born in Westmoreland county, October 20, 1809, and came with his parents to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, when about nine years of age. He remained on the homestead until arriving at his majority, and then settled upon 100 acres of land where his son Jacob S. now resides. This land was owned by a Revolutionary soldier, and was purchased by him, his brother Jesse locating on 100 acres adjoining. He resided upon this farm until his death, in 1885, spending his entire life in agricultural pursuits. He married Elizabeth MILLER, and their children were as follows: Margaret, deceased wife of John McCLELLAN; William, who died at Davis Island, New York, while serving in the United States army; Elizabeth, wife of Perry WOLFORD; Annie, wife of Greer McCANDLESS; Epaphroditus, who died in Andersonville prison during the Rebellion; Eveline, wife of W.M. HUMPHREY; Jesse J., and Tabitha, deceased wife of Curtis HOCKENBERRY. He married for his second wife Margaret WEAKLEY, a daughter of James WEAKLEY, who survives him and resides upon the old homestead. Of their three children, Jacob Shaffer survives. Mr. KIESTER was a justice of the peace for many years and also filled the office of school director. He was an elder in the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville, and in politics, a Republican.

JACOB SHAFFER KIESTER, only living child of Jacob and Margaret KIESTER, was born January 27, 1859, upon the homestead farm in Slippery Rock township. He received a common school education, and has always resided upon the old farm. In 1888 he, with M.C. DOBSON, P.A. SHANNON and John CANNON, [p. 1211] established the Empire Brick and Tile Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer, and carried on business in the manufacture of brick and tile. In 1892 he married Bessie MORRISON, a daughter of W.J. MORRISON, of Slippery Rock township. Mr. KIESTER is a stanch Republican. Both he and wife are connected with the United Presbyterian church at Centreville.

JESSE KIESTER, son of Philip and Margaret (SHAFFER) KIESTER, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1808, and came with his parents to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, when about ten years of age. After reaching his majority he settled upon 100 acres of land where his son, W. S. KIESTER, resides. He cleared this farm, and engaged in keeping a tavern, which he conducted for many years. He married Margaret WOLFORD, a daughter of Henry WOLFORD, and their children were as follows: Philip, deceased; Jacob S., a member of the One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, who died in a rebel prison at Florence, North Carolina; Amelda, wife of Alexander MORTLAND; William H., a resident of Washington; James M., deceased; Emma, wife of John BOYLES, and Winfield S. Mr. KIESTER died February 1, 1888, and his wife, April 9, 1890.

PAUL KIESTER, son of Philip and Margaret KIESTER, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, November 22, 1823, was reared upon the homestead, and received a limited education in the pioneer schools of his district. He remained on the homestead until 1850, and then removed to Harrisville, where he spent two years. Returning home he resumed farming, and has since followed that occupation. Upon the death of his mother he purchased the farm, which contains 130 acres of well improved land. In 1848 he married Mary NEYMAN, a daughter of Daniel NEYMAN, and their children are as follows: Oscar D.; Mary N., deceased wife of Frank FAIR, and John C.F., of Washington, Pennsylvania. Mr. KIESTER is a Republican, has served as school director six years, and also as collector of the township.

GEORGE CHRISTLEY was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and was a son of George and Margaret (SNYDER) CHRISTLEY. His father was a native of Germany, who immigrated to Reamstown, Lancaster county, about 1760, and engaged in merchandising; he there married Margaret SNYDER, to whom were born four children. Two of these, George and Margaret, survived. The father died when our subject was a child, and his widow married a man named NORRIS, to whom she bore one daughter, Elizabeth. NORRIS returned to England, and was never heard of again. The mother with her three children removed to Westmoreland county, and settled near Greensburg, where she was again married, to Curtis ROOK. Two sons, William and Curtis, were the fruits of this union. Margaret CHRISTLEY married Fred RICHARD, and subsequently a man named MATTOX. She survived both husbands and died at the age of ninety years at the home of her daughter, in Clarksville, Mercer county. George CHRISTLEY grew to manhood in Westmoreland county, and about 1811 removed to North Liberty, Mercer county, where the remaining years of his life were spent. His family consisted of the following children: William; John; Michael; George; Samuel; Curtis; Mary, who married Stephen COOPER; Eva; Margaret, who married [p. 1212] John SMITH; Elizabeth, who married William FLEMING, and Catherine, who married Valentine GLENN.

JOHN CHRISTLEY, second son of George CHRISTLEY, was born in Westmoreland county, in 1797, and removed with his parents to Mercer county in 1811. He learned the cabinetmaker's trade with his father, who followed that business in connection with farming. In 1823 he came to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and settled on a farm of 100 acres, which his father purchased for him, now the property of his son Curtis. Here he resided until his death, carrying on the cabinet trade in connection with farming. He married Mary SMITH, a daughter of William SMITH. She died in 1825, leaving three sons, viz.: James P.; William George, and John H. His second marriage was with Elizabeth SMITH, a sister of his first wife, to which union were born the following children: Thomas F.; Mary J., who married John HOCKENBERRY; W. Edwin, deceased; Samuel J., who was killed at Second Bull Run; Sarah E., who married E. STEVENSON, and after his death John MOORE; Curtis I.; Catherine F., who married William BRUCE; Margaret C., who married Samuel GLENN, and Caroline B., who became the wife of William FOSTER. On the completion of the Pittsburg and Erie turnpike, Mr. CHRISTLEY was appointed toll-keeper of the gate located near his house, which position he held as long as the road continued a toll road. He also kept a hotel, and his house was the change station for the stage and mail route between Mercer and Pittsburg. Mr. CHRISTLEY was a stanch Republican, and although not a member of any church, he attended services with the Methodist Episcopal society, and was a liberal supporter of that denomination. He died in 1872.

CURTIS I. CHRISTLEY, youngest son of John and Elizabeth CHRISTLEY, was born on the farm where he now lives, in Slippery Rock township, March 31, 1836. He was reared on the homestead, and attended the common schools of the district. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. He participated in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. At the expiration of his term of service he returned home, and subsequently purchased his present farm from his father, and is now the owner of 115 acres of well improved land. In 1874 he married Margaret E. BRANNON, a daughter of Thomas BRANNON, of Franklin township. Their family consists of Tirza F., an only daughter, and Fred. Mr. CHRISTLEY is a stanch Republican, and has filled the offices of school director, auditor, and treasurer of his township. He is a member of the Bingham Post, Number 305, G.A.R., and is a representative of one of the oldest families in the community.

JOHN HARVEY CHRISTLEY, third son of John and Mary (SMITH) CHRISTLEY, was born in Slippery Rock township, February 18, 1824, received a good education, and in early life followed teaching. In 1852 he engaged in farming, and in 1867, in partnership with Mr. McKNIGHT, purchased the mill property which he now operates. This partnership continued for four years, when he disposed of his interest in the mill, but subsequently bought it back, and has since operated it in connection with his farm of 400 acres. He married Mary J. GABBY, a daughter of John GABBY, and by this union they are the parents of ten children, [p. 1213] viz.: Margaret E.; Lillie F., deceased; Anna F.; John L.; Alice I., wife of John MOORE; Florence A., wife of C.A. ATKINSON; Curtis O.; Mary E.; Thomas L., and Hannah, deceased. Mr. CHRISTLEY has been a life-long Republican, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which society he has filled the office of steward, and is one of the present trustees.

MICHAEL CHRISTLEY, son of George CHRISTLEY, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, December 23, 1799, and came to Mercer county with his parents in childhood. He attended the pioneer schools of his vicinity for a short period, but in after years he acquired by observation and reading a wide knowledge of men and books. He was familiarly known as "Uncle Mike" CHRISTLEY, and highly respected for his upright character and strict integrity. About 1823 he settled upon 100 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, purchased by his father, adjoining his brother John's farm. This he cleared and improved, and continued to follow agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1867. His son Neyman now resides upon the old homestead. Mr. CHRISTLEY was married three times. His first wife was Rachel BECKWITH, who died in 1837, the mother of the following children: Almira B., wife of E.H. ADAMS; Catherine, who married E.D. DeWOLF, and after his death a Mr. KENIFF; Joel B., of Indiana; Fidelia, deceased, and Calista, wife of W.B. PEARSON. His second wife was Almira BECKWITH, a sister of his first wife, who died in 1839 without issue. His third wife was Mrs. Elizabeth WALLACE, a daughter of Daniel NEYMAN, whom he married in 1840. She survives him and resides with her son upon the old homestead. Five children were the fruits of this union, viz.: Rachel F., wife of Dr. J.B. LIVINGSTON; Neyman; Mary C., wife of W.R. HAYS; Michael, deceased, and William L., a resident of Indiana. In politics, Mr. CHRISTLEY was an ardent Republican, and during slavery days was a strong Abolitionist. He was one of the original members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Centreville, and filled the offices of steward, trustee and class leader.

NEYMAN CHRISTLEY, son of Michael and Elizabeth (WALLACE, nee NEYMAN) CHRISTLEY, was born May 10, 1843, upon the homestead where he now resides, in Slippery Rock township. He was reared upon the farm, and received a common school education. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three years. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, and other engagements in which his regiment served during his term of enlistment. After his return to Butler county, he followed the occupation of a carpenter for some years. In 1871 he settled upon the old homestead, and has since followed agricultural pursuits. On January 18, 1869, he married Mary A. ROBB, a daughter of Josiah C. ROBB, of Mercer county, to which union have been born three children, viz.: Illula S.; Ben, and Grant, who died in February, 1892. Mr. CHRISTLEY is one of the trustees and original stockholders of the State Normal School, at Centreville. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of the O.G. BINGHAM Post, Number 305, G.A.R., of that borough.

CORNELIUS GILL came with his parents from Ireland to Pennsylvania, and settled on Turtle creek, Westmoreland county. He married in that county, and resided there until 1825, in which year he came with his sons, Samuel, David and [p. 1214] John, to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and purchased 400 acres of land situated where Hiram M. GILL, the PATTON heirs, J.C. KERR and John KELLY now live. His homestead was the John KELLY farm, and here he spent the remaining years of his life. His wife died prior to his settlement in Slippery Rock township. He was buried in the graveyard attached to the United Presbyterian church in Worth township. His family were as follows: Arthur, who died in Westmoreland county; Samuel and David, both of whom died in Slippery Rock township; John, who died in Missouri in 1868; Jane, and Nancy, both of whom died in Slippery Rock township, and Martha, who died in Westmoreland county, at the age of ninety-four years.

DAVID GILL, son of Cornelius GILL, was born in Westmoreland county, in 1801, and there learned the wheelwright's trade, which business he followed through life. He came to this county with his father, and settled upon the farm where his son, Hiram M., resides, cleared seventy-five acres during his residence thereon, and died on February 12, 1885. He married Martha McKEE, a daughter of James McKEE, one of the pioneers of Slippery Rock township. She survives and is living with her son Hiram M. They were the parents of the following children: Sarah B., deceased wife of James WILSON; Thomas M.; Letitia, deceased wife of Hiram COCHRAN; Hugh P.; Nancy, and Jasper, both of whom died in youth; James S., who enlisted in Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed at Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 1864; Hiram M.; Martha, deceased, and Maria A., wife of T.F. PATTON. Mr. GILL was a Democrat until 1860, and then became a Republican. He was a member of Slippery Rock United Presbyterian church, and is buried in the graveyard of that society in Worth township.

HIRAM M. GILL, son of David and Martha GILL, was born upon the homestead farm in Slippery Rock township, February 12, 1844. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in Company C, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three years and eight months. He was in the following engagements: James Island, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson, Knoxville, etc. After his re-enlistment his regiment became a part of the Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and he participated in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and Poplar Grove Church, and was with GRANT at the surrender of LEE. After the war closed he returned to his home, and upon his father's death purchased the farm, which he has since made his residence. Mr. GILL was married in 1867, to Elizabeth WILSON, a daughter of David WILSON. She died in 1878, leaving four children, viz.: Ina M.; Frank L., who died in 1891; Sallie V., a graduate of the State Normal School, and now engaged in teaching, and Charlie D. In 1883 Mr. GILL married Louisa CRAWFORD, a daughter of Samuel CRAWFORD, of Beaver county. In politics, he is a Republican, has filled the office of school director six years, and is a member of Bingham Post, G.A.R. He is president of the Creamery Company, and an active, representative citizen. Both he and wife are members of the Centreville United Presbyterian church.

[p. 1215]
JOHN DICKEY was born at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1794, eldest son of Archie and Isabelle (McGREW) DICKEY. His father was a native of Down county, Ireland, and immigrated to Adams county, Pennsylvania, in 1785, and served with the forces that suppressed the Whiskey Insurrection. About 1808 he was placed in charge of the Manor lands, near Kittanning, and filled that position for some years. He married Isabella McGREW, in Chester county, and their children were as follows: John; William; Jane; James; Robert; Bell; George, and Archibald, all of whom are dead except George, who resides in Tarentum. Archibald DICKEY, Sr., died at the home of his son Robert, in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county. The subject of this sketch was reared in Armstrong county, and after arriving at manhood engaged in farming in Sugar Creek township. On April 1, 1830, he purchased from the Western University 117 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, where his sons, John and David, now live. He settled upon this farm and resided there down to his death, May 31, 1872. He married Nancy TEMPLETON, who died in 1832, leaving the following children: Ann, who married James FOSTER, and died September 24, 1894; Archie, of Worth township; James, who died in 1892, and Samuel, of Venango township, who died April 23, 1894. Mr. DICKEY married for his second wife Mrs. Eliza J. WILSON, a daughter of D.D. CROSS, of Worth township, to which union the following children were born: Isabella, deceased; John W.; David; Sarah, wife of J.W. RALSTON, and one that died in infancy. Mrs. DICKEY survived her husband about fifteen years, dying in October, 1887. Both are buried in the graveyard in Worth township attached to Slippery Rock United Presbyterian church. He was an elder in that organization, and was one of the builders of the present church edifice. In politics, he was a Republican.

JOHN W. DICKEY, son of John and Eliza J. DICKEY, was born in Slippery Rock township, upon the homestead farm, February 19, 1845. He received a common school education, but his father being of poor health, the work of the farm was attended to by our subject. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. He was at the battles of Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. His term of service having expired he returned to his home and resumed the duties on the farm. At his father's death he and his brother David purchased the old homestead. On April 24, 1876, he married Margaret REED, a daughter of George REED, and has seven children, viz.: Mabel; J. Robert; Joseph A.; William J.; George; Eleanor G.; and Alice V. Mr. DICKEY is one of the leading Republicans of his township, and has served fourteen years as school director. He is a leading member of Slippery Rock United Presbyterian church, and has filled the offices of elder, treasurer, clerk of the session, and superintendent of the Sabbath school for many years. He is one of the original stockholders of the State Normal School, and also a stockholder in the Centreville Creamery Company.

WILLIAM BOVARD, eldest son of James and Jane BOVARD, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, in 1799, and grew to manhood in his native township. He afterwards located on the farm in Fairview township settled by his father, but in 1834 purchased 125 acres in Slippery Rock township, where his [p. 1216] son, Samuel C., now lives. He resided here until 1851, in which year he retired from active labor, and lived with his son, James J., the balance of his life, dying in 1872. He married Sarah CROSS, a daughter of Samuel CROSS, who survived him four years, and died in June, 1876. They were parents of three children, viz.: James J.; Samuel C., of Slippery Rock township, and Sarah E. Politically, Mr. BOVARD was a Democrat. He was one of the early members of Harmony United Presbyterian church, and when the Centreville society was organized he united with that body, and gave liberally towards the erection of the church building.

JAMES J. BOVARD, eldest son of William and Sarah BOVARD, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, August 21, 1827, and was about seven years old when his parents located in Slippery Rock. He was reared in this township, and educated in the public schools. In 1851 he purchased the CROSS homestead, where he has since lived with his sister, Sarah E. He was originally a member of Harmony United Presbyterian church, later became connected with Bethel United Presbyterian church, and held the office of trustee in that society for six years. Politically, he is a stanch Democrat, is one of the progressive citizens of the community, and a substantial, enterprising farmer, owning one of the best improved homesteads in the township.

JOHNSTON BOVARD, son of James and Jane (CHAMBERS) BOVARD, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, in 1811, and was reared amidst pioneer surroundings. After he grew to maturity he purchased 100 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, upon which his son William H. now resides, and here he erected a house and continued to follow agriculture the remaining years of his life. In 1833 he married Lydia ADAMS, a daughter of Jonathan ADAMS, of Slippery Rock township, to which union were born the following children: Jonathan, of Mercer township; Jane, wife of Andrew DRENNAN; George W., of Tionesta; James C., of Mercer township; William H., and Eli D. Mr. BOVARD died in 1874; his widow is still residing on the old homestead in Slippery Rock township. He was a stanch Democrat, and served as justice of the peace and school director for several terms. He always took a special interest in educational matters. Originally a Covenanter, he afterwards united with the Bethel United Presbyterian church, and served as a ruling elder and superintendent of the Sabbath school for a number of years.

JONATHAN BOVARD, eldest son of Johnston and Lydia BOVARD, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, September 9, 1834, was reared upon the farm and learned the carpenter's trade, which he has followed more or less in connection with farming. Mr. BOVARD was married to Theresa BROWN, a daughter of Joseph BROWN, of Mercer township, November 26, 1873. They are the parents of five children, viz.: Jane E., deceased; Frank F.; Joseph H.; Flora M., and Richard E. In 1875 he purchased a part of the Joseph BROWN farm, upon which he now resides. Mr. BOVARD is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, an adherent of the Democratic party. He has filled most of the offices in the township, at different periods, including that of school director.

[p. 1217]
WILLIAM H. BOVARD, son of Johnston BOVARD, was born November 26, 1846, on the homestead farm in Slippery Rock township. He received a common school education, and is now the owner of the old homestead, which contains 110 acres. He married Harriett McCALLEN, a daughter of John McCALLEN, and has three children: John A.; Karr C., and Mary. Mr. BOVARD is a Democrat, and takes a deep interest in the success of his party. He is a member of Bethel United Presbyterian church, has served on the school board, is connected with the Farmers Alliance, and is a substantial, enterprising citizen.

CHARLES BOVARD, son of James and Jane (CHAMBERS) BOVARD, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, March 24, 1816, and removed to Cherry township with his parents in the spring of 1824. He received a common school education and was reared a farmer, which vocation he followed all his life. He was married February 14, 1850, to Mary Jane HAYS, a daughter of John HAYS, of Centreville. She was born August 29, 1829, and became the mother of eight children, viz.: Jennie Chambers, born June 21, 1852, married Albert S. HAYNES, January 18, 1873, and died September 25, 1881; Fanny Caroline, born February 8, 1854, married Hiram CALER, July 4, 1877, and died January 2, 1879; John Richard, born August 20, 1857, and married Mary M. MILLER, December 18, 1879; Charles Benning, born September 3, 1859; George McWatty, born August 15, 1861; William Elmer, born October 22, 1863; Mary Emma, born August 18, 1866, and Ettie Lutetia, born August 12, 1869. Mrs. BOVARD died March 7, 1876, and on July 18, 1877, he married Catherine KERR, of Cherry township. He died December 1, 1880, and his wife in 1893. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, in which he filled the office of elder for twenty-two years. In politics, he was a Democrat, and served as school director in Cherry township.

WILLIAM E. BOVARD was born upon the homestead in Cherry township, Butler county, October 22, 1863, there grew to maturity, and obtained his education in the public schools. On September 24, 1884, he married Elizabeth SNYDER, born July 13, 1866, a daughter of John SNYDER, Jr., of Mercer township, and has four children: Elsie Jane, born July 9, 1886; Charles Earl, October 24, 1887; Roy Elmer, June 29, 1889, and Floyd Snyder, March 25, 1891. In 1885 Mr. BOVARD removed to Mercer township and purchased the MORRISON farm, consisting of sixty-two acres, upon which he has since resided. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, a Democrat. He has served as auditor and supervisor of his township, and is a member of the K.O.T.M.

JOHN REED, SR., was born in Down county, Ireland, in 1766, and immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1821, settling in Allegheny county, whence he removed to Mercer county. In 1837 he purchased the claim of James NESBIT, containing 116 acres, in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, where his grandsons, John and H.R. REED, now reside. Here he spent the remaining years of his life, and died about 1844. He married Mary McKNIGHT, in Ireland, to which union were born ten children, as follows: William, who died in Slippery Rock township in 1864; Jane, who died in Ireland; Thomas, who died in Armstrong county in 1892; Sidney, who died soon after the family came to this country; Mary, deceased wife of Thomas DAVIDSON; Hugh, who died at Freeport; George; Mar- [p. 1218] garet, deceased wife of W.J. VANN, and two that died in early youth. Mr. REED was a member of Harmony Associate church, of Mercer township. His wife died about 1837, and both are buried in the old Harmony churchyard.

GEORGE REED, son of John and Mary REED, was born in Ireland in 1809, and came with his parents to Pennsylvania in 1821, and to Butler county in 1837. He resided with his parents until his father's death, when the farm came into his possession. He made most of the improvements thereon, and resided upon the homestead until his death. He was a cooper, and after coming to Butler county worked at his trade a few years in Freeport. Mr. REED married Eleanor McCOY, a daughter of Thomas McCOY, a native of Virginia, who settled in Mercer county. They were the parents of the following children: John; Mary J., wife of William McGREW; Hannah, wife of J.M. HINES; Thomas, a resident of Kansas City, Missouri; Margaret, wife of J.W. DICKEY; William, who resides on a part of the old homestead; Ella; Sadie; Hugh R., living on the old homestead, and two that died in infancy. Mr. REED was reared in the Associate church, and joined the United Presbyterian church in 1857, being one of the original members of the Centreville organization. He died November 9, 1871, and was buried in the Harmony graveyard. His widow survives him, and resides upon the homestead farm. In politics, Mr. REED was originally a Whig, and afterwards a Republican.

JOHN REED, eldest son of George and Eleanor REED, was born March 3, 1842, upon the homestead in Slippery Rock township, was reared a farmer, and received a common school education. He has followed agriculture in connection with mining, having developed and operated a coal mine upon his farm for the past thirty years. In 1875 Mr. REED married Samantha MOOREHEAD, a daughter of William MOOREHEAD, of Lawrence county, and has five children, viz.: Bertha E.; William F.; Lawrence; Alexander, and Everett L. In politics, Mr. REED is a Republican, and was elected a justice of the peace in 1887, and re-elected in 1892. He has always taken a commendable interest in school affairs, has served on the school board, and is one of the original stockholders of the State Normal School. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville, in which he has filled the positions of trustee and superintendent of Sabbath school.

ALEXANDER BLACK, SR., a native of Donegal county, Ireland, immigrated to Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and purchased 130 acres of land in Clay township. He cleared and improved his farm, and died upon it in 1875. He married Elizabeth McELHANEY, in Ireland, who bore him the following children: Elizabeth, wife of William McELHANEY; Catherine, wife of John McKINNEY; Esther, wife of William McKINNEY; Alexander; Samuel; Rebecca, and Martha. The mother died some two years before her husband. Mr. BLACK was a member of the United Presbyterian church of West Sunbury, and in politics, he was a Democrat.

ALEXANDER BLACK, eldest son of Alexander and Elizabeth BLACK, was born in Ireland, in 1834, and came with his parents to Butler county. He grew to manhood on the homestead in Clay township, where he resided until his removal to Warren county, to engage in the lumber business. In 1873 he purchased his present farm in Slippery Rock township, containing [p. 1219] 131 acres, and has since been engaged in farming. He married Angeline CHRISTIE, a daughter of William CHRISTIE, and has four children, viz.: Elizabeth, wife of Joseph BARNES; Annie, wife of C. McCANDLESS; Gustavus, and Angeline, wife of Fred UBER. Mr. BLACK is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville, and in politics, is a Democrat. He is one of the leading farmers of his township.

SAMUEL T. CHANDLER was born in New Hampshire, in January, 1811, a son of Nehemiah and Abagail (DUSTIN) CHANDLER. His mother was a descendant of the famous Hannah DUSTIN. In 1841 he settled in Lawrence county, where he resided on a farm until 1860, and then purchased the property in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, now owned by his son George N. He was a teacher by profession, and followed that vocation for some years after coming to this State. He improved and resided on his farm in Slippery Rock township until his death, which occurred on March 22, 1884. He is buried in the new cemetery at Centreville. Mr. CHANDLER married Mary A. DENNISTON, a daughter of William DENNISTON, of Springfield township, Mercer county, to whom were born the following children: Margaret, wife of James LAWRENCE; Eliza A., widow of S.N. STEPHENSON; Mary E.; Emma F.; George N.; William D., deceased, and Sarah M. Mrs. CHANDLER resides on the old homestead with her children. In politics, Mr. CHANDLER was a Democrat, and filled the office of school director several years.

GEORGE N. CHANDLER was born in Lawrence county, December 2, 1854 son of Samuel T. and Mary A. CHANDLER. He was about six years old when his parents located in Slippery Rock township, and he has ever since resided upon the homestead farm. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of Mylert Lodge, I.O.O.F., of Centreville. He has followed general farming, and is the owner of 126 acres of well improved land.

ROBERT McFATE was born in Londonderry, Ireland, in 1816, and immigrated to Pennsylvania, in 1836, where he found employment in the construction of the Pennsylvania canal. Later he removed to Venango county, and purchased a farm near Oil City. In 1860 the oil excitement in that vicinity brought him a purchaser, and he sold his farm at a good price, and bought the land where his son, Robert A., now lives, in Slippery Rock township, embracing 150 acres. Here he died July 14, 1892, and is buried in the new cemetery at Centreville. He married Mary McELWEE, to which union were born the following children: Martha, deceased; Margaret, wife of J.E. WATT; Mary, wife of A.C. PERRY; Eliza, wife of T.M. JOHNSON; Flo, wife of W.J. JOHNSON, and Robert A. In politics, Mr. McFATE was a Democrat, and in religion, was a member of Bethel United Presbyterian church, of Slippery Rock township.

ROBERT A. McFATE, the only son of Robert and Mary McFATE, was born June 18, 1865, upon the homestead farm, was educated in the public schools, and upon the death of his father he purchased the farm from the other heirs. He married Ella McFATE, a daughter of Joseph McFATE, and has two children, viz.: Robert W.C., and Thomas Johnson. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville, and in politics, he is a Democrat. He is a [p. 1220] member of the Farmers Alliance, and is a stockholder in the Centreville Creamery Company, and in Slippery Rock State Normal School.

THOMAS McCOY, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, immigrated to Pennsylvania towards the close of the Eighteenth century, and settled in Springfield township, Mercer county. He entered 200 acres of land, which he cleared and improved, and died upon his farm in 1844. He married Rebecca DENNISTON, whose parents were among the first settlers of Springfield township. She became the mother of the following children: John; Maria, who married William ALEXANDER; Sarah, who married Andrew COULTER; Nancy, who married Moses PARSHALL; William; Thomas; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Andrew ROSE; Jane, who married Philip PAINTER; Alexander, and Robert. Mr. McCOY and wife were members of the Presbyterian church. She died some years before her husband, and both are buried in the Stevenson graveyard, in Springfield township, Mercer county.

JOHN McCOY, eldest son of Thomas and Rebecca McCOY, was born in Springfield township, Mercer county, October 7, 1800, and was reared upon the homestead farm. He learned the carpenter's trade, and followed that business many years at Centreville, to which place he removed from Mercer county. In 1864 he settled on a farm in Slippery Rock township, where his son Robert resides, which property he purchased some years before, and here he died on August 24, 1884. Mr. McCOY was twice married; first to Jane HALL, a native of Ireland, who died without issue. On October 19, 1850, he married Elizabeth ARMSTRONG, a daughter of Thomas ARMSTRONG, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, who came to Mercer county in 1842. The children of this union are as follows: Thomas, a resident of Lawrence county; Robert; John E., of Pendleton, Oregon; Rebecca, wife of John G. UBER, and Elizabeth, a professional nurse in Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. McCOY resides upon the old homestead. Mr. McCOY was a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a stanch supporter of the Democratic party.

ROBERT McCOY, son of John and Elizabeth McCOY, was born in Centreville, Butler county, October 25, 1854, and received a public school education. He was reared a farmer and has continued to follow that vocation up to the present. In November, 1883, he married Grace MOREHEAD, a daughter of Harvey MOREHEAD, of New Castle, and has three children: Robert T., Max E., and Martha E. Mr. McCOY devotes considerable attention to the breeding of fine stock, and is quite a successful farmer. Both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a Democrat, is a member of the K. of P., and has served five years in Company F, Fifteenth Regiment, N.G.P.

SAMUEL BARD, a native of Berks county, Pennsylvania, and of German ancestry, was born in 1795, and married Margaret McARTHUR, who was of Irish descent. He learned the tailoring trade in his youth, and after his marriage moved to New Lisbon, Ohio, where he followed his trade for some time. In 1822 he removed to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, settled on the present site of Centreville, and was the first tailor in the village. About 1836 he engaged in manufacturing fanning mills, and in 1838 started a foundry, the first between Pittsburg and Erie. This he operated until 1840, when he sold it to his [p. 1221] son, John T., who carried it on for two years, and it then was bought back by our subject. Mr. and Mrs. BARD were the parents of the following children: Mary Ann, wife of William L. BINGHAM; John T., who died in December, 1879; William B., who died in 1892; Benjamin F., who enlisted in the Union army, and was killed at the battle of Pea Ridge; two who died in youth; A.J., and R.M., the latter a retired merchant of Centreville. Mr. BARD was a Democrat, in politics, and though he never held office, he took a lively interest in public affairs.

A.J. BARD, son of Samuel and Margaret (McARTHUR) BARD, was born in Centreville, Butler county, June 5, 1828. He attended the village school until he was twelve years of age, when he entered the store of his brother, John T., as a clerk. Here he remained until 1856, having in the meantime become a partner with his brother J.T., whom he soon bought out and engaged in business for himself, until 1858. In 1861 he was elected a justice of the peace, and served four terms. He was engaged in the timber business for outside parties for one year; was appointed a notary public, and combined with its duties the business of fire insurance, until May, 1893, when he was appointed by President CLEVELAND postmaster of the borough. Mr. BARD was married June 1, 1854, to Marion McKNIGHT, a daughter of Robert McKNIGHT, to which union have been born four children, viz.: S.S., a hardware merchant of McKeesport; R.M., who is in the gas business in Centreville; Jennie D., wife of Peter BARTZ, and Annie May, wife of Rev. U.S. BARTZ, a Presbyterian minister. Mr. BARD has spent his entire life in Centreville, and is the oldest living person born in the town. He is known and recognized as a public-spirited citizen and a man of high integrity. In politics, he has always been an unswerving Democrat, and an ardent advocate of the principles and doctrines of his party. He has been a member of the I.O.O.F. since 1849, and is a charter member of Slippery Rock Lodge, No. 108, A.O.U.W. The family are members of the Presbyterian church.

JONATHAN MAYBURY, SR., a native of Virginia, born about 1767, came to Butler county early in the present century, and entered the employ of Dr. Detmar BASSE, sometimes called Dr. Basse MULLER, the founder of Zelienople, as book-keeper at his iron furnace. He subsequently went to Westmoreland county where he engaged in farming, and while there was appointed as weigh-master on the Pennsylvania canal, with headquarters at Johnstown. About 1838 he again came to Butler county, as book-keeper for the Hickory furnace, in Slippery Rock township, and died in Centreville about 1842. Mr. MAYBURY was twice married. His first wife died in Virginia, and he married his second wife, Mary WILLIAMS, of Westmoreland county, while a resident of Zelienople. Their children were as follows: Julia, wife of John BIGERT; Charles, deceased; Elizabeth, deceased wife of George DORN; Polly, deceased, and Jonathan. Mr. MAYBURY is buried in the old cemetery at Centreville.

JONATHAN MAYBURY, son of Jonathan and Mary MAYBURY, was born at Zelienople, Butler county, in 1829. He was reared in Centreville, received a common school education, and learned the carpenter's trade. In 1850 he commenced business for himself, and has followed contracting and building for the [p. 1222] past forty-four years. He has erected the larger portion of the homes in Centreville, including the HUMPHREY residence, and has remodeled the extensive buildings of the State Normal School, in that borough. The firm of MAYBURY & Son, is one of the well known building firms of Butler county. In connection with his business, he also carries on farming. Mr. MAYBURY married Frances M. CRANE, a daughter of Dr. CRANE, and his children are as follows: Austin; Orrie F., and Harriet, all of whom are dead; Edward M., a member of the firm of Maybury & Son; Mary; Cyrus H., and William. Politically, he is a Republican, and in 1870 was elected county commissioner. He has served three terms as burgess of Centreville, and is one of the leading citizens of the borough. The family are adherents of the Presbyterian church.

DR. ELI G. DeWOLF was one of the early physicians of Butler county. He came from Ohio to Slippery Rock township in 1825, where for twenty-two years he was engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery, dying in 1847. He married Eliza HARRIS, a native of Butler county, and their children were as follows: Ephraim H., of Freeport, Ohio; Oratio J., editor of the Fostoria Daily and Weekly Dispatch, at Fostoria, Ohio; Eli G., deceased, founder and for many years editor of the Findlay Daily and Weekly Republican, Findlay, Ohio; E. Darwin, deceased; Isaac S.P., a resident of Centreville, Butler county, and Ann Eliza, wife of Thomas ROBINSON, of Butler.

E. DARWIN DeWOLF, son of Dr. Eli G. DeWOLF, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and spent his early years amidst pioneer surroundings. He married Catherine CHRISTLEY, a daughter of Michael CHRISTLEY, of Slippery Rock township, and resided upon his homestead in that township down to his death, in 1865, at the age of thirty-eight years. Mrs. DeWOLF now resides in California. They were the parents of four children, viz.: Joel P., editor of the Fostoria Daily and Weekly Review, Fostoria, Ohio; Willard L., of Millerstown; Melvin, and Ella, the last two of whom are dead.

BENJAMIN PEARSON, physician and surgeon, is a son of Thomas W. and Margaret J. (RODGERS) PEARSON, the former a native of Mercer, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Ohio. His grandfather, Bevan PEARSON, a native of Philadelphia, was one of the early settlers of Mercer, where he lived and died. The subject of this sketch was born in Mercer, December 24, 1838, received a common school education, and subsequently attended the Mercer Academy, and Duff's Commercial College. He read medicine with Dr. S.S. MEHARD, of Mercer, commenced practice at Centreville, Butler county, in March, 1862, where he remained until 1866, in which year he removed to Tionesta, because of ill health, and continued his professional duties at that point for two years. In 1868 he returned to Centreville, where he has been engaged in continuous practice for the past twenty-six years. In the spring of 1881 he graduated at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. Dr. PEARSON has always taken an active interest in educational matters, and was one of the leading spirits in obtaining the State Normal School at Centreville. He was one of the building committee, and is now serving as trustee of that institution. He is one of the incorporators and original directors of the Centreville Savings Bank, and has been prominent in the social and material development of the borough. Up to 1884 the doctor was a Democrat,
[p. 1223] but since that year he has supported the Prohibition party. In 1892 he was the nominee of the Prohibitionists of Butler county for Congress, and was one of the nominees of the same party for the legislature in 1894. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and is one of the charter members of the A.O.U.W. On August 13, 1863, Dr. PEARSON married Lizzie WISE, a daughter of Jacob WISE, of Emmitsburg, Maryland, to which union have been born five children, as follows: Effie I.; Thomas W., a Presbyterian minister; Benjamin; Eugene O., and Alfred, deceased. Dr. PEARSON is one of the leading and prominent citizens of the community, and gives a liberal support to every worthy enterprise.

GEORGE MAXWELL was born in Plain Grove township, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1841, son of William and Nancy (WADDLE) MAXWELL, and grandson of James MAXWELL, one of the pioneers of Lawrence county. He was reared upon the homestead farm, and in 1861 enlisted in Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, known as the "Round Heads," and served until the close of the war. He participated in the following engagements: James Island, where he was slightly wounded, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson, Knoxville, the Wilderness, and Spottsylvania Court House; was wounded in the last mentioned battle, May 12, 1864, by a gun shot in the right knee, was sent to the field hospital, thence to Grosvenor Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, thence to McClellan Hospital, Philadelphia, where he remained until August 28, 1865, on which date he was honorably discharged from the service. In 1866 Mr. MAXWELL located at Centreville, Butler county, where he engaged in the purchase of live stock for the eastern market, which business he has followed up to the present. He is a man of commendable public enterprise, and was one of the first citizens of the community to offer his means and influence towards obtaining the State Normal School, at Centreville. He was one of the original stockholders of that institution, served on the building committee, and has been president of the board of trustees since its organization. Few men of his locality have done more for the material prosperity of the community than the subject of this sketch. He is a leading Republican, and is a prominent member of O.G. Bingham Post, Number 305, G.A.R. of Slippery Rock.

DR. ALBERT E. MALTBY, principal of the State Normal School, at Slippery Rock, Butler county, was born in Pulaski, Jefferson county, New York, October 27, 1850, son of John and Rachel (CRAWFORD) MALTBY, the former a native of New York, and the latter of Ireland. His early education was obtained in the public schools of Fayetteville, Onondaga county, New York, and at the Fayetteville Academy. He subsequently entered Cornell University, and was graduated with honors in 1876. A pupil of Agassiz and Goldwin SMITH, he enjoyed unusual advantages in science and history. He began teaching in the Ury school in Philadelphia, and was soon offered an instructorship in Cornell University, but declined the offer. In 1878 he was appointed an engineer on the survey of the boundary line between Guatamala and Mexico. In 1880 he accepted the professorship of mathematics and astronomy in St. Lawrence University, New York, and during his residence in that place was married, December 26, 1883, to Harriet DEZELL, a daughter of Robert DEZELL, of Canton, St. Lawrence county. [p. 1224] Dr. MALTBY became professor of natural sciences in the State Normal School at Indiana, Pennsylvania, in 1884, and after five years of very successful work at that institution, he resigned to take charge of the training department of the State Normal School at Millersville. As a master of methods and the detail of model school work, his power was soon evident to all who visited that school. The enthusiasm of the young teachers under his instructions was unbounded, and was shown in the work which they were able to do. In 1890 Dr. MALTBY accepted the principalship of the State Normal School at Slippery Rock, Butler county, and the rapid growth of this institution is a fair index of his executive ability. As an institute instructor and lecturer, he has acquired a State reputation, and his admirable efforts in that field of labor have gained many students for the Slippery Rock State Normal, and placed that school in the foremost rank. As a writer on theoretical and practical school methods, he is singularly happy in taking his readers into confidential sympathy with his views and converting them to his original ways of putting them into school-room practice. It would be impossible for a teacher to follow him through any illustrative teaching, either as observer, auditor, or reader, and not feel a strong desire to investigate and undertake the work for himself. This power to inspire others to think and to work, is of the first importance in the training and supervision of teachers, and is one secret of Dr. MALTBY's success in attracting live people within his circle of influence. In addition to giving close attention to the duties of his responsible position, Dr. MALTBY has found time during recent years to write and publish three volumes that have given him a wide reputation as an author. Two of these books, "Froebel's Square," and "Map Modeling in Geography," have taken a high rank as text books. The third volume is entitled, "The Story of Our Flag," and deals with a patriotic subject in an exceedingly entertaining and interesting manner.

PROF. ISAAC NEWTON MOORE, of the State Normal School, was born July 27, 1858, upon the homestead farm in Brady township, son of Samuel and Martha (GRAHAM) MOORE, and grandson of Samuel MOORE, the pioneer. He received a good English education, and in 1877 commenced teaching in the public schools of Lawrence county. In 1881 he entered Westminster College, at New Wilmington, and was graduated in 1885. In the latter year he was appointed principal of the High School at New Castle, filled that position two years, and in 1887 accepted the principalship of the Waterford Academy, at Waterford, Erie county, where he continued until the autumn of 1888, when he was appointed professor of ancient languages and natural science, in the State Normal School, at Slippery Rock, which position he has filled acceptably up to the present. Professor MOORE was married August 30, 1888, to Adella McDOWELL, a daughter of David McDOWELL, a of Sheakleyville, Mercer county, and has one son, Ralph. Politically, he is a Republican, and in religious faith, is a member of the United Presbyterian church.

PROF. ISAAC M. McCLYMONDS, son of James and Lydia (VANCE) McCLYMONDS, was born on the McCLYMONDS homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, June 15, 1847. After receiving a good common school education, he entered Westminster College, at New Wilmington, and subsequently the Edin- [p. 1225] boro State Normal School, and graduated from the latter institution. He taught in the public schools of Butler and Armstrong counties from 1868 until the spring of 1881, when he was appointed superintendent of the model department of the Edinboro State Normal. In 1889 he was appointed professor of school economy algebra, at Slippery Rock State Normal School, which position he has filled with credit up to the present. Professor McCLYMONDS was married September 2, 1869, to Elizabeth R. GLENN, a daughter of Robert GLENN, of Worth township, to which union have born seven children. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and fills the office of elder in that society.

FRANK CLUTTON, son of Jonathan CLUTTON, one of the early settlers of Brady township, Butler county, was born in Franklin township, November 15, 1857. He was reared in Brady and Worth townships, attended the district schools, and began clerking in his father's store in boyhood. At the age of twenty-two he took charge of the store at Coaltown, for Bard & Son, with whom he remained three years. He then became manager of the Hazard Coal Company's store, in Mercer county, where he remained some two years and a half. He next entered the employ of the Westermann Brothers, of Millerstown, as book-keeper. In 1877 he and his brother George W. purchased the drug store of M.L. KELLY, at Slippery Rock, which they conducted under the firm name of CLUTTON Brothers until 1893, when it was changed to CLUTTON Brothers & McGAFFIC, and the gents furnishing business, and boots and shoes were added thereto. Mr. McGAFFIC retired from the firm in September, 1894, and it then became CLUTTON Brothers, whose business is now confined to drugs exclusively. George W. CLUTTON located in New Castle, in August, 1891, where the firm carry on the drug business under the name of CLUTTON Brothers. Mr. CLUTTON was married September 11, 1879, to Lola F. RIDDLE, a daughter of James D. RIDDLE, deceased. Their children are as follows: Bertha, deceased; William K.; Paul D.; Augustus T., and Francis E. Politically, Mr. CLUTTON is a Republican, is president of the borough council, and was one of the original stockholders and trustees of the Slippery Rock State Normal School. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has filled the offices of trustee and steward. He is also a member of Hebron Lodge, F.& A.M., and Slippery Rock Lodge, K. of P. He is one of the leading business men of the town, as well as a progressive, enterprising citizen.

GEORGE W. CLUTTON was born in Franklin township, Butler county, April 8, 1864, and received a common school education. In 1878 he entered the employ of John H. WALKER, who established the first drug store in Slippery Rock. After serving his apprenticeship, he went to Coaltown and took charge of a drug store, which he afterwards purchased, and which he continued to carry on until the fall of 1886, when it was burned out. In the spring of 1887 his brother Frank and himself purchased their present place in Slippery Rock. In August, 1891, he went to New Castle and took charge of the Central drug store, which is also carried on under the name and style of CLUTTON Brothers. Mr. CLUTTON married Ellen RIDGEWAY, a daughter of Henry RIDGEWAY, of Coaltown, Butler county, and has one son, Fred. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and the K. of P., also of the Methodist Episcopal church.

[p. 1226]
W.H. GRINE was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, June 23, 1854, son of Helwig and Catherine (CROLL) GRINE, natives of Germany, and residents of Franklin township, Butler county. Our subject was reared in Allegheny county, and Franklin township, Butler county, his parents locating here in 1868. He received a common school education, and at the age of seventeen began clerking in Pittsburg, remained there one year, and then went into the oil fields of Venango, McKean and Clarion counties. After two years spent in that region, he again went to Pittsburg and resumed clerking in a store. In 1884 he settled at Centreville, and engaged in the huckster business, which he followed for several years. In 1893 he became interested in the creamery business, and it was mainly through his efforts that Centreville Cooperative Creamery Association, Limited, was organized, and a creamery established. Mr. GRINE was elected general manager, and in connection with the duties of this position he also follows farming. He married Anna KENNEDY, a daughter of J. K. KENNEDY, of Butler county, to which union have been born ten children: William H.; Arthur E.; Catherine E.; Charles R.; Albert F., deceased; Clifford C.; Eugene E.; Raymond K., deceased; Mary, and Helen G. In politics, Mr. GRINE is a Republican, has filled the office of burgess, and also served in the borough council. In early life he was a Lutheran, but after settling in Centreville he united with the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the K. of P., the Jr. O.U.A.M., and the K. of H., and is one of the enterprising citizens of the borough.

H.P. GRIFFITH was born in Utica, New York, November 17, 1832, son of Henry and Jane (HUGHES) GRIFFITH. At the age of fourteen he went to New York city, where he learned the cooper's trade. In 1860 he located at Titusville, Pennsylvania, established himself in business, and manufactured the first iron bound oil barrels made in Pennsylvania. He established several cooper shops throughout the oil region, and conducted an extensive business. He subsequently engaged in the oil industry, and followed producing in the Oil Creek field from 1862 until 1874. In the latter year he began operating in Greece City, Butler county, and afterwards in the Millerstown field, which he continued until 1877. In that year, under the firm name of Hays & Griffith, he commenced operation in the Bradford field. In March, 1885, he returned to Butler county, and leased a strip of land extending from Wurtemburg, Pennsylvania, to a point six miles northeast of Centreville, and with H.E. PICKETT, organized the Shenango Gas Company, to supply New Castle with natural gas. This company carried out its plan successfully, and is in operation at the present time. In 1886 Mr. GRIFFITH drilled a well west of Centreville, put down another the following year on the John WOLFORD farm, and in 1890 drilled a third on the WILLIAMs farm, in Slippery Rock township, and in 1892 a fourth well on the EYTH farm. In 1887 he piped the borough of Centreville, and the foregoing wells supply his plant, and furnish fuel for about 500 fires. Mr. GRIFFITH married Barbara KAHLER, and is the father of four children, viz.: Jane A.; Grace; Frank E., and Helen. He was one of the leading spirits in obtaining the location of the State Normal School at Centreville, and was the largest cash subscriber to the building fund. He has been a trustee of that institution since its organization, and also a member of the sanitary committee. Politically, he is a stanch [sic] Republican, and in [p. 1227] religious faith, an adherent of the Presbyterian church. He is recognized as one of the representative and progressive citizens of the borough, a man always ready with his means and influence to advance the prosperity of the town.

ROBERT G. HUMPHREY, son of James HUMPHREY, was born in Worth township, Butler county, in 1825. He learned the wagonmaker's trade in youth, and carried on business in North Liberty township, Mercer county, until 1865, in which year he settled in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, purchased a farm, and carried on that business in connection with his trade. He married Margaret MAXWELL, a daughter of William MAXWELL, and was the father of the following children: William M.; Milton J., a resident of Slippery Rock township; Mary A., wife of J.C. MORTON; Wellington W., of Slippery Rock township; Nancy J., wife of Charles MINICH; Norman A., of Pendleton, Ohio; John G., who resides in Ottawa, Kansas, and George M. Mr. HUMPHREY died June 5, 1874; his widow resides in Centreville with her son William M. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church, at Prospect, and in politics, a Republican. His only brother, Thomas G., is a farmer, and resides in Beloit, Kansas.

WILLIAM M. HUMPHREY, eldest son of Robert G. and Margaret HUMPHREY, was born in Mercer county, September 21, 1849. He was reared a farmer, and was educated in the common schools. In 1884 he purchased a farm of 100 acres in Connoquenessing township, which began producing oil about 1890, and has now twenty-six wells located upon it. It is in the Hundred Foot field, and has made its owner one of the wealthy citizens of the county. In 1892 he purchased some twenty-four acres at Centreville, upon which he has erected one of the finest homes in this section of the State. He is also the owner of another farm of 143 acres, known as the David McKEE farm, in Slippery Rock township. On December 31, 1874, Mr. HUMPHREY married Eveline KIESTER, a daughter of Jacob KIESTER, and has two sons: Clyde and Glenn. Eva D. McCLELLAN, a niece, now twenty-three years of age, has made her home with Mr. and Mrs. HUMPHREY since she was four years old. Mr. HUMPHREY is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and politically, is a supporter of the Republican party.

ALBERT H. BAKER was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, December 8, 1846, son of James C. BAKER. He was reared in his native county, and after arriving at manhood he engaged in various occupations, and finally became a fireman on a railroad. In 1870 he removed to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and engaged in the saw mill business, followed this for some time, and then began mining coal, at which he remained four years. He afterwards followed contracting, and also embarked in butchering, and finally went into the livery business at Centreville, under the firm name of BAKER & CHRISTLEY. This firm continued until August, 1892, when the firm of BAKER & NELSON succeeded it. Mr. BAKER is also engaged in the furniture business under the firm name of BAKER, KIESTER & NELSON. He has been twice married. His first wife was Martha J. DOWNS, who died in 1893, leaving three children, viz.: Frank; Eva, and Herbert. His second wife was Mrs. Melissa KELLY, of New Wilmington. Mr. BAKER is a stanch Republican, and has served in the borough council and other local offices. He is a member of the F.& A.M., the I.O.O.F., and [p. 1228] the Jr. O.U.A.M., and is connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, of Centreville.

JOHN McGONEGAL was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, May 21, 1859, son of Marcus and Lillie A. (MORRISON) McGONEGAL, his mother being a daughter of Benjamin MORRISON. He received a common school education, and was reared upon a farm until seventeen years of age, when he commenced learning the carpenter's trade. He followed this business until July, 1893, at which time he was appointed engineer of the State Normal School, at Slippery Rock. In 1892 he constructed his water works plant, which he operates in connection with his business as engineer. Mr. McGONEGAL married Mary J. TAYLOR, and is the father of six children, viz.: William M.; Bessie J.; George F.; Ruth H.; John R., and Eva F. He has been a member of the Centreville United Presbyterian church since boyhood, and is a ruling elder in the same church. Politically, he is a Republican.

SAMUEL BARNES, SR., was born in Down county, Ireland, in 1736, and immigrated to one of the eastern counties of this State. About 1795, accompanied by his wife Susanna and two children, William and Betsey, the latter of whom subsequently married a Mr. MARTIN, he came to Mercer township, Butler county, and settled upon 200 acres of land now the property of his great grandsons, John A. and James B. BARNES. The patent for this land was obtained by his son William, April 6, 1832. He built his cabin in the midst of an unbroken forest, and here spent the remaining years of his life. His wife died on June 5, 1820, and himself, December 25, 1821. They are buried in the graveyard in Mercer township connected with Harmony United Presbyterian church.

WILLIAM BARNES, only son of Samuel and Susanna BARNES, was a native of Ireland, and came with his parents to Butler county. He assisted his parents in clearing and improving the old homestead in Mercer township, and after their decease the property came into his possession. He married Jane BLACK, who bore him the following children: Samuel, who died in Slippery Rock township; Jane, who married George McELREE; William, who died unmarried, May 27, 1863; John, and James, both of whom died in Mercer township; Alexander, who died in Mercer county; Thomas, who died July 4, 1875, unmarried, and Robert, who married Margaret CRAIG, and died October 6, 1887. The mother died on July 27, 1832, and the father, July 21, 1841. They were early members of Harmony United Presbyterian church, and were buried in the old graveyard in Mercer township. In politics, Mr. BARNES was an ardent Democrat.

SAMUEL BARNES, eldest son of William and Jane BARNES, was born upon the homestead in Mercer township, Butler county, and resided with his parents until settling upon the farm in Slippery Rock township, where his son Alexander now lives. He cleared and improved this properry [sic], and spent the balance of his life thereon. He married Martha BRADEN, who died in 1844, leaving the following children: William, deceased; Ezekiel, also dead; Eva J., who married James McKEE; Alexander; Phoebe, deceased; James, and Robert, both deceased; Ephraim, a resident of Bradford; Thomas, of Forward township, and Braden, deceased. Mr. BARNES married for his second wife Nancy TANNEHILL, and died about 1880. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. In early life he sup- [p. 1229] ported the Whig party, and afterwards became a Democrat. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church.

ALEXANDER BARNES, son of Samuel and Martha BARNES, was born April 15, 1829, in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, was reared upon the homestead and received a common school education. He worked in various places until the age of twenty-eight, when he purchased the homestead, upon which he has since resided. He married Margaret J. McDERMOTT, a daughter of James McDERMOTT. She died November 29, 1887, having borne him the following children: James C., deceased; Mary, wife of George BELL; Thomas, and Phoebe A., both deceased; Samuel, and Eva. His second wife was Mary DUGAN. Politically, Mr. BARNES is one of the active Democrats in his township, and has filled the office of school director. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church.

JOHN BARNES, son of William and Jane (BLACK) BARNES, was born on the old BARNES homestead, in Mercer township, Butler county, in 1800, received his education in a pioneer subscription school, and was reared amidst the scenes and trials of early days. After reaching manhood he purchased 100 acres of land where his son Hiram now resides. He cleared this farm, erected buildings, and spent the remaining years of his life in making a home for his family. He married Elizabeth SNYDER, a daughter of Philip SNYDER, of Slippery Rock township, to which union were born the following children: Sarah, wife of William McGILL; William, deceased; Philip, a resident of Mercer county; James B.; John H., of Mercer county; Hiram; Jane E., wife of William WILLIAMSON; Thomas, and Eli, both of whom are dead. Mr. BARNES was an ardent Democrat, and filled most of the township offices at different periods. Both he and wife were members of Harmony United Presbyterian church. They died in 1876, and 1884, respectively, and are buried in the Harmony graveyard.

JAMES B. BARNES, son of John and Elizabeth BARNES, was born on August 27, 1836, in Mercer township, received a common school education and was reared a farmer. In 1863 he purchased 100 acres of the old BARNES tract, which had passed out of the hands of the family, and has since erected all of his present improvements. On February 12, 1863, he married Mary J. STEVENSON, a daughter of John STEVENSON, of Franklin township, Butler county. They are the parents of seven children, viz.: John C., deceased; Edward N.; David E., deceased; Catherine E.; Anna A., deceased; Josiah S. and Manthus E. Mr. BARNES has been an elder of Harmony United Presbyterian church for twenty years, and politically, he is a supporter of the Democratic party.

HIRAM BARNES, fifth son of John and Elizabeth BARNES, was born upon his present homestead in 1843, and his entire life has been passed in his native township. On May 27, 1875, he married Harriett J. McCOY, a daughter of Madison McCOY. Politically, he is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of Harmony United Presbyterian church.

JAMES BARNES was born on the old homestead in Mercer township, Butler county, February 7, 1802, son of William and Jane BARNES, and grandson of Samuel and Susanna BARNES. He was reared beneath the parental roof, and subsequently purchased the farm where his son Thomas now resides. Upon this farm [p. 1230] was one of the most extensive coal deposits in this part of the county, and mining was carried on here by the Mercer Mining and Manufacturing Company for twenty years. Mr. BARNES married Sally McCUNE, a daughter of John McCUNE, an early settler of Mercer township. To this marriage were born the following children: John A.; Mary A., wife of Samuel BOVARD; William B., who died October 26, 1858; Nancy, widow of William McTAGGART; Thomas; Martha J., wife of James WILEY; Susanna, deceased wife of James KELLY; James M., who died June 23, 1858; Robert L., of Marion township, and Washington S. Mrs. BARNES died August 18, 1876, and her husband, December 25, the same year. They were members of Bethel United Presbyterian church, and in politics, Mr. BARNES was an active Democrat.

JOHN A. BARNES, eldest son of James and Sally BARNES, was born in Mercer township, Butler county, November 19, 1827, was reared upon the homestead, and received a common school education. After he grew to maturity, he and his father purchased the old BARNES homestead, on a portion of which he erected all the present improvements, and has been engaged in farming thereon since the fall of 1852. Mr. BARNES was married October 21, 1852, to Sarah HOGG, a daughter of Robert HOGG, of Cherry township, and is the father of the following children: Sadie A., deceased; Mary D., wife of Charles SNYDER; Susan, wife of James McDOUGAL; James N. who married Onie PATTISON, and has three children, and Frankie, deceased. Mrs. BARNES died November 12, 1894. Mr. BARNES is an elder in Bethel United Presbyterian church, which office he has held since 1876. Politically, he is a Democrat, has filled the office of school director for twenty-one years, and has also held other township offices.

THOMAS BARNES was born upon the farm where he now resides, in Mercer township, April 24, 1836, third son of James and Sally BARNES. After the death of his father he purchased the farm, and has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He married Sarah J. McCREARY, a daughter of Thomas McCREARY, of Mercer county. Ten children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Lizzie V., wife of William OSIER; Richard, who married Catherine GILMER; Nettie, wife of Hugh MILNER; Nancy, deceased; Alice M.; Lila E.; James O.; Thomas M.; Ruby G., and Flossie A. Mr. BARNES is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of the present school board.

WASHINGTON S. BARNES, youngest son of James and Sally BARNES, was born June 25, 1848, upon the homestead farm in Mercer township. He was reared a farmer, and has always followed that vocation. In April, 1879, he purchased his present farm in Mercer township, upon which he has since resided. He was married December 3, 1878, to Mary J. BLACK, a daughter of R.S. BLACK, of Marion township, and their children are as follows: Hattie S.; Samuel H.; Frank M., and Fannie M. In politics, Mr. BARNES is a Democrat, has filled the office of poor director for a number of years, and has always taken a leading interest in public affairs. He is a member of Harmony United Presbyterian church, and a liberal contributor towards that society.

EBENEZER BROWN, a native of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, came to Mercer township, Butler county in 1797, and took up 600 acres of land. He cleared and improved a farm on this tract, and died in 1832. He married a Miss [p. 1231] PORTER, and their family consisted of the following children: Jane; Alexander; William P.; Samuel; James; Elsie; Ebenezer; Porter, and Joseph, all of whom are dead. Mr. BROWN was a member of the Presbyterian church, and died in that faith. His wife died in 1830.

SAMUEL BROWN, third son of Ebenezer BROWN, was born April 22, 1812, upon the old homestead in Mercer township. He received such an education as the pioneer schools afforded, and learned the tanner's trade. He subsequently established a tannery at Harrisville, which he conducted until 1880. Mr. BROWN married Eliza J., daughter of John WADDELL, of Butler county, and their children were: Mary M., who married Thomas CROSS; John W.; Ermina L., deceased wife of H.M. KERR; Orlando, deceased; Otis P., a resident of Ohio, and Mead S., deceased. In politics, Mr. BROWN was a Democrat, and in religious faith, a Presbyterian. He died June 22, 1888, near Centreville, Butler county.

JOHN SNYDER, SR., was born in Liberty township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1805, a son of Jacob SNYDER, a native of Germany. His father served in the Revolutionary war, and sometime prior to 1800 he settled in Liberty township, Mercer county, where he spent the remaining years of his life. The subject of this sketch was reared on the homestead, and purchased 170 acres of land in Mercer township, Butler county, in 1852, upon which his son John now resides. He married Elizabeth UBER, a daughter of Michael UBER, one of the early settlers of Mercer county, and the following children were born to this marriage: Susan, wife of Eli BEIGHLEY; Mary, wife of Alexander RODGERS; Daniel, deceased; Michael, deceased; Sarah, deceased wife of Robert HANNA; Rebecca, wife of A. WILCOX; Maria, wife of Joseph I. BLAIR; Caroline, wife of William VAN DYKE; Lavina, and George W., both deceased; John, and one that died in early youth. Mr. SNYDER was a stanch Democrat, an active worker in the party, and filled the office of school director in his township. In early life he was a member of the German Reformed church, and after his settlement in Mercer township, there being no church of his faith in that locality, he did not unite with any denomination. His wife died on March 27, 1886, and himself, February 1, 1888.

JOHN SNYDER, youngest son of John and Elizabeth SNYDER, was born in Liberty township, Mercer county, March 16, 1841, and was eleven years old when his parents came to Butler county. He attended the common schools of his district, and grew to maturity upon his present homestead, which he received from his father. In September, 1862, he married Eliza J. BAILEY, a daughter of Robert BAILEY, of Venango county, and they are the parents of six children, three of whom are living, viz.: Lizzie, wife of William BOVARD; Joseph F., and Lawrence. The deceased are William, and two that died in infancy. Mr. SNYDER is a Democrat, but has never had any desire for official position. The family are members of the Presbyterian church, of Harrisville, and Mr. SNYDER is an elder in that society. He is recognized as one of the leading and progressive farmers of the community.

WILLIAM McGARVEY was born in Donegal county, Ireland, July 17, 1800, son of John and Nancy (JACKSON) McGARVEY of the same place. In 1830 the family immigrated to Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, where his father died in [p. 1232] 1851, and his mother several years before. In 1835 he married Margaret SMITH, a daughter of Matthew SMITH, of Fairview township, Butler county, who bore him a family of seven children, viz.: Matthew; Martha, who married J.A. WILSON; Nancy, who married William GIBSON; William; John J.; Robert, and one that died in infancy. In 1850 Mr. McGARVEY removed to Fairview township, purchasing the Matthew SMITH farm of 250 acres. In 1876 he settled in Fairview borough, where he died on March 10, 1885. His wife died on December 19, 1876. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, in which society he filled the office of elder a number of years. He was first a Whig and afterwards a Democrat, and served as supervisor and collector of his township.

JOHN J. McGARVEY was born in Sugar Creek township, Armstrong County, July 17, 1844, son of William and Margaret McGARVEY. He came with his parents to Butler county when about six years old, and was educated in a select school and at Dayton Academy, and taught for several terms. He afterwards engaged in farming, and in August, 1862, enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was mustered in at Camp Curtin, and served in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was honorably discharged from the service on May 26, 1863, and returned to Butler county. In September, 1864, he re-enlisted in Company L, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, joined Sheridan's army in the Shenandoah valley, and served until the close of the war. Returning home he resumed his duties upon the farm, and on October 7, 1869, married Sidney J. CAMPBELL, of Parker township. Eight children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Margaret, wife of Willis H. BROWN; William B.; Samuel N.; Robert; Harry E.; Howard E.; Nancy B., and Mary. Mr. McGARVEY is an elder in the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican. He has served as a school director, overseer of the poor, and auditor, and is one of the enterprising farmers of his township. He is a charter member of Post Number 325, G.A.R., of Grove city.

HON. JAMES KERR was born in Springfield township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, May 18, 1813, son of Samuel KERR, and grandson of James KERR, a native of Ireland. The latter came from Adams county about 1797, and settled in Springfield township, Mercer county. Samuel was a native of Adams county, born in 1791, grew to manhood in Mercer county, whence he came to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, to take charge of Mt. Etna and Hickory furnaces, which position he occupied for several years. He was elected to the state senate while a resident of this county, afterwards removed to New Castle, and was appointed by Governor PORTER superintendent of the canal. He also represented Mercer county in the legislature, and died at Sandy Lake in 1873. He married Mary MOORE, of Mercer county, who bore him a family of eleven children, as follows: James; John; Mrs. Jane McCONNELL; Mrs. Mary A. CLEARY; Mrs. Martha ALEXANDER; Mrs. Sarah POLLOCK; Samuel; Lafayette; Clinton; Mrs. Lucinda BARKER, and Mrs. Caroline BROWN, all of whom are dead except James and Mary A. The subject of this sketch began carrying the mail from Mt. Etna to Franklin when nine years old, and continued to do so until he was thirteen years of age. He then followed various occupations until 1830, in which year he settled at Harrisville, Butler county. From 1837 until 1840 he was a contractor on the [p. 1233] Pennsylvania canal. In the latter year he embarked in merchandising at Harrisville, and conducted that business successfully for nearly forty years. During a large portion of this time he was also extensively engaged in farming, being the owner of twelve farms in the vicinity of Harrisville. In 1847 he built Marion furnace, in Marion township, in partnership with Robert BREADEN, the only iron furnace in Butler county that did not suspend. He was also superintendent of Maple furnace, in Allegheny township, in 1846-47 and '48. He carried on an extensive business of purchasing cattle for the eastern markets during this period, and was one of the most active and energetic business men in the county. Judge KERR was a Democrat until 1854, since which time he has been an adherent of the Republican party. He filled the office of justice of the peace for thirty years, as well as many other local positions in the township and borough. In 1860 he was an elector on the Lincoln and Hamlin ticket, and in 1861 he was elected associate judge of Butler county. In 1868 he was elected to the state senate, and throughout this period wielded a wide influence in the councils of his party. Judge KERR was married in 1838, to Priscilla McMILLAN, who died in 1866, leaving two children, viz.: Mary, widow of J.M. CUBBISON, and Lizzie K., wife of Capt. H.A. AYERS. His second wife was Catherine McCALLAN, of Cherry township. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church since 1842, and few men in the county have a wider acquaintance or are better known than this venerable pioneer. He retired from active business in 1890, and has since devoted his attention to looking after his extensive landed interests.

DANIEL WICK was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, in 1786, and at the age of nine years removed with his parents to Washington county, and located on Ten Mile creek. When eighteen years of age the family removed to Austintown, Trumbull county, Ohio, where Daniel enlisted in the War of 1812, and served as a fifer. At the age of twenty-six he married Elizabeth ARMITAGE, a daughter of Benjamin ARMITAGE, of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and became the father of six children, viz.: Annie K., who married Isaac KIMMELL, of Coitsville, Ohio; Mary J., wife of T.J. HISST, of the same place; Robert K., of Harrisville; Phoebe J., wife of George W. SEATON, of Westmoreland county; Daniel M., and William H. When Mr. WICK was thirty-one years of age, he removed with his family to Coitsville, where he died on June 18, 1863. His wife survived until 1869. They were members of the Presbyterian church, in which society he filled the office of clerk of the church. He was a Democrat until the second election of Jackson, when he became a Whig, and in 1840 a Free Soiler. He followed farming throughout his life, and never took much interest in public affairs.

ROBERT K. WICK, son of Daniel and Elizabeth WICK, was born at Coitsville, Mahoning county, Ohio, October 15, 1818, and received his education at a subscription school, subsequently attending a select school at New Bedford. He received a certificate to teach, and taught for four terms, and afterwards became a salesman in a general store at Poland. He next followed the peddling business for two years, and on July 1, 1838, he located at Harrisville, Butler county, where for twenty years he was engaged in the manufacture and sale of fanning mills. Mr. WICK was married January 1, 1846, to Bulina A. RATHBUN, to which union have been born six children, viz.: Mary, deceased; Elizabeth E., wife of Samuel [p. 1234] BINGHAM; Eugene E.; Clara E., wife of Robert L. BROWN; Eva J., and Margaret G. Mr. WICK has been one of the most extensive farmers and stock-growers in this section of the State, in which he is at present largely engaged. He has purchased at different periods a large amount of land in Harrisville and vicinity, and erected his present residence in 1870. At one time he was the owner of over 4,000 sheep, which he had taken care of by different farmers, and settled the business without the loss of a cent or a lawsuit. He is one of the wealthiest citizens of Butler county. Politically, he is a Republican, has served in the borough council, and has been a member of the school board for several terms. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and superintendent of the Sabbath school.

ROBERT BLACK, an early merchant of Harrisville, was born in Donegal county, Ireland, in October, 1809, there grew to manhood, and in 1834 married Elizabeth McELHANEY, of the same county, a daughter of Robert McELHANEY. The young couple immigrated to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, soon after their marriage, and lived in that city until 1843, when they removed to Harrisville, Butler county. Mr. BLACK embarked in general merchandising, which he carried on successfully until his death, October 20, 1870. His widow lives with her son Robert. In 1845 Mr. BLACK purchased the Harris property, where the postoffice is now located. He was a stanch Democrat, was a member of the school board, and also served in the borough council of Harrisville. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church, to which his widow also belongs. They were the parents of eight children, six of whom survived infancy, as follows: William, deceased; Mary J., wife of Dr. J.H. ELRICK, of Harrisville; Fannie, deceased wife of Rev. J.F. ARMSTRONG, of Mercer county; Robert, merchant and postmaster of Harrisville; John F., and Richard.

ROBERT BLACK, SR., was born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, son of Adam and Polly BLACK, natives of the same county. His parents removed to Washington county in 1803, and the following year located in Springfield township, Mercer county, where his father died in 1816, and his mother in 1841. They were married in 1787, and reared a family of nine children, eight of whom were born before the settlement in Mercer county, the youngest having been born in Mercer county in 1805. The names of their children were as follows: Betsey, who married John CHAMBERS; Henry; Alexander; Joseph; Adam; Robert; Maria, who married Major John HARRIS; Iby, who married Rev. John MUNSON, and Chambers. Robert was reared upon the homestead farm, which he afterwards purchased. He married Sarah COURTNEY, to which marriage were born two children, both of whom died in infancy. His wife died in 1826, and he was again married, to Sarah UBER, to which union were born the following children: Harriet, who married Scott McCREADY, of Lawrence county; Margaret, who married Joseph BURNS, of the same county; Caroline, who became the wife of T.W. MORROW, of Harrisville; Sarah, wife of John FITZGERALD, of Iowa; Sibbie; H. Calvin, and two that died in infancy. Mr. BLACK was a leading member of the Whig party, and served two terms in the legislature. He died at Harrisburg during his second term, in 1848. His wife died upon the homestead in Mercer county, in 1846.

[p. 1235]
H. CALVIN BLACK was born in Springfield township, Mercer county, January 4, 1838, only son of Robert and Sarah BLACK, and grandson of Adam BLACK, the pioneer of the family in Mercer county. He was left an orphan at the age of ten years, and then went to live with his uncle, Alexander BLACK, with whom he made his home until of age. He received a good common school education, and afterwards attended a Commercial College in Pittsburg. Mr. BLACK clerked for a few years in West Virginia, and subsequently in Mercer county, and in 1864 embarked in the mercantile business at Balm, where he carried on business for three years. In 1867 he located at Harrisville, where he clerked for Harris & Morrow, and afterwards became a member of the firm of Morrow & Black. He finally became sole proprietor of the business, later took his two oldest sons into partnership, and carried on under the firm name of Black & Sons until his death, October 27, 1894. In 1861 Mr. BLACK married Adaline PAINTER, a daughter of Philip and Jane PAINTER of Mercer county. Three sons and four daughters blessed this union, named as follows: Robert N.; Austa M., wife of W.C. HAWN, of Fairview; John R.; Harriet N., deceased; Florence E.; Nora M., and Garfield. In 1867 he united with the Presbyterian church of Centre, served as elder in the church at Harrisville until a few years ago, and then transferred his membership to the United Presbyterian church of Harmony. Politically, he was a stanch Republican, and always took an active interest in public affairs. He filled several of the borough offices, and was one of its progressive and public-spirited citizens. His many sterling qualities of mind and heart endeared him to the community at large. He was successful in business, a good citizen, an accommodating neighbor, and a worthy and liberal supporter of the church. Mr. BLACK was an affectionate husband, and a kind and indulgent father.

JAMES C. CURRY, eldest son of Isaac CURRY, was born in Centre township, Butler county, December 23, 1804. His father was a native of Ireland, and settled near Unionville at an early date, where he reared the following children: James C.; Robert; David; Isaac; Barbara; Julia Ann; Nancy, and Elizabeth. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township, and received a good common school education, which he afterwards utilized in teaching school. On February 24, 1825, he married Martha EDGAR, a daughter of John EDGAR, of Franklin township, to which union were born six children, viz.: John E.; Isaiah D., who died in the Union army, at Baltimore, April 15, 1865; Sarah A., wife of Harvey H. SMITH, of Butler county; Angeline, wife of Alexander DUGGINS, of Missouri; Martha A., wife of William GOULD, of this county, and Amanda M., deceased. Mr. CURRY removed to Greenville, Mercer county, some years after his marriage, but returned to Butler county in 1850, and settled at Ralston's mill. He afterwards went to Indiana, and located at Elizabeth, Harrison county, resided there some years and then moved to Missouri, where he died. His wife died at Elizabeth, Indiana. Mr. CURRY served in an Indiana regiment during the Rebellion.

JOHN E. CURRY was born in Franklin township, Butler county, May 18, 1827, eldest child of James C. and Martha CURRY. He learned the chairmaker's and painter's trades, and in the fall of 1850 located at Harrisville. In 1853 he purchased a business property, which was twice burned, being completely [p. 1236] destroyed in March, 1890. He immediately erected his present store building and residence, where he carries on the grocery, confectionery and notion business. On December 31, 1850, he married Maria E. McNAIR, a daughter of Thomas McNAIR, of Butler. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, in which he fills the office of treasurer. In politics, Mr. CURRY is an ardent Democrat, was postmaster of Harrisville for eight years under Pierce and Buchanan, has served in the borough council, and also as treasurer for several years.

REV. DAVID IMBRIE, one of the earliest ministers of the Associate church in Pennsylvania, was a native of Philadelphia, born of Scotch parentage on August 28, 1777. His parents returned to Scotland, and remained there until the termination of the War of Independence, when they again came to this country, and settled at Darlington, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. David was educated at Canonsburg Academy, and was one of nine students who founded the Franklin Literary Society, November 14, 1797. He studied theology with Dr. John ANDERSON, was licensed December 14, 1803, by Chartiers Presbytery, and ordained September 3, 1806. He was pastor of Bethel and Darlington congregations from 1808 until his death, June 13, 1842, on which date he was stricken with apoplexy, soon after his arrival at Bethel church, and died at the home of a member nearby.

REV. DAVID REED IMBRIE, son of Rev. David IMBRIE, was born at Darlington, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1812. He was educated at Darlington Academy, under Dr. George SCOTT, studied theology at Canonsburg, was licensed on July 16, 1839, by the Ohio Presbytery, and was ordained by the Shenango Presbytery, April 26, 1842. He was installed as pastor of New Wilmington, Prospect, and New Castle congregations, but resigned the last mentioned charge in 1847, Mt. Prospect in 1853, and New Wilmington in 1867. In 1870 he removed to Kansas, and served Ottawa congregation until his death, January 29, 1878. Mr. IMBRIE married Nancy R. JOHNSTON, a daughter of John JOHNSTON, of Mercersburg, Franklin county, in June, 1843, and was the father of eight children, as follows: Rev. John J.; Almira J., deceased; Rev. David R.; Melverin M., deceased; Nancy S., wife of Robert CLARK; Alexander M., deceased; Caroline R., wife of John KELSO, and Mary M., deceased. His widow resides with her daughter, Mrs. KELSO, at New Galilee.

REV. JOHN J. IMBRIE was born on June 29, 1844, at New Wilmington, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, was educated at Westminster College, and studied theology at Monmouth. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served in West Virginia under General NEGLEY. He afterwards resumed his studies, and was licensed by the Garnett Presbytery, April 6, 1872, and ordained on November 10, 1875, by Wheeling Presbytery. His first charges were Brownsville and Mt. Pleasant, Monroe county, Ohio. In 1875-76 he had charge of the congregation at Wampum, Lawrence county; in 1876-79 was pastor of the Remington Harbor and Shenango churches, and since 1882 he has had charge of Scotch Hill, Ebenezer and West Unity congregations, these being his present charges. In 1886 Mr. IMBRIE purchased the Robert BLACK property at Harrisville, consisting of sixteen acres, and erected his [p. 1237] present residence the same year. He was married on September 23, 1873, to Maggie A. SHARP, a daughter of James SHARP, of Darlington, Beaver county. Ten children have blessed this union, as follows: Clarence E.; Wilburt D.; Leroy S.; Maggie E.; David R.; John A.; Ocie A.; Bessie R.; Theron D., and James E. Mr. IMBRIE is an adherent of the Republican party, but aside from exercising the elective franchise, takes no active interest in political matters. He devotes his whole attention to the spiritual and material welfare of his congregations, which have been quite prosperous during his pastorate.

DAVID W. HUMPHREY, SR., was born in Worth township, Butler county, September 6, 1843, son of William HUMPHREY. He received a common school education, and was a farmer and carpenter, which business he followed throughout his life. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. William H. JACK, and was mustered into the service at Camp Orr, near Kittanning. The regiment proceeded down the Ohio river with General NEGLEY, and he took part in the following battles: Stone River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap, Reseca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, and Atlanta. Returning to Nashville he was honorably discharged on November 4, 1864, and thence came home and resumed his duties upon the farm. On December 29, 1864, he married Julia A. STUDEBAKER, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth STUDEBAKER, of Worth township, to which union were born two children, viz.: David W. and Mary R., deceased. Mr. HUMPHREY was a member of the Baptist church, and died on July 16, 1871. His widow married Andrew ALLISON, of Worth township, where she is still living.

DAVID W. HUMPHREY, only son of David W. and Julia A. HUMPHREY, was born upon the homestead in Worth township, February 3, 1866, was educated in the public schools, and afterwards spent two terms at Grove City College and one term at the Edinboro State Normal. He then taught school for a period, and subsequently embarked in merchandising at Eau Claire, as junior member of the firm of Gardner & Humphrey. In 1889 he purchased his partner's interest and continued to carry on the business alone until 1893, when he sold out to W. P. JAMISON & Company, and bought the store of S.B. BINGHAM, of Harrisville, where he now carries on merchandising under the firm name of D.W. HUMPHREY & Company. He married Nettie A. PISOR, a daughter of John and Mary J. PISOR, of Worth township, February 9, 1888. Five children have been born to this union, three of whom died in infancy. The remaining two are Paul A., deceased and Ralph. Mr. HUMPHREY is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has filled the office of steward in that society. He is connected with Tent No. 187, K.O.T.M., of Harrisville, and in politics, is an adherent of the Democratic party.

JOSEPH CUMMINS was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1809, was reared in his native county, and there married Eleanor MOORE, a daughter of John MOORE, in 1831. In 1837 they came to Butler county and purchased a farm in Marion township, where Mr. CUMMINS died in December, 1869. His widow resides upon the old homestead. They were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: William A.; Lycurgus R.; Mary J., deceased; Melinda, wife of A.F. [p. 1238] HOLLISTER, of Youngstown, Ohio; John M., deceased; Lysander F.; Joseph; Walter C.; Mary E., wife of Alphonzo FORQUER, of Marion township; Mellville, and James, both deceased; Samuel F., and Elizabeth J., wife of James M. SCOTT, of Butler. Mr. CUMMINS was an elder in the Presbyterian church, and one of the prominent members of that denomination in Butler county. Politically, he was a Republican, served in the legislature in 1843-44, was associate judge of Butler county for two terms, and justice of the peace for eighteen years.

LYCURGUS R. CUMMINS was born in Washington county on September 19, 1834, and was three years old when his parents, Joseph and Eleanor CUMMINS, settled in Marion township. He remained with his father throughout his boyhood days, and subsequently learned the butcher's trade, which he now carries on at Harrisville. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, was mustered in at Camp Orr, near Kittanning, and went down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers with General NEGLEY, where his regiment joined the Army of the Cumberland. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost, Reseca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain and Atlanta, and was mustered out on November 4, 1864, at Nashville, with the rank of Sergeant. Mr. CUMMINS is a charter member of Z.C. QUILLEN Post, No. 246, G.A.R., also of the U.V.L. of Butler. On June 11, 1866, he married Margaret A. TIMBLIN, of Concord township, a daughter of Jonathan TIMBLIN. Eight children have been born to this union, viz.: Joseph A., deceased; Edwin L.; Sadie E.; Frank; Harry; Paul; Nellie G., and Eva M. Mr. CUMMINS is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a stanch Republican, has been delegate to county conventions several times, has served on the school board, and is a member of the K. of H., and the A.O.U.W.

THOMAS HUMPHREY, a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, who came to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, after the Revolution, settled in what is now Worth township, Butler county, in 1798, where he owned 200 acres of land, two cows and one horse, in 1803. He purchased a tract of land from a jobber named IRWIN, adjoining the James McNEES claim, which McNEEs was holding for IRWIN, and cleared a large area. Before leaving Westmoreland county he married Elizabeth COULTER, and died in 1839, leaving a widow and nine children. The widow died in 1848, and the last of the children, Mrs. Margaret RIDDLE, died in 1892. The names of the sons and daughters were as follows: James, who went west in 1830, and died there; William, who died in 1864; Thomas Armstrong, who died in Arkansas, in 1886; Harvey, who died in Missouri, in 1890; Jane, deceased wife of Jacob EMERY; Margaret, deceased wife of John RIDDLE; Elizabeth, deceased wife of George BOOK; Mary, deceased wife of Michael STEINTORF, and Sarah, who married Ebenezer CHRISTY.

WILLIAM HUMPHREY, son of Thomas and Elizabeth HUMPHREY, was born in Westmoreland county, in 1797, came with his parents to Butler county, and was reared upon the homestead in Worth township. He received from his father one-half of the 200-acre tract which he had entered, and upon this land he spent the remaining years of his life. In 1825 he married Elizabeth DUNBAR, to which union were born the following children: Angeline, widow of Alexander [p. 1239] RUTTER, of New Castle; James, who married Ruth STUDEBAKER, and lives in Worth township; Mary, who married David BENNETT; John; William, a resident of Portersville; Washington, who married in Texas and died there; Wilson, who married Annie STUDEBAKER, and Ruth, who married D.P. DAVIS, of Worth township. Mr. HUMPHREY and wife were members of the Presbyterian church and in politics, he was an ardent Democrat.

JOHN HUMPHREY was born in Worth township, Butler county, July 16, 1833, son of William and Elizabeth HUMPHREY, and grandson of Thomas HUMPHREY. He attended the old Rocky Springs school, when his uncle, Thomas HUMPHREY, was teacher, but like other boys of the period was compelled to give more attention to farm work than to school matters. During the winter of 1852-53, he studied surveying under J. Irwin HOGUE, and at the same time commenced to learn the carpenter's trade under Porterfield MARTIN. In the winter of 1853-54 he took charge of the old Rocky Springs school, where he presided for one term, subsequently teaching in the "Eight Square" and the "Centre" schools of Worth township, and the Martin school in Lawrence county. Mr. HUMPHREY worked at the carpenter's trade in connection with agricultural pursuits, the latter being always his favorite vocation. On August 28, 1856, he married Lydia STUDEBAKER, a daughter of Henry, and a grand-daughter of David STUDEBAKER, the first settler of Worth township. Five children were born to this marriage, viz.: Josephine; Lillian R., wife of W.F. GARDINER, of Jacksonville; William H., who married Sadie HAY; Sherman C., who married Clara STUDEBAKER, and Elizabeth, wife of Franklin BOOK. The mother died on January 6, 1879, aged forty two years, and was buried in Zion Baptist cemetery. On October 13, 1892, Mr. HUMPHREY married Mrs. Millie BOOK, of Worth township. Politically, 'Squire HUMPHREY has always been an unswerving Democrat, and in 1865 he was elected a justice of the peace, served two full terms, and then retired from public life. When his brother James was elected to the legislature in 1878, he resigned the office of justice, and the subject of this sketch was chosen to fill the vacancy. In 1882 he was elected for a full term, and re-elected in 1887. In January, 1890, 'Squire HUMPHREY was appointed to fill a vacancy on the board of county commissioners, and in the fall of that year he was elected to the same office, and served until January, 1894. He is one of the leading members of his party, and throughout his official life has retained the confidence of the best people of the community.

MATTHEW McCOLLOUGH, SR., was born near Belfast, Ireland, in 1778, son of James McCOLLOUGH. He acquired a fair education in his native land, and at the age of nineteen immigrated to Pennsylvania and located at Carlisle, where he engaged in teaching. He there learned the stonemasons's trade, which he followed in Cumberland and Butler counties for many years in connection with farming. Soon after settling at Carlisle he married Jane HUNTER, a daughter of William HUNTER, and about 1803, accompanied his father-in-law and family to Butler county. Mr. HUNTER purchased 400 acres of land on and near the site of Prospect, in Franklin township, fifty acres of which he gave to Mr. McCOLLOUGH. On a part of this the present borough of Prospect now stands. A proviso was attached to the gift that if he moved off the land he was not to sell it, but give [p. 1240] it to his two eldest children, which he did in 1818, at the time he removed to Muddy Creek township. Mr. McCOLLOUGH erected a cabin, and began the work of clearing a farm, carrying on his trade in connection therewith. He assisted in the erection of the first jail at Butler, being employed by John NEGLEY, the contractor. In 1818 he purchased 300 acres of land in Muddy Creek township, which now embraces the HYLE farm, and the Robert, William F., and William B. McCOLLOUGH farms. He cleared and improved 100 acres of this tract, and erected the brick house on the farm now occupied by Robert and William B. McCOLLOUGH. Here he remained throughout the balance of his life, dying in 1858. His wife died in 1842, and both are buried in the United Presbyterian graveyard at Prospect. Mr. McCOLLOUGH was a member of Captain MARTIN's company in the War of 1812, and was stationed at Erie. His family consisted of the following children: Mary, deceased wife of David JONES; William, deceased; James, who died in Indiana; Thomas, deceased; Matthew, of Worth township; George W., a resident of New Castle; Robert, and Dinwiddie, both of whom died on the homestead. Mr. McCOLLOUGH was one of the early members of White Oak Springs Covenanter church, but when the United Presbyterian church of Prospect was organized he united with that society, assisted in the erection of a church building, and was connected with it until his death. He was one of the oldest A.Y. Masons in Butler county, having been a member of a lodge in Belfast, Ireland. In politics, he was a life-long Democrat, filled many of the township offices, and took an active interest in public affairs.

MATTHEW McCOLLOUGH, fourth son of Matthew and Jane McCOLLOUGH, was born on the site of Prospect, Butler county, December 15, 1813, received a limited education in the pioneer schools, and was reared upon the home farm. He remained with his parents until 1834, then rented a farm in Franklin township, where he lived for seven years, and subsequently lived on two other rented farms in the same township for nine years. At the end of this time he purchased 117 acres in Worth township, upon which he has resided down to the present, devoting his sole attention to agriculture. Mr. McCOLLOUGH has been twice married; his first wife was Jane WHITE, only child of Andrew Spear and Angelina (FORD) WHITE, pioneers of Franklin township; she died in 1844. Two children were born of this union, viz.: Andrew W., a prominent oil and gas operator of Butler, and Marion F., who was killed at the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, while serving in Company D, Eleventh Pennsylvania Reserve. His second wife was Fanny J. SHANNON, a daughter of David SHANNON, of Connoquenessing township, to which union were born nine children, as follows: Annie, wife of James TEBAY; Jane, deceased wife of James REED; Angelina, wife of Oscar McCLYMONDS; Nannie, wife of S.B. MARTINCOURT; Emma, wife of Archibald MARSHALL; David, and Marion. Mr. McCOLLOUGH is a member of Portersville United Presbyterian church, and a liberal supporter of religious and educational institutions. In politics, he has always been a supporter of the Democratic party, and has filled several of the offices in his township. He is a man of commendable public spirit, and one of the representative pioneers of the community.

CHRISTOPHER WIMER came from Adams county, Pennsylvania, to Butler county, in the year 1798, and located in Worth township, immediately north of [p. 1241] the site of Mechanicsburg. Mr. WIMER married a Miss SNYDER, of Adams county, and reared a family of seven children, viz.: Samuel; John; Peter; Jonathan; William; Isaac, and Rebecca, who married Thomas KELLY, one of the early settlers of the township. The parents resided in this county the balance of their lives, leaving numerous descendants. Mr. WIMER was a Whig, in politics, and a member of the Seceder church.

SAMUEL WIMER, eldest child of Christopher WIMER, was born in Adams county, in 1792, and was six years old when his parents settled in Worth township. Here he grew to manhood enduring the trials and privations of pioneer days, and obtaining such an education as the schools of the period afforded. He later purchased the farm now owned by his son George, and resided upon it down to his death, in 1873. He married Elizabeth HINES, a daughter of Richard HINES, and reared the following children: Samuel, of Worth township; Mary J., deceased wife of James ABINETT; Abner, deceased, and George.

GEORGE WIMER, youngest child of Samuel and Elizabeth WIMER, was born upon his present farm in 1835. Upon his father's death he inherited the old homestead, where his entire life has been passed. He makes his home with his brother Samuel. He owns 210 acres of well improved land, and is quite a successful farmer. In politics, he is a Republican, and an adherent of the United Presbyterian church.

BENEDICT GROSSMAN, a native of Germany, immigrated to York county, Pennsylvania, and there married Betsey STIVERT. When six years old she was captured by Indians and held a prisoner for seven years. In 1797 Mr. GROSSMAN, with his wife and five children, Simon, Benjamin, Jacob, Betsy, wife of Robert BLACK, and Catherine, who subsequently married Jacob KISSINGER, and his son-in-law, Robert BLACK, came to Butler county, and purchased lands in Cherry township. Another daughter, Polly, the wife of Robert McCALLAN, did not come for two years. Mr. GROSSMAN brought with him a small stock of merchandise, which he placed in a log building in Washington township, in charge of Robert BLACK, but soon afterwards removed the goods to his home in Cherry township, and carried on a small store for several years. He was thus one of the pioneer merchants of the county. Mr. GROSSMAN and wife died upon the homestead, and were buried on the Abner McCALLAN farm. Their sons, Simon and Benjamin, served in the War of 1812. Simon settled in Brady township, while Benjamin and Jacob made their homes in Slippery Rock.

SIMON GROSSMAN came with his parents to Butler county, and spent the remaining years of his life in this section of the State. He married a Miss CAROTHERS, and reared the following children: Benjamin, born in 1801, and died in Brady township; Alexander, who died in Missouri; Eliza, deceased wife of Henry BLACK; Hugh C., who died in Brady township; John, who died in Franklin township; Simon and James, both of whom died in Brady; Robert, who died in St. Joseph, Missouri, and Polly, wife of William WEBBER. The parents died in Franklin township, the mother in 1844, and the father in 1849.

HUGH C. GROSSMAN, son of Simon GROSSMAN, was born in Brady township, Butler county, April 3, 1810, was reared a farmer, and always followed that occupation. He married Mary A. MOORE, October 13, 1842, to which union [p. 1242] were born the following children: Elizabeth A., wife of John CARNAHAN, of Kansas; Hugh H., of Worth township; James M., of Cherry township; Sarah C., wife of James DUNN, of Brady; Catherine S., deceased wife of Ezra CHRISTIE; Mary E., wife of Robert FOWSER, of Butler; Ashley W., of Slippery Rock; Dora L., wife of James STOUGHTON, of Clay; Richard B., of Brady; Joseph G., of Worth; Lydia A., wife of Charles HUNT, of Lawrence county, and John S., a resident of Brady township. Mr. GROSSMAN died on January 10, 1891, and his wife, April 12, 1892.

HUGH H. GROSSMAN, son of Hugh C. and Mary A. GROSSMAN, was born in Brady township, May 14, 1845, received a common school education, and was reared a farmer. When twenty years of age he commenced life for himself, working on a farm, subsequently had charge of a portion of the homestead, given him by his father, which he sold, and purchased from John CRAIG his present home of ninety acres, lying northeast of Jacksville, upon which he has resided since 1872. Mr. GROSSMAN was married April 16, 1872, to Rebecca A. WICK, a daughter of Henry E. WICK, of Slippery Rock township. Six children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Araminta F.; Hugh H.; Lewis A.; William S.; Perry G., and Irene, all of whom are living at home. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, Mr. GROSSMAN is a Republican.

JOHN MOORE, SR., was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1761, son of William MOORE, a native of Ireland. After reaching his maturity, he went to Washington county, lived there a short time, and about 1800 came to Butler county and located about two miles south of the present MOORE homestead, which he purchased two years later. He resided upon this farm until his death, in 1851. He married Elizabeth McCLINTOCK, who died in 1840. They were the parents of five children, all of whom are dead, viz.: William; James; Sarah; John, and Mary.

WILLIAM MOORE was born in Chester county, and came with his parents to Butler county, where he was reared and spent the remaining years of his life. He followed farming upon the old homestead, where he died in 1868. He married Mary McCLYMONDS, a daughter of Thomas McCLYMONDS. She died in 1870, the mother of the following children: John, deceased; Thomas; Jane; William, who was killed at Gaines Mill; James, of Worth township; Samuel, who was killed at Petersburg, and Elizabeth, who died in childhood.

THOMAS MOORE was born on his present farm, in Worth township, in 1829, and his entire life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits. After arriving at manhood he bought a farm two miles south of the homestead, which he sold two years later and purchased a place in Slippery Rock township, where he lived from 1856 to 1869. On the death of his father he returned home, and has since resided upon the homestead. Mr. MOORE was married May 18, 1852, to Mary GLENN, a daughter of Robert GLENN, of Worth township, who has borne him the following children: Elizabeth, and Tressa, both of whom died in childhood; William R., who lives on the homestead; James N., a member of the Butler bar; John G., a resident of Butler; Jennie, who died in childhood, and Olive. Mr. MOORE is a stanch Republican, and filled the offices of collector and constable [p. 1243] while living in Slippery Rock township, and has been road commissioner in Worth township. The family are adherents of the United Presbyterian church, and Mr. MOORE is an elder and trustee in that society. He cultivates 165 acres of well improved land, and is one of the leading farmers and stock-growers in his township.

JOHN MOORE was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, eldest son of Samuel MOORE, and came to Brady township, Butler county, with his parents. He grew to manhood in this county, receiving such an education as the schools of the period afforded. In 1829 he purchased the farm in Muddy Creek township now owned by Samuel JONES, upon which he resided until his death, July 19, 1833. Mr. MOORE was married on March 10, 1829, to Anna McCLYMONDS, a daughter of Thomas McCLYMONDS, to which union were born two children, viz.: Jane, who died unmarried, May 13, 1875, and Samuel H., of Worth township. The mother married for her second husband, James MOORE, no connection of her first husband, and died June 1, 1889.

SAMUEL H. MOORE, only son of John and Anna MOORE, was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, November 21, 1829, was reared upon his stepfather´s farm in Worth township, and received a common school education. When he was twenty-three years of age, he settled upon the farm purchased by his father in Muddy Creek township, where he lived until 1866, in which year he bought his present homestead of 100 acres. Here he has erected buildings and made the necessary improvements, and possesses one of the best farms in his locality. Politically, he is a Republican, and has always taken a deep interest in the public schools of the county. All of his children have taught school, and he has served as a school director for many years. In 1880 he was elected a justice of the peace, and re-elected in 1885. On November 23, 1852, Mr. Moore married Katie J. PATTERSON, a daughter of John PATTERSON, and is the father of five children, viz.: Hannah C., wife of J. M. HUNT; Anna J., wife of J. W. PHILLIPS; Martha V., wife of Samuel KILDOO; John M., and Edith. The family are connected with the United Presbyterian church of Harlansburg.


[End of Chapter 74-1 (pgs.1203-1243) - Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 73-3 (pgs.1175-1203) - Biographical Sketches: Zelienople, Harmony and Evans City Boros; Jackson, Forward, Adams, Cranberry, Connoquenessing and Lancaster Twps
Continued Chapter 74-2 (pgs.1243-1281) - Biographical Sketches: Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough
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Updated: 04 Apr 2001, 09:18