History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 74 (Pgs. 1243-1281)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Pat Collins>.


CHAPTER LXXIV

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough

[p. 1243]
SAMUEL CORNELIUS was born in Worth township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1804, and received his education in one of the pioneer subscription schools. He grew to maturity upon his father's farm, and in 1827 he married Margaret, a daughter of Thomas McCLYMONDS, of Muddy Creek township. Eleven children were the fruits of this union, nine of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Col. James E., who died from wounds received in the Rebellion; Samuel M.; Lieut. Isaac W., killed at the battle of Cold Harbor; Mary A., wife of George KENNEDY, of Slippery Rock township; Thomas J., who was killed at the battle of Gaines Mill; John C., who was killed at Fredericksburg; Alexander M.; William M., and Jesse G. Mr. CORNELIUS was a member of the Seceder church, and died in 1868. His widow survived ten years, dying in 1878. Politically, he was in early days a Whig, but upon the formation of the Republican party he joined that organization, and remained faithful to its principles down to his death.

ROBERT BARRON was born in Down county, Ireland, September 19, 1832, son of David and Margaret (GIBSON) BARRON, who were married in Ireland in [p. 1244] 1831. His father was a son of John BARRON, a native of Down county, Ireland, and grandson of John BARRON, Sr., a farmer of the same county. The latter had a family of eight children: Archie; John; William; David; Robert; Margaret; James, and Samuel. The second son, John, was the grandfather of our subject, and died in Down county, aged eighty-five years. His sons William; Robert; John, and David, came to the United States. William, a school teacher, died in West Virginia; Robert, a merchant, died in Ohio, and John, a weaver, worked in Pittsburg ten years, and then returned to Ireland and died there. David, the father of Robert, was a weaver, but followed farming until 1834, in which year he came to the United States, leaving his wife and child in Ireland, and died at Steubenville, Ohio. His widow and child made their home with her parents, James and Susan (HINES) GIBSON. Her maternal grandfather, Richard HINES, came to this country in 1800, with his wife and five children, viz.: Richard; George; Eleanor; Betty, and Jane, leaving behind Alexander and Susan. They afterwards settled in Brady township, Butler county. Alexander later came to this county, and died at the home of his parents. Their children, George, Eleanor, and Jane, also died at home. Richard located on a farm in Brady township, married Betsey BRANDON, and two of his children, Eli and Mrs. Mary GIBSON, reside on the old HINES homestead. The mother of our subject married George DIXON, and remained in Ireland. Robert came to the United States when seventeen years of age, worked for a short time on a railroad at Albany, New York, and then came to the home of his grandmother, Susan GIBSON, of Worth township, Butler county. Here he remained for two years, working on a farm in summer and attending school in winter. He afterwards learned the plasterer's trade, and worked at it until 1872. In 1860 he bought 100 acres of land upon which he now resides, sent for his mother and her husband, and gave them a home during their declining years. He has added to his farm from time to time until he now owns 250 acres, and is one of the leading farmers of the township. Mr. BARRON was married, September 28, 1854, to Mrs. Mary CRAIG, nee SHAFFER, and has five children, viz.: Joseph, who married a daughter of Alexander BLACK, and lives on a apart of the homestead; Mary C., wife of A. V. GROSSMAN, of Brady township; Robert J., who died at the age of seven; Elizabeth J., wife of W. P. MARTIN, of Venango township, and Alvirda, wife of Jacob MILLEMAN, of Harmony. In 1872 Mr. BARRON was elected, on the Republican ticket, to the office of county commissioner, and re-elected in 1875. During this time he purchased the Willard Hotel, conducted it for a short time, and subsequently sold it. For many years he has been prominent in the local councils of his party, and has filled nearly all the township offices. In March, 1885, he served as foreman of the grand jury in the United States district court at Scranton. Mr. BARRON is now vice-president of the Worth Mutual Fire Insurance Company, filled the office of president of the company for two years, and has also served on the board of directors. He was an elder in the Slippery Rock United Presbyterian church for twenty-five years, and for two years has filled the same office in the West Liberty United Presbyterian church.

JOHN CRAIG, a son of John CRAIG, was born in Ireland, in 1782, there grew to manhood and married Nancy HINDS. They reared five children, viz.: George, [p. 1245] who came to Butler county in 1839, and was killed while working on the canal near Sharon, Mercer county; William; James; Sarah, and John. In 1841 Mr. CRAIG and family immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Butler county. He rented the WIGTON farm, celebrated as the home of the WIGTON family murdered by the Indian, MOHAWK, which he cultivated for three years. Later he and his son William bought a farm in Worth township, where Mr. CRAIG died in 1866, aged eighty-four years, and his wife, in 1872, aged ninety years. Their sons, William and James, also died on this farm, while Sarah, who married Samuel GIBSON, is also dead.

JOHN CRAIG, Jr., only living child of John and Nancy CRAIG, was born in Ireland, February 9, 1823, and was about eighteen years of age when the family settled in Butler county. He afterwards rented a farm for two years, and then purchased the H. H. GROSSMAN farm, which he sold in 1873. He went to Virginia, purchased a farm in that State, and lived there for three years, then sold it and returned to Worth township, bought his present homestead, and has since been engaged in farming upon it. Mr. CRAIG was married February 11, 1846, to Esther CLARK, a daughter of James CLARK, of Slippery Rock township. Both he and wife are members of the Baptist church, and in politics, he is a Democrat. His homestead, containing seventy-four acres, is on the line of Lawrence county, the county line dividing it.

DAVID LOCKE was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1839, son of Thomas LOCKE, and grandson of William LOCKE. His father was a native of Lawrence county, married Sarah FOX, and reared a family of five children, viz.: Mary, wife of William McCRACKEN; John; David; William, deceased, and Maria A., wife of David McCRACKEN, of New Castle. Thomas LOCKE died in 1846. When fifteen years old David began life for himself as a common laborer, and afterwards learned the shoemaker's trade, which he worked at for three years in Lawrence county. In 1861 he went to the oil country, and worked from Titusville to the river, drilling oil wells. After about six months he left the oil country, and on August 27, 1861, married Catherine RODGERS, a daughter of Nathaniel and Catherine RODGERS, of Lawrence county. She was born December 3, 1838, and is the mother of the following children: William E., of New Castle; Jennie, deceased; John, also a resident of New Castle; Catherine E., wife of Edward CROCKER; Earnest L.; Sarah D., wife of Harry RODGERS: David F.; Anna C.; Alice T., deceased, and LeRoy N. After his marriage Mr. LOCKE took up his residence in Mercer county, and for three years worked at his trade during the winter months, and for James UBER on a farm in summer. He then moved to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, and worked on a farm for David PORTER. At the expiration of five years he rented a farm from David ARMSTRONG, on which he remained three years. He next rented a farm from Philip FAIR and lived on it two years, after which he moved near Centreville and resided one year, when he bought the place upon which he now resides from William CROCKER. Mr. LOCKE and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

EDWARD CAMPBELL was born in Hickory township, Lawrence county, February 22, 1829, son of Robert CAMPBELL. He received a common school edu- [p. 1246] cation, learned the plasterer's trade, and followed that in connection with farming. In 1849 he married Lavina SMART of Lawrence county, to which union were born eight children, as follows: Robert M.; Joseph G.; William J.; Ammon H.; James E.; Mary E., wife of William KILDOO; Ruth E., wife of Frank BLACK, and Charles L. Mr. CAMPBELL located in Worth township, Butler county, in 1866, upon the old STOUGHTON farm, and there died in 1889, and his wife in 1891. They were members of the Baptist church, and he was connected with Portersville Lodge, I. O. O. F. In politics, he was a stanch Democrat.

JOHN HOCKENBERRY, a native of Perry county, Pennsylvania, came to Butler county about 1803, and settled in Brady township. He resided there for several years, and then removed to Cherry township, where he died. He married Hannah KELLY, and was the father of eight children, viz.: John; Casper; Jonathan; Elizabeth, who married James BUCHANAN; Jane, who married Moses McCANDLESS; Annie, who married and died in Ohio; Ellen, who married William GRAHAM, and Joseph, all of whom are dead.

CASPER HOCKENBERRY, SR., second son of John and Hannah HOCKENBERRY, was born in Perry county, in 1785, came with his parents to Butler county, and about 1810 located on Muddy creek, in Worth township. He purchased 200 acres of land, upon which he spent the remaining years of his life, and died on October 29, 1860. He married Margaret SHAFFER, who bore him the following children: Annie, who married Jonathan WIMER; Joseph, a resident of Butler; Catherine, wife of J. J. BAKER; Hannah, deceased wife of William GALLAGHER; Effie, wife of Joseph FORRESTER; Mahala, wife of Sheplar BOSTON; William, who died recently in Worth township, and Mary, wife of Elijah ROLLS.

JOSEPH HOCKENBERRY, eldest son of Casper and Margaret HOCKENBERRY, was born January 16, 1814. After arriving at maturity he purchased a farm in Worth township, but subsequently removed to Franklin township, and followed agriculture until 1891. He then retired from active business life, and located in Butler, where he is spending his declining years. Mr. HOCKENBERRY has been twice married. His first wife was Eliza KENNEDY, a daughter of David KENNEDY. She died in 1878, leaving six children, viz.: Casper; Euphemia, wife of Jacob SHIELDS; Mary J., wife of J. S. SNYDER; Margaret, who married William BENNET, and after his death John HUNT; Mahala, wife of James CRATTY, and J. PIERCE. His second wife was Mrs. Mary J. LEPLEY, who died in 1883.

CASPER HOCKENBERRY, eldest son of Joseph and Eliza (KENNEDY) HOCKENBERRY, was born on the HOCKENBERRY homestead, in Worth township, November 27, 1835. He obtained a common school education, and was reared a farmer. In 1864 he purchased seventy-five acres in Franklin township, to which he has since added the same amount, and has resided upon this farm up to the present. He is also the owner of 100 acres in Connoquenessing township. In 1891 oil was discovered upon his farm in Franklin township, which now contains ten producing wells, which bring him in a comfortable competence. Mr. HOCKENBERRY is one of the successful farmers of the county, and a man of enterprise and public spirit. In 1864 he married Priscilla BRYAN, a daughter of Robert Steel BRYAN, of Cherry township. Fourteen children have been born to this union, viz.: Wilbert E.; Margaret C., wife of William COOPER; Robert M.; Joseph [p. 1247] M.; Mary E., wife of Lewis DOUBLE; Casper A.; William M.; Amelia; James C.; Ann Eliza; Blanche; David; Milton, and Ernest. Mr. HOCKENBERRY is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of the Baptist church. He is recognized as one of the leading citizens of the community.

WILLIAM HOCKENBERRY, youngest son of Casper and Margaret HOCKENBERRY, was born in Worth township, Butler county, March 30, 1827, and died upon his homestead, December 15, 1893. He was reared to farm life, and received a common school education. When twenty-three years of age, his father having died, William began life for himself, and continued to follow agricultural pursuits until his death. On October 2, 1851, he married Mary FISHER, a daughter of Jacob FISHER, of Worth township, who survives him. Ten children blessed this union, viz.: James N., a resident of Illinois; Nancy, wife of William STECKLE, of Butler; Hampson, of Brady township; Casper J., of New Castle; Lizzie, wife of William SHIELDS, of Worth township; Clara, wife of Benjamin LILLIE, of Coraopolis; Iva J., wife of John LEMMON, of Jackson township; Marion F., who resides on the homestead, and Nettie R., wife of Edward JOHNSON, of Connoquenessing township. Mr. HOCKENBERRY was a member of the Baptist church, and in politics, a Democrat.

JOHN THOMPSON, Sr., a native of Antrim county, Ireland, immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1795, and in April, 1799, removed from Chartiers creek, Allegheny county, to what is now Brady township, Butler county. He was married in Ireland to Martha HUMES, who became the mother of six sons and five daughters, as follows: William H.; John H.; Robert W.; Thomas C.; Humes, and James. The daughters were, Jane, who married James ALLSWORTH; Elizabeth, who married Nathan F. McCANDLESS; Margaret, who married James W. TURK; Martha, who married John S. McCANDLESS, whose father was the first sheriff of Butler county, and Mary, who became the wife of William COOPER. The sons were very large men, and were noted for their great physical strength. Mr. THOMPSON owned 1,000 acres of land, was one of the leading pioneers of the county, and died in 1846, aged ninety-six years. His wife survived him many years, and died on March 6, 1861. Both were pioneer members of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church.

WILLIAM H. THOMPSON was born in Allegheny county, December 1, 1796, eldest son of John and Martha THOMPSON. He came to Butler county with his parents, was reared on the old homestead in Brady township, and spent his entire life on the farm. He stood six feet five inches in height, and was recognized as the strongest man in the county. He married Jane McCANDLESS, a daughter of John McCANDLESS, and reared three children, viz.: John M., of Butler; William G., of Marion, Iowa, and Solomon R., of Brady township. Mr. THOMPSON was a Republican, in politics, and both he and wife were members of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church. He died August 19, 1867, and his wife the following year, in the seventy-second year of her age.

JOHN H. THOMPSON, second son of John and Martha THOMPSON, was born on Chartiers creek, Allegheny county, December 1, 1798, and removed with his parents to Butler county the following April, where he was reared and educated. He married Jane C. McCANDLESS, a daughter of William McCANDLESS, a [p. 1248] pioneer of Centre township, and settled on a part of the land purchased by his father. They became the parents of seven children, as follows: Martha A., deceased, who first married James W. COULTER, and for her second husband, David STAPLETON; Nancy J., wife of S. W. PINGREY, of Durango, Colorado; Jemima, wife of Lewis WIGTON, of California; Josiah M., of Brady township; Mary E., who first married William LYTLE, and is now the wife of Rev. William LODGE, of Iowa City, Iowa; Keziah H., wife of Addison MILLER, of Butler, and E. Julia, deceased wife of T. H. LYON. Mr. THOMPSON and wife were members of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church, and in politics, he was a Republican. He died December 21, 1860. His widow resides with her son, Josiah M., at the ripe age of eighty-nine years.

ROBERT W. THOMPSON, third son of John and Martha THOMPSON, was born upon his father's farm in Brady township, Butler county, in 1803. He grew to manhood inured to the trials and hardships of pioneer life, and inherited the homestead from his parents. He married Frances CRAIG, to which union were born five children, viz.: Nelson H., who resides upon the old homestead in Brady township; Martha B., wife of Benjamin SCOTT, of Venango county; Jennie F.; Maggie R., wife of Frank P. CRITCHLOW, of Prospect, and Robert C. The parents spent their whole lives in Brady township.

SOLOMON R. THOMPSON, youngest son of William H. and Jane THOMPSON, was born on his grandfather's homestead, in Brady township, March 17, 1831. He was reared on the farm, and attended the common schools of his neighborhood. After the death of his father he inherited the old THOMPSON homestead, where he has spent his life engaged in farming. He married Martha McCANDLESS, a daughter of Nathan McCANDLESS, to which union have been born eight children, viz.: Nathan, of Smethport; William G., deceased; Edna; Edwin C.; Mary E.; Anna Loretta; William H., and Charles W. Mr. THOMPSON has been a life-long member of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church, and since the organization of the Republican party he has given it an unswerving support.

EDWIN C. THOMPSON, physician and surgeon, son of Solomon R. and Martha (MCCANDLESS) THOMPSON, was born July 14, 1861, in Brady township, Butler county. He was educated in the common schools, and at West Sunbury Academy and Grove City College. He read medicine with Dr. A. A. KELTY, of Rose Point, Lawrence county, attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and subsequently spent two years in the medical department of the Western Reserve College, Cleveland, Ohio, graduating from the latter institution, February 28, 1885. His certificate of graduation was endorsed by the Medico Chirurgical College, January 13, 1892. In March, 1885, he commenced practice at West Liberty, Butler county, where for the past ten years he has continued in the active duties of his profession. He is a member of the Butler County Medical Society, and keeps well abreast of the improvements in medical science. Dr. THOMPSON is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a Republican, but takes no active interest in public affairs. He was married March 31, 1885, to Berdena STAPLETON, a daughter of David STAPLETON, of Iowa City, Iowa, and is the father of two daughters, Franc, deceased, and Mary.

[p. 1249]
CONRAD SNYDER, SR., was born in Switzerland in 1735, there married, and fled with his wife from his native land to the Netherlands to escape conscription into the French army. On reaching his destination he learned for the first time of America, and decided to come to this country. He sold his time for transportation for himself and wife, and it is believed that he served seven years in one of the eastern counties of this State to pay for his passage. He removed from Philadelphia county to Bedford county, thence to Westmoreland, and in 1800 accompanied his son Conrad and family to Butler county. They settled in Brady township, where he died on March 10, 1827, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. His wife, Nancy, died July 16, 1803, and both are buried in the graveyard on the SNYDER farm. They reared three children, viz.: Catherine, who married Frederick DUBBS; Nancy, who married Daniel CARTER, and Conrad.

CONRAD SNYDER, JR., son of Conrad and Nancy SNYDER, was born in Philadelphia county, Pennsylvania, in 1777, and came with his parents to Butler county when about twenty-three years of age. He purchased 400 acres of land, now known as the WATSON farm, but subsequently sold one-half of this tract, and gave the remaining half to his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth DOUBLE. After residing here some years he purchased 200 acres in Brady township, where his son Conrad now lives, and here he spent the remaining years of his life. He was the most extensive farmer and stock-breeder in this section of the country, and a few years before his death owned 3,000 acres, situated in Brady, Franklin, and Slippery Rock townships. He gave to each of his children 200 acres of land, and at his death the remainder was sold and the proceeds divided among his children. Mr. SNYDER was quite a celebrated hunter, and during pioneer days made considerable money in this way, which he carefully invested in stock and lands. He was a self educated man, and could read and write both English and German fluently. In politics, he was first a Whig and afterwards a Republican, but would never accept any public office. He was one of the pioneer members of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church. Mr. SNYDER married Ann M. BRYAN, a daughter of Seth BRYAN, of Westmoreland county. Nine children blessed this union, named as follows: John, who married Elizabeth RALSTON, and lived and died in Brady township; Elizabeth, deceased wife of Seth DOUBLE; Mary, deceased wife of Thomas STRAIN; Nancy, deceased wife of Isaac DOUBLE; Zephaniah, who married Rachel KENNEDY, and died in Brady township; Prudence, deceased wife of John WEBB; Effie J., widow of Humes THOMPSON; Conrad, of Brady township, and Catherine, widow of John CROLL. Mr. SNYDER died February 27, 1866, and his wife, January 2, 1869, in the eighty-eighth year of her age.

CONRAD SNYDER, youngest son of Conrad and Ann. M. SNYDER, was born upon his present farm in Brady township, November 2, 1822. He received such an education as the common schools afforded, and grew to manhood beneath the parental roof, assisting his parents in carrying on the farm, which his father gave to him a few years before his death. He retired from active business life in 1893, and the farm in now managed by his son, Everett C. He married Nancy McCANDLESS, a daughter of James McCANDLESS, of Franklin township. She was born January 6, 1826, and died November 28, 1863. Mrs. SNYDER was the [p. 1250] mother of the following children: Lavina, wife of Lyman P. HILLIARD; Elva T., who married Sarah McCALL; Emeline S., wife of John ALLEN; Alfred H., who married Ann CAMPBELL; Alvin C., who married Laura McNEES; Mary A., wife of Josiah P. McCALL; Everett C., who married Edith ABERNATHY, and Nancy J., deceased. Politically, Mr. SNYDER is a Republican, but like his father would never accept office of any kind. He has been a life-long member of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church, and is one of the leading citizens of the community.

ZEPHANIAH SNYDER, son of Conrad and Ann M. SNYDER, and grandson of Conrad SNYDER, Sr., was born upon the old homestead in Brady township, Butler county, January 17, 1813, and grew to manhood amidst the scenes of pioneer days. He settled on 200 acres of land where John GROSSMAN now lives, in Brady township, and here he resided down to this death, June 12, 1887. He married Rachel KENNEDY, a daughter of John KENNEDY, of Franklin township, who resides with her daughter, Mrs. John McNEES. Nine children were the fruits of this union, viz.: Louisa, who died in 1892; Joseph C.; Mary E., wife of John McNEES; Eleanor J., widow of Nicholas IFFT; Effie, wife of Robert ALLEN; Harvey N., of Kittanning; Rachel E., wife of W. B. CURRY; Seth, and Lorenzo B. Mr. SNYDER was a Republican, and took quite an active interest in local political matters. He was a member of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church.

JOSEPH C. SNYDER, eldest son of Zephaniah and Rachel SNYDER, was born November 24, 1837, upon the homestead farm. He received a common school education, and at the age of twenty-one engaged in merchandising, which business he followed for a few years at West Liberty. He then purchased his present farm of 141 acres, to the cultivation and improvement of which he has since devoted his attention. In 1859 he married Mary J. HOCKENBERRY, a daughter of Joseph HOCKENBERRY, who has borne him a family of eight children, viz.: Rachel A., wife of Oscar BOOZEL; Joseph A., of Butler; Mary F., deceased; Armada, wife of Milo V. GOLD; Hosea Z.; David L.; Robert K., and Clara M. Mr. SNYDER is a stanch Republican, was elected justice of the peace in 1876, and served five years. He has also filled the office of school director, and has been quite active in the local councils of his party. He is a member of Muddy Creek Presbyterian church, in which society he has served as trustee. He is recognized as one of the enterprising and public-spirited citizens of his township, and gives his support to every worthy project.

ROBERT GLENN was a son of John GLENN, a native of Ireland, who settled in Centre county. His father was twice married, and on his second marriage he purchased land in Kentucky for the children of his first wife, and the GLENNS of that State are his descendants. Robert was a son of the second marriage, and was born in Centre county about 1773. He came to Mercer county about 1808, purchased 200 acres of land in Pine township, and 175 acres in Butler county, but did not settle upon either. The same year he bought of John HOCKENBERRY and William ELLIOTT 300 acres of land where his grandson, John A. GLENN, now resides, in Worth township, upon which he settled in 1810. He built the stone house still standing, where he died in 1833. He is buried in the United Presbyterian graveyard of Worth township. Mr. GLENN married Martha BORLAND, of Centre county, who bore him a family of eight children, viz.: John, who served [p. 1251] in the War of 1812, and died on the homestead; Mary, deceased wife of John GILFILLAN; Andrew; Catherine, deceased wife of James HUMPHREY; Robert, who died in Worth township; Margaret, deceased wife of John CHRISTIE; William, who died in Beaver county, and Archibald who died in Muddy Creek township.

ANDREW GLENN, son of Robert and Martha GLENN, was born in Centre county, and came with his parents to this county in childhood. He was reared upon the homestead farm, and learned the blacksmith's trade with John EMERY, whom his father had established in business on the GLENN farm. About 1824 he settled on a portion of the homestead, in Brady township, where his son Robert F. now lives. He erected a blacksmith's shop and carried on that business until 1833, in connection with farming. He returned to the old homestead after his father's death, then purchased the property, and resided there the balance of his life. He died in 1869. In politics, he was a Republican, and in religion, was an adherent of the Seceder church, in which society he filled the office of elder. Mr. GLENN married Ann EAKIN, a daughter of Robert EAKIN, of Lawrence county. She died in 1844, the mother of the following children: Robert F.; Alexander, and Martha J., both deceased; Aaron, of Iowa; Polly, deceased; Martha J., widow of Ezekiel WILSON; Wilhelmina, wife of Presley GILL; John A., and Margaret, deceased. His second wife of Mary MAXWELL, who bore one daughter, Annie E., wife of Benjamin THOMPSON.

ROBERT F. GLENN, eldest son of Andrew and Ann GLENN, was born September 21, 1820, upon the old homestead farm. He assisted his parents in the farm duties during boyhood days, and attended the district school of his neighborhood. In 1842 he settled upon his present farm, the site of his father's first settlement, and here he has resided for more than fifty years, following the peaceful avocation of a farmer's life. He owns 200 acres of well improved land, and is a prosperous and well-to-do citizen. In 1842 he married Sarah MOORE, a daughter of Samuel MOORE, one of the pioneers of Brady township, and has two children, Margaret, and Samuel C., the latter of whom carries on the farm for his father. Mr. GLENN was a member of the first Republican organization in the county, and has always supported that party. Originally a member of the Seceder church, he later united with the Centreville United Presbyterian society, in which he fills the office of trustee.

JOHN WICK, a native of New Jersey, came to Armstrong county in 1796, and early in the present century removed to what is now Brady township, Butler county. He married a Miss FERGUSON, and their children were as follows: James; John; Elisha; William; Jeremiah; Margaret; Sarah; Jemima; Elizabeth, and Jane. The parents spent the balance of their lives in this county. The second son, John, was born in 1795, and came with his parents to Butler county, where he grew to manhood. He married Mary WIGTON, a daughter of John WIGTON, and was the father of the following children: Henry E.; Perry; Mary J.; Harvey; Sarah; Alfred, and Lewis. The family lived in Slippery Rock and Brady townships, and the parents spent their lives in that part of the county.

HENRY E. WICK was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, August 22, 1825, eldest child of John and Mary WICK. He grew to manhood upon the homestead farm, and then commenced buying and shipping horses. [p. 1252] He afterwards followed merchandising and the lumber business over forty-five years, a portion of the time at WICK station, which was named for him and where he was the first postmaster. Mr. WICK married Elizabeth SMITH, a daughter of Daniel SMITH, a Scotchman, an early settler of Brady township. Thirteen children were the fruits of this union, as follows: John S.; Mary J.; Rebecca A.; Lewis C.; Sarah M., deceased; Elizabeth Z.; Alfred H.; Perry C.; Rosalia A.; William S.; Walter S., deceased; Florence A., and Amy F. Mr. WICK has been a Republican since the organization of the party, and was a delegate from Butler county to the first Republican convention at Pittsburg, in 1855. In 1887 he located at Oil City, but is now a resident of Butler.

JAMES P. MCQUISTION was born in Brady township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1844, received a common school education and was reared a farmer. After arriving at manhood he embarked in stock-dealing and merchandising at Centreville. Soon after the war commenced he enlisted in the three months' service, and when his term expired he re-enlisted in the artillery and served three years. He was honorably discharged when his term had expired, and then returned to his home in Butler county. In 1865 he married Eleanor, a daughter of William HUNTER, of Pittsburg, to which union were born six children, as follows: Charles F. L.; Clare E.; Emma V.; Orville, deceased; Frank E., and Rolla H. Mr. McQUISTION was a member of BINGHAM Post, G. A. R., of Centreville, and resided in that locality down to his death. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church, a trustee in that denomination, and also a Sabbath school teacher. Politically, he was a Republican, and filled the offices of justice of the peace and school director.

JOSEPH DONAGHY was born in Antrim county, Ireland, December 27, 1805, a son of Thomas and Catherine (GORDON) DONAGHY. He learned the carpenter's trade in his native land, and in 1830 immigrated to St. Johns, New Brunswick, where he found employment until 1832. In the latter year he removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he continued to work at his trade, and later engaged in the grocery business until 1840. He then located at Centreville, Butler county, and embarked in merchandising. In 1844 he purchased 175 acres of land in Brady township, and here he devoted the remaining years of his life to agriculture. He married, in Ireland, Nancy MURRAY, March 23, 1827. She was a daughter of George MURRAY, of Antrim county, Ireland, and bore him the following children: Thomas; Jane M., wife of James HALL; George, who died in infancy; George W., of Pittsburg; Mary A., wife of J. C. GILL; Martha M., wife of William GILL; Lucinda G.; Amanda M.; Nancy, and Emma F., the last four of whom are dead, and James H. Mr. DONAGHY was a stanch Democrat, and served as burgess of Centreville. He was one of the original members of the Centreville United Presbyterian church, and died January 17, 1863. His widow resides with her son, James H., upon the old homestead, where she has lived for more than a half a century.

JAMES H. DONAGHY, youngest son of Joseph and Nancy DONAGHY, was born upon the farm where he now resides, June 4, 1848. He was educated in the common schools and at DUFF's Commercial College, of Pittsburg, and has [p. 1253] devoted his entire attention to agriculture. He is one of the leading Democrats of his township, as well as one of its progressive and enterprising citizens.

SAMUEL RIDDLE, SR., came from Chester county, Pennsylvania, about 1800, and settled in Butler township, Butler county, close to what is now the limits of the borough of Butler. He subsequently purchased a farm in Franklin township, upon which James CRATTY resides. It contained 100 acres, upon which he erected a log house and began the work of making a home for himself and family. He prospered in his efforts, and afterwards purchased the two farms where his grandsons, James and Samuel RIDDLE, now live, but died upon his original purchase, at the remarkable age of ninety-six years. Mr. RIDDLE married Hannah HARVEY, and by this union became the father of the following children: Martha, who married Dr. Andrew SPEAR; James; Matilda, who married Jacob BRINKER; Eliza, who married Norbert FOLTZ; John; Samuel, and Julia, who married James HARVEY.

JAMES RIDDLE, eldest son of Samuel RIDDLE, was born in 1796, in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and was about four years old, when his parents settled in Butler county. He was reared upon the homestead in Franklin township, and afterwards located upon the farm now owned by his son Samuel, which he cleared and improved. He died there in 1870, aged seventy-four years. He married Sarah POTTS, a native of Ireland, who died in 1837, leaving a family of seven children, viz.: William; Samuel; John, deceased; James; George, who died in Tennessee; Alfred, a resident of Missouri, and Abner J., who lives in Kentucky. Mr. RIDDLE married for his second wife Eliza POTTS, a sister of his first wife, who bore him the following children: Francis S.; Sarah, deceased wife of Joseph SPONSLER; Anna E., wife of John McCLURE; Theodore, and Nelson, who died from wounds received at Chancellorsville. Mr. RIDDLE was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Prospect, and in politics, he was an adherent of the Democratic party.

SAMUEL RIDDLE, second in the family of James and Sarah RIDDLE, was born May 22, 1825, upon the farm where his brother James resides, in Franklin township, Butler county. He received a common school education, and was reared a farmer. In 1850 he went to California, where he worked in the mines for two years, then returned to Butler county, and embarked in merchandising and hotel keeping at Prospect, in partnership with Jacob PHIPPS, under the firm name of PHIPPS & RIDDLE, which existed for two years. He next located at Wesleyville, Venango county, where he conducted a store and hotel for one year. Returning to Prospect, he was interested in various enterprises until 1859, when he again went to California, but remained on the Pacific coast only a short time. He then established a confectionery business at Prospect, which he carried on for several years. In 1867 he was elected a justice of the peace, and served in that capacity for twenty-six years, removing to his farm in Franklin township in April, 1893. Mr. RIDDLE was married in 1853, to Elizabeth ALLEN, a native of Ireland, and their family are as follows: James; Margaret, deceased; Victor E.; Letitia, deceased wife of George COWAN; Alvin, and Annie, widow of George COWAN. While a resident of Prospect, Mr. RIDDLE was one of the progressive citizens of the borough, and filled many of the public offices. He has [p. 1254] been a life-long Democrat, and is an ardent supporter of the measures and principles of that party.

THOMAS CRITCHLOW was born in Connoquenessing township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, October 5, 1812, son of John and Sophia (GRAY) CRITCHLOW, early settlers of this county. His father enlisted in the War of 1812, and died at Black Rock, on the Niagara river. From an old diary of Thomas CRITCHLOW's, it is learned that he was at Bald Ridge, in Connoquenessing township, at the age of sixteen, working upon a farm, believed to have been purchased by his father. He possessed a good education, and engaged in teaching in that locality. In 1844 he embarked in merchandising at Petersville, erected a store building there, and carried on business until 1859, when he removed to Prospect. He erected a store building in the borough, on the site of S. S. FORRESTER's store, where he conducted business two days a week, Fridays and Saturdays, until 1883, when he retired, transferring his business to his sons, F. P. and T. J. In 1862 he purchased the original fair grounds at Prospect, which he owned for several years, as well as considerable real estate in and around that borough. Politically, he was an ardent Democrat, and served as school director, always taking an active interest in educational matters. Mr. CRITCHLOW married Eliza DODDS, a daughter of James DODDS, which union was blessed with four children, viz.: Frank P.; George W., a minister; Thomas J., and Dillie, wife of O. M. RUSSELL. Mr. CRITCHLOW died December 28, 1889, and his wife, July 27, 1891.

FRANK P. CRITCHLOW, eldest son of Thomas and Eliza CRITCHLOW, was born at Petersville, Butler county, December 4, 1825. He received his primary education in the common schools and subsequently attended Waynesburg College. He taught in the schools of Franklin, Washington, Muddy Creek and Clay townships, for some years, and afterwards engaged in the huckster business. He next entered the employ of Thomas WILSON, of Centreville, as clerk, and in 1883 formed a partnership with his brother, Thomas J., and succeeded to their father's business at Prospect, which they have successfully carried on. Mr. CRITCHLOW was married February 28, 1888, to Maggie R. THOMPSON, to which union have been born four children, viz.: Howard T.; T. Roscoe; Robert F., and Alice. Politically, he was a Democrat until within a few years, when he became a Prohibitionist, and was the candidate of that party for the legislature in 1887. He has filled the office of school director for nine years, and is also a member of the borough council of Prospect. Mr. CRITCHLOW is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church of Prospect, and is an elder in that society. He is connected with the Jr. O. U. A. M., and the A. O. U. W.

REV. GEORGE W. CRITCHLOW, second son of Thomas CRITCHLOW, was born in Petersville, Butler county, received a good education and afterwards studied for the Lutheran ministry. He is now located at Sagerstown, Crawford county, where he has charge of the Lutheran congregation. He married Felecia NESBIT, and they are the parents of five children.

JAMES CRATTY came to Muddy Creek township, Butler county, from the vicinity of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, early in the present century, and settled upon the land now owned by Joshua McCANDLESS. He was accompanied to this county by his brothers, Robert and Thomas, and sister Rachel. His [p. 1255] brothers each selected a tract of 400 acres, upon which they settled. James was twice married, his first wife being Mary JOHNSTON, a daughter of Bernard JOHNSTON, to whom were born two children, viz.: Sarah, deceased wife of Joseph WHITE, and Mary, wife of James McDONALD. His second wife was Jane ENGLISH, who became the mother of the following children: Thomas; Jane, deceased wife of David DUNMIRE; Margaret, deceased wife of Robert MORRISON; Elizabeth, wife of James MORRISON; Rachel; Anne, deceased wife of Nelson MYERS; Matilda, deceased wife of William PHILLIPS; James, deceased; Prudence, deceased wife of Alexander WILSON; Catherine, wife of Conrad SHANOR; Samuel; William; Robert, and John, the last four of whom are dead. Mr. CRATTY was a member of Mt. Nebo Presbyterian church. He was one of the early assessors and collectors of the township, was a Democrat in early life, and later a Republican. He served in the War of 1812, as a member of Captain MARTIN's company.

THOMAS CRATTY, oldest son of James and Jane (ENGLISH) CRATTY, was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, December 19, 1811, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm. At the age of twenty-eight he settled upon the farm where he now resides, in Franklin township, and has since cleared and improved the same. In 1839 he married Sarah MORRISON, a daughter of John MORRISON, and is the father of three children, as follows: James A.; Mary, deceased, and John M. The last mentioned married Hannah J. McCANDLESS, and has four children. He cultivates the old homestead, upon which his father has lived for fifty-five years. Politically, Mr. CRATTY has always been a Democrat, and in religious faith, he is a member of Mt. Nebo Presbyterian church. He is one of the oldest citizens of Butler county, being now in his eighty-fourth year.

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL was born in Parker township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1813, and was reared upon his father's farm. In 1837 he purchased a farm in Concord township, and April 11, 1839, he married Eliza J., daughter of Thompson JAMISON, of that township. Three children were born to this union, as follows: Joseph C., who enlisted in Company E, Thirty-first Ohio Volunteers, in August, 1861, participated in twenty-two battles and was killed at the battle of Chickamauga; William T., and Andrew G. In 1873 he bought property in Mount Chestnut, where he resided until his death, November 13, 1877. His widow survived until December 3, 1883. They were members of the United Presbyterian church, and died in that faith. Mr. CAMPBELL was a Whig during the existence of that party, and afterwards a Republican.

ADAM ALBERT came from Virginia to Butler county, Pennsylvania, about 1799, and located on a tract of 500 acres of land in Franklin township. He resided upon that farm until he died, clearing and improving it. He was the father of twelve children, as follows: Daniel; Adam; George; William; Henry; John; Peter; Andrew; Elizabeth, who married Charles HENSHEW; Margaret, who married James MILLER; Mary, who married Thomas DUNN, and Nancy, who became the wife of David PEARCE. Mr. ALBERT was a member of the Lutheran church, and was one of the pioneers of that denomination in Butler county.

ANDREW ALBERT was born in Franklin township, September 12, 1824, son of Adam ALBERT, and grew to manhood in his native township. In January, 1846, he married Maria BAKER, a daughter of Cadwallader BAKER, and they were [p. 1256] the parents of the following children: William W.; Matilda J., deceased wife of John STEWART; Emma, who married Andrew J. AVERY; Uriah, deceased; Levi; Mary E., wife of John ROBINSON; Warren; Alfred, deceased, and Cora B., who married R. O. QUIGLEY. Mr. ALBERT and wife were members of the Lutheran church, in which faith he died, June 3, 1890. He was a Republican, and filled several of the township offices.

WILLIAM WEIGLE was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1812, there learned the carpenter's trade, and subsequently removed to Lawrence county, where he married Sarah HOGUE, in 1830. They were the parents of nine children, as follows: Abraham; Samuel; Jeannette, wife of William McGINNIS; John; James, deceased; William; Charles; Daniel, and Cyrus. The family removed to Butler county and settled in Franklin township, where Mr. WEIGLE died in 1880, and his wife in 1882. They were members of the Baptist church, and in politics, he was an adherent of the Republican party.

SAMUEL WEIGLE was born at Weigletown, Lawrence county, in June, 1833, learned the blacksmith's trade, and came to Butler county with his parents. In 1854 he married Barbara ALBERT, a daughter of George ALBERT, of Franklin township, and has five surviving children, viz.: George P.; John M.; Raymond S.; William G., and Charles E. Mr. WEIGLE is engaged in business at Prospect, where he has carried on blacksmithing for many years. He is a member of the Baptist church, and in politics, a Republican.

SIPE BELLIS was born in Harmony, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1821, received a common school education and learned the blacksmith's trade. From Harmony he went to Portersville, thence to Muddy Creek, Worth and Franklin townships, consecutively, coming to the last mentioned in 1861. Here he purchased the C. SHANNON farm, upon which he now resides. Mr. BELLIS was married in 1845, to Mary, daughter of John MYERS, of Yellow Creek, which union has been blessed with nine children: John C., deceased; George C.; Lewis; Catherine, deceased; William; Samuel; Charles; Mary, wife of Benjamin McLAUGHLIN of Titusville, and Ollie, deceased. In politics, he is a Democrat, has filled the office of school director, and is a trustee in the Presbyterian church.

HENRY SHANOR, SR., was born in Maryland, in 1758, removed to Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, after reaching his maturity, and about 1798 settled in Butler county, purchasing 200 acres of land where George FLINNER and William BARKLEY now live, in Muddy Creek township. Upon this farm he built his cabin and resided until his death, in 1838. He married Elizabeth BUTTONBARGER, a native of Westmoreland county, who survived him four years, and died in 1842. They were members of the Lutheran church, and were interred in the old Stone Church graveyard, in Lancaster township. Their family were as follows: Henry; Daniel; Elizabeth, who married Thomas JOHNSON; Susan; Abraham; Michael; Solomon; Christina; Margaret, who married Abraham ZERLEY, and Lydia, who married Jacob MOYER.

HENRY SHANOR, JR., eldest son of Henry and Elizabeth SHANOR, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1788, and was about ten years of age when his parents came to Butler county. He grew to manhood in Muddy Creek township, married Susan BEIGHLEY, a daughter of John BEIGHLEY, and settled upon [p. 1257] his father-in-law's farm. In 1817 he located upon the farm where his son Jonathan J. now resides, which was purchased after his death, in 1827, by his father-in-law, who deeded it to Mrs. SHANOR. His family were as follows: Jonathan J.; Abraham, deceased; John C.; Mary R., who married William McDONALD; Catherine, deceased wife of Andrew KALTENBACH; Henry J., and Absalom. His widow married James BLACK, and died in 1887. Mr. SHANOR was one of the pioneer members of St. John's Lutheran church, and was a deacon in that society at the time of his death.

JONATHAN J. SHANOR, eldest in the family of Henry and Susan (BEIGHLEY) SHANOR, was born in Connoquenessing township, upon the farm of his grandfather, John BEIGHLEY, in 1812. When five years old his father removed to the farm where our subject now lives, and he has spent seventy-seven years of his life upon this place, the great portion of which time he was engaged in farming. He cultivated 200 acres until within a few years, when he sold one-half of his property. In 1838 he married Ann McDONALD, a daughter of William McDONALD, to which union were born the following children: Susannah, wife of John DODDS; William, deceased; Reuben; William McD., of Iowa; Conrad, who enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died at Georgetown, D.C., from wounds received at the battle of Fredericksburg; Samantha, widow of S. McALLISTER; Angelina, deceased; Maggie, wife of Warren MYERS, and two that died in infancy. Mr. SHANOR and wife are members of the Lutheran church, of Prospect, in which he has held the offices of deacon and elder. In early life he was a Democrat, but has been a Republican since 1856. He has filled the offices of school director, and many other minor positions.

DANIEL SHANOR, SR., second son of Henry and Elizabeth (BUTTONBARGER) SHANOR, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, about 1791, and came with his parents to Butler county in 1798. He was reared upon his father's farm in this county, and was the second man to join Captain BOSTON's company, at Butler, for service in the War of 1812. He afterwards purchased 200 acres of land in Lancaster township, where William KOCHER now lives, cleared and improved it, and died there in 1879. Mr. SHANOR was a stonemason and plasterer, and followed that business in connection with farming. He married Deborah MOYER, a daughter of Samuel MOYER, of Lancaster township, and they were the parents of the following children: Henry, who died in Franklin township; Catherine, widow of John ZIEGLER; Samuel, of Muddy Creek; Edward, who died in Lancaster township; Jacob, who was murdered in Georgia; Sarah, who died in 1835; Daniel, who died the same year; Abraham, who died in 1836, and Elizabeth, wife of Henry KOCHER. Mrs. SHANOR died in 1870. They were members of the German Reformed church of Harmony, in which Mr. SHANOR filled the offices of elder and deacon. He was a stanch Democrat, but would never accept office or take any active part in political affairs.

SAMUEL SHANOR, only living son of Daniel and Deborah SHANOR, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, September 7, 1823, and grew to manhood upon his father's farm in Lancaster township. He resided upon the old homestead until 1881, in which year he purchased his present farm of 121 acres in [p. 1258] Muddy Creek township, and has since erected the buildings now upon it. He married Catherine STAUFFER, a daughter of Henry STAUFFER. She died in 1861, leaving three children, viz.: Ellen, wife of Madison DAVIS; Campbell, who resides upon the homestead, and Daniel, of Erie. Politically, he is a Democrat, has served two terms as supervisor and overseer of the poor in Lancaster township, and has held the office of supervisor in Muddy Creek township since 1890. He is a member of the German Reformed church of Harmony, in which society he has filled the offices of deacon and elder.

HENRY SHANOR, eldest son of Daniel and Deborah (MOYER) SHANOR, was born upon the homestead farm in Lancaster township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1814, and grew to manhood beneath the parental roof. He received a meager education in the pioneer subscription schools, and learned the stonemason's trade before reaching manhood. In 1840 he purchased a farm of 180 acres, in Franklin township, now in possession of his son Daniel, which he cleared and improved, and resided upon it until his death, in 1880. He was engaged for many years in contracting and building, in connection with his farm duties, and was quite a successful man. He married Magdalena STAMM, a daughter of Daniel STAMM, of Beaver county, and their children were as follows: Sarah, wife of Jonathan TAYLOR; Daniel; Deborah, wife of William MORROW; Eli, deceased; Alfred F.; Elizabeth J., wife of William KAUFMAN, and Emma, wife of J. C. McCLYMONDS. Politically, Mr. SHANOR was a Democrat, and in religious faith, and adherent of the Lutheran church.

DANIEL SHANOR, eldest son of Henry and Magdalena SHANOR, was born in Franklin township, Butler county, November 1, 1844, grew to maturity upon the homestead farm and inherited the same at his father's death. He resided upon it until 1891, when he purchased his present farm of 105 acres, and is now operating both places, making a total acreage of 268 acres. In 1891 oil was discovered upon the old homestead, and there are now seven producing wells located there, with a total production of fifty-six barrels per day. They are operated by McFARLAND & Company. Mr. SHANOR married Mrs. Annie WARREN, nee FORRESTER, who died in July, 1892, leaving three children, viz.: Magdalena; Effie May, and Etta P. Politically, Mr. SHANOR is a Democrat, and is one of the enterprising farmers of Franklin township.

ALFRED F. SHANOR, youngest son of Henry and Magdalena SHANOR, was born October 1, 1851, in Franklin township, Butler county, and was reared and educated in his native township. He purchased his present farm of 137 acres, in Muddy Creek township, in 1880, and located upon it the following year. He has made all the improvements which it now contains, and has one of the best farms in the township. Mr. SHANOR was married in April, 1881, to Ellen SHAFFER, a daughter of Henry SHAFFER, of Prospect, and has three children, viz.: Mont. W.; Amy B., and Catherine A. In politics, he is a Democrat, and an ardent supporter of his party. In 1886 Mr. SHANOR engaged in buying stock for the home market, which business he has since carried on in connection with his farm. He is recognized as one of the leading farmers of his township, as well as one of its most progressive citizens, and has a small production of oil on his farm.

[p. 1259]
DAVID KENNEDY was one of the early settlers of Muddy Creek township, Butler county. He was born in Monaghan county, Ireland, in 1752, there married Jane GRACIE, and in 1788, in company with his wife and one son, Robert, he immigrated to Philadelphia, where he found employment as a wheelwright, which trade he had learned in his native land. While residents of Philadelphia the following children were born to them: John, Edward, and David, who lived and died in Muddy Creek township; Daniel, who settled in Slippery Rock township, Lawrence county, and there died, and Elizabeth who married George FRAZIER, and died in Muddy Creek township. The eldest son, Robert, grew to manhood in Philadelphia, and engaged in teaming between that city and the western part of the State. His mother carried on a dairy in Philadelphia, and the parents and Robert combined their capital with the intention of purchasing a farm in western Pennsylvania. In 1800 they removed to Butler county, and purchased a 400-acre claim from Matthew KELLY, a Revolutionary soldier, situated in what is now Muddy Creek township, and built a cabin on the land where David R. KENNEDY now lives. It was a log structure, twenty-six by eighteen, one and a half stories high, and finished in that crude manner in which nearly all of the early buildings were constructed. The father lived to see 200 acres of this land cleared and improved, and died January 1, 1840, while on a visit to the home of his son Edward, who resided a few miles distant in the same township. His wife had died about 1828. Both were members of the Presbyterian church of Montville, Lawrence county, and were interred in the cemetery attached to that church.

ROBERT KENNEDY, eldest in the family of David and Jane KENNEDY, was born in Monaghan county, Ireland, in 1777, spent his early life in Philadelphia, and was afterwards employed in hauling goods between that city and the towns in the western part of the State. It is claimed he brought the first load of merchandise to the borough of Butler, from Philadelphia, for John POTTS, an early merchant of Butler. After his father purchased land in Muddy Creek township, Robert devoted himself to clearing and improving it, and at his father's death he received 217½ acres of the original tract, containing the old home. Here he resided until his death, in November, 1848. He married Mary Ann PATTERSON, a daughter of John PATTERSON, a native of Ireland, who settled in Pittsburg. The following children were born to this union: Jane, who married Alexander AIKEN; David R.; John, a resident of New Castle, and Cassie, wife of William J. McCLYMONDS, of Beaver Falls. Mrs. KENNEDY died in 1854. Both were members of the United Presbyterian church at Portersville, and he was instrumental in the erection of the first church in that village. Politically, Mr. KENNEDY was a Democrat, and served as a school director for several years. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, from Butler county.

DAVID R. KENNEDY, eldest son of Robert and Mary Ann KENNEDY, was born upon the old homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, October 4, 1830, was educated in the old log school house of his neighborhood, and has been engaged in agriculture up to within a few years, when he retired, turning over his farm of 140 acres to his sons, Robert B. and James E. In April, 1861, when the first call was made for troops by President LINCOLN, he accompanied a [p. 1260] squad of thirty men from his neighborhood, all of whom joined Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served three months, the full term of his enlistment. In 1862 he married Mary J. STONER, a daughter of James STONER, of Lawrence county. Four children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Robert B.; Laura E.; Lizzie, deceased, and James N. Mr. KENNEDY is a Republican, and has held the offices of assessor, collector and school director. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville, in which he held the office of treasurer for a number of years.

DANIEL KENNEDY, fifth son of David and Jane KENNEDY, was born in Philadelphia, and came with his parents to Muddy Creek township, where he grew to manhood. He followed farming and droving for some years, buying stock for the Pittsburg and Philadelphia markets. Later he removed to Lawrence county, and, in partnership with his sons, David L. and Hosea, engaged in operating two mills in that county, where he resided until his death. He married Cassie LEVIS, daughter of John LEVIS, of Philadelphia, who died some years before her husband. Their children were as follows: David L., deceased; Elizabeth, wife of Dr. D. R. MARKS, of Prospect; John K., who resides in New Brighton; Hosea, a resident of New Castle; William, deceased, and Thomas P. Mr. KENNEDY was an adherent of the Democratic party, and was recognized as a progressive, enterprising business man.

THOMAS P. KENNEDY, youngest son of Daniel and Cassie KENNEDY, was born upon his father's homestead in Muddy Creek township, November 9, 1836, was reared a farmer, and went to Lawrence county, where he assisted his father in operating the mills for five years. In 1875 he purchased forty acres of the BAUDER farm, erected buildings and has since devoted his attention to farming. He married Mary BAUDER, a daughter of John BAUDER, and they are the parents of the following children: Henry N.; John K.; Lewis K.; Harvey P.; Minnie V.; Sarah E.; Dora M.; Peter C., and three that died in early yonth (sic). Mr. KENNEDY is a Democrat, and has filled the office of school director and other minor positions in his township.

ARTHUR CLEELAND, a native of Down county, Ireland, immigrated to the United States about 1791, owing to religious and political troubles in his native land. He was forced to leave home in disguise to escape violence, and was concealed near the seaboard for three months while his family disposed of his property, after which they joined him and came to this country, settling in the Buffalo Valley, Pennsylvania. About 1800 Mr. CLEELAND came to Butler county, purchased 400 acres of land, and built his cabin on the farm now owned by Samuel CLEELAND, in Muddy Creek township. With him came his wife and family. Their children were as follows: John; James; Robert; Arthur; David; Thomas; Samuel; Jane, who married Allen STREATOR, and Ellen, who became the wife of Thomas KELTY. Mr. CLEELAND and wife spent the remaining years of their lives upon their farm in Muddy Creek township.

ROBERT CLEELAND, third son of Arthur CLEELAND, was born in Down county, Ireland, about 1774, and came with his parents to Butler county. His father gave him 100 acres of land, which he settled and improved, and spent his life thereon. He married Phoebe WIMER, and their children were as follows: [p. 1261] John, a resident of Butler; Nancy, deceased wife of John MORRISON; Isaac, deceased; Sarah, deceased wife of Adam STREATOR; Samuel; William; Rachel; Eleanor; Jane (the last three are dead), and Phoebe, wife of Jacob STRUBLE. Mr. CLEELAND and wife were pioneer members of the Portersville Presbyterian church. He died in 1837, and she in 1844. Politically, he was a Whig, but never held any public office.

SAMUEL CLEELAND was born upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, July 31, 1818, third son of Robert and Phoebe CLEELAND. He was reared a farmer, and remained with his parents until his marriage, when the farm was divided between him and his brother Isaac. In 1865 he removed to Centre township, lived there eight years, and then returned to the homestead, where he has since resided. Mr. CLEELAND married Mary WIMER, a daughter of Adam WIMER, of Lawrence county. She died November 28, 1881, leaving two children: Henry and Robert, who are engaged in cultivating the farm, their father having retired from active life. He has been a life-long member of the Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

THOMAS CLEELAND was born in Down county, Ireland, about 1780, sixth son of Arthur CLEELAND, and came with his parents to the United Sates, and subsequently to Butler county. Very little is known of his early life by his descendants. He was twice married, each time to a Miss JOHNSTON, and his children were as follows: William, who died in Wisconsin; David, deceased; Nancy, deceased wife of Allen MORRISON; Mary, deceased, who was twice married, first to Thomas ROBINSON, and afterwards to John LIMFER; Ellen, wife of Rev. Joseph BUCHANAN, and Margaret and Hannah, both deceased. The parents spent the remainder of their lives in Butler county.

DAVID CLEELAND was born upon his father's homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, in 1810, son of Thomas CLEELAND. He received a good education, and taught in the schools of his native county for several years. In 1833 he purchased the farm upon which his son, Thomas J., now resides, where he died in 1859. He married Mary M. McCLYMONDS, a daughter of James McCLYMONDS, one of the pioneers of the county. Their children were as follows: Margaret, deceased wife of William DOWLER; James M., of Grove City; Addison, who died in early youth; Addison, who grew to manhood, enlisted in Company C, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers ("Rounds Heads"), and died from exposure in the service, at Fairfax Court House, Virginia; Maria E., deceased; William J., who resides in Muddy Creek township; Thomas J., of the same township; David T., a physician of Harlansburg, Lawrence county, and Ella, who resides upon the homestead with her brother Thomas J. Mrs. CLEELAND survived her husband until 1889. They were members of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville, in which society Mr. CLEELAND filled the office of elder. He served as school director for a number of years, and also filled other offices in his township.

THOMAS J. CLEELAND was born December 16, 1848, upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, and is the fifth son of David and Mary M. CLEELAND. He received a common school education, was reared a farmer, and is engaged in cultivating the original homestead, consisting of 100 acres. He is [p. 1262] one of the representative farmers of his township, and a progressive, public-spirited citizen. Politically, he is a Republican, and is at present serving as a member of the school board. He is connected with the United Presbyterian church, and contributes liberally towards that denomination.

WILLIAM J. CLEELAND, fourth son of David and Mary M. (McCLYMONDS) CLEELAND, was born upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, March 27, 1846, and received a common school education. He was reared a farmer, and resided with his parents until his enlistment in the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Militia, Captain CHRISTIE's company, in which he served two months. In 1864 he enlisted in Company A, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until the close of the war. He was subsequently engaged in various occupations until he purchased his present farm of eighty acres, and is now making a specialty of fruit growing. He was married in 1868, to Sarah J. FISHER, a daughter of Samuel FISHER, of Lawrence county. Five children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Addison; Mary; Ira; James, and Roy. Mr. CLEELAND is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville. He is connected with WATSON Brothers Post, G. A. R., and also with the A. O. U. W.

JOHN GALLAGHER, SR., one of the pioneers of Butler county, was a native of Down county, Ireland, and settled in Muddy Creek township, late in the Eighteenth or early in the present century. He purchased a tract of 400 acres of land, erected upon it a log house, and resided there the remainder of his life. The site of his home is now the property of Henderson WILSON. With him came his wife and the following children: James; John; William; Mary, who married James ENGLISH; Margaret, and Jane. The eldest son, James was twice married, his first wife being Sarah FORRESTER, and his second, Mary ALBRIGHT. He died in Muddy Creek township, as did also his brother William.

JAMES GALLAGHER, eldest son of John GALLAGHER, Sr., was born in Ireland, and came with his parents to Muddy Creek township, Butler county. He subsequently settled on a farm in what is now Franklin township, where the remainder of his life was spent. Mr. GALLAGHER was twice married. His first wife bore him a family of three children, as follows: George; William, and Margaret, who married George ELLIOTT, all of whom are deceased. By his second marriage he became the father of nine children, viz.: John, a resident of Franklin township; Sarah A., deceased wife of William ROSE; Nancy, wife of Lott WILSON; James, who resides in California; Robert, who was a member of Captain PILLOW's company, and died in the Rebellion; Henry, of Pittsburg; Mahala J., wife of Samuel BURNSIDES; Amelia, wife of Dinwiddie McCOLLOUGH, and Matilda, wife of James DUNN.

JOHN GALLAGHER, Jr., second son of John GALLAGHER, Sr., was born in Ireland, and came with his parents to Butler county. He finally settled upon a part of the land entered by his father, who gave him 100 acres, and he resided upon the same down to his death, in 1881. The farm is now in possession of his son Thomas, and the original log house is still standing. Mr. GALLAGHER married Frances MAINS, a daughter of Thomas MAINS, who lived in what is now Franklin township. To this union were born the following children: John; Thomas; [p. 1263] Ellen, who married Charles GALLAGHER; Margaret; Mary, and Catherine, who married Jacob CABLE, all of whom are dead excepting Thomas and Catherine. Mr. GALLAGHER and wife were members of the United Presbyterian church, and are interred in the cemetery at Prospect. He was a member of Captain BOSTON's company in the War of 1812.

THOMAS GALLAGHER, second son of John and Frances GALLAGHER, was born July 11, 1817, upon his father's farm in Muddy Creek township. He was reared a farmer, and his advantages for an education were such as the pioneer schools afforded. He remained with his parents until 1860, and then purchased a farm of fifty-three acres, and erected his present residence and other necessary improvements. It adjoins the old homestead, a part of which he owns, his farm now embracing 130 acres. Mr. GALLAGHER married Catherine GARVEY, a daughter of Thomas GARVEY. She died in 1885, the mother of two children: William a resident of California, and James, who resides at home, and who married Anna WOODS and has two children. In early life Mr. GALLAGHER was a Whig, but has been a Republican since the formation of that party. He is a member of the English Lutheran church of Prospect, in which he has filled the offices of deacon and elder. He has retired from the active duties of life, and is one of the oldest citizens in his native township, where he has resided for seventy-seven years.

JOHN GALLAGHER, eldest son of John and Frances (MAINS) GALLAGHER, and grandson of John GALLAGHER, Sr., was born in 1811, upon the land purchased by his grandfather in Muddy Creek township. He was reared on his father's farm, and subsequently purchased fifty acres of the homestead, upon which he erected improvements and resided until his death, April 16, 1885. He married Sarah FERGUSON, a daughter of Hugh FERGUSON, one of the early settlers of Franklin township, to which union were born the following children: Ferguson W.; Fannie, deceased wife of James WHITE; Mary E., deceased wife of J. Milton WHITE; Nancy A., wife of Charles F. WHITE; Joshua; Elizabeth, and John, deceased. Mr. GALLAGHER was a Democrat until the Rebellion, when he became an adherent of the Republican party. Both he and wife were members of the United Presbyterian church at Prospect. The latter died March 6, 1887.

FERGUSON W. GALLAGHER, eldest son of John and Sarah GALLAGHER, was born upon his father's homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, February 27, 1834. He received a good education and followed teaching until 1861. In August of that year he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until discharged because of physical disability. Returning to his home he engaged in huckstering, which business he followed for some years, then purchased a farm adjoining his present homestead, upon which he resided until 1882. In that year he bought 111 acres and located upon it, where he has since lived. In 1863 he married Jane KENNEDY, a daughter of David KENNEDY, who died leaving two children: Sherman and Hosea. The former married Nancy Prudence KENNEDY and has two children, Nancy Jane and Florence Louisa. Mr. GALLAGHER married for his second wife Sarah FINDLEY, to whom have been born eight children; viz.: Emma J.; Amelia M.; Maggie L.; Clara; James; Aggie; Grace E., and Bessie. Politically, he is a Republican, and has held the offices of overseer and collector. He [p. 1264]
is a member of John H. RANDOLPH Post, G. A. R., and is secretary of the United Presbyterian church of Prospect, in which he has also held the office of trustee.

JOSHUA GALLAGHER, son of John and Sarah GALLAGHER, was born July 20, 1846, in Muddy Creek township, where he has always resided. In 1878 he married Mary J. MOORE, a daughter of Isaac MOORE, and settled upon his present homestead. They are the parents of one son, Ralph. Mr. GALLAGHER is a Republican, and one of the prosperous farmers of the community.

JOHN MYERS, SR., was a native of Germany who came to America prior to the Revolution and served in that struggle for liberty. After the close of the war he settled in Virginia, and resided there until his removal to Butler county. About 1805 he accompanied John BOSTON, William BEIGHLEY, Adam ALBERT, and John MOON to this county, and settled upon what is now the BAUDER farm, in Muddy Creek township, but through an imperfect title or some other cause he lost the property. He then purchased 400 acres, situated where David MYERS' heirs, John MYERS, and William and Charles MYERS, now reside, upon which he resided until his death. He was married in Virginia to Sarah MOON, a daughter of John MOON, and their children were as follows: Solomon; John; Samuel; Daniel; George; David, and Annie, who married John BEIGHLEY, all of whom are deceased. Mr. MYERS and wife were pioneer members of the Lutheran church of Lancaster township.

JOHN MYERS, second son of John and Sarah MYERS, was born in Virginia, about 1791, and came with his parents to Butler county. After reaching his majority, his father gave him 200 acres of the original tract, upon which in later years he erected the stone house where his sons William and Charles reside. He devoted the balance of his life in clearing and improving this farm. He was twice married, his first wife being Rachel STICKEL, to which union were born six children, viz.: Sarah, deceased wife of James SLEMMONS; Nelson, who married Annie CRATTY, and lives in Tennessee; Mary, wife of Sipe BELLIS; Samuel, deceased, who married a Miss SMITH; John, who married Nannie TURNER, and lives in Nebraska, and Margaret, wife of Henry FIELDGROW. He married for his second wife Hannah MORRISON, a daughter of John MORRISON, who became the mother of four children, as follows: Tirzah; Emeline; William, and Charles. Mr. MYERS died in 1844. His second wife survived him until 1888, and both are interred in the Presbyterian cemetery at Portersville, to which denomination they belonged.

WILLIAM MYERS, eldest son of John and Hannah MYERS, was born upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, attended the public schools of his district, and grew to manhood in his native township. He has always resided upon the old homestead, engaged in farming. He is a member of the Presbyterian church of Portersville, and in politics, he is a Republican.

CHARLES MYERS, youngest in the family of John and Hannah MYERS, was born in Muddy Creek township, and has spent his entire life upon the homestead farm, which he and his brother William cultivate in partnership. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and politically, an ardent supporter of the Republican party. His sisters, Tirzah and Emeline, also reside on the old homestead, which was purchased by their grandfather early in the present century.

[p. 1265]
SOLOMON MYERS, eldest son of John and Sarah MYERS, was born in Virginia, came with his parents to Butler county, and settled upon a part of the tract entered by his father in Muddy Creek township. He was twice married. His first wife was Margaret BOSTON, a sister of Capt. John BOSTON, who served in the War of 1812. His children by this marriage were as follows: George; John; Boston; Samuel; Elizabeth, who married Charles PHILLIPS, and Sarah, who married William ALBERT. His second wife was Margaret DOUGLASS, to which union were born the following children: James; Jasper; Newton; Hosea; Milton; David, and Lucinda, who married James A. HUMPHREY. Mr. MYERS and wife were members of the Lutheran church. They died upon their homestead in Muddy Creek township.

DAVID MYERS was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, in 1834, grew to manhood upon his father's farm, subsequently purchased the old homestead, and resided upon it until his death. He was twice married; first to Eleanor COOPER, who bore him two sons: Orin D., and Ellsworth E. His second marriage occurred in September, 1870, to Margaret S. SULLIVAN, a daughter of Thomas SULLIVAN, of Prospect. She became the mother of the following children: Hosea M.; Milton S.; Gailey; James A.; Hosea H., deceased; Don C., and Samuel T. Mr. MYERS was an active worker in the Republican party, and filled the office of school director for a number of years. He was a member of the Baptist church, and died in that faith, October 15, 1889. His widow resides upon the homestead farm, where the greater portion of his life was passed.

DANIEL MYERS, fourth son of John and Sarah MYERS, was born in Virginia, October 13, 1800, and was about four years of age when his parents located in Muddy Creek township, Butler county. He grew up upon the farm, and at the age of eighteen commenced learning the stonemason's trade with John MOON, which he followed for some years, finally engaging in the business for himself. He purchased 100 acres of the original MYERS tract, erected buildings and other improvements, and engaged in farming in connection with his trade. He married Annie SMITH, a daughter of Elijah SMITH, who came from New Jersey to Slippery Rock township, Butler county, at an early day. She died in 1852, and her husband, September 5, 1855. They were interred in the Presbyterian cemetery at Portersville. Their children were as follows: Sarah, wife of John JOHNSTON; Mary J., deceased wife of William ROBERTS; Ruhama, wife of Richard LEWIS; Milton, who enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, was captured and died at Andersonville prison; John S.; Amanda, wife of William ROBBINS, and Annie, who married a Mr. WOODS. Daniel MYERS was a colonel in the old State Militia, took quite an interest in public affairs, and served as collector, assessor, auditor, supervisor and school director in his township. In politics, he was a Whig. He was reared in the Lutheran church, but in later life united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a class leader in that denomination.

JOHN S. MYERS, second son of Daniel and Annie MYERS, was born April 23, 1832, upon his present homestead in Muddy Creek township. He learned the stonemason's and bricklayer's trades with his father, and in 1853 commenced [p. 1266] business for himself. He followed that business for thirty years in different parts of the county, while at the same time he carried on his farm. In 1883 he retired from contracting, and has since devoted his entire attention to agricultural pursuits. Mr. MYERS was married November 9, 1855, to Mary A. PEGGS, a daughter of Edward PEGGS, of Lawrence county, to which union have been born the following children: Annie, wife of Samuel JONES; Laura J., wife of George MAGEE; Ella, wife of Frank REIS; William; Harry; Edward; Minnie, and Jefferson. Mr. MYERS is a Republican, and has filled the offices of supervisor, assessor and collector in his township. The family are connected with the Presbyterian church of Portersville.

JOHN BOSTON was born near Winchester, Virginia, in 1774, there grew to manhood, and about 1805 came to Butler county, and purchased the claim of a Revolutionary soldier, consisting of 200 acres, in what is now Muddy Creek township. He was accompanied by his wife, Elizabeth, and several sisters. He cleared up a farm and resided upon it until within a few years of his death, which occurred in 1862, at the home of his son, Sheplar, in Portersville. His children were as follows: George; Rebecca, who married Daniel SMITH; John; Christina, who married James DOUGLASS; Adam; Catharine, who married Andrew DOUGLASS; William; Sheplar, and Sarah. Mr. BOSTON was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was located in the Lake Erie country. He was a stanch Democrat, and one of the original members of the old Lutheran church of Lancaster township. His widow survived him two years.

THOMAS CHRISTIE was a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and settled on the site of Porterville, Butler county, in 1812. He was a brother-in-law of Robert STEWART, the first settler on the site of that borough. His grandfather was a native of Scotland, and settled in Connecticut at an early day, leaving a family of six sons, two of whom settled in Ohio, two in Nova Scotia, and two in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, one of the last mentioned being the father of Thomas. The subject of this sketch purchased 400 acres of land, a portion of which is included in the southern part of Portersville. He married Eleanor GAILEY, and they were the parents of the following children: Susan, who married Archibald GLENN; Clara, who married Dr. William McCLELLAND; Margaret, who married Dr. RANDOLPH; Jane, who married John SHARP; Elizabeth, who married Dr. John COWDEN; John; William, and Thomas G., all of whom are dead. William was the father of Dr. James H. CHRISTIE of Allegheny. Mr. CHRISTIE was one of the extensive farmers of Muddy Creek township, was a justice of the peace for many years, and is well remembered as "Squire CHRISTIE." He was a pioneer member of the Associate Presbyterian church, and later of the United Presbyterian church, of Portersville. He was one of the early merchants of that borough, and a widely known anti-slavery advocate. He died in 1851, and his wife some years before.

THOMAS G. CHRISTIE was born at Portersville, Butler county, in 1822, and was the youngest son of Thomas and Eleanor CHRISTIE. He was reared upon the homestead farm, and afterwards engaged in merchandising at Portersville, which he followed until his death, in 1851. In 1843 he married Nancy R. GEORGE, a [p. 1267] daughter of James GEORGE, of Mercer county, to which union were born three children, viz.: Henderson W.; Calvin G., and Thomas G. Mr. CHRISTIE was a member of the Seceder church, and in politics, a Whig.

DR. JOHN COWDEN was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1797, son of William COWDEN, a native of Franklin county, Pennsylvania, who removed to Washington county after reaching his majority, and in 1800 located in Trumbull (now Mahoning) county, Ohio, with his family, where he spent the remainder of his life. John was the fourth son, was reared in Ohio, and read medicine with his uncle, Dr. Isaac P. COWDEN, of Poland, Ohio. In 1818 he commenced practice at Porterville, Butler county, where he prosecuted his professional duties for nearly fifty years. He then retired to Allegheny City, and died February 15, 1880, in his eighty-fourth year. Dr. COWDEN married Elizabeth CHRISTIE, a daughter of Thomas CHRISTIE, one of the early settlers of Muddy Creek township, and a justice of the peace for many years in that subdivision. They reared a family of seven children, viz.: William REYNOLDS; Maria C., who married James FRAZIER; Elizabeth, deceased wife of Erskine McCLELLAND; Eleanor J., wife of John FRAZIER; Tirzah, wife of Andrew GAILEY, and Susannah, deceased wife of Rev. Samuel KERR, of Harrisville. Mrs. COWDEN died in 1879, and both she and husband are interred in the United Presbyterian cemetery at Portersville. Dr. COWDEN was one of the early members of the Associate Presbyterian church, and later an elder in the United Presbyterian church for many years.

DR. WILLIAM REYNOLDS COWDEN was born in Portersville, Butler county, March 4, 1820, only son of Dr. John and Elizabeth COWDEN. His primary education was obtained at the Jamestown Academy, in Jamestown, Mercer county, and at the Venango Academy, in Franklin, Venango county. He subsequently spent two years at Washington and Jefferson College, and then engaged in teaching. He read medicine with his father, and attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in the winters of 1844-45, and 1845-46. In the spring of 1846 he commenced practice at Portersville, and with the exception of three years spent at West Sunbury, and a few years in Worth township, when comparatively retired from practice, he was engaged in the active duties of his profession at Portersville for forty-eight years, and is the oldest practicing physician in Butler county. In 1894 he removed to Middle Lancaster, where he still continues to practice. Dr. COWDEN was married November 7, 1850, to Matilda M. KLINE, a daughter of J. George and Catherine KLINE, of Mercer, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of two sons and five daughters, as follows: William Rush, a practicing physician at Middle Lancaster, Butler county; John Victor, who is now reading medicine; Anna E., wife of C. F. WICK, of West Sunbury; Ida M., wife of George M. CAMPBELL, of Centreville; Margaret K., wife of Elmer ELLIOTT, of Butler; Eva M., wife of John EDMUNDSON, of Prospect, and Eleanor J., a teacher in the public schools. Dr. COWDEN is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and one of the liberal supporters of that society. Politically, he was a Whig until the formation of the Republican party, and since that time has supported that organization. He cast his first vote for Henry CLAY in 1844, and has voted for every presidential candidate of his party for the past fifty years.

[p. 1268]
WILLIAM HUMPHREY, son of William and Elizabeth (DUNBAR) HUMPHREY, was born August 22, 1835, upon the homestead farm in Worth township, Butler county, the same tract settled by his grandfather, Thomas HUMPHREY, in 1798. He received a common school education, and also attended a select school at Portersville. At the age of twenty-two he commenced to learn surveying under Hugh SMITH, and followed that profession, in connection with teaching in the public schools of Portersville and Muddy Creek township, for fifteen years. In 1861 he established a general store at Portersville, and also engaged in buying wool. Since that time he has purchased over 500,000 pounds of wool, being one of the most extensive buyers in Butler county. For more than thirty years Mr. HUMPHREY has carried on merchandising at Portersville, and is one of the successful business men of the community. In 1868 he was elected justice of the peace for Portersville, and filled that position for twenty years. He has also been a school director for ten years, and a member of the council and burgess of Portersville. He was identified with the Democratic party until 1876, when he became connected with the Prohibition movement, and has since given it his support. He is a strong protectionist, and an advocate of a high tariff, believing that policy beneficial to the country at large. Mr. HUMPHREY is a member of the Portersville Presbyterian church, is a trustee in that society, and a member of the general session since 1886. In 1856 he married Elizabeth RIDDLE, a daughter of John RIDDLE, and has a family of four sons and one daughter, as follows: James; John, who is in partnership with his father; Walter N., a physician; Edwin W., now a law student in Philadelphia, and Margaret. Mr. HUMPHREY is one of the leading citizens of Butler county, and has always been one of the enterprising and progressive business men of the community in which he has spent the greater portion of his life.

DAVID MARSHALL was born in Ireland, in 1812, son of James and Jean (PEEBLES) MARSHALL, who immigrated with their family, to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1822, and located in Penn township, Butler county, in 1824. David was about twelve years of age when his parents settled in this county, and he grew to manhood upon his father's farm in Penn township. In 1839 he engaged in merchandising at Petersville, Connoquenessing township, where he carried on business for two years, then removed to Prospect, Franklin township, and continued the same business down to 1865. In that year he retired to a farm near Prospect, where he died in 1877. He was twice married, his first wife being Euphemia GILLILAND, a daughter of Barnet GILLILAND, to whom was born one son, James M. Mrs. MARSHALL died in November, 1871, and was interred in the United Presbyterian cemetery at Prospect. Mr. MARSHALL married for his second wife, Mrs. Martha FRAZIER, who survives him. He was deeply interested in the public schools, and served as a director for many years. Politically, he was a Whig in early life, and a Republican from the formation of that party. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church of Prospect, was a trustee in that society, and was one of the building committee in the erection of the present church building.

JAMES M. MARSHALL, only child of David and Euphemia MARSHALL, was born at Petersville, Butler county, June 3, 1841, received his education in the [p. 1269] public schools of Prospect, and subsequently entered his father's store in that borough. In 1862 he formed a partnership with William RIDDLE, and carried on merchandising at Prospect down to 1873, when he retired to a farm in Worth township, and resided there until 1885. In 1880 he established the banking house, now known as J. M. Marshall & Company, at Portersville, and removed to that borough in 1885. He has devoted his attention to his banking business for the past fourteen years. In 1860 he married Ruth A. RIDDLE, a daughter of John A. RIDDLE, of Portersville, and they are the parents of the following children: John D., an attorney of Butler; Archie S., a merchant of Portersville; H. N., an attorney of New Castle; Thomas C., a merchant at Hazell Dell; Margaret, wife of Edward KENNEDY; Sarah E.; William R.; James P.; Nannie E., and Edwin H. Mr. MARSHALL was a Republican until 1868, and since that time has been an ardent supporter of the Democratic party. He is a member of the Presbyterian church of Portersville. He is one of the leading citizens of the county, and is interested quite largely in real estate at Hazel Dell, Lawrence county, as well as in his native county.

W. H. DANN, manufacturer and dealer in harness, etc., was born in Middle Lancaster, Butler county, May 2, 1859, son of Jacob and Margaret (TOTAL) DANN. His father was a native of Hesse-Cassel, Germany, and immigrated to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1844, where he worked at the tailor's trade, which he had learned in his native land. In 1847 he settled in Middle Lancaster, Butler county, where he has carried on business for the past forty-seven years. Jacob DANN was married in Pittsburg, and reared a family of nine children. W. H. grew to manhood in Middle Lancaster, received a common school education, and learned the harnessmaker's trade, which he worked at for several years in various places. He finally established himself in business at Middle Lancaster, which he carried on down to 1891, and then removed to Portersville, where he has since conducted a general store in connection with his trade. He deals in all kinds of harness and wagon stock, and carries a full line of whips, harness, blankets and driving goods. Mr. DANN married Mary ERB, a daughter of E. ERB, of Middle Lancaster, and has two children: Ralph L., and Luella. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is the present tax collector of Portersville. He is a member of Portersville Lodge, No. 909, I. O. O. F., and assistant secretary of the I. O. O. F. Endowment Association. He is one of the prosperous and enterprising merchants of Portersville, and gives a liberal support to every worthy project.

JACOB HEBERLING was born in Carbon county, Pennsylvania, in 1792, was reared in his native county, and came to Zelienople, Butler county, after reaching manhood. He had learned the stonemason's trade in his early home, and one of his first contracts after coming to this county was the erection of the old stone church at Zelienople. He was a man of good education and taught school during the winter seasons. He married Mary GRUVER, a daughter of Michael GRUVER, one of the early settlers of Jackson township, and of their family of twelve children, six grew to maturity viz.: Reuben; John; Paul; Christina, who married Samuel SWAIN; Sarah, wife of William PEFFER, and Henry. Mrs. HEBERLING died in 1840, and her husband, in 1842, upon their farm in Jackson township. [p. 1270] They were members of the Lutheran church in early days, but subsequently united with the Methodist Episcopal church.

HENRY HEBERLING, youngest in the family of Jacob and Mary HEBERLING, was born in Jackson township, Butler county, August 16, 1837, and was reared upon the homestead farm. In March, 1857, he went to Missouri, and learned the tinner's trade at Canton. In 1859 he returned to Pennsylvania, and engaged in business at Beaver, Beaver county, but removed to Portersville, in April, 1860, where he established a general tin store, which he has conducted up to the present time. Mr. HEBERLING was married September 27, 1860, to Christina, a daughter of George LAMBERT, and has a family of seven children: Nettie; Harry; William; Thomas; Frank; Sarah, and Theodore. In politics, he is a Republican. He is a member of the Lutheran church of Middle Lancaster.

SAMUEL MOORE, SR., was one of the early settlers of what is now Brady township, Butler county. He was born in Antrim county, Ireland, in 1780, there learned the weaver's trade, and at the age of sixteen immigrated to Baltimore, Maryland, near which city he found employment on a farm, but remained there only a short time. He removed to Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he worked at this trade for several years. He married Sarah CORNELIUS, a daughter of Isaac CORNELIUS, of that county, who subsequently came with his family to Butler county. In 1801 Mr. MOORE located in Allegheny county, where he followed his trade and cultivated a small farm, but later bought a larger farm six miles southwest of Pittsburg. He resided there until 1827, in which year he purchased 200 acres of land in what is now Brady township, Butler county, erected buildings and resided upon it until his death, in 1833. His family consisted of the following children: John, who died in Muddy Creek township; Mary, deceased wife of William McCLYMONDS; Isaac, of Muddy Creek township; Charles, who died in the same township; James, deceased, whose descendants are in Ohio; Jane, deceased wife of James BROWN; Joseph, deceased; Sarah, wife of Robert GLENN; Esther, widow of Silas COVERT; Elizabeth, deceased wife of Newell GRAHAM; Samuel, a resident of Brady township, and one that died in infancy. Mrs. MOORE survived her husband twenty-three years, dying in 1856, and both are buried in the Wolf Creek graveyard. Mr. MOORE and wife were members of the Seceder church, in which he was an elder. Politically, he was a supporter of the Whig party, and an ardent anti-slavery advocate.

ISAAC MOORE, second son of Samuel and Sarah MOORE, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1805, grew to manhood in that county, and came with his parents to Butler county. He remained with them for two years, and then purchased 100 acres of land in Muddy Creek township. He cleared and improved this farm, and followed agriculture until 1882, when he retired. In 1829 he married Nancy SCOTT, a daughter of John SCOTT. She was the mother of eleven children, viz.: Samuel W., of Brady township; Rachel, who lives with her father; Joseph, of Mercer county; John C., of Muddy Creek township; Sarah, widow of M. W. KENNEDY; Eli J.; Adeline, wife of John KENNEDY; William S., of Muddy Creek township; Mary J., wife of Joshua GALLAGHER; James Madison, deceased, and Minerva A., wife of Benton DICK. Mrs. MOORE died in 1891. A coincident connected with this family is the fact that [p. 1271] Samuel W., Eli J., and Adeline A., were all born on March 19, their father's birthday; while his son, William S., and grandson, William P., were born on October 18. Mr. MOORE has lived to see all of his children well settled in life, and all engaged in agricultural pursuits. Both he and wife were members of the Seceder church, later of the Associate Reformed, and finally of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville. He is a worthy christian man and an upright citizen. He was originally a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and has filled a number of the minor offices of his township. He is to-day one of the oldest citizens of Butler county.

SAMUEL MOORE was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1822, and is a son of Samuel MOORE, Sr., He was reared in Brady township, received a common school education, and has spent the greater portion of his life upon his present homestead, following the peaceful vocation of a farmer. Mr. MOORE has been twice married. His first wife was Martha GRAHAM, of Mercer county, who died in 1873, leaving five children, as follows: Elizabeth, wife of Presley STEVENSON, of Kansas; John, a resident of Brady township; Lorenzo, a merchant of Butler; William, of Pittsburg, and Isaac Newton, a teacher in the Slippery Rock State Normal School. His second wife was Martha DODDS, whom he married in 1874, by which union five children have been born to him, viz.: Thomas; Clara; Nannie; Sadie, and Ida. Mr. MOORE is a member of the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

SAMUEL W. MOORE, eldest son of Isaac and Nancy MOORE, was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, March 19, 1830, and was reared upon the old homestead. In 1855 he settled on the farm where his brother John resides, and lived there until 1859. In that year he purchased his present farm of 100 acres, in Brady township, which he has since cleared and improved. On May 10, 1855, he married Elizabeth A. MOORE, a daugher of James MOORE, of Worth township, and their children are as follows: Willis J., deceased; Jefferson W.; Cyrus G.; Elizabeth A., wife of W. L. CONNELL; Mattie A., wife of John G. THOMPSON; William M., and Charles S. Mr. MOORE is a member of Slippery Rock United Presbyterian church, in which he has filled the office of trustee. He is a stanch Republican, and has served as school director, and held other minor offices in his township. For the past nineteen years he has been a director and agent of the Worth Mutual Insurance Company, and always takes a decided interest in public matters.

JOHN C. MOORE was born July 8, 1836, upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, son of Isaac and Nancy MOORE. He resided with his parents until August, 1861, when he enlisted in Company C, One Hundreth [sic] Pennsylvania Volunteers, known as the "Round Heads," and served three years and eleven months, participating in the following engagements: Port Royal, Hilton Head Ferry, James Island, where he was wounded in the left shoulder, was in the hospitals at Hilton Head, and New York city, and after four months returned to his regiment; Sulphur Springs, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Knoxville, siege of Vicksburg, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, and other engagements. He returned to Butler county at the close of the war, and remained at home until [p. 1272] 1866, when he purchased his present farm, upon which he has since resided. He married Sarah WILSON, a daughter of David WILSON, of Clay township, in 1866, and has two children, viz.: Frank W., who married Etta WEIGLE, and Laura E., wife of John HUMPHREY. Mr. MOORE and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville. In politics, he is a Republican, and is a member of WATSON Brothers Post, G. A. R.

ELI J. MOORE, fourth son of Isaac and Nancy MOORE, was born upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, March 19, 1841, received a common school education, and remained with his parents until August, 1864, when he enlisted in Company A, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery. He served until the close of the war, then returned to the homestead, and remained working upon it for two years. At the end of this time he entered the employ of W. E. KIRKER, of Harlansburg, Lawrence county, and clerked for him four years. He then returned to the homestead, where he has since resided, cultivating it in connection with a small farm of his own. He married Rachel SHAFFER, a daughter of Samuel SHAFFER, of Lawrence county, and has three children, viz.: Blanche; Ira L., and Floyd R. Mr. MOORE is an adherent of the Republican party, and has filled the office of overseer of the poor for twelve years and school director for three years. He has always taken a commendable interest in the local affairs of his township. Both he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church, in which he fills the office of elder. He is connected with WATSON Brothers Post, G. A. R., of Portersville.

WILLIAM S. MOORE, fifth son of Isaac and Nancy MOORE, was born October 18, 1843, upon the old homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, was educated in the public schools, and reared a farmer. He taught in the schools of Muddy Creek and Worth townships for four years, and in 1871 located on his present farm, which is considered one of the best in the township. It contains 100 acres, with good improvements, all of which he has made since locating upon it. He married Margaret TEBAY, a daughter of John TEBAY, of Muddy Creek township. She died in February, 1882, the mother of four children, as follows: Isaac H., deceased; William P., a teacher; Maud S., and Minnie P. He married for his second wife, Sadie BUCHANAN, a daughter of James BUCHANAN, of Mercer township. Politically, he is a Republican, and was elected justice of the peace in 1880, and again in 1893. He has always manifested a commendable interest in the schools of his township and has served as school director for several years. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville, and has been choir leader for thirty years.

CHARLES MOORE, son of Samuel and Sarah MOORE, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1807, was reared in that county, and was twenty years of age when his parents located in Butler county. He subsequently settled upon the farm where his son Robert now resides, in Muddy Creek township, which he cleared and improved. He married Margaret WHITE, a daughter of Robert WHITE, of Lawrence county, to which union were born the following children: John, a resident of Kansas; Jane, wife of James SNOOKS; Sarah, deceased wife of Thomas McMURRAY; Robert; Mary E., wife of Rev. Elim THOMAS, and Samuel, of Pittsburg. Mr. MOORE died in 1843. His widow married James ENGLISH, [p. 1273] by whom she had two children: Murray E., and William. She died April 1, 1887. Mr. MOORE is buried in the United Presbyterian churchyard at Montville, Lawrence county.

ROBERT MOORE, second son of Charles and Margaret MOORE, was born September 3, 1839, upon the homestead farm in Muddy Creek township, which property he now owns, having purchased it in 1873. He received his education in the district school, and has been engaged in farming since boyhood. He married Rachel SCOTT, a daughter of John SCOTT, of Muddy Creek township, to which union have been born ten children, nine of whom are living, viz.: Cora, wife of Robert KENNEDY; James; Annie; Lizzie; Sadie; Mary; Nannie; Robert, and Francis. In August, 1861, Mr. MOORE enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine momnths. He is a member of WATSON Brothers Post, G. A. R., of Portersville. Politically, he is a Republican, and is now filling the offices of school director, township treasurer, and clerk. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville.

EDWARD WHITE, SR., was a native of Down county, Ireland, and immigrated to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and subsequently to Pittsburg, at an early day. He afterwards settled upon a tract of 200 acres of land in Butler county, close to the line of Lawrence. He was twice married, his first wife being a Miss CHRISTIE, who became the mother of the following children: James, who settled upon an adjoining tract of 200 acres; John; Mrs. Ann WILSON; Joseph, and Mrs. Jane CIST. His second wife was a Mrs. FOOD, to whom were born two children, viz.: Thomas, and Charles. The father died at the home of his son, Joseph, in Muddy Creek township.

JOSEPH WHITE, third son of Edward WHITE, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1792. His mother dying when he was quite young, he was thrown upon his own resources in early boyhood. He grew to manhood in Allegheny county, and early in the present century came to Butler county and purchased 200 acres of land from a Mrs. ELLIOT, situated where his sons, Charles F. and J. Milton, now live, in Muddy Creek township. He resided upon this land, clearing and improving it, until his death, which occurred in 1873. He married Sarah CRATTY, a daughter of James CRATTY, and they were the parents of the following children: James C., of Beaver Falls; Edward, and Newton, both deceased; Mary A., a resident of Butler; J. Milton; Thomas P.; William C.; and Elizabeth J., the last three being dead, and Charles F.; also four that died in infancy. Mr. WHITE was a soldier in the War of 1812, serving in Captain MARTIN's company, of Butler county. Politically, he was a Democrat, and filled the offices of school director and supervisor. His wife died in May, 1889. Both she and husband were members of the United Presbyterian church of Prospect.

J. MILTON WHITE, son of Joseph and Sarah WHITE, was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, September 6, 1840, and was reared and educated in his native township. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served five months, when he was discharged because of physical disability. He then settled upon his present homestead of 100 acres, and has made many improvements by the erection of [p. 1274] buildings, etc. He married Mary E. GALLAGHER, a daughter of John GALLAGHER. She died in 1877, leaving a family of six children, viz.: Albert E.; Anderson F.; Lawrence M.; Cora E.; Jackson W., and John D. He married for his second wife Margaret E. FLEMING, a daughter of Robert FLEMING, of Petersville, Connoquenessing township. Mr. WHITE is a member of the Portersville Presbyterian church, and is connected with WATSON Brothers Post, G. A.R. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has held the office of school director in this township.

CHARLES F. WHITE, youngest son of Joseph and Sarah WHITE, was born upon his present homestead in Muddy Creek township, August 29, 1846, and has spent his entire life in his native township. In 1875 he married Nancy A. GALLAGHER, a daughter of John GALLAGHER, and has three children: Curtis L.; Mintie F., and Ada L. Politically, he is a Republican, and is a member of the United Presbyterian church. He is engaged in mining coal upon his farm, from the same mines developed by his father fifty years ago, which now produce about 20,000 bushels per year.

JAMES ENGLISH, a native of Ireland, settled upon the farm where his grandson, William F., now resides, in Muddy Creek township, Butler county. It consisted of 200 acres, a portion of a tract purchased by his wife's father. He married Mary GALLAGHER, and their family were as follows: John; Margaret, who married Steel BRYAN; Jane, who married Zeni DURREN' Elizabeth, who married James PISOR; Isaiah; James Y.; Mary Ann, who married Valentine WHITMER; David, and William. Mr. ENGLISH and wife were early members of the United Presbyterian church of Portersville, and both died in Muddy Creek township.

JAMES Y. ENGLISH, third son of James and Mary ENGLISH, was born in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, in 1832. He grew to manhood in that township, and lived with his parents until 1861, when he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was severely wounded in the right arm at the battle of Fredericksburg, and was afterwards discharged from the service. He settled on a farm in Franklin township, after his marriage to Jane FORRESTER, a daughter of William FORRESTER, and died there in June, 1892. Their children were as follows: William F.; Leroy; Newton, deceased; Edward; Martha, deceased; Mary, deceased; Henry; Judson; Susan, and Ford. Mr. ENGLISH was an enterprising citizen, and filled many of the township offices; in politics, he was a Republican, and was a prominent member of the Zion Baptist church. His widow resides upon the homestead in Franklin township.

WILLIAM F. ENGLISH, eldest son of James Y. and Jane ENGLISH, was born in Franklin township, Butler county, June 19, 1856, received a common school education, and afterwards taught in the schools of Franklin, Fairview and Washington townships for six years. In 1881 he settled upon the old English homestead in Muddy Creek township, where he is cultivating 100 acres, and engaged in the dairy business. He married Eliza Jane HILLIARD, a daughter of Frederick HILLIARD, and has four children, viz.: Newton; Pearl; Enos, and [p. 1275] James. He is a member of Zion Baptist church, and in politics, he is an adherent of the Republican party.

NICHOLAS BARKLEY was born near Hesse-Cassel, Germany, in 1784, was reared upon his father's farm, and cultivated a farm of his own in his native land before coming to America. He married in Germany, Ann STRUTT, and became the father of the following children: Margaret, widow of William CLEAVER; Nicholas, deceased; Conrad; George, deceased; John, a resident of Ohio; Hartman, who resides in Pittsburg, and Elizabeth, deceased wife of Cornelius BEIGHLEY. In 1834 Mr. BARKLEY and family immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Muddy Creek township, Butler county. He purchased 400 acres of land, which is now in possession of his son Conrad, and grandsons, and Mrs. Edward BEIGHLEY, his grand-daughter. After his settlement here he commenced clearing and improving his land, but lived only three years, dying in April, 1837. His wife died the following month, and both were buried in the graveyard at the Lutheran church, in Lancaster township. They were members of that society and very worthy people.

CONRAD BARKLEY, SR., second son of Nicholas and Ann BARKLEY, was born near Hesse-Cassel, Germany, September 14, 1816, and was eighteen years old when his parents immigrated to Butler county. After attaining his majority, he received 200 acres of the land purchased by his father, to which he has since added 100 acres more. He cleared and improved the homestead, and his entire life since coming to this county has been spent upon it. He has divided 200 acres of this land between his sons, retaining 100 for himself, upon which are very substantial buildings and other good improvements. He married Margaret STAAF, a daughter of Milton STAAF, a native of Germany, who settled in Lancaster township. Eleven children were born to this union, eight of whom are living, viz.: John; Conrad; William; Samuel; Elias; George A.; Margaret, wife of George FLINNER, and Mary, wife of Robert CAMPBELL. Mr. BARKLEY is a member of the Lutheran church of Middle Lancaster, is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the oldest living citizens of Muddy Creek township.

JOHN BARKLEY, oldest son of Conrad BARKLEY, was born June 29, 1842, and reared on the homestead farm. He married Eva BLOOM, born March 26, 1849, a daughter of Nicholas BLOOM, of Zelienople, to which union have been born nine children, as follows: Nettie E., wife of John NAGGEL; Tillie M., wife of William G. DUNCAN; Josephine S.; Henry E.; Austin S.; Clarence I.; Charles A.; Sidney A., and Bessie V. The family belong to the Lutheran church.

CONRAD BARKLEY, second son of Conrad and Margaret BARKLEY, was born upon the homestead in Muddy Creek township, and has always resided in his native township. He married Caroline KOCH and has two children: John A., and Clara. He resides on a portion of the original farm which he received from his father. Politically, he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM BARKLEY, third son of Conrad and Margaret BARKLEY, was born and reared upon the homestead farm, and received fifty-five acres of land from his father. In 1871 he married Mary SCHEIDEMANTLE, and has four children: Lizzie, wife of George GROSS; William; Annie, and Henry. Mr. BARKLEY is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party.

[p. 1276]
SAMUEL BARKLEY, fourth son of Conrad BARKLEY, was born June 20, 1851. He was reared on the homestead farm, learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1878 received a house and lot from his father in Middle Lancaster. He married Elizabeth BEHM, daughter of Adam BEHM, of Middle Lancaster, to which union there have been born seven children, as follows: Clara Emma; William Edward; Samuel Albert; Annie Catherine; George Martin; Herman F., and an infant son. The family are members of the Lutheran church of Middle Lancaster.

ELIAS BARKLEY, fifth son of Conrad and Margaret BARKLEY, was born September 3, 1857, in Muddy Creek township, received a common school education, and was reared a farmer. In 1881 he settled upon fifty acres of the original homestead, to which he has since added thirty-five acres, and has made all the improvements. On April 14, 1879, he married Leah BEHM, a daughter of Adam BEHM, and is the father of six children, as follows: Sadie A.; Harry E., deceased; Maggie K.; Perry M.; Ida C., and Lizzie. In politics, Mr. BARKLEY is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the Lutheran church at Middle Lancaster.

GEORGE A. BARKLEY was born November 6, 1863, in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm, which has always been his residence. In 1886, he married Anna BAUDER, a daughter of Nicholas BAUDER, of Muddy Creek township, and has four children, viz.: Emma; Mary; Pierson, and Anna. Mr. BARKLEY is a member of the Presbyterian church of Portersville, is an adherent of the Democratic party, and is one of the enterprising young farmers of his township.

GEORGE BARKLEY was born near Hesse-Cassel, Germany, in 1818, third son of Nicholas and Ann (STRUTT) BARKLEY. In 1834 the family immigrated to Pennsylvania, and settled in Butler county. George subsequently went to Pittsburg, where he followed various occupations until 1852, when he returned to Butler county, and purchased 140 acres of land in Muddy Creek township, now the home of his son Alfred H., where he resided until his death, in 1877. He married Margaret BEHM, a daughter of Nicholas BEHM, who still resides upon the homestead farm. They were the parents of the following children: Catherine, wife of Henry HYLE; John, of Franklin township; Sarah, wife of Samuel KNOX; Margaret, wife of Joachim SNYDER; Emma, wife of David WEST; Mary, widow of Jonathan JONES, and Alfred H. In politics, Mr. BARKLEY was a Democrat. He was a member of the Lutheran church, in which organization he filled the office of elder.

ALFRED H. BARKLEY, youngest son of George and Margaret BARKLEY, was born upon the homestead in Muddy Creek township, in 1862, received a common school education, and after reaching his maturity, purchased the farm from his parents. In 1891 oil was developed upon it, and thirteen wells have since been put down, with a total production of 200 barrels per day. In 1885 he married Emma WIMER, a daughter of Jonathan WIMER, of Worth township, and has three children, viz.: Floyd; Gladys, and Paul. Mr. BARKLEY is an adherent of the Democratic party, and is a member of Rustic Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Prospect. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church, of [p. 1277] which he is also an attendant. He is one of the enterprising, substantial and progressive farmers of his township.

PHILIP MELVIN, a native of Down county, Ireland, son of James MELVIN, was born in 1802, grew to maturity in his native land, and about 1821 immigrated to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He learned the cooper's trade in that county, and followed it for some years in Allegheny City. He married Eliza SETH, a daughter of Jacob SETH, of Beaver county, to which union were born the following children: Ann J., wife of James M. BRECKENRIDGE; Elizabeth, wife of Frank DAVIS; David R.; Charlotte, deceased wife of William LOCK, and Philip S., of Kansas. In 1836 Mr. MELVIN removed to Muddy Creek township, Butler county, and settled upon the farm now in possession of his son David's children. He purchased 200 acres of land, which was patented by James STEWART in 1787. Here he erected a home and devoted the remainder of his life to agricultural pursuits, in connection with his trade, which he followed down to within a few years of his death, in 1882. In early manhood he was a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and always took a deep interest in political matters. Mr. MELVIN was one of the original members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Portersville, and died a member of the society at Prospect.

DAVID R. MELVIN was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, November 14, 1832, and is the eldest son of Philip and Eliza MELVIN. He remained with his parents until he learned the wagon-maker's trade, and in 1856 established that business upon his farm in Muddy Creek township, and conducted the same for twenty years. He also engaged in farming. In 1855 he married Susan ROBERTS, a daughter of William ROBERTS, of Lawrence county, to which union have been born eight children, six of whom survive, as follows: Emma, wife of Gilmer SHARP; Herman P.; Olive, wife of A. J. FRANCIS; Jennie, wife of Wm. S. LUTZ; William W., and August H. Mr. MELVIN is a Republican, and has filled the offices of constable, supervisor and school director. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Prospect.

LOTT WILSON was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1831, son of James and Mary (BAUM) WILSON, and came with his parents to Butler county in 1844. His father was a native of Berks county, whence he removed to Westmoreland county, and afterwards to Butler county. After a few years' residence in Connoquenessing township, he removed to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he died. By his marriage to Mary BAUM he became the father of the following children: Martha J., who married Hiram MILHUISEN; Tamson, who married James CRATTY; William, of Lancaster township, and Lott. The subject of this sketch learned the cooper's trade, which he followed until 1854, and then settled upon the farm where he now resides. It contains 100 acres, which he has cleared and improved, and for the past forty years he has devoted his attention to farming. Mr. WILSON was married in 1854, to Nancy GALLAGHER, a daughter of James GALLAGHER, to which union have been born five children, viz.: Dunwoody; James; Henderson; Robert; William; Jane, wife of Vest SHARP; Tillie, and two that died in infancy. In politics, Mr. WILSON is a Republican, and he is a member of the Lutheran church of Prospect.

[p. 1278]
JOHN BAUDER, SR., was born at Mett, Canton of Berne, Switzerland, November 19, 1807, son of Abraham and Rose (WALTERS) BAUDER, natives of the same country. He learned the cooper's trade in youth, and in 1831 immigrated with his parents to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, where he found employment upon the construction of the Pittsburg and Allegheny aqueduct, of the Pennsylvania canal. He afterwards engaged in the dairy business, and then purchased a farm six miles west of Allegheny City, where he lived until the spring of 1852. At that time he removed to Butler county, purchasing 450 acres of land in Muddy Creek township, where his sons, Henry, Jacob, Frederick, and Nicholas, and his daughter, Mrs. T. P. KENNEDY, now reside. His parents came with him to this county, died here, and are interred in the Presbyterian cemetery at Portersville. In 1867 he and son Henry erected the mill now operated by the latter, who purchased his father's interest in 1870. In the latter year Mr. BAUDER retired from active business, and spent the remaining years of his life upon his farm. Politically, he was a Whig in early days, and afterwards a Republican. He married Anna WILOMA, a native of Berne, Switzerland, and they became the parents of the following children: John, a resident of California; Anna, deceased wife of Nicholas VOEGHTLEY; Jacob; Nicholas; Mary, wife of T. P. KENNEDY; Frederick, and Henry, all residents of Muddy Creek township; William, of Lawrence county; Charles, of Washington county; Samuel, of Beaver county; Edwin, a resident of California, and two that died in early youth. Mr. BAUDER and wife were members of the German Reformed church, in which society he filled the office of deacon. He died March 19, 1886, and his wife, July 29, 1887. They were interred in the German Reformed cemetery, at Middle Lancaster.

HENRY BAUDER, son of John and Anna BAUDER, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 20, 1841, and came with his parents to Butler county when eleven years of age. He attended the district school of his neighborhood, and upon reaching his majority he went to Allegheny county and learned the miller's trade. After completing his apprenticeship he spent two years in Cleveland working at his trade, and subsequently four years in St. Louis. Returning to Butler county he obtained a position as miller in the KENNEDY mill, on Slippery Rock, where he worked for two years. In 1867 he formed a partnership with his father, in the erection of the BAUDER mill, in Muddy Creek township, and has since carried on business at that point. He was associated with his father, in the erection of the BAUDER mill, in Muddy Creek township, and has since carried on business at that point. He was associated with his father, and afterwards with his brother John. The latter sold his interest to Samuel and Edward BAUDER, and they afterwards disposed of their interests to Henry, who has always been the practical member of the firm, and is now sole poroprietor. The mill has a daily capacity of thirty barrels, and is operated by steam. Mr. BAUDER is also engaged in farming, and is quite a prosperous business man. He married Johanna PYLE, a daughter of Joseph PYLE, of Muddy Creek township, and they are the parents of five children, viz.: Melissa J., wife of Henry J. MARKS; Cora, wife of F. R. WIMER; Ellen R.; George C., and Edna. Mr. BAUDER has been a member of the United Presbyterian church for twenty years, and is one of the ruling elders of the Portersville church. In politics, he is a Republican, and takes a deep interest in the success of his party.

[p. 1279]
JACOB BAUDER, second son of John and Anna BAUDER, was born May 18, 1834, in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, and grew to maturity in that county. He accompanied his parents to Butler county, and remained with them until 1865, when he purchased a farm in Muddy Creek township, upon which he lived for seven years. He then returned to the homestead farm, where he has since resided, being now the owner of 225 acres. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three months. He was married in 1865, to Louisa BRATSCHI, a daughter of Samuel BRATSCHI, who resided in Muddy Creek township down to his death. Four children have been the fruits of this union, as follows: John N., a resident of Portersville; Elizabeth A., wife of John G. LUTZ, of Lancaster township; Franklin E., and Henrietta R. Politically, Mr. BAUDER is a Republican, is a member of Portersville Lodge, Number 909, I. O. O. F., and is one of the leading farmers of Muddy Creek township.

NICHOLAS BAUDER, third son of John and Anna BAUDER, was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, December 6, 1835, received a common school education, and was reared a farmer. He came with his parents to Butler county, and assisted his father in clearing and improving the lands purchased in Muddy Creek township. In 1864 he bought fifty acres from his father, erected a residence upon it and made other necessary improvements; he has also added considerable to the acreage of his farm since making his first purchase. In connection with his farm duties, Mr. BAUDER has been engaged for some years in purchasing and selling live stock. In 1861 he married Anna BRATSCHI, a daughter of Samuel BRATSCHI, who emigrated to this county in 1856, from Switzerland, and settled near Middle Lancaster. After his wife's death Mr. BRATSCHI made his home with the subject of this sketch until his death, in 1892, at the age of eighty-three years. He was a member of the German Reformed church of Middle Lancaster, and in politics, a Republican. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. BAUDER, as follows: Anna, wife of George BARKLEY; Nicholas, deceased; Samuel, who married Nettie POWELL; Helena; Emma, deceased wife of William COVERT; Hays, and Herman. Politically, Mr. BAUDER is a Republican, and has filled the office of overseer of the poor for one term, and also that of supervisor four terms. He is a member of the German Reformed church of Middle Lancaster, is connected with Portersville Lodge, Number 909, I. O. O. F., and is also a member of the Encampment.

FREDERICK BAUDER, fourth son of John and Anna BAUDER, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1839, and when thirteen years of age came with his parents to Butler county, where he attended the public schools of his district, and grew to manhood upon his father's farm in Muddy Creek township. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers, known as the "Round Heads," and served until December 28, 1863, he then re-enlisted and remained in the army until mustered out, July 25, 1865. He participated in the following engagements: The capture of Port Royal, James Island, where he was struck with a piece of shell on the shoulder, but not severely injured, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, where he was wounded in the right index finger, Antietam, Fredericksburg, siege [p. 1280] of Knoxville, Vicksburg, the Wilderness, and Spottsylvania Court House. In the last mentioned battle he was severely wounded. A minie-ball entered his upper lip, on the left side, and came out through the right cheek, tearing out his teeth and nearly severing his tongue. He was confined for several months in Mount Pleasant and McClellan Hospitals, Washington, D. C., and at the hospitals in Germantown, near Philadelphia, and Pittsburg. He was discharged from the last mentioned hospital October 15, 1864, was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, and located in Washington, D. C., doing guard duty, until mustered out of the service. Returning to his home in Muddy Creek township he purchased a part of the old homestead, and has since been engaged in general farming and coal operating, having two coal banks upon his farm. Mr. BAUDER was married in 1867, to Rebecca J. WIMER, a daughter of Isaac WIMER, of Muddy Creek township, and has four children, viz.: Robert J.; Frederick U., deceased; Jeannette, wife of James POWELL, and Eliza, wife of John WAGNER. Mr. BAUDER is a member of WATSON Brothers Post, Number 478, G. A. R., also of Portersville Lodge and Encampment, I. O. O. F. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, takes quite an active interest in the local politics of his township, and has served as supervisor and collector.

REUBEN FISHER was born in Slippery Rock township, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in 1817, son of George FISHER, a native of Westmoreland county, who removed to what is now Lawrence county about 1797. He settled upon 100 acres of land in Slippery Rock township, where he spent the remainder of his life. His children were as follows: John; Solomon; Henry; Jacob; Reuben; Isaac; William; Polly; Katie; Bessie, and Andrew. Reuben was the fifth son in the family, and resided in Lawrence county until 1845, in which year he purchased a farm in Butler county, close to the county line, upon which he lived for fourteen years engaged in farming. He then bought a grist mill at Harlansburg, Lawrence county, which he operated until 1863. In that year he purchased 180 acres of land in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, where his sons, Washington and Thomas, now live, and resided upon it until his death, in 1869. He was twice married, his first wife being a Miss KENNEDY, who did not long survive her marriage. His second wife was Barbara BURTON, to whom were born the following children: Washington; Reuben, of Cranberry township; Thomas; Phoebe, who married Jacob LEIGHT; Catherine; Salina, wife of William UPDEGRAFF, and Lizzie. Mr. FISHER was a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church, of Rose Point, Lawrence county, and died in that faith.

WASHINGTON FISHER, eldest son of Reuben and Barbara FISHER, was born August 9, 1840, in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, received his education at the common schools, and resided with his parents in Lawrence and Butler counties until his manhood. He married Sarah E. POLLOCK, a daughter of Alexander POLLOCK, of Lawrence county, and has one son, Chester L. He is engaged in farming on a portion of the old homestead in Muddy Creek township.

THOMAS FISHER, third son of Reuben and Barbara (BURTON) FISHER, was born in Slippery Rock township, Lawrence county, September 7, 1859, and was reared upon the homestead in Muddy Creek township, Butler county. Upon the death of his father he received fifty acres of land, to which he has since added [p. 1281] twenty acres more, erected buildings and otherwise improved his farm. He married Dora TAYLOR, a daughter of William TAYLOR, of Lawrence county, which union has been blessed by three children, viz.: Ernest; Madge, and Winifred. Mr. FISHER was reared in the Covenanter church, and is now a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church, of Rose Point, Lawrence county, in which society he is superintendent of the Sunday school. He is one of the progressive and enterprising farmers of the community.

ALEXANDER C. WELLER is a son of John and Mary (VANCE) WELLER, and a grandson of Philip WELLER, who came from New Jersey, in 1812, and located on Big run, near New Castle, Lawrence county. John WELLER was born in New Jersey, in 1800, came with his parents to Lawrence county, there grew to manhood, and married Mary VANCE. He died in that county in 1888. They were the parents of six sons and five daughters. Alexander C. is the youngest son, and was born September 5, 1845. He received a common school education, and lived with his parents until 1867, when he settled upon his present farm of 114 acres, in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, where he has since been engaged in general farming. In 1866 he married Mary A. RIDDLE, a daughter of John RIDDLE, of Butler county. Ten children have been the fruits of this union, as follows: Cynthia E., wife of Jonas FRY; William N.; Margaret J., wife of Dallas WIMER; Minnie, wife of Glenn GOVES; Elizabeth A.; John R.; Laura; George A.; Ada R., and Wealthy Emma. In 1864 Mr. WELLER enlisted in Company I, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until the close of the war. He is a member of WATSON Brothers Post, G. A. R., of Portersville, and is an ardent supporter of the Republican party.


[End of Chapter 74-2 (pgs.1243-1281) - Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough
History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895]

Previous Chapter 74-1 (pgs.1203-1243) - Biographical Sketches: Slippery Rock Township and Centreville Borough; Mercer Township and Harrisville Borough; Worth and Brady Townships; Franklin Twp and Prospect Borough; Muddy Creek Township and Portersville Borough
Next Chapter 75-1 (pgs.1281-1304) - Biographical Sketches: Cherry, Washington, Marion, Venango, Parker and Allegheny Townships
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Updated: 31 Jul 2001