History of Butler County Pennsylvania, 1895

Biographical Sketches, Chapter 75 (Pgs. 1281-1304)

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Link to plat maps of Butler townships and boroughs from the Atlas of Butler County, G.M. Hopkins & Co., 1874. Please read the explanation and caution about this transcription. Use your browser's "search" or "find" capability to look for surnames in the chapter that are not included as biographical sketches. Transcribed by: Pat Collins.


CHAPTER LXXV

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Cherry, Washington, Marion, Venango, Parker and Allegheny Townships

[p. 1281]

JOHN CHRISTY, a native of Ireland, immigrated to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, toward the middle of the last century, and settled on a farm near the site of Greensburg. He there married Sarah DUNBAR, and in the spring of 1799 removed to Butler county and purchased 400 acres of land in what is now Cherry township, situated where his grand-daughter, Mrs. Martha CAMPBELL, now lives. Here he erected a cabin in the primitive forest, and spent the remaining years of his life in clearing and improving a home for his children. His death occurred about 1820. The following children were born of his marriage to Sarah Dunbar: Andrew, and David, both of whom died in Cherry township; [p. 1282] John, who died in Donegal township; James, who died in Cherry; William, who died at Parker's Landing; Dunbar, who died in Cherry; Robert, and George, both of whom died in the same township; Gilbert, who died in Mercer county; Mary; Anna; Elizabeth, and Sarah, all of whom became the heads of families.

DUNBAR CHRISTY, son of John and Sarah CHRISTY, was born in Westmoreland county, in 1793, and was six years old when his parents settled in Cherry township. Here he grew to manhood, and purchased a tract of 400 acres in Clay township, his farm being where James PORTER now resides. In 1837 he sold the original farm and purchased the property where Mrs. Elizabeth CHRISTY lives, consisting of 200 acres, and died upon this farm March 7, 1883. Mr. CHRISTY was married on June 16, 1818, to Mary FINDLEY, a daughter of Judge Samuel FINDLEY, of Clay township, one of the first associate judges of the county. She died in 1870, at the age of eighty-two years. Their children were as follows: Mary, who died in early youth; John F., who died in 1885; Samuel D., who died in 1864, while serving in the Union army; David D., a minister of the United Presbyterian church, residing in Kansas; Robert F., of Cherry township, and Sarah A., who died in infancy. Mr. CHRISTY was a member of the Associate Reformed church in early life, and one of the original members of West Sunbury United Presbyterian church, being one of the first elders in that society. In politics, he was first a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and took an active interest in public affairs.

ROBERT F. CHRISTY, youngest son of Dunbar and Mary CHRISTY, was born August 20, 1828, upon the homestead farm in Clay township, received a common school and academic education, and remained with his parents until their death. He followed teaching for several years, and was engaged in farming until 1893, in which year he retired from active business life. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, at West Sunbury, is a Republican, in politics, and is one of the esteemed and progressive citizens of his township.

ROBERT BLACK, a native of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, born about 1770, was one of the early settlers of Cherry township, Butler county. He was married in Huntingdon county, to Elizabeth GROSSMAN, a daughter of Benedict and Betsey (STIVERT) GROSSMAN, and in 1797 the whole family came to Butler county. Mr. GROSSMAN brought out a small stock of goods, opened a store in a log building in Washington township, and placed Robert BLACK in charge of the same, but the store was soon removed to their new home in Cherry township, where they carried on the business for several years. About 1800 Mr. BLACK purchased 250 acres of land in Cherry township, where his son Joseph now resides. Here he cleared a farm and passed the remaining years of his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. His children were as follows: Benjamin, born in 1800, and died in Cherry township; Henry, who died in Brady township; Margaret, deceased; Robert, who went west and there died; John, who died in Concord township; Elizabeth, deceased wife of John PIERCE; Adam, who died on a part of the old homestead; James, who died in Allegheny township; Simon, who died in the same township; Joseph; Mary, deceased wife of John TURNER, and Eli, of West Sunbury. Mr. BLACK and wife were life-long [p. 1283] members of the Presbyterian church, and in politics he was a Whig. He was one of the pioneer constables of his township.

JOSEPH BLACK, son of Robert and Elizabeth BLACK, was born in Cherry township, on his present homestead, July 6, 1820. He was reared on the farm, and followed the millwright's trade four years. He then settled on the old homestead, subsequently purchased 178 acres of the original tract, and continued to farm the same until 1882, in which year he retired, and now resides with his daughter, Mrs. Henry PETERS. Mr. BLACK married Polly McCALLEN, a daughter of Robert McCALLEN, who became the mother of the following children: Mary E., wife of Joseph KENAHAN; Robert McCALLEN, who married Keziah McCOY in 1872, and who resides on the old homestead; Julia Ann, wife of Henry PETERS; John C.; Eli C., and Maria, the last three of whom are deceased. Politically, Mr. BLACK is a Republican, and is an adherent of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church, in which society he has filled the office of trustee. He is one of the oldest citizens in the township, and is highly respected by the people of the community.

HENRY PETERS was born in Germany, in 1854, and is a son of Henry PETERS. He immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1874, and found employment in the mines and oil fields of Butler county. In 1879 he married Julia Ann BLACK, a daughter of Joseph BLACK, and settled upon eighty acres of the BLACK homestead. In politics, Mr. PETERS is a Republican, and takes a deep interest in public affairs. He is a member of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church, and is a public-spirited and progressive farmer.

JAMES BOVARD was born in Ireland, in 1776, a son of John BOVARD, a native of Donegal county, who immigrated to Pennsylvania about 1786, and settled in Westmoreland county. The family of John BOVARD consisted of five children, viz: John; Charles; James; Fanny, who married William CHAMBERS, and Mary, who married Robert FOSTER. James was the only member of the family who settled in Butler county. In 1798 he purchased 200 acres of land in what is now Fairview township, a part of the site of Karns City, and resided there until the spring of 1824. The previous year he bought 250 acres of land in what is now Cherry township, to which he removed with his family the following spring. The homestead is now in possession of his grandson, Charles B. Bovard. He cleared the land, erected buildings thereon, and resided there down to his death. In youth he obtained a very limited education, but through the passing years acquired a wide knowledge of public affairs. He was a stanch Democrat, filled the various township offices, was county commissioner one term, and associate judge of Butler county for thirty-six years. In early life he was connected with the Associate Reformed church, known as Unity church, but when Centreville United Presbyterian church was organized he joined that body and gave liberally of his means toward the erection of a church building. He filled the office of elder until his death, which occurred in 1853. Mr. BOVARD was married in Westmoreland county, before his removal to Butler county, to Jane CHAMBERS, a daughter of James CHAMBERS. Ten children were born to this union as follows: William; John; Jane, who married Thomas FLOYD; James C.; Fanny; Johnson; [p. 1284] Hutchison; Charles; George, and Washington, all of whom are dead except the last mentioned.

WASHINGTON BOVARD, youngest son of James and Jane BOVARD, was born in Fairview township, Butler county, April 9, 1819. He resided with his parents until maturity, and received his education in the pioneer schools of his neighborhood. In 1845 he embarked in merchandising at West Sunbury, which business he followed for five years. He then settled upon a part of the homestead farm in Cherry township, where he has resided down to the present, owning a farm of 140 acres of well improved land. In 1847 he married Naomi McJUNKIN, a daughter of William McJUNKIN, to which union have been born the following children: Imelda, wife of John BAILEY; James, deceased, who married Sarah HALL; Angeline, wife of Clarence CAMPBELL; William D., who married Belle BUCHANAN; Orrin D., of Pittsburg, and Margaret, wife of H.Q. WALKER. Mr. BOVARD and wife are members of Bethel United Presbyterian church, in which society he fills the office of elder. Politically, he is a Prohibitionist, always true to his party and an ardent advocate of its principles. In 1855 he was elected a justice of the peace, in which office he served five years. He has been a school director for twenty years, and has filled many other offices in the township. The postoffice at Bovard, also the railroad station, were named in his honor. He is one of the prominent, respected and enterprising citizens of the community.

CHARLES B. BOVARD, son of Charles and Mary BOVARD, was born upon the homestead where he now resides, September 3, 1859, received a public school education, and has followed farming since boyhood. He now owns fifty-four acres of well improved land. In politics, he is a Democrat, and in religious faith is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of Centreville. Mr. BOVARD is connected with Lodge, Number 408, Farmers Alliance, of Branchton, and is one of the enterprising farmers of his community.

JOSEPH McCOY was a son of Thomas and Catherine McCOY, who removed from Virginia to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, prior to 1800. He remained with his parents in Mercer county until 1802, in which year he settled in Mercer township, Butler county. He had previously married Isabella CRAIG, a native of Virginia, to which union were born the following children: Thomas; John; Nancy, who married David JOHNSON; Hiram C.; Elizabeth, who married Alexander BLACK, and after his death Robert MITCHELL; Hugh; David; William, and Lewis. Mr. McCOY remained upon his farm in this county until 1820, when he went to Louisiana for the purpose of erecting a mill, and there died of yellow fever. He was a soldier from Butler county in the War of 1812.

HIRAM C. McCOY was born in Mercer township, Butler county, August 17, 1811, third son of Joseph and Isabella McCOY. He was about nine years old when his father died, leaving the family in straightened circumstances, and his opportunities for an education were thus limited to a few months each year in the pioneer schools of his neighborhood. At the age of seventeen he commenced to learn the wagon-maker's trade, which he followed for some years. He then entered the employ of Thomas KYLE, a merchant of Harrisville, later engaged in business with his employer, and opened a store in Wolf Creek township, [p. 1285] Mercer county. In 1850 he formed a partnership with Judge KERR and opened a store at Anandale, Butler county. He subsequently purchased KERR's interest and continued the business until 1861, in which year he was elected to the legislature, and re-elected in 1862. In 1863 he embarked in the hotel business at Anandale, and conducted a hotel there for several years. About 1868, in partnership with Jacob GROSSMAN, he built a grist mill at New Hope, Cherry township, and operated it for several years. In 1870 he was appointed an associate judge to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Judge CUMMINS, and was the Republican nominee for the same office, but was defeated by the late Samuel MARSHALL. In 1871, in connection with Charles DUFFY, he opened a general store at Anandale, and this partnership continued until 1878, when the firm of H. C. McCOY & Son was formed, and existed until the death of Judge McCOY, October 20, 1893. In politics, he was originally a Whig, but upon the formation of the Republican party he cast his fortunes with that organization and continued to support it down to his death. He was quite prominent in local affairs, and besides serving in the legislature and on the bench, he was a justice of the peace for some years, and also filled the positions of school director, postmaster, etc., for a long period. He was quite an extensive dealer in real estate, and actively identified with agricultural interests throughout his life. Judge McCOY was twice married; first in 1834, to Sarah McCALLEN, a daughter of Robert McCALLEN. She died in 1837, leaving three children, viz.: Lewis B., of Washington; Mary A., wife of Robert SHIRA, and Sarah M., wife of Ephraim BLACK. His second wife was Harriet McCALLEN, a sister of his first wife, to which union were born two children: Isabella, deceased wife of Lewis SEATON, and John F. Mrs. McCOY survives her husband and is spending her last years with her children. Judge McCOY was a member of the United Presbyterian church, a man of strong religious convictions, and gave liberally of his means toward the erection of the church building at Mt. Vernon. He was a man of broad views and liberal opinions, and one of the leading men of the community, being progressive, enterprising and public-spirited.

JOHN F. McCOY, youngest son of Hiram C. McCOY, was born May 10, 1857, in Butler county. He received a common school education, and was associated with his father in business until the death of the latter, since which event he has continued alone. He married Clara CHRISTLEY, a daughter of T. F. CHRISTLEY, of Cherry township. He has filled the office of postmaster of Anandale, and his wife is now holding the same position. Politically, he is a Republican.

HENRY WOLFORD, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, settled in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, in 1804, where he purchased 125 acres of land, erected a cabin and began life in the forests of this county. His father, John WOLFORD, was a native of eastern Pennsylvania, and came of Dutch ancestry. He lived and died in Westmoreland county where he followed the occupation of a miller and farmer. His family consisted of the following children: George; John; Peter; Henry; Christian; Daniel; Jacob; Betsey, and Susan. All of these died in Westmoreland county excepting George, who settled in Indiana county, John who located in Mercer county, and Henry who came [p.1286] to Butler county, and spent the remaining years of his life here. After residing in Slippery Rock township for many years, Henry purchased a small place at Coaltown, Cherry township, where he died. He married Mary FRICK, of Westmoreland county, to which union were born thirteen children, as follows: Mary, deceased wife of Daniel KIESTER; John, of Prospect; Henry, deceased; Betsey, widow of Samuel RALSTON; Margaret, deceased wife of Jesse KIESTER; Catherine, deceased wife of Joseph FAIR; Jacob; Daniel, deceased; Sarah, deceased wife of John KIESTER; George, deceased; Peter, of Venango county; Eli, a resident of Ohio, and Angeline, wife of Henry BOLINGER. Mr. WOLFORD was a member of the Lutheran church, and both he and wife died in that faith. In politics, he was a Whig.

JACOB WOLFORD, son of Henry and Mary WOLFORD, was born on the farm in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, April 22, 1817. He attended the pioneer subscription schools, and worked upon the farm assisting his parents in the home duties. At the age of twenty-two he settled in Clay township, and in 1848 he purchased 100 acres of land where he now resides, to which he has since added fifty acres, and also owns an adjoining farm of sixty-two acres. He has one of the best improved farms in Cherry township, but of late years has practically retired from
active labor, being now in his seventy-eighth year. Mr. WOLFORD married Lavina ADAMS, a daughter of John ADAMS, who bore him the following children: Perry; Emeline, wife of Foster HINDMAN; Milton, a resident of Illinois; Lewis, of the same State; Charlotte, and Nelson, both deceased; George; John, deceased; Sarah M., wife of William STEWART, and Angeline, wife of W. TINKER. Mr. WOLFORD is a Republican, and has filled the office of school director and other official positions in his township. He is one of the original members of the United Presbyterian church of West Sunbury, in which society he has been a trustee for twenty years. He has been a liberal contributor towards the erection of three church buildings in West Sunbury, and is a generous supporter of every worthy enterprise. He is one of the leading citizens of Cherry township, where he has resided for nearly half a century.

GEORGE BOOK, a native of Germany, came to the United States after the Revolutionary war, and subsequently settled in what is now Worth township, Butler county, where he died, February 5, 1823. He married Isabella VOGAN, who survived him until October 25, 1854. They were the parents of nine children, as follows: Ruth, who married Charles BRANT; Christine, who married Joseph STUDEBAKER; John; George; William; Samuel; James; Polly, who married Harlan VOGAN, and Isabella, who became the wife of Thomas SHANNON. The family were among the early settlers of Worth township.

JAMES BOOK, son of George and Isabella BOOK, was born upon the homestead in Worth township, Butler county, in 1812. He was reared in his native township and learned the trades of stonemason and shoemaker, which he followed there and at New Castle. He subsequently purchased a farm in Cherry township, where his sons, Charles H., and Uriah H. now live. After his settlement in Cherry township he worked at the stonemason's trade in connection with his farm until a few years preceding his death, which occurred April 8, 1868. Mr. BOOK married Mary STUDEBAKER, a daughter of David STUDEBAKER, [p. 1287] one of the first settlers of Butler county. She died in February, 1885, the mother of the following children: Isabella, deceased wife of Aquilla MILES; David P., who was captain of Company E, One Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Elizabeth N., who died in early youth; John G., who died in 1874; Charles H., and Uriah H. Mr. Book was one of the original members of Zion Baptist church, and in politics, he was a Democrat.

CHARLES H. BOOK, son of James and Mary BOOK, was born in 1847, in Worth township, Butler county. He was reared upon a farm, received a common school education, and settled upon a part of the homestead in Cherry township, where he made the present improvements. He married Martha WASSON, a daughter of William WASSON. They are members of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church, in which he holds the office of elder. He is an ardent Republican, has filled the position of school director, etc., in his township, and was a candidate for county treasurer in 1893.

URIAH H. BOOK, youngest son of James and Mary BOOK, was born October 8, 1850, in Worth township, Butler county, was reared on a farm and received a common school education. He learned the carriage-maker's trade, which he followed in Kentucky and Tennessee until 1880, when he embarked in the mercantile business at New Hope, Butler county, and subsequently removed to Kiester, where he continued the same business. In 1894 he engaged in oil producing, and is now operating in the Washington field. Politically, Mr. BOOK is a Democrat, and is one of the representative citizens of his township. He is a member of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church.

JESSE HALL was born in Cecil county, Maryland, in 1799, son of Isaac HALL, a native of the same State, and of English extraction. Jesse followed farming in his native county until 1837, in which year he traded his farm for 500 acres of land situated in what is now Cherry, Brady, Clay and Slippery Rock townships, the larger portion of which is yet owned by his descendants. He built his house upon the farm in Clay township now owned by Amos HALL, where he spent the remaining years of his life, dying in 1869. He married Mary ALEXANDER, of Cecil county, Maryland, who survived him about ten years, and both are buried in St. John's graveyard. Ten children were the fruits of this union, viz: Isaac A.; James W.; Robert B.; William P.; Caroline, widow of William SCOTT; Jesse R.; John N.; Mrs. Rachel BROWN; Amos, and Isaiah. In politics, Mr. HALL was a Republican. Some fifteen years before his death he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was the leading spirit in the organization of St. John's church and the erection of the building.

ISAAC A. HALL, eldest son of John and Mary HALL, was born in Cecil county, Maryland, January 5, 1824, came with his parents to Butler county, and grew to manhood upon the homestead in Clay township. At the age of twenty-two he received thirty-seven acres of his father's farm, and commenced the work of making a home, clearing off the timber and otherwise improving it. He has since added to his original farm 113 acres, and has erected all of the improvements. Mr. HALL has devoted his entire life to agriculture, and is the owner of one of the best improved farms in the northern part of the county. He retired from active business life in 1892, leaving the management of the farm to his son [p. 1288] Milton. Mr. HALL married Hannah McJUNKIN, a daughter of James McJUNKIN, to which union were born four children, viz.: Mary A., and Nancy, both deceased; Milton, who married Agnes GLENN, and Sarah, widow of James BOVARD. Mrs. HALL died January 21, 1895. She was a member of West Sunbury Presbyterian church. Mr. HALL is a member of the same society, and in politics, he is a Republican. He has led a very busy life, and although taking no active interest in public affairs, he has filled the office of school director in his township, and done his full share in the social and material development of the community.

JOHN SPROUL, a native of Down county, Ireland, settled on Oil creek, Venango county, about 1811. In 1816 he came to Butler county and purchased a farm near Mt. Chestnut, which he cleared and improved, and spent the remaining years of his life there. He was a weaver, and left his native land in company with a family named ROBINSON. On the voyage Mr. ROBINSON died, and our subject subsequently married the widow. Six children were born to this union, viz.: Andrew; Robert; Margaret, who married William HOWE; Sarah, who married Samuel HOWE; Fannie, who married John WEIGLEY, and Ellen, who married Joseph DODDS, all of whom are dead. His second wife was Eleanor KINCAID, nee PILLOW, who bore him four children: William, deceased; James, of Marion township; Susan, wife of Andrew ROSE, and Hugh. Mr. SPROUL died in 1837; his widow survived him until 1854. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

HUGH SPROUL, youngest child of John and Eleanor SPROUL, was born on the homestead farm near Mt. Chestnut, Butler county, July 4, 1824. At the age of sixteen he commenced learning the carpenter's trade, and in 1848 he located in Cherry township, where he established himself in business, and was one of the leading carpenters and builders of that locality for thirty years. He also performed the duties of a millwright, and still continues to work at his trade in connection with farming. In 1851 he purchased and settled on his present farm of 160 acres, which he has since improved and cultivated. Mr. SPROUL has been twice married; first in 1848, to Elizabeth SMITH, who died in 1850, leaving two children, who are still living, viz.: John P., a physician of Plain Grove, and Elizabeth, wife of C. S. STONER, of Butler. In 1851 he married Sarah GLENN, a daughter of James GLENN, of Clay township. The children of this marriage are as follows: William, and Ellen, both of whom died in early youth; James, who died in 1884; Andrew, a merchant at Gomersal; Addie, wife of Jacob REINCK; Clara, wife of John CHRISTY; Rella, wife of Samuel HINDMAN; Minnie, wife of D. L. HOCKENBERRY; Everett, and Ross. In politics, Mr. SPROUL is a Republican, has filled the office of school director, and is at present collector and assessor of his township. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church, of West Sunbury. In 1864 he enlisted in Company A, Sixth Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until the close of the war. He and Edwin G. SPROUL built the grist mill at Anandale, which is operated under the firm name of Hugh SPROUL & Company.

JAMES SPROUL, son of John and Eleanor SPROUL, was born in Franklin township, Butler county, November 15, 1820, and was reared in his native township. He has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits, and has resided in [p. 1289] Marion township since 1880. In 1851 he married Elizabeth SCOTT, a daughter of Robert SCOTT, of Franklin township, and is the father of four children, viz.: Edwin G.; Francis, deceased; James, and John. Mr. SPROUL is the oldest living member of the family. In politics, he is a Republican, and a respected citizen of the township.

EDWIN G. SPROUL, eldest son of James and Elizabeth SPROUL, was born in Butler township, Butler county, in October, 1852, where he was reared and educated. After attaining his majority he engaged in lumbering and in operating saw mills in different parts of Butler county, and in partnership with his uncle, Hugh SPROUL, erected the Anandale grist mill, at Anandale station, in Marion township, which has since been operated under his management, the firm name being Hugh SPROUL & Company. The mill is equipped with modern improvements, including the roller process, and is one of the leading mills in this section, of the county. Mr. SPROUL was married July 9, 1873, to Mary CROUP, a daughter of Abraham and Harriet CROUP, of Butler township. They have four children, viz.: Clara; Hugh; Cora, and Cortie. Mr. SPROUL is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

THOMAS BRYAN was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1789, and was a son of Zephaniah and Elizabeth (De VORCE) BRYAN. His father was a native of Maryland, and settled on the line of Allegheny and Westmoreland counties, Pennsylvania, where he died. He was a veteran of the Revolution. His wife was Elizabeth De VORCE, and their children were as follows: John; Mary, who married Conrad SNYDER; Joseph; Elizabeth, who married Joseph SPEARS; Jennie, who married John DOUBLE; Effie, who married John WILSON; Thomas, and Prudence, who married John ABNER. His second wife was a Miss McLANE, and their children were: James; Zephaniah, Zachariah; Phoebe; Mrs. Margaret WILSON; Nancy, who married James WILSON; David, and Hamilton, all of whom are dead. In October, 1819, Thomas BRYAN came to Butler county and purchased 300 acres of land in Brady township, where his son Thomas now resides. He was manufacturer of spinning wheels, and worked at his trade in connection with farming. He died upon his farm in Brady township, January 23, 1874, and his wife Margaret, in 1879. He married Margaret STEEL, a daughter of Robert STEEL, of Westmoreland county, to which union were born the following children: Eliza J., deceased wife of John T. McCANDLESS; Robert S.; Zephaniah, of California; Thomas J. D., deceased; John, a resident of Beaver Fall; Thomas, of Brady township, and Archie L., of Beaver Falls. Mr. BRYAN was a Baptist, and Mrs. BRYAN a Presbyterian. In politics, he was a Democrat.

ROBERT S. BRYAN, son of Thomas and Margaret BRYAN, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1818, and was reared in Brady township, Butler county. He worked with his father at the spinning wheel trade, at which he was engaged for many years. In 1841 he purchased sixty acres of the old homestead farm, upon which he resided until 1864. In that year he bought 318 acres in Cherry township, which he has since improved, and now owns one of the best farms in the community. Mr. BRYAN was married in 1844, to Margaret English, a daughter of James ENGLISH, of Muddy Creek township. The following children are the fruits of this union: Priscilla, wife of Casper HOCKENBERRY; Mary [p. 1290] A.; Eliza J., deceased wife of Robert HOGG; Thomas J., of Concord township; Margaret A.; Archibald L., of Franklin township; Elizabeth A., deceased, and Marinda C. Mr. BRYAN and wife are members of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a stanch Democrat, and has filled many of the township offices. He is one of the most extensive farmers of his township, and gives a liberal support to every worthy enterprise.

THOMAS F. CHRISTLEY, son of John and Elizabeth (SMITH) CHRISTLEY, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, February 7, 1828. He received a common school education, and learned the plasterer's trade in early manhood. In 1858 he purchased his present farm in Cherry township, which consisted of 196 acres, a portion of which he has since sold. He now owns 100 acres of well improved land, where he has followed agricultural pursuits, in connection with his trade, up to within a few years. In July, 1857, he married Ann C. HILL, a daughter of Daniel K. HILL, of Centreville, and has the following children: Clara M., wife of John F. McCOY; Alfred M., an attorney of Butler; Samuel J., a lawyer residing in Chicago; Wilbur H., deceased; Emma, wife of Andrew SPROUL; John and Herbert, both deceased; Laurell E.; DeWitt, deceased; Blanche, and Maude. Mr. CHRISTLEY was a Republican until 1884, when he became a Prohibitionist. He has filled the offices of school director and supervisor, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs. In 1864 he enlisted in Company B, Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Hatcher's Run, Petersburg, etc. In early life he united with the Methodist Episcopal church of Centreville, and was one of the original members of the Anandale church. He is a member of Dickson Post, G.A.R., of West Sunbury, and one of the leading citizens of his township.

WILLIAM D. McCUNE, physician and surgeon, is a son of Robert and Jane (DEVIN) McCUNE, and a grandson of Archibald McCUNE, one of the early settlers of Lawrence county. He was born near Grove City, Mercer county, October 5, 1848, and was educated in the public schools and at Grove City Academy. He read medicine with Dr. M. P. BARKER, of New Castle, and graduated at the Medical University, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1878. The following year he located at Bovard, Butler county, where he has continued in practice up to the present. Dr. McCUNE married Cary COSGROVE, a daughter of James COSGROVE, of Lawrence county, and has one son, Harry B. In politics, he is actively identified with the Democratic party. He is a member of New Hope Presbyterian church, and is connected with the I.O.O.F., and the Jr. O.U.A.M.

GEORGE K. McADOO, M.D., son of W.F. and Maria (DUMARS) McADOO, was born in Sugar Grove township, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, July 21, 1866. He was educated in the public schools of Greenville, Grove City College and at Thiel College, read medicine with Dr. L. H. HENRY, of Kennard, and graduated at West Penn Medical College, Pittsburg, in March, 1892. He began practice at Coraopolis, but in May, 1892, located at Anandale, Butler county, where he has since been engaged in the duties of his profession. Dr. McADOO was married in June, 1891 to Ethyl NELSON, a daughter of J. J. NELSON, of Emlenton, [p. 1291] and has one daughter, Dulce M. The Doctor is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of Pleasant Valley Presbyterian church.

WILLIAM BELL, Sr., was a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and came to Butler county about 1796. He entered a tract of about 500 acres of land in what is now Washington township, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was killed while assisting in the erection of a neighbor's house, and left a family of five sons and four daughters, all of whom are dead. The names of the sons are as follows: John; William; Samuel; George, and Walter, all of whom were in the War of 1812. The daughters were: Polly, who married David CHRISTIE; Rosa, who married Thomas TAYLOR; Betsey, who married Robert PHILLIPS, and Rebecca, who became the wife of John CAMPBELL. Mr. BELL was a man of considerable prominence in his locality, and was widely known for his great antipathy to Indians, against whom he had seen much service. He had lost several of his brothers and ancestry during the Indian wars, consequently had little love for the red man.

WILLIAM BELL, son of William BELL, Sr., was born in Westmoreland county, April 11, 1788, and came to Butler county with his father when about eight years old. He grew to manhood in Washington township, served in the War of 1812, and was married to Catherine McKIMMONS, May 3, 1814. They settled in this township, and lived and died upon the old homestead, now the property of their son Alexander. Mr. BELL was the father of the following children: Samuel; John; Gabriel; William; Alexander; Patton; Polly; Rebecca; Eliza J., and Martha. His wife was a daughter of Gabriel McKIMMONS, a native of Ireland, and a pioneer of Butler county. Mr. BELL died January 30, 1850, and his wife, August 22, 1852. They were among the original members of the United Presbyterian church, at Mt. Vernon.

ALEXANDER BELL, son of William and Catherine BELL, was born on his present homestead in Washington township, May 23, 1829. He inherited the property from his father, and has always been engaged in farming, and recently in oil producing. He was married September 12, 1854, to Ellen STEWART, a daughter of James and Elizabeth STEWART, the former a native of Butler county, and the latter of Ireland. Mrs. BELL was born June 28, 1835, and is the mother of ten children, all of whom are living, viz.: Ada A.; Amanda J.; Thomas P.; Lizzie A.; Emma C.; Sarah L.; Charles E.; Edwin E.; Jessie M., and Harriet E. In August 1864, Mr. BELL enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, being present at the surrender of LEE's army. Politically, he has been a Democrat, but of late years has supported the Prohibition party. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church.

SAMUEL BELL, third son of William BELL, Sr., was born in Westmoreland county, and grew to manhood in Butler county. The family located in Washington township, Butler county, and later Samuel opened a store at North Washington, being one of the early merchants of that place. He subsequently purchased 200 acres of land, which embraced the farms now owned by his sons, Nelson P. and Andrew I. BELL, on the line of Washington and Concord townships. Here he resided until his death, September 18, 1846. Mr. BELL married [p. 1292] Barbara CAMPBELL, a daughter of Samuel CAMPBELL, to which union were born the following children: James C.; Rosanna, wife of Henry SHANE; Samuel S.; William and Archibald, both deceased; Martha J., wife of Ira CAMPBELL; Andrew Irvin, and Nelson P. Mrs. BELL died about 1879. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which denomination her husband also belonged. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and in politics, he was a stanch Democrat.

ANDREW IRVIN BELL, fifth son of Samuel and Barbara BELL, was born on his present homestead farm in Washington township, December 9, 1837. He received a common school education, and was reared a farmer. After reaching his majority, he bought fifty acres of land from his mother, to which he has added fifty-one acres and made all of the improvements. In connection with farming, he is also interested in oil producing, having several wells upon his farm. Mr. BELL married Sadie MILLER, who has borne him the following children: Eveline, wife of W. P. HILLIARD; Albert S.; Minnie May; Leroy; Harry E., deceased; Plummer E.; Lester, and Lilly. Politically, Mr. BELL is a Republican, and in religion, is connected with the Methodist Episcopal church of North Washington.

SAMUEL MEALS was a native of York county, Pennsylvania, whither his parents immigrated from Germany prior to the Revolution. He grew to manhood in his native county, whence he removed to Adams county, there married and reared the following children: George, who married Elizabeth STUDEBAKER; Peggy, who married George DAUBENSPECK; William, who finally settled in Clarion county; Samuel, who married Miss HOOVER; Jacob, who married a Miss VARNUM, and Daniel, who married Catherine STUDEBAKER. In the spring of 1796 the eldest son, George, came to what is now Butler county, took up several hundred acres of land on the line of Washington and Concord townships, and made some improvements. The following year the father and balance of the family came and settle on this land. Mr. MEALS was a blacksmith, as were also his sons George and Samuel, and built the first shop in the township, which he carried on in connection with farming. He was quite a prominent man in his neighborhood and filled many of the township offices at different periods. He and all his children attained a ripe old age, and their descendants are numerous in Butler County.

GEORGE MEALS, eldest son of Samuel MEALS, Sr., was born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and there grew to maturity. In 1796 he came to this part of the State and took up the large tract of land referred to in his father's sketch, upon which the family settled the following year. George afterwards went to Westmoreland county and there married Elizabeth STUDEBAKER. About 1811 he returned to Butler county and settled at Mechanicsburg, in Worth township, where he carried on a blacksmith shop. In 1817 he removed to Concord township, and later to Washington township, where he continued to follow his trade in connection with agriculture. To George and Elizabeth MEALS were born seven children, as follows: Samuel G., who was born in Westmoreland county, July 4, 1809 and died on his farm in Washington township, September 21, 1877; Lydia, who married John MAHOOD; Mollie; Joseph G.; Peggy, who mar- [p.1293] ried Joseph PISOR; Elizabeth, who married Jacob PISOR, and Susanna, who married Daniel PISOR. The parents and all of the children are deceased.

JOSEPH G. MEALS, second son of George MEALS, was born in Worth township, Butler county, June 6, 1813. He removed with his parents into Concord township when about four years old, and later to Washington township. He married Hannah HILLIARD, a daughter of Isaac HILLIARD, to whom were born ten children. Five of these grew to maturity, viz.: Isaac; Samuel P.; Naomi J., wife of E. E. KIDDER; Thomas J., and Sheridan T. Mr. MEALS was a stonemason, and followed his trade in connection with farming until his death, May 5, 1893. His widow resides with her daughter in Warren, Ohio. He was an elder in the United Presbyterian church, and in politics, a Republican.

JOHN SHIRA was a native of Berks county, Pennsylvania, of German origin, and served in the Revolutionary war. After its close he married and settled in Westmoreland county, his wife being Maria Ann FRIFUGLE. About 1798 he removed to Butler county, accompanied by his wife and five children, and settled on what is now known as the FLETCHER farm, in Washington township. He soon afterwards purchased a large tract of land in the southern part of the township, of which, however, he was afterwords [sic] dispossessed by fraud. He then bought a tract of 300 acres near the center of the township, which is now owned by his grandsons, Alfred L. and David H. SHIRA. He reared a family of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, as follows: Daniel; Susan, who married Adam MOONEY; Polly, who married Jacob Hilliard; John, who served in the War of 1812; William; Jacob; Peter; Lewis; Elizabeth, who married Robert HANNA, and David, all of whom are dead. Mr. SHIRA was one of the original members of the Lutheran church at North Washington, was an exemplary man and a good citizen.

DAVID SHIRA, youngest son of John and Maria Ann SHIRA, was born March 4, 1805, in Washington township, Butler county, and grew to manhood in that locality. He married Maria Hutchison, whose parents were among the early settlers of the county. They reared seven children, whose names are as follows: William M.; Samuel; Robert O.; Alfred L.; David H.; Eliza J., and Anna. Mr. SHIRA and wife were pioneer members of the United Presbyterian church, at Mt. Vernon. He died April 9, 1885, and his wife, April 7, 1890.

WILLIAM M. SHIRA, eldest son of David and Maria SHIRA, was born June 23, 1833, upon the old homestead, grew to maturity in his native township, and received a common school education. In 1854 he crossed the plains to California, in pursuit of the riches stored in the gold mines of that state, and followed mining until 1858. In that year he returned home via the Isthmus of Panama, bringing with him the accumulations of the four years spent in the mines. In the meantime he had sent sufficient money here to purchase his present farm, upon which he settled and has since resided. Mr. SHIRA was married on June 29, 1850, to Elizabeth M. CHRISTY, a daughter of William CHRISTY, of Venango county, where her father served as justice of the peace for many years. Six children have been born to this union, viz.: Margaret L., wife of George W. MEALS; Maria E., wife of James B. YOUNG; Leonidas, who married Edith MITCHELL; Alvin L.; Jennie, and Adda M. The family are adherents of the [p. 1294] United Presbyterian church, in which Mr. SHIRA has filled the office of ruling elder for several years. Politically, he has been a life-long Republican, has taken quite an active part in public affairs, and was elected prothonotary of Butler county in 1884, in which office he served three years. He has also filled the office of school director many years, and is one of the leading farmers of the community.

SAMUEL SHIRA, second son of David and Maria (HUTCHISON) SHIRA, was born January 7, 1836, upon the homestead farm in Washington township. He received a common school education, was reared a farmer, and is now the owner of 125 acres of well improved land. Mr. SHIRA was married on February 22, 1859, to Ruth E. STEINTORF, who was born July 6, 1840. They are the parents of the following children: Calvin C., who married Clara DODDS, and lives in Butler; Ida M., wife of J. Horace GLENN, of Washington township; Annie E., wife of Edward BELL; Madge A.; David W.; Thomas P., and Eva F. Mr. SHIRA has a fine oil development on his farm, one of the most productive wells in the Washington field being struck there in 1893, which now contains nine oil wells and one gas well. He is one of the progressive business men [sic] of the township, and gives his support to every worthy enterprise. Politically, he is a stanch Republican, and has filled most of the local offices of his township. He and family are members of the United Presbyterian church.

PETER SHIRA, son of John SHIRA, was born October 15, 1800, and is still living in Washington township at the remarkable age of more than ninety-four years. On January 2, 1826, he married Jane HUTCHESON, born May 12, 1800, and immediately following their marriage they settled in Washington township, Butler county, and began the work of making a home. They became the parents of four sons and four daughters, viz.: William H., of Parker township; Margaret A., wife of William LEWIS, of Washington township; John M., and Fergus M., both residents of Parker township; Matilda, wife of M. J. CHRISTY, of Washington township; Esther, wife of William CHRISTY, of Venango township; Pelina, wife of D. M. WALDRON, of Mercer county, and Alfred G., who enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died in the service. The mother died April 6, 1892, after a happy married life of sixty-six years.

FERGUS M. SHIRA was born in Washington township, Butler county, February 4, 1833, third son of Peter and Jane Shira. He was reared upon a farm and received his education in the common schools and at Witherspoon Institute. On January 1, 1857, he married Catherine J. KELLY, a native of Slippery Rock township, where she was born September 1, 1839. Her father, Samuel KELLY, was born in Down county Ireland, December 25, 1800, and died April 28, 1880. Her mother, Eliza (McKEE) KELLY, was born in Antrim county, Ireland, in 1814, and died April 17, 1880, eleven days before her husband. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. SHIRA took up their residence in Washington township, where he followed the carpenter's trade, and also engaged in oil operating in Venango county. In 1869 he located near Parker City, which has since been his home. He followed his trade for some years, but later devoted his attention to oil producing, which he still continues to follow. Mr. and Mrs. [p. 1295] SHIRA are the parents of two children, viz.: Samuel Curtis, born December 6, 1857, and Caspian H., March 17, 1860. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the Royal Templars. Politically, he is a leading Republican of his township, has served as justice of the peace, and was a candidate for sheriff in 1882.

JAMES MAHOOD was a native of Ireland, whence he came to the United States, where he married Sally MAHOOD, whose parents had immigrated to this country at the same time. They stopped for a short period near Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, coming to Butler county about 1800. His wife's family settled in what is now Penn township, while he located on a tract of 500 acres lying northwest of the site of North Washington, a portion of which is still owned by his grandson, James A. MAHOOD. He reared a family of seven children, as follows: John; George; James; Adam; Thomas; Ann, and Sarah, who married Jacob MILLER, all of whom are dead except James and Mrs. MILLER. Mr. MAHOOD became a man of some local prominence. He was killed in middle life.

JOHN MAHOOD, eldest son of James MAHOOD, was born in 1800, grew up amidst the scenes of pioneer life, and endured the privations incident to that period. He married Lydia MEALS, whose parents were pioneers of Washington township, and reared four children, viz.: James A.; George W.; Samuel, and Joseph. Mr. MAHOOD was one of the original members of the United Presbyterian church of Mt. Vernon, and died in 1851. His widow belonged to the same organization, and survived him more than forty years, dying January 16, 1893, aged eighty-six years.

JAMES A. MAHOOD, eldest son of John and Lydia MAHOOD, was born on the farm near where he now resides, January 14, 1830, was reared to farm life, and has followed that vocation up to the present. In early manhood he worked for a few years at wagon-making. On March 18, 1856, Mr. MAHOOD married Marilda HILLIARD, a daughter of Samuel R. HILLIARD, a descendant of one of the early settlers of the township. They are the parents of six children, as follows: John L.; Margaret A.; Samuel E.; Cora M., wife of W. R. TURNER; William E., and W. Scott. Mr. MAHOOD and wife are members of the United Presbyterian church of Mt. Vernon, and in politics, he is a Republican.

JACOB HILLIARD, a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, was a son of Isaac HILLIARD, a native of Germany. Jacob was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and after its close engaged in farming. In 1802 he located in what is now Washington township, Butler county, purchasing 300 acres of land where Oscar MEALS now resides. Soon afterwards he and two of his sons secured a second tract of about 300 acres, and in the course of a few years the family owned about 1200 acres in that locality. Jacob HILLIARD reared a family of nine sons, all of whom lived to a ripe old age, and became heads of families, except Philip, who never married. Their names are as follows: Francis; Jacob; Peter; George; Abraham; Isaac; John; Philip, and Elisha. Abraham and Isaac served in the War of 1812. The father died at the age of eighty-one years. He was a man of considerable local influence and prominence, and led an active and useful life. [p. 1296]

JOHN HILLIARD, son of Jacob HILLIARD, Sr., was born August 3, 1795, and came to Butler county with his parents when a lad of seven years. He was reared in Parker township, and was married December 11, 1820, to Mary PARKER. They were the parents of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity. Four of the sons served in the Rebellion, viz.: Eli, Israel, Peter and James. Eli was a lieutenant, and was killed at the battle of Fredericksburg. In 1823 Mr. HILLIARD erected the first grist mill on Slippery Rock creek, at Hilliards, and followed that business the remainder of his life. He died December 11, 1869.

PHILIP HILLIARD, fourth son of John and Mary HILLIARD, was born in what is now Washington township, February 10, 1828, was educated in the common schools and at Butler Academy, and taught several years in the public schools of the county. In 1856 he was elected a county commissioner, and at the close of his term was twice appointed to fill a vacancy as clerk of the board. In 1860 he was elected a justice of the peace, and served continuously for twenty years. In 1870 he was census enumerator for six districts in the northeast part of the county. In 1877 he engaged in merchandising, which he followed for six years. He is at present filling several township offices, and is one of the useful men of the community. Mr. HILLIARD was married on June 7, 1859, to Mary S. COE, to which union were born four children, all of whom are dead. Politically, he is a Republican, a high protectionist, and a stanch supporter of the principles of his party. He served as postmaster under HARRISON's administration, and for forty years has filled some official position. He is the oldest living representative of this pioneer family, after whom the village of Hilliards was named.

PETER P. HILLIARD, miller, is the seventh son of John and Mary (PARKER) HILLIARD, and was born in the village of Hilliards, December 24, 1832. He received a common school education, and in boyhood commenced to learn the milling business with his father; subsequently became his partner, and at his father's death succeeded to the business, which he continued down to 1888. He and his brother Philip are the only surviving members of the family in this vicinity. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served eleven months. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Fredericksburg, and was kept in Libby prison for twenty-three days, when he was exchanged. He participated in many hard fought battles, and was mustered out of service with the rank of corporal. Mr. HILLIARD was married to Sarah A. RIDER, September 18, 1860, who became the mother of four children, viz.: John M.F.; Newton E.; Nancy BELL, deceased, and Margaretta A. Mrs. HILLIARD died July 11, 1863. He was again married, to Effina M. HILLIARD, a grand-daughter of Z. A. HILLIARD, of Washington township, who is the mother of one daughter, Chloe M. Politically, Mr. HILLIARD is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

HILLIARD BROTHERS, farmers and manufacturers of brick and tile, consist of P. Lyman HILLIARD, born December 18, 1848; M. Luther HILLIARD, born September 21, 1861, and William P. HILLIARD, born in July, 1869. All were born upon the old homestead, where they now reside, and are sons of Samuel and Elizabeth (JAMISON) HILLIARD. Samuel was a son of Isaac HILLIARD, and a grandson of Jacob HILLIARD, Sr., the first of the family to settle in Washington [p. 1297] township. Their mother was the grand-daughter of a Hessian soldier who served in the German contingent of the English army, in the Revolution, and settled in Pennsylvania at the close of the war. The old homestead of Samuel HILLIARD has been divided into three farms, the property of his sons. In 1887 they established a brick and tile yard upon the old farm, which is rapidly developing into a lucrative business, being the only one of the kind in the township. The family are Republicans, in politics. The Hilliard Brothers are recognized as enterprising and progressive business men.

THOMAS KELLY, JR., son of Thomas KELLY, was born in Parker township, Butler county, received a good common school education, and followed school teaching for many years. He afterwards settled in Washington township and engaged in farming. He was a Whig during the existence of that party, and afterwards a Republican. He filled many of the offices in his township, and one term as county commissioner. From his youth he was a member of the Seceder church, and after the union, in 1858, he was a United Presbyterian. He was an elder in both denominations, and was known as one of the most pious, God-fearing men in Butler county. Mr. KELLY married Miss Miriam WILSON, and to them were born the following named children: James W.; John T.; Richard; Melinda, now the Widow MAXWELL; Thomas D., deceased; Nancy, deceased wife of H.H. DAUBENSPECK; Isabella; Milton A., and Melvin B., the last three of whom are dead, and Amelda J., wife of Frank PEFFER. Mr. KELLY was a natural mechanic, an industrious man, a fine penman, and was strong in body, mind and character. He died on October 2, 1867, in the fifty-ninth year of his age. His wife, a sincere Christian and a kind mother, survived him until March, 1871.

HARMON SEATON was born in Washington township, Butler county, June 9, 1842. His grandfather, Robert SEATON, came from eastern Pennsylvania to Butler county in 1800, and settled in Marion township, entering 400 acres of land, upon which he afterwards carried on a tannery and woolen mill. The subject of this sketch enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volunteers, in August, 1861, and served three years. In September, 1864, he enlisted in the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. At the battle of Fair Oaks he was wounded in the right thigh, and has been a pensioner since the Rebellion ended. In politics, Mr. SEATON is a Republican, and is now filling the offices of collector and constable.

ALEXANDER CLARK was born in eastern Pennsylvania, May 30, 1800, a son of Col. William CLARK, a native of Scotland, who served in the Revolution. After the war Colonel CLARK settled in this State, and married a Miss NESBIT. Alexander was reared in Pennsylvania, came to Butler county in 1835, and settled on a farm near the center of Washington township, where he remained the balance of his life. He was one of the prosperous farmers of the community for half a century. He was twice married; first to Eliza STOREY, May 23, 1848. She was born in Fairview township, Butler county, March 18, 1817, and became the mother of nine children. By his second marriage Mr. CLARK was the father of seven children. He died December 25, 1889. He was a Republican, in politics and filled the various offices in his township. A member of the United Pres- [p. 1298] byterian church, he always manifested a commendable interest in religious affairs.

JOHN C. CLARK, fourth son of Alexander CLARK by his second marriage, was born upon the old homestead where he now lives, December 31, 1856. He was reared and educated in his native township, and has devoted his energies towards agricultural pursuits. He has recently engaged in oil producing on his own farm, most of which he has leased for that purpose. He is an active Republican, and one of the prosperous young farmers of his township.

WILLIAM ROYLE was a native of Chester county, England, and by trade a machinist. He married Sarah SIMMONS in his native land, and immigrated with his family to Pennsylvania in 1837. In 1840 he came to Butler county, and ten years afterwards purchased a farm in Allegheny township, upon which he lived until his death. They had a family of four sons, named as follows: William, of Allegheny township; Charles, deceased; Robert, deceased, and Henry, of Washington township.

HENRY ROYLE, farmer and coal dealer, was born in England, in August, 1825, and came to Butler county with his parents. He purchased his present homestead in 1867, consisting of seventy acres, upon which he has since resided. In 1876 he leased some coal lands near his farm, which he has developed into a very lucrative trade, shipping as many as thirty tons per day. He has recently constructed a switch to his mine, and hopes in the near future to largely increase his business. Mr. ROYLE was married November 13, 1851, to Eliza CROZIER, a native of Armstrong county. Eleven children have been born to this union, whose names are as follows: Mrs. Sarah JENKINS; Mrs. Harriet COOK; William; Mrs. Julia A. McKEE; John; Robert; Washington M.; Clara; James H.; Isabella, and Catherine. Four of the sons, Robert, Washington, James, and John are in business with their father. Mr. ROYLE was a Democrat up to 1893, when he declared his intention to henceforth support the Republican party and a high tariff.

EDMUND JENKINS was born October 5, 1842, a son of Joseph JENKINS. On May 14, 1874, he married Sarah ROYLE, a daughter of Henry and Eliza ROYLE. He was then a resident of Brady's Bend, Armstrong county. Mrs. JENKINS was born August 31, 1853, and has two children, viz.: Mary, born December 6, 1877, and Hattie, born March 29, 1879. Her husband died August 8, 1878.

JOHN BEATTY, a native of Ireland, came to Pennsylvania with his parents in boyhood, and settled in Westmoreland county. He grew to manhood in that county, and there married Jane GUTHRIE, December 31, 1789, a sister of Jack GUTHRIE, a celebrated Indian scout of that period. Her brother William was killed by the Indians during the massacre at Hannahstown. In 1792 John BEATTY removed to Perry township, Armstrong county, and settled on a farm, where he spent the balance of his life. His children were as follows: Jane, who married William CAMPBELL; Agnes, who married James SHEPARD; Margaret, who married a Mr. HALL, and after his death, James GUTHRIE; John G.; Samuel; William; Elizabeth, and Sarah.

WILLIAM BEATTY, youngest son of John and Jane BEATTY, was born in 1805, in Perry township, Armstrong county. He there grew to maturity, and married [p. 1299] Elizabeth A. SEDGWICK. They lived upon the old homestead in Armstrong county until 1854, in which year they located upon a farm at Annisville, Washington township, Butler county, where he died the same year. Mr. BEATTY was an old-line Whig and an Abolitionist, and was a strict temperance man. He served as a justice of the peace in his native county for many years. He reared a large family, and has many descendants residing in this section of the State.

JOHN L. BEATTY, druggist, was born in Perry township, Armstrong county, November 1, 1833. On the death of his father the care of the family largely devolved upon him, as he was the eldest. He worked for his mother for some years, and then purchased the farm and carried it on until 1871, in which year he sold out and engaged in oil producing. He followed the oil business for four years, removing to Hilliards in 1875, where he engaged in the lumber trade. He continued in that business until 1883, and then embarked in a drug store, which he has since conducted. Mr. BEATTY was married June 25, 1857, to Henrietta D. McCOOL, whose ancestors came from Ireland. Nine children were the fruits of the union, five of whom are living, viz.: Edwin C.; William S.; Gertrude E., wife of Joseph BURNETT; Maud M., and Clarence L. The deceased are: Laura B., who married W.B. FOWLER; George P.; Philo A., and Elizabeth L. Mr. BEATTY and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he fills the office of Sunday school superintendent. In politics, he is a Republican, and has held many of the offices in his township. He is the owner of a farm of 125 acres adjoining the village of Hilliards, from which the Standard Plate Glass Company of Butler obtain the sand for polishing purposes. It is thus a valuable property, and brings him in a respectable income.

REV. R.B. STARKS, pastor of the Lutheran church at North Washington, was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, January 17, 1842. He is a son of Robert P. and Margaret (WILLS) STARKS, natives of Mifflin county, of Scotch ancestry, and of the same lineage as Gen. John STARK, of Revolutionary fame. His father was a laborer, and had a brother who died while serving in the Mexican war. The subject of this sketch was educated at Selins Grove Missionary Institute, and was ordained in 1879. He commenced his ministry in Will county, Illinois, where he remained for two years, and then located at Elderton, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, where he was pastor of a Lutheran charge for four and a half years. In January, 1885, he became pastor of his present charge, which position he has occupied up to the present. Mr. STARKS served in Company C, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for nearly three years, being honorably discharged on May 29, 1865. He was wounded in the right thigh by a gun shot in front of Petersburg, for which he draws a pension from the government. His brother, Charles T., served in the same company, and died in the rebel prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Mr. STARKS was married May 12, 1880, to Jennie KISTNER, who died July 27, 1882, leaving two sons: Benjamin K., born February 27, 1881, and Robert W., deceased. He was again married August 8, 1883, to Maggie BLACK, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (CRISSMAN) BLACK, of Indiana county. Since becoming pastor of his present charge, Mr. STARKS has done much towards its spiritual and material prosperity, and the congregation is now in a flourishing condition.

[p. 1300]

O.P. PISOR, physician and surgeon, North Washington, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, January 16, 1853, son of John and Mary (EMERY) PISOR, both natives of this county. The PISORS were among the first settlers of this section of the State, and located in Butler county as early as 1795, their original entries being situated in what is now Worth township. We find in the first assessment of original Slippery Rock township, made in 1803, the names of Jacob and John PISOR, spelled in records "POYZER." Jacob is assessed with 400 acres of land, one horse and one cow, and John with a saw mill and distillery. Adam and George PISOR came about the same time as John and Jacob, and settled in the same locality. Adam married a daughter of David STUDEBAKER, the first settler of Worth township, and their son John, was the father of our subject. The family is of German origin, and numerous descendants of the original settlers are still living in the county. John PISOR, son of Jacob, was the first white child born within the limits of Worth township, his birth occurring on October 31, 1798. David STUDEBAKER, the maternal great grandfather of our subject, came to Butler county from Westmoreland county. His father was a soldier in the Revolution, and a captive among the Indians in boyhood for nine years. John PISOR married Mary J. EMERY, located in Worth township in 1857, and was quite a successful farmer. He was a Democrat, in politics, and was an elder in the Presbyterian church. The subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm, attended the common schools in boyhood, and completed his education at Pine Grove Academy and at Waynesburg College. He afterwards engaged in teaching, which profession he followed for several years, commencing in the meantime the study of medicine with Dr. PATTERSON, of Slippery Rock. He attended lectures for two seasons at the Medical Department of the University of Wooster, Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1881 he attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, in Philadelphia, graduating from that institution in March, 1881. He began practice at Harrisville, Butler county, remaining there for seven years, and then removed to North Washington. He has since built up a lucrative practice, and is recognized as one of the progressive physicians of the county. Dr. PISOR is a member of the Butler County Medical Society, and takes a deep interest in the growth and development of medical science. He is prominent in educational affairs, and has served as a member of the school board, and secretary of the same for several years. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and for some years superintendent of the Sunday school. Dr. PISOR was married October 4, 1881, to Margaret A. JORDAN, a daughter of Henry and Isabella (ORR) JORDAN, a native of Lawrence county. Three children are the fruits of this union, as follows: Marshall ORR; John PLUMMER, and Frank JORDAN. Politically, Dr. PISOR is a Democrat, and is a stanch supporter of the principles and measures of his party.

CAMDON McKEE, of the firm of McKEE & Company, merchants and manufacturers, was born in Allegheny township, Butler county, September 11, 1857, son of Josiah and Julia A. (LOW) McKEE. His father was born in Armstrong county, in 1819, and his mother in Butler county, in 1822. They removed to Ohio in 1887, where they now reside. His maternal grandparents were early settlers of Allegheny township, where the subject of this sketch was reared. On September 23, 1887, he married Loretta SLOAN, a daughter of Samuel and Mar- [p. 1301] garet (IRVIN) SLOAN of Venango township, Butler county, where her family were pioneers. Mrs. McKEE died February 21, 1891. The firm of McKEE & Company carry on an extensive business in hardware, stoves, agricultural implements, wagons, etc., and also conduct a planing mill at Hilliards. The mill was established by Mr. McKEE's father at Six Points, Butler county, in 1870, and removed to Hilliards in 1876. It was carried on by Josiah McKEE until 1884, in which year it came into the possession of its present owners.

WILLIAM K. PARTRIDGE, of the firm of McKEE & Company, was born in French Creek township, Venango county, February 19, 1853, son of Thomas and Margaret (KILGORE) Partridge, both natives of Mercer county, who located in Venango county about 1843. William K. was reared on a farm, and on May 25, 1882, was married to Ada McKEE, a daughter of Josiah and Julia A. McKEE. She was born in Allegheny township, Butler county, and is the mother of two children: Mabel, born February 17, 1883, and Fred, April 17, 1885. Mr. PARTRIDGE located at Hilliards in 1884, where he formed a partnership with Camdon McKEE in the mercantile and manufacturing business, which they have since carried on successfully. Politically, he is a Democrat, and in religious faith, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of North Washington.

OZIAS M. PATTERSON, agent of the Pittsburg, Shenango and Lake Erie railroad, at Hilliards, was born in Delaware township, Mercer county, March 18, 1855, son of William C. and Mary (COLTON) PATTERSON, the former a native of Mercer county, and the latter of Erie county. His grandfather, Andrew PATTERSON, a native of Maryland, located in Mercer county about 1803. His father died in 1886. His maternal grandfather, Luther COLTON, a native of New York, first removed to Erie county, and thence to Mercer county at an early day. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and his widow drew a pension as long as she lived. The subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm, but has been connected more or less with railroads since boyhood. He has been an employee on regular station work since 1881, and became agent at Hilliards in March, 1888. Mr. PATTERSON was married on January 1, 1875, to Lucy PATTERSON, a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (HART) PATTERSON, of Crawford county. Her grandfather was one of the early settlers and owned a part of the land where the town of Sharon now stands. Mr. and Mrs. PATTERSON have a family of four children, as follows: Blanche; Lloyd L.; Wade W., and Raed J. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics, he is a Republican, and is a member of Eureka Lodge, A.O.U.W., of Grove City.

JAMES VINCENT, SR., a native of Ireland, came to the United States in 1794, and located in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. While there he married Charity GILMORE, and early in 1796 they removed to Mercer county. Becoming dissatisfied with the locality in which they settled, Mr. VINCENT purchased, the same year, a tract of 400 acres in what is now Marion township, Butler county, and early in 1798 he settled upon it with his wife and two sons, Thomas and John. The children born here are as follows: James; Robert; Jane, who married Robert ALLEN; Mary, who married Alexander SCOTT; Margaret, who married James BARNES; Gibson; William, and George C. Some time in the twenties he purchased 200 acres of land near Cadiz, Ohio, and gave to Thomas and John, [p. 1302] 100 acres each, upon which they settled, but they sold their farms in 1839, and removed to Washington county, Iowa. About the same time Mr. VINCENT purchased another 200-acre tract in what is now Slippery Rock township, Butler county, upon which his sons Robert and William located. He built a grist mill there, operated by water power, but in the fall of 1835 it was burned. He soon afterwards rebuilt it and the mill is still standing and in successful operation. Gibson VINCENT married Matilda BAIRD, a daughter of Thomas BAIRD, of Venango county, owned the larger part of the old homestead, and died there in 1864. His widow is still living on the old place. The youngest son, Rev. George C. VINCENT, became a Presbyterian minister, and for nearly fifty years preached the gospel in Ohio, Illinois, Iowa and Pennsylvania. He was also a prominent educator, being a professor in Westminster College at one time, and president of Franklin College for seven years. He was an editorial writer of considerable ability and continued his labors in the ministry until a few months of his death, which occurred at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, October 16, 1889. James VINCENT, Sr., died upon the old homestead, March 18, 1847.

JAMES VINCENT, son of James and Charity VINCENT, was born in Marion township, Butler county, August 11, 1798, and is said to have been the first child born in that part of the county. He resided on part of the old homestead all his life. In early days he served as captain of a militia company, and took an active interest in public affairs. He married Nancy KERR, a daughter of John KERR, of Mercer county, who bore him three children: Harriet, who married James PORTER; John K., and Charity, wife of Levi PORTER. Captain VINCENT was a stanch Republican, and was a leading member of the United Presbyterian church. He died on August 10, 1870, aged seventy-two years.

JOHN K. VINCENT, only son of James and Nancy VINCENT, was born on the old VINCENT homestead in Marion township, August 6, 1830, and has spent his entire life thereon. In 1862 he married Martha BAIRD, a daughter of James BAIRD, and a grand-daughter of Thomas BAIRD. Her grandfather was a native of Franklin county, Pennsylvania, a surveyor by profession, and settled in Clinton township, Venango county, in 1796. Mr. and Mrs. VINCENT are the parents of three children, viz.: Hattie; William J., and Charles G. They are members of the United Presbyterian church. In politics, he is a Republican, and has served one term as justice of the peace.

WILLIAM J. VINCENT, son of John K. and Martha VINCENT, was born on the VINCENT homestead, Marion township, January 20, 1866, received a common school education, and has followed farming as an occupation. On October 20, 1887, he married Nannie SNYDER, a daughter of Jonathan and Rose (NUTT) SNYDER, of Mercer county. Three children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Mary; Wilda, and Rose. Politically, Mr. VINCENT is a Republican, and is a member of the United Presbyterian church.

HUGH MURRIN, SR., a native of Londonderry county, Ireland, immigrated to America prior to the Revolution, and served in a New Jersey regiment throughout that struggle for liberty. He was married in New Jersey to Catherine SHAW, and they were the parents of the following children who grew to maturity: James; Joseph; Hugh; John; Philip; George; William; Peter; [p. 1303] Catherine, and Mary. After his marriage he settled in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1799, in which year he removed with his family to Butler county, and settled upon a tract of 400 acres in what is now Venango township. His sons, James and Joseph, each took up 200 acres near their father's entry. Mr. MURRIN erected a cabin and began the work of making a home in the primitive forest of Butler county. Both he and wife died upon the farm, and were buried in a private graveyard located thereon. They were stanch members of the Catholic church, and erected on their farm, as early as 1805 a small log church building where services were celebrated by the early missionary fathers of western Pennsylvania. In his will he left some money towards the erection of a more commodious church, which was carried into effect at a later day through the efforts of his son John. The lands settled by himself and sons are yet in possession of his descendants.

JOHN MURRIN, fourth son of Hugh and Catherine MURRIN, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1787, and was twelve years of age when his parents came to Butler county. He grew to manhood upon the homestead farm, and obtained such an education as the schools of that period afforded, but in after years he acquired through observation and reading a wide knowledge of men and books. After attaining his majority he purchased 200 acres of land adjoining the old homestead, where he established a store about 1830, and conducted that business for some ten years. He also purchased a grist mill, erected saw mills, and was an extensive lumber manufacturer for many years. At his death he owned between 1200 and 1500 acres of land. He also operated a distillery for some years. In 1820 he was appointed by Governor WOLFE a justice of the peace, and served continuously through re-elections to the same office for over forty years. He was widely and intimately known throughout western Pennsylvania as ‘Squire John MURRIN, and was one of the most prominent men in this section of the State. Politically, he was an ardent Democrat, was a candidate of his party for the legislature, associate judge, etc., and always active in public affairs. He was the founder of the village of Murrinsville, and gave liberally of his means towards the erection of the Catholic church at that point, being one of the leading members of the congregation throughout his life. He married Elizabeth KEATING, a daughter of Hugh KEATING, of Centre county, and reared a family of eleven children, as follows: Hugh, and William, both deceased; John, of Butler; Francis P., a resident of Ohio; Margaret, deceased wife of William FORQUER; Catherine, wife of Patrick McBRIDE; Mary, deceased wife of C. McBRIDE; Julia Ann, who married Alexander SIMPSON; Matilda, wife of Michael GORMLEY; Elizabeth, deceased wife of Henry GORMLEY, and Louisa, wife of J.S. NEESON. 'Squire Murrin died July 19, 1863, his wife having passed away on August 31, 1848. They sleep side by side in the Catholic graveyard at Murrinsville.

HUGH MURRIN, eldest son of John and Elizabeth MURRIN, was born in Venango township, Butler county, April 4, 1817, was reared upon the farm, and received a common school education. In early manhood he located in Marion township, upon the farm now owned by his nephew, John Z. MURRIN. He later spent four years at Emlenton, where he was engaged in the hotel and mercantile business, [p. 1304] and then returned to his farm in Marion township. In 1866 he removed to Murrinsville, locating on the property now occupied by his children, where he continued farming, and also carried on the hotel business for sixteen years prior to his death, which occurred September 28, 1885. He married Jane GORMLEY, a daughter of Cornelius and Mary GORMLEY, of Marion township, to which union were born nine children, as follows: Elizabeth; John F.; Anna, wife of Michael HIGGINS; Harry; James A.; Josephine L.; Cornelius G.; Catherine, and Matilda. His wife died February 12, 1883. Mr. MURRIN was a practical member of the Catholic church, and reared his family in that faith. In politics, he was a Democrat, and in early days was captain of a militia company.

WILLIAM MURRIN, son of John and Elizabeth (KEATING) MURRIN, was born in Marion township, Butler county, April 10, 1827, and was reared upon his father's farm. In early manhood he conducted a store at Murrinsville in partnership with Patrick McBRIDE, and later was proprietor of the Murrin House, at Franklin, for fifteen years. He then returned to Murrinsville, and was engaged in merchandising from 1874 until 1881, when he located upon his farm in Marion township, and continued to follow agriculture until his death, which occurred December 20, 1887. He married Elizabeth FIELDING, a daughter of Zachariah and Rosanna (CARR) FIELDING, of Slippery Rock township, Butler county. She became the mother of seven children, viz.: Bessie, wife of Bernard McCREA; John Z.; Rosanna, deceased; William E.; Estella, now Sister M. Norberta, of the order of Sisters of Charity; Maude, and Katherine. Mrs. MURRIN is a resident of Franklin, Pennsylvania. She is a member of the Catholic church, in which faith her husband lived and died. Politically, he was a Democrat, and an enterprising, progressive citizen.

JOHN Z. MURRIN, eldest son of William and Elizabeth MURRIN, was born at Murrinsville, Butler county, October 31, 1858, and was reared in Butler and Venago counties. He received a common school education, and has been engaged in farming in Marion township since 1879. On August 20, 1880, he married Catherine McBRIDE, a daughter of Michael and Grace (FRIEL) McBRIDE, of Venango township, and has six children, viz.: Marie; Grace; W. Lawrence; John B.; Catherine, and Ella. Mr. MURRIN and family are members of the Catholic church, and in politics, he is a Democrat. After serving four years as justice of the peace of Marion township, he resigned to accept the postmastership at Boyers, to which position he was appointed in July, 1893. He is a descendant of Hugh MURRIN, Sr., who came to Butler county nearly one hundred years ago.


[End of Chapter 75-1 (pgs.1281-1304) - Cherry, Washington, Marion, Venango, Parker and Allegheny Townships, History of Butler County Pennsylvania, R. C. Brown Co., Publishers, 1895.]

Previous Chapter 74-2 (pgs.1243-1281) - Biographical Sketches: Slippery Rock Twp and Centreville Boro; Mercer Twp and Harrisville Boro; Worth and Brady Twps; Franklin Twp and Prospect Boro; Muddy Creek Twp and Portersville Boro
Continued Chapter 75-2 (pgs.1304-1331) - Biographical Sketches: Cherry, Washington, Marion, Venango, Parker and Allegheny Townships
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Updated: 25 Sep 2000, 10:43