THE CONESTOGA AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY


History of Martic Township

from

History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

with Biographical Sketches
of Many of the Pioneers and Prominent Men.

by Franklin Ellis and Samuel Evans.



Philadelphia:
Everts & Peck
1883

Chapter LXVI
Martic Township



NOTE: Ellis and Evans were the editors, S. C. Stevenson wrote the section on Martic Township. Providence Township was formed from Martic Township in 1853, there is material on early Providence Township here as well.


967

MARTIC TOWNSHIP

Geographical and Topographical-Martic township is situated in the southwestern part of Lancaster County. It was organized as a township in 1729, the organization being ratified in 1730. It is bounded as follows: north by the Pequea Creek, which separates it from Pequea township; northeast by Providence; east by Providence and Drumore; southeast and south by Drumore; west by the Susquehanna River. It derives its name from a small tribe of Indians who inhabited the township in the neighborhood of the mouth of Pequea Creek. It is one of the six townships into which Lancaster County was originally divided, and is spelled upon the old records "Martock."

Geology of the Township.-Along the northern and northwestern borders of the township are found extensive deposits of carbonate of lime. These desposits are the source from which are derived the principal fertilizers used by the farmers, and in consequence of these deposits the farms in the vicinity are very productive. Small deposits of magnetic ore are also found in various sections, but not enough to warrant the deposits being worked as a source of revenue. On the farm of Mr. George S. Lamborn have been discovered deposits of black oxide of manganese, but not in sufficient quantities to lead to any important results.

Flora 2-The flora of the township is especially rich and abundant. Trees of magnificent growth and of almost all varieties crown her hills and slopes, whilst the lower forms of plant life exist in rich profusion. Near the village of Rawlinsville there is a tract known as Eshleman's meadow, in which upwards of two hundred and fifty different plant forms have been discovered. The following is a tabulated statement of the different natural orders found in this section: 1. Ranucculaceae, crow-foot family; 2. Dipsaceae, teasel family; 3. Caryophyllaceae, pink family; Discoriaceae, wild yam; 5. Anacardiaceae, Sumac family; 6. Anonaceae, pawpaw family; 7. Violaceae, violet family; 8. Ericaceae, heath family; 9. Leguminosae, bean family; 10. Aristocholaceae, birth-root family; 11. Compositae; 12. Sauriaceae, lizard's tail; 13. Phytolaccaceae, poke family; 14. Rosaceae, rose family; 15. Rubiaceae, madder family; 16. Asclepidaceae, milkweed family; 17. Euphorbiaceae, spurge family; 18. Alismaceae, loose strife family; 19. Onagraceae, evening primrose family; 20. Grossulaceae, opine family; 21. Sinaceae, wild flax family; 22. Scrophulariacae, fig-wort family; 23. Verbenaceae, vervain family; Labiatae, mint family; 24. Labiatae, mint family; 25. Boraginaceae, borage family; 26. Solanaceae, nightshade family; 27. Polygonaceae, knotweed family; 28. Urticaceae, nettle family; 29. Similaceae, smilax family; 30. Lilacaea, lily family; 31. Cyperaceae, serge family; 32. Filices, fern family; 33. Lycopodiaceae, club moss family; 34. Lobeliaceae, lobelia family; 35. Plantaginaceae, plantain family. All of these natural orders have been discovered in this section, their location has been determined and the genera and species fixed by the local botanists. Belonging to these thirty-five different orders about eight hundred different genera have been discovered, including above five thousand different species. Near the village of Marticville, upon the farm of David S. McElhaney, stand two magnificent trees of the oak family (Quercus villosa, or willow-oak), said to be the only two specimens of the kind within the limits of the county of Lancaster.

Natural Features.-In the north the land is generally level, with a slight inclination to roll. In consequence of the proximity of this portion of the township to the great limestone belt skirting the northern part, the soil is very productive, and the labor of the farmer is repaid with abundant crops. In the centre of the township the land is decidedly hilly, and though, in consequence of the gravely nature of the soil, the land is not quite so productive as in other parts of the township, labor and skillful cultivation yields an ample return. In the eastern part the land is level, while in the southern part it exhibits a slight disposition to a rolling nature, sloping gradually towards the Susquehanna River. The following streams furnish the water-power of the township; Muddy Run, rising near Rawlinsville, on the farm of Samuel Martin, deceased, now owned by Jacob Strine, ex-sheriff of Lancaster County, flowing southwest, forming the southwestern boundary between Martic and Drumore, from near the residence of Hannah Dughan to the Susquehanna, entering that river between two points known as Cully's Falls and Neal's Fishery. On this stream are located the following mills: Grist and saw-mill, property of Peter Snavely. The Tucquan, rising in the village of Rawlinsville, and entering the Susquehanna River below a point known as Erb's saw-mill, is the most noted stream in this section of the county. From its source to its mouth, a distance of six miles, its course is through a ravine, abounding in picturesque and beautiful scenery. Rocks of every shape, crowned with trees or nodding with magnificent ferns, greet the eye. Here the stream is a gentle rivulet, there a miniature whirlpool, and again it rushes through a rocky chasm in one wild plunge, like a frightened steed panting to break the bonds that bind it. From Erb's saw-mill to the Susquehanna River, a distance of about two miles, the stream is so tortuous that the public road crosses it five times.
About one mile from the river the stream passes through a deep gorge, known as the Devil's Hole. Here, between precipitous rocks towering up for hundreds

2 By U. S. Clark



968
HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

of feet, the tourist may sit for hours and muse upon the beauty and grandeur of the scene. The rocks, crowned with magnificent growths of the mountain laurel (Rhododendron maximum), shut out the faintest glimmer of the sunlight, and one can almost imagine that he is surrounded by fairy enchantment. The ravine through which this stream passes is noted for the richness and profusion of its botanical specimens, and is a great place of resort for lovers of that delightful science.

Early Settlers.-The early settlers of the northern part of the township were originally from Hesse-Darmstadt, in Germany. According to the testimony of some of the oldest inhabitants, the northern part was settled by Matthias Kreider in or about the year 1691, but in all probability his arrival was nearly a score of years later. He settled upon the southern bank of the Pequea Creek, a little to the north of the present village of Marticville. His tract contained two hundred acres, the stipulated price being one shilling per acre, or one cord of wood for every acre of land. It is said that he paid for his land with the wood that grew upon it.
Other settlers from the "Old County" soon followed this first pioneer, and in a short time the region was settled. The Dutch element largely preponderates in the northern part of the township, and the same plodding industry, desire to make money, simplicity of habits, general sameness of dress, peculiar religious traits that prevail among the Germans in the "Old Country" characterize their brethren in this section of the township. They cling to the customs of their ancestors with a tenacity which neither time, distance nor surrounding circumstances can wholly obliterate. These pioneer settlers were followed in a short time by families of the Goods, Hubers, Warfels, Hares, and Millers. At a later period in the history of this township came the Sweigarts, Eshlemans, and the Shanks.
The Good family came to the township at an early period of its history, the date of some of their deeds running back anterior to the time when the commonwealth purchased the right of the heirs of Penns. They settled south and west of the present village of Marticville, and their descendants still occupy the land purchased by their forefathers. The family name is closely identified with the history of the township. They have been foremost in improvements, in furthering all that might conduce to the prosperity of their section, and in promoting the good of the community. It may be mentioned as a fact in the history of this township that a number of positions of trust or honor that have been conferred upon the township by the voters of the county the members of the Good family have held the largest share, and at present John J. Good, son of Daniel Good, who once held the important position of county commissioner (in 1851), is county treasurer of Lancaster County.

The Huber family also secured a foothold in this township at a very early period of its existence. They also settled in the neighborhood of Marticville, and the family to-day occupy a large portion of the northern part of the territory of the township. Among the prominent members now living are Henry Huber, postmaster at Marticville, who had held that position for a period of thirty-six years; Joseph Huber, one of the progressive farmers of the northern end; Benjamin Huber, also extensively engaged in the farming business; David Huber, of Marticville and David H. Huber, engaged in farming in the southern section. Later on in the history of the township came the Eshlemans, who have contributed by their ability in developing the agricultural facilities of the northern section in no small degree.
The section of the township along the Susquehanna River south of the mouth of the Pequea Creek was settled by the Clarks, McCrearys, and Reads early in the eighteenth century, they, with the family of the Neels, have taken up all the land from the river to and including much of what is now known as Mount Nebo. All the above names have disappeared from the list of taxable except the Clarks and Neels, who still live upon the land occupied by their fathers, and are numbered among the more progressive men of the section.
The Clark family has always bee closely identified with every religious and educational enterprise, James Clark having been secretary of the school board for a period of nine years, and for a long time been an official member in the Mount Nebo Methodist Episcopal Church.
The McCreary family has always been noted for its zeal in the cause of education, charity for the needy, liberal-mindedness, sound judgment upon all matters pertaining to the common welfare, and its members were among the best informed upon almost all topics that could be mentioned. William McCreary, the last of the name in this township, and who died in 1868, had during his lifetime given liberally to the church of his choice (the Mount Nebo Presbyterian).
At the tie of its organization in 1854, Mr. McCreary placed one thousand dollars on interest, and directed that the interest of the sum and fifty dollars of the principal should be used each year as long as it lasted to pay the salary of the minister. This church has also a small circulation library, the gift of William McCreary, who gave his own private library and one thousand dollars to purchase new books. The committee on purchase consisted of Messrs. Will. Ed. McCreary, Thomas Stewart, and S. C. Stevenson.
The southern part of the township was settled by Scotch-Irish Covenanters about the year 1740 or 1742. Among the earliest settlers were the following: David Jones, John Marshall, William Andrews, James Stewart, the Duncans, Grays, Dixons, Boyds, Steeles, McCaughlins, Robinsons, Whorrys, Whites, Pegans and Sokses. None of their descendants, as



969

Martic Township


far as known, now live in the township except the Pegans (mentioned elsewhere) and Mary Jane, wife of Thomas E. Ambler, who is a lineal descendant of the Boyds, being a granddaughter of John Boyd, who in 1752 settled upon the land now owned by Milton Wike, of Columbia.
The oldest house in this part, and, as far as known, the oldest in the township, was built by James Duncan in 1755, and is still occupied as a dwelling-house by the present owner, Ellen Kehoe. In this house John Stevenson, father of the writer of the present sketch, was born in 1807. His father Samuel Stevenson, had lived here for some years, and taught school in this township, also in Manheim township, this county. Some of his old subscription lists are still preserved in the Stevenson family, showing him to have been a good penman, a very necessary qualification for a school-teacher in that day. He was also a surveyor and scrivener, and wrote many of the legal documents required at that time.
Among the later settlers here may be mentioned Joseph Wentz, who came from Doe Run, Chester Co. in 1792, and for a number of years was justice of the peace. He raised a large family of children ,some of them have been closely identified with the later history of the township. Amount those still living in the township are Thomas Wentz, owner of Wentz's mill. He had been a member of the Bethesda Methodist Episcopal Church since its erection in 1843, and from that time to the present has been in official capacity in the church. Another son, William Wentz, recently deceased, held a number of positions in the township having been school director for several terms; he also held the office of assessor, besides other positions of trust, and was at the time of his death tax collector. His two sons, Isaac J. and William H., still live in the township and are farmers. John Wentz (merchant), of the firm of Brown & Wentz, is a son of John Wentz, and grandson of Joseph Wentz. He is one of the most active and untiring business men of whom the community can boast.
Among the oldest families in this section are the Simpsons. They purchased a property in Martic, about two miles south of Rawlinsville, in 1821, and have resided upon it from that date up to the present time (1883). The father of the family, John Simpson, was married to a daughter of Roger Douts. From this union resulted eight children,-James, Mary, Sarah, Robert (deceased), William (deceased), Jane, and Bartholomew, and one who died in childhood. The family, especially the male members, are men of note in the community in which they live. James, the oldest, has held several offices of trust and profit in the township. He was auditor of the township for many years, and held the office of assessor from 1840 up to 1858. Bartholomew was a member of the school board for a period of not less than twelve years, and during all that time labored solely for the good of the schools of the township.

All the members of this family are noted for their hospitality, public-spiritedness, devotion to the cause of the right, sober, industrious, and pious men. They labored earnestly for the good of the community.
We might mention also the names of Robinsons, descendants of John Robinson, who came from Ireland near the close of the century. Of his descendants now living in the township, Isaac H. Robinson is a merchant doing an active business at Bethesda, and Thomas Robinson, lately retired from farming on account of increasing age and declining health, who now lives with his son-in-law, James F. Harner, an enterprising man. Thomas Cully, a descendant of George Cully, also lives in this part, and is one of the solid men of the township, noted for his hospitality and kindness to the poor.
James Pegan, grandfather of the present family of Pegans in Martic township, came to Lancaster County prior to 1757, and settled upon a tract of land in Martic township, near the village of Bethesda. This tract was known as "Pegan's Fancy." A patent for this land was issued to Andrew Pegan, bearing date 1810. James Pegan, above mentioned, had three sons, namely, James, Andrew, and Henry, and three daughters, Margaret, Ann, and Jane. Andrew Pegan, who received the patent already mentioned, was the father of seven children, three sons and four daughters. His sons were James, Alexander, and Andrew. Two of these reside at present (1883) in Martic township, James near the village of Bethesda, and Alexander near the village of Mount Nebo. Margaret (deceased), the oldest of the daughters, was married to George Nimlow. Two of her descendants, namely, Hannah Margaret, wife of Isaac Walton, merchant, and Anna Mary, wife of James Akens, shoemaker, reside at present (1883) in the village of Mount Nebo. A son, James Andrew, is a tobacco merchant in the city of Lancaster, and Sarah Jane is married to Hugh Kilgore, of York County. James Pegan has been postmaster at Bethesda from 1863 to the present time (1883). Alexander Pegan has held the same office at Mount Nebo (with occasional interruptions) for a number of years.
James Pegan, the grandfather of the present family, served as a soldier in the Continental army during the struggle of the colonies for national independence.
William Ambler, the father of the present Ambler family of Martic, came to Lancaster County from Montgomery County on March 25, 1829. He was married to a daughter of Israel Penrose. The Penroses emigrated from Bucks to Lancaster County in 1827. The living members of the family of William Ambler are as follows: Penrose, married to Elizabeth Smedley, residence Fulton township, Lancaster Co., occupation farming; Thomas, married to Mary Jane Boyd, residence Martic township, occupation farming; Edward, married to Mary Johnson, residence Drumore township, occupation cabinet-maker and undertaker;



970
HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

Adaline, married to James Smedley; Anna, married to Aquilla Lamborn, residence Drumore. Thomas Ambler, the member of the family who resides in Martic township, is one of the most progressive farmers that the township can boast of. He is a man of more than ordinary intelligence, liberal in his views upon all subjects pertaining to educational and religious matters, charitable to the poor, of kindly and benevolent impulses, and active and energetic in all that pertains to the welfare of his native section.
About the year 1830 the Shoemaker family emigrated from Montgomery County, and settled in Lancaster County, choosing Martic township as their place of residence. They settled in close proximity to the Amblers, the two properties adjoining.
Joseph Harner, the father of the present Harner family in this township, was born in Montgomery County, and emigrated to Lancaster County in 1838. He also chose Martic as his place of residence, settling near the Ambler property. He married Mary Slingluff, daughter of John Slingluff, of Montgomery County. From this union descended the present family of Harners in this township, namely, John S. (who married a daughter of J. B. Long), George (deceased), Samuel (married to McLaughlin), Joseph, Rebecca (deceased), Jesse, Mary Ann (married to Thomas Cully), May (deceased), and Elizabeth (married to Harrison Long).
The Harner family number among its members some of the most progressive farmers in this section of the county. They are all noted for their devotion to the cause of morals, religion, and education. John S. held the office of school director in the township for some years, and his influence contributed in no small degree to the position which the schools occupy today in history of the township. Jesse Harner was also a schools occupy today in the history of the township. Jesse Harner was also a school director for a number of years, and aided by his ability and moral worth in placing the common schools of this section upon a more enduring basis.
The Armstrong family are also men of note in this community. Hugh Armstrong, the progenitor of the present family of that name in this township, came from Ireland to Edward Brien's landing at Martic Forge, about the year 1800. After coming to this country, he married Jane Shoff, a relative of the present family of Shoffs, of Martic. From the union of these two persons sprang the present family of Armstrongs. There are nine children, descendants of Hugh Armstrong,-John, Joseph, William, Gordon, Hugh, Nancy (married to Edward Galen), Elizabeth (married to Isaac Null), Bell (married to Hugh O'Nail), Jane (married to Mahlon P. Eckman). All of the male members of this family have become distinguished citizens of the township. John, the oldest member of the family, was elected to the office of county commissioner in 1869, holding that position until 1872. Anterior to this time he had held nearly every office within the gift of the people of the township. He is a man of large means, noted for his generous disposition, kindness of heart, and abundant hospitality. Joseph is an intelligent farmer, and a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. William is also a farmer, residing near Mount Nebo, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a man of liberal views and kindly disposition. Thomas deceased, left a family of five boys, as follows: B. F. Armstrong, member of the school board of Martic; Thomas Jefferson, until recently assessor of Providence township; Christian, Daniel and George. Gordon Armstrong is at present (1883) supervisor of the public roads of Martic. Hugh, another member, was for many years a school-teacher in the township, a man of no mean abilities in scholastic attainments, and at present (1883) holds the position of justice of the peace in Martic. He is at present a surveyor and scrivener by profession, and has been for a number of years connected in church fellowship with the Bethesda Methodist Episcopal Church. Hugh Armstrong, son of John Armstrong, is at present (1883) a member of the board of auditors of Martic township. Among the descendants of the Armstrongs is one who deserves notice; we refer to James Galen, residing at present with his mother upon the property of Milton Wike, of Columbia borough. He has the largest numismatic cabinet in the county, some of his coins antedating the birth of Christ.
Among the prominent property-owners in the township at present is George M. Steinman, member of the firm of Steinman & Co., of Lancaster, who bought of Samuel Allison one hundred and fifteen acres of land known as "Martic Heights," and commenced making improvements thereon. This farm has been increased by subsequent purchases, until he now owns eight hundred and twenty-three acres. About four hundred acres of this tract is under cultivation, the balance is covered with timber. The greater part of this land was poor and worked down by bad farming, but under wide direction and the skillful care of John Monteith, who for eighteen years was Mr. Steinman's farmer, this farm has reached a degree of perfection unequaled by any in the township, and at present is the most valuable landed estate in Southern Lancaster County. The farm is at present under the efficient management of B. F. Armstrong. Upon this property are three sets of farm buildings and three tenant houses. The water supply of the main farm is from a water wheel and pump of the capacity of twenty-five hundred gallons per day. The water is stored in a stone reservoir containing sixty-three thousand gallons' capacity. The two other farms are watered by springs.
George Lamborn, an intelligent and public-spirited citizen, is a farmer living in the lower end of the township (along Muddy Run). He is a member of the society of Friends. For fifteen consecutive years he was a member of the school board of Martic,



971

Martic Township

and held the position of secretary in that body for nine years. During this time he has left a mark upon the pupils of the public schools that will be an enduring monument to his memory, such as any one may well be proud of. Mr. Lamborn is the owner of the largest mineral collection in the township.
Joseph Engles, one of the justices of the peace for Martic township, is one of the most prominent citizens He lived in the village of Mount Nebo, and has for a number of years been one of the leading merchants of the village. He is a man of commanding presence, vigorous intellect, and stern conscientiousness. Few person have a stronger hold upon the confidence and affections of the people than the subject of this sketch. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Mount Nebo since 1859. Mr. Engles has been a justice of the peace in Martic, with slight interruptions, from 1865 to the present time.

PROVINCIAL TAX OF MARTIC FOR 1757 (INCLUDING PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP).

          
                                       s. d.                                                    s. d.
     James Reed.....................0  10  6             William Stuart.......................0  15  0
     James Duncan...................1   5  0             Samuel Simson........................1   0  0
     Briece Miller..................0   5  0             Thomas White.........................1   2  6
     Robert Pennery.................0  10  0             John Celwill.........................0  18  0
     Samuel Hilliss.................0  10  0             James Snodgrass......................0  10  0
     Andrew Johnson.................0   2  6             Robert Fulton........................0   5  0
     John Alexander.................0  11  6             Samuel Workman.......................0   6  0
     Janet Snodgrass................0   9  0             Hugh Workman.........................0  10  0  
     William Leamen.................0  16  0             Robert Brutherton....................0  10  0
     Robert Mathroll................0   6  0             William Brutherton...................0  10  0
     Jacob Beams....................1  10  0             John Long............................1   5  0
     Christian Graft................1   6  0             Arsbel Steel.........................0   7  6
     Michael Graft..................3  10  0             Hugh Blear...........................0  10  0
     Ulrich Yourty..................0  16  0             Samuel Mears.........................0  10  6
     Jacob Graft....................3  15  0             Alexander Scoot......................0  16  0
     Michael Shank..................1  12  6             William Reed.........................1   2  6
     Ocly Everly....................1  10  6             David Moor...........................0   5  6
     Jacob Hoover, Sen..............1   0  0             George Johnson.......................0   5  0
     Hugh Long......................1   7  0             James Reed...........................0   4  6
     David Wells....................0  16  0             Daniel Reed..........................0   7  6
     James Robinson.................0  12  0             James Blear..........................0   7  6
     Moses Nelson...................0  10  0             David McBride........................0  10  0
     Thomas Nelson..................0  10  0             John McAnolty .......................0  10  0
     Samuel Luckley.................0  10  0             John Alexander.......................1  12  0
     Robert Luckley.................0  10  0             John Ramsey..........................1  10  0
     John McMullon..................0  15  0             Adam Moore...........................0  10  6
     William McGarrach..............0   6  0             Samuel McCullough....................0  18  0
     John McCullough................0   4  0             James Luckey.........................0  10  3
     Christian Murphy...............0   3  0             Patrick Duncan.......................0   9  0 
     George Coop....................0   4  0             Alexander Hunter.....................0  10  0
     John Funk......................0   5  0             Arsbell Birdy........................0   4  0
     Francis Taylor.................0   7  0             Thomas Smith........................ 2  15  0
     Henry Stofer...................0   7  6             John Alexander.......................0   2  0
     William Folk...................1   0  0             William Snodgrass....................1   2  6
     Jacob Loughman.................0  10  0             George Campble.......................0   7  6
     John Good......................2   5  0             Arsbell Brownlee.....................0   4  6
     Henry Lines....................1   7  0             John Graft...........................1   7  0
     John Stofer....................1   5  0             Jacob Brant..........................0  15  0
     William Hover..................0   3  0             George Kinkead.......................0   5  0
     Jacob Whitter..................0  18  0             John Garvin..........................0   7  0
     Andrew Armstrong...............0  10  0             William Snodgrass....................0  15  0
     Samuel Erwin...................0  10  0             Matthew Cuningham....................0  12  0
     Joseph Bloar...................0   7  6             Peter Paterson.......................0   5  0
     Widow Erwin....................0   7  6             John Snodgrass.......................1   0  0
     Widow Steel....................0  12  0             William Snodgrass....................0  14  0
     Samuel Dixson..................0  13  0             James Snodgrass......................0  12  0
     John Grimes....................0  18  0             John Leeman..........................1   0  0
     Thomas Cully...................0   7  0             George Sutter........................0   5  0
     Andrew Pagon...................0  15  0             Samuel Rogers........................0  10  0
     George McLaughlin..............0  14  0             James Clark..........................1   7  0
     Alexander McLaughlin...........0  16  0             Hugh Cilwell.........................0  14  0
     Robert Lees....................0   7  6             Hugh Blear...........................0   7  6
     James Moore....................0  13  0             Edward Gilbert.......................0   9  3
     Thomas Black...................0  12  0             Samuel Mears.........................0  10  0
     Daniel McDryon.................0  10  0             Alexander Scott......................0  15  0
     George Reed....................0  14  0             William Reed.........................0  10  0
     Alexander Baldridge............0  10  6             William Neely........................0   2  6
     John Muckle....................0   3  6             William Reed.........................0   8  0
     William Reynolds...............0  10  0             David Reed...........................0  12  0
     William White..................0   4  6             James Nixson.........................0   5  0
     Thomas McCulley................0   7  0             Hugh Reynolds........................0   5  0
     Martin Funk....................0  12  0             William Diven........................0   2  6
     Widow McGachey.................0   5  0             John McBride.........................0  17  0
     Widow Lusk.....................0   5  0             Thomas Whorry........................0  10  0
     Peter Clark....................0   5  0             John Onall...........................0  12  0
     John Duncan....................1   7  0             James Clark..........................0   7  6
     Robert Duncan..................0   6  0             John Lowman..........................0   7  6
     Hugh Gray......................0  10  0             Samuel Byrs..........................2   0  0 
     John Gaby......................0   7  6             Jacob Winter.........................0  17  6
     Robert Gill....................0  14  0             Jacob Storer.........................2  10  0
     William Stuart.................0   5  0             Patrick McCleare.....................0  10  0
     John Hunter....................0  10  0             Jacob Bear...........................0  16  0
     William Clark..................0   7  6             John Graft Jr,.......................1   2  6
     James Pagon....................1   5  0             John Winter..........................0   6  3
     Widow McCleroy.................0   7  6             Adam Tomous..........................0  14  0
     Harry Blecher..................0  14  0             Henry Stare..........................2   5  0
     Michael Blecher................1   2  6             Martin Byrs......................   .0  10  0
     John Hannow....................0   8  0             Frederick Shouler....................0   9  0
     John McClean...................0   4  0             Jacob Brubacker......................1   8  0
     Christian Shank................1   5  0             Francis Taylor.......................0  10  0
     Benjamin Arsball...............0   5  0             Henry Hover..........................1   2  6
     Dinis McMackon.................0   5  0             Alexander McCalestre.................0   7  6
     Thomas Boyd....................1   0  0             John McDowel.........................1   0  0
     John Baldredge.................0  10  0 

Freeman

     John Clark.....................1  0  0              Patrick Brubak.......................1  0  0 
     Andrew McHaffey................1  0  0              James Brownlee.......................1  0  0 
     James Long.....................1  0  0              John Brownlee........................1  0  0
     Samuel Whorry..................1  0  0              William Nixon........................1  0  0 
     William Leaman.................1  0  0              John Boyd............................1  0  0
     William Clark..................1  0  0              Hans Adams...........................1  0  0 
     William Gabbey.................1  0  0              William Fullertown...................1  0  0 
     Robert Stuart..................1  0  0 

WARRANTEES OF LAND IN MARTIC PRIOR TO 1800

Anderson, William, June 19, 1745, 200 acres between the mouth of Conestoga Creek and Mount Massey.
Armor, Thomas, Feb. 25, 1772, 40 acres, on Susquehanna River, next to George Stevenson; owned in 1883 by R. Brubaker.
Armstrong, Andrew, March 20, 1753, 100 acres, including improvements, next to Humphrey Benner and Ulrich Yartz, in Martic.
Atkinson, Michael, May 13, 1748, 50 acres, next to James Clark and James McFerson.
Baar, Jacob, Feb. 15, 1754, 50 acres, next to John Robison and George Turner.
Baldridge, John, Dec. 14, 1750, 100 acres, next to John Ramsey and others.
Barnard, Jeremiah, Dec. 12, 1745, 150 acres on branch of Muddy Creek, near Susquehanna.
Bleecher, Michael, Feb. 28, 1759, 20 acres, next to his other land.
Bowles, Thomas, June 19, 1744, 200 acres, next to John Taylor, over Susquehanna.
Boyd, John, Jan. 17, 1750, 50 acres, next to Thomas White and James Moore. This property remained in the family until the death of W. C. Boyd, when it was sold to Milton Wike, of Columbia (present owner).
Boyse, Jacob, March 6, 1743, 100 acres, next to Samuel Boyse. Now owned by Martic Forge.
Boyse, Samuel, March 6, 1743, 50 acres, next to his other land. The old forge property.
Duncan, James, Aug. 22, 1753, 150 acres, bought by Samuel Stevenson in 1819, sold by his son, John Stevenson, in 1858, now owned by Ellen Kehoe.
Erwin, Samuel, Sept. 30, 1755, 50 acres, next to Robert Boyd and William Goay.
Forsyth, Robert, Dec. 28, 1742, 50 acres, next to Widow Middleton and Sanders Scott, improved in 1739.
Gibson, Patrick, Dec. 22, 1744, 50 acres, next to Henry Hoover and Leonard Benson, improved in 1737.
Gwin, John, Jan. 3, 1750, 60 acres, next to John McDrewins.
Gross, Andrew, Nov. 29, 1745, 50 acres, next to Mike Grove.
Grunde, Jacob, Nov. 7, 1755, 20 acres, next to John Smith.
Johnson, George, Nov. 8, 1743, 50 acres, next to John Logan.
Johnson, Benjamin, Oct. 18, 1787, 14 acres, next to J. and S. Boyse, or Boyer.
Kinkead, John, Dec. 14, 1750, 50 acres, next to William Forbes and Widow Roads.
Laske, Elizabeth, Jan.31, 1750, 100 acres, next to Robert Steele and T. White, now owned by David Eshleman.
McAnaulty, John, Dec. 20, 1750, 100 acres, next to Widow Snodgrass, now owned by George M. Steinman.
McCall, Samuel, March 27, 1764, 50 acres on Susquehanna.
McCullough, Samuel, Feb. 14, 1750, 100 acres, now owned by David Miller.



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HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

McLaughlin, George, Dec. 1, 1750, 30 acres.
McLaughlin, Alexander and George, May 24, 1753, 150 acres, now owned by J. S. Harner.
McLaughlin, Alexander, Feb. 12, 1755, 20 acres. The two McLaughlin brothers owned at one time a large tract of land comprising at present the farms of Thomas E. Ambler, John S. Harner, Isaac J. and W. H. Wentz, and Thomas Robinson.
Mears, Samuel Dec. 14, 1750, 40 acres.
Middleton, George, April 13, 1737, on east side of Pequea Creek.
Middleton, George, Feb.. 5, 1745, 50 acres, improved in 1737.
Ramsey, John, March 20, 1743, 100 acres, , returned in Drumore.
Read, James, Jan. 3. 1754, 30 acres, next to his other land, now owned by Rolandus Brubaker.
Read, James, March 10, 1743, 50 acres, over river.
Read, James, July 1, 1755, 70 acres, in Martic.
Read, James, Nov. 26, 1756, 50 acres, next to Joseph Reed.
Read Joseph, Jan. 4, 1759, 50 acres, next to James Reed.
Robinson, James, May 5, 1752, 100 acres, included in his improvement, now owned by Jesse Shoemaker's heirs.
Schollas, Frederick, March 30, 1756, 50 acres.
Smith, Abraham, March 11, 1737, 200 acres, next to Jacob Boyer and J. Middleton.
Snodgrass, James, Sept. 6, 1751, 20 acres, now owned by J. N. Massey.
Snodgrass, John, Dec. 20, 1750, 100 acres, next to James Patterson's, now owned by George M. Steinman.
Snodgrass, Janet (widow), Dec. 20, 1750, 100 acres, next to John McAnaullty, now owned by George M. Steinman.
Steel, Robert, Nov. 28, 1753, 90 acres, next to his other land, sold to John Simpson in 1821. The present owners are the heirs of John Simpson.
Stewart, James, July 17, 1742, 50 acres, including improvements by Thomas Stewart. Thomas, Adam, Jan. 3. 1759, 25 acres, next to his other land.
Warry, Thomas, Feb. 28, 1750, 100 acres, now owned by Dana & Miller. Wentzel, John Adam, May 24, 1748.
Wilson, Samuel, Nov. 25, 1751, in his improvement of 1745.
Yorty, Uriah, Dec. 21, 1750, 100 acres.

                                           NON-ASSOCIATORS FOR MARTIC TOWNSHIP, 1777

Thomas Whiry Martin Byers Samuel McCoulough Peter Miller William Clark Peter Toots Hugh Barr Henry Hebel Henry Stofer John McGinnis Christ. Stofer William Turner Chriley Lame Frederick Heble James Reiburen John Heble Arthur Rody Conrad Heble Jacob Whitman Henry Bleeker Alexander Kegy James Harris Christ. Kegy John Smith Henry Kegy Woolery Smith Alexander Kegy, Jr. Samuel Keeder Martin Byers, Jr. Jacob Bear John Bughanan
TAXABLES IN 1807 OF WHAT IS NOW MARTIC TOWNSHIP
Ankrim, James, tanner Connelly, Henry, laborer Alexander, John Cramer, Peter Allen, William, collier Dorouch, Thomas Ankrim, Samuel Denning, William, merchant Brine, Edward, Esq. Dout, Roger Brown, James, innkeeper Dout, Samuel Brannin, Margaret Dout, Robert Black, Widow Debuts, Hugh Byers, Henry, doctor Dunkle, George Byers, Jacob Douglas, John, wood-hauler Blair, John, weaver Elliote, Samuel Cully, Widow Eale, Henry, collier Campbell, Patrick Frayzer, Widow Campbell, George Farmer, Gregory Clark, Widow Furgason, John, laborer Clark, James Fullerton, Alex, wood-hauler Cartilo, John, forgeman Galen, James Cherry, George, cordwainer Gardner, Valentine, tanner Crow, George, steel-maker German, Lawrence, cordwainer Coil, Henry, collier Good, John Harris, William Miller, Abraham Heston, Henry Miller, Peter Harris, John, innkeeper McConnel, Oliver, blacksmith Hagen, John, forgeman Moore, John, collier Hemmelrick, Jacob, laborer McCall, Robert, collier Hart, Benjamin, tanner Neel, James Hart, John, tanner Nogil, John, forgeman Herr, Emanuel Neilson, Stephen, laborer Huber, Abraham, Oldfield, David Heston, John O'Donnel, Hugh. Henry, Richard, mason O'Neal, Charles Irwin, William, collier Patterson, John Jones, Richard, distiller Penny, James, joiner Johnston, John, hatter Porter, James, joiner Kline, Henry Patten, John Kelly, Samuel, cordwainer Pagen, James Kirk, Lentilus, wagoner Penny, Hugh Kepperly, Jacob, mason Paul, James Kepperly, Frederick Robison, John Lines, Samuel Robison, Thomas Lamburn, George Robison, James Lamburn, Townsend Robison, John, Jr. Long, Hugh Reed, John, Esq. Lemon William Rice, Peter, wagoner Leard, John, tailor Robison, John, weaver Lines, Christian Seigaint, Jane Miller, Martin Sides, George McCouch, Robert, tailor Snodgrass, James McMullin, Steward Swagert, Felix Moore, Adam Steer, Michael, wagoner Mackey, Thomas Seabrook, Henry, collier Miglaughlin, William Seabrook, William, wood-chopper Miglaughlin, George Spencer, John McCandles, John Shoff, John McKee, William Swagert, Sebastian McCullough, Samuel Shank, Christian McNear, Archibald Seabrook, William gunsmith McCreary, John Shoff, Jacob Morris, John, forgeman Shank, John Mayley, James Wallace, John, tailor Mayberry, Sylvanus Wents, Joseph, miller Moore, William, collier Williams, Robert, hatter McCarty, John, blacksmith Young, Peter, distiller
FREEMAN
David Smith, merchant Samuel Snodgrass Isaac Smith, merchant Thomas Clark James Pendry, sickle-maker Philip Gardner Robert Francis Robert Douglas, collier Joseph Reid Owen Connelly, collier Thomas Shindleton Patrick Connelly, collier Edward Pennel John Connelly, wood-chopper Samuel Stevenson Anthony, Kernes, cordwainer Thomas Black, tanner Joseph Meginnes James Black David Irwin John Ryley Samuel McConnell Peter Polen George Warfle, cordwainer John Cramer, collier William Doub Joseph Penny Hugh Black John Dunkle John Long Powley Dunkle Samuel Snodgrass

Justices of the Peace.-Since the adoption of the State Constitution, authorizing townships to elect their own justices of the peace, the following-named person have been elected in Martic township.
                         Ryland, McCalister, April 14, 1840              Thomas Wentz, April 1864
                         John Good, April 14, 1840                       Joseph Engles, April 1865
                         James Black, April 15, 1845                     Elias Aument, April 1869
                         R. B. McAllister, April 15, 1845                Joseph Engles, April, 1870
                         Henry Rush, April 9, 1850                       Jacob Reese, April, 1874
                         F. Henry Andrews, April 11, 1854                Abraham Good, April, 1876
                         John Rawlins, April 11, 1854                    Joseph Engles, April, 1877
                         John McClune, April 12, 1859                    Hugh Armstrong, April 1879
                         Henry Andrews, April 12, 1859                   Joseph Engles, April 1882
                         Jacob L. Lehman, April 12, 1864



973

MARTIC TOWNSHIP

Martic township contains four villages of considerable size.
Marticville is situated in the northern part of the township, about nine miles south of the city of Lancaster. It contains about two hundred inhabitants, one Methodist Church, two stores, one of which is the post-office, one good hotel, and one public school. The village is pleasantly located in the midst of limestone region, noted for the productive quality of its farms. This village was commenced early in the history of the township, being started upon the road leading from Conestoga Centre to the present village of Marticville, and was originally called "Frogtown," the western part still retaining that name. The population is principally of the Dutch element, and retains to a great degree the customs of its ancestry.

To see an 1875 map of Martic Township, click here. This is a scaled (60%) copy of the map, to see the full version choose it from the maps menu.

Rawlinsville is situated in the eastern part of the township, on the road leading from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry, about thirteen miles from the former and five miles from the latter place. It contains about one hundred inhabitants, two stores, two hotels, one Methodist Church, and one public school. We have been unable to obtain any authentic data as to when the village was settled, but it was probably made the site of a village very early in the history of the township. It is situated in the midst of a fine farming region, the people being noted for their thrift, devotion to the cause of education, and general intelligence.

Bethesda is situated in the southwestern part of the township, about one mile north of the famous ferry on the Susquehanna River, known as McCall's Ferry. It contains about one hundred inhabitants, two stores, one Methodist Church, one resident physician, and one public school, and a post-office.

Mount Nebo is situated near the centre of Martic township, about fourteen miles south from Lancaster, and about two and two-thirds miles east from the Columbia and Port Deposit Railroad. It contains two general stores, two churches, one Methodist and one Presbyterian, cabinet-shop and furniture warerooms, and one public school. It contains no hotel, and it is a remarkable fact in the history of this village that it never did contain a hotel.
It is situated in the midst of a region noted for the grandeur and beauty of its landscape scenery. From Armstrong's Hill, a little to the east of the village, may be seen one of the grandest landscape scenes to be found anywhere within the limits of the county. Looking to the north from this point of observation, you behold an extended view of hill and dale, dotted with smiling fields, sleeping groves, isolated farmhouses, and an every-varying panorama of beauty, until the view is lost became the eye does not possess the power to pierce the distance beyond. On the northwest the observer has a magnificent view of the Susquehanna River, bordered with wooded slopes, and, taken as a whole, this view, especially in the summer season of the year, is really enchanting. Mount Nebo is remarkable also as being the seat of the oldest Methodist Church in Martic township. The inhabitants are noted for their hospitality to strangers, devotion to the cause of religion, general intelligence, and zeal in the cause of common school education. As an evidence of the truth of this latter statement we may mention the fact that the school district of which Mount Nebo forms a part has within the last three years sent out five common school teachers, all of whom were trained to the profession at the public school in this place.
Closely identified with the history of Mount Nebo is the Hagen family. For the last sixty-five years the name has been prominent in every enterprise, and they are numbered among the most valuable citizens of the village. Joshua Hagen (recently deceased), the eldest son of John Hagen, was a man of note, holding a number of positions of honor and trust. Though never married he was a householder all his life, and was noted from his hospitality and enterprising spirit. Davis Hagen, who learned the trade of axe-making with his brother Joshua, spent the greater portion of his life in this village working at his trade, which he taught to his five boys; viz: Henry Bascom, John, Albert, Davis and William. Of these five sons John is at present working at blacksmithing in Rawlinsville, William is carrying on axe-making in Mount Nebo, and Albert is engaged at his trade (blacksmithing) in this village, and at present is a member of the board of prison inspectors of Lancaster County.

Schools.-The common school law of Pennsylvania was passed in 1834, and adopted by Martic township in 1836. From that time until the present there has been a steady and gradual improvement in her school system. At the date of the acceptance of the common school law by Martic she had 616 taxables inhabitants, including Providence township. In 1837 she had 9 school-houses 9 teachers, 484 pupils, and the tax levy for school purposes amounted to $800; state appropriation, $1162.81; total receipts, $1605.58; expenditures, $1167.41; expended on building, $525. Tax collector Joshua Hagen collected the first school tax levied in the township. The most notable improvement in the history of the common schools of this township was made between the years 1861 and 1883. In 1861 the aggregate amount of taxation for school purposes was $1900; term of school, five months; number of school-houses, 7; amounts paid to teachers ranging from $18 to $25. From that time until 1880 there appeared to be a standstill in the history of this township, when at that period a new impetus was given to the cause of education. In the above-named year the taxation aggregated $2800, the term of school six months, and the salary ranging from $30 to $37. At present, through there has not been much increase in taxation, Martic now boasts 10 schools, a term of six months, and a salary ranging from $34. to $50.



974
HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

Church History.-The church history of Martic township commences with the Muddy Run Presbyterian Church. The land upon which the church stands was taken up or patented in 1742 by David Jones, John Marshall, and William Andrews, and a log house built the same year. There are no records to show who was the first pastor, as some years after its erection nearly all the settlers left, on account of a difficulty with the Indians, and removed to South Carolina. The second house, also log, was built in or about the year 1760. In the year 1820 a man by the name of Gregory Farmer, an eccentric character, living upon the banks of the Tucquan Creek, near the farm now owned by Henry Galen, conceived the idea of erecting a stone church in place of the "Old Log House," then in a very dilapidated condition, and although building-stone was very plenty in the vicinity and nearly valueless, he would accept nothing as a gratuity, but paid for everything entering into its construction with his own means. A man by the name of Annans was pastor of the congregation, and to show the relation existing between pastor and people at that time the following anecdote may be related: A member of the church, David Stewart by name, was leader of the choir. In endeavoring to sing the psalm read by the minister he missed the tune. After several ineffectual attempts to right himself, the preacher's patience became exhausted, and he peremptorily ordered him to close the "Beyuk," saying, "You shan't abuse the word of God so." This command ended the psalm-singing for that day. The fourth and present house was built in 1853. This house was also built of stone, but still at this late day it is known as the "old Log church." Mr. Annans was succeeded in 1826 by Rev. William Easton as pastor, who preached there regularly until the year 1877, a period of fifty one years, during which time he had seen laid to rest in the quiet graveyard adjoining the church almost the entire congregation that was present to listen to his first sermon. The present pastor is David Anderson, who preaches here the second and fourth Sabbaths in each month.

Methodist Episcopal Church, Mount Nebo.-The second church in point of age is the Methodist Episcopal Church at Mount Nebo. Methodism, in its struggle for a foothold in this township, had many difficulties to encounter. The strong leaning to the doctrine of the Mennonites by the inhabitants of the northern part of the township, the religious fervor of the Scot-Irish Covenantors in the southern section, made this section of the county a barren field for a time for the inculcation of the doctrines of Wesley. In 1817, however, we find that Jacob Harnish, of Conestoga township, leased a lot to James Neal, Valentine Gardner, John Read, and William McCreary, for a term of ninety-nine years, the yearly rent, being one pepper-corn, to be paid upon the ground if desired, upon which was erected a house to be used for church and school purposes. In the year 1818 Methodist meetings were held at the house of David Sockett, at which a man by the name of King preached. Sockett lived upon the property now owned by David Miller, near Muddy Run. After this occasional meetings were held in the public school-house and in private dwellings until 1834, when the zeal and influence of Isaac Greist and others caused a Methodist Church to be erected in the village of Mount Nebo, it being the first Methodist Church in this part of the county. The ground upon which this church was erected was deeded, the deed bearing date Aug. 2, 1834, by Jacob Harnish and wife, to Isaac Greist, John Miles, Isaac Wentz, John Owens, and Robert Bruce, who constituted the first board of trustees. In this connection Isaac Griest should receive more than a passing notice. The cause of Methodism never had a warmer friend or a stronger advocate. He gave liberally of his means whenever called upon. He had for some years before his death contemplated leaving his property to the church at Mount Nebo, but he died before his wife, namely, March 18, 1876. His wife, however, who died Nov. 1, 1879, carried out the wishes of her husband, and bestowed the bulk of her possessions to the trustees at Mount Nebo for the purpose of erecting a new house, the corner-stone of which was laid Aug. 17, 1882, and the house dedicated to the service of God Aug. 12, 1883. Revs. J. S. J. McConnell and George Cummins preached the dedicatory sermons, assisted by Rev. J. C. Wood, of Marietta, and others.
The present structure is built of brick and furnished in a substantial manner. The church is fifty-five feet long by thirty-four feet wide. Samuel Jones, of Rawlinsville, Martic township, was contractor. The names of the building committee were as follows: John A. Alexander, Rev. B. K. Hambleton, James Clark.
The following-named gentlemen constitute the present board of trustees: John Crawford, president; James Clark, secretary; J. A. Alexander, treasurer; F. Young, B. K. Hambleton, Rolandus Brubaker, William Armstrong, I. N. Massey, Samuel Alexander. Present membership, forty-four.

Bethesda Methodist Episcopal Church.-The deed of land upon which this church is erected was obtained from John Creamer and wife. The deed was made to the following-named persons, who constituted the first board of trustees; William Mayberry, Henry Hart, John Wentz, Isaac S. Wentz, Lewis Wilkinson, Daniel Swift and Harrison Potts. It is built of stone, and was built by subscription in 1843. James Hahn, the first preacher in charge at this place, who was a carpenter by trade, was the builder. William McLaughlin did the carpenter work until the church was under roof. It was finished by Christian Creamer and Lewis Wilkinson. The present board of trustees consists of the following person: Thomas Wentz, Jesse Harner, J. O. Dunkle, William McLaughlin, L. R. McClune, John H. Carter,



975

Martic Township

Hugh Armstrong, William H. Wentz, James Ecklan. Present membership, ninety.

Rawlinsville Methodist Episcopal Church.-This is a frame structure, erected in 1875. The land was obtained from B. F. Miller, and deeded by him to the following-named gentlemen, who constituted the first board of trustees: John Monteith, Elias Aument, John Hart, Jacob Hart, H. L. Thompson, Abraham Creamer, Samuel Drumm, Lewis Volrath, Washington Drumm. Contractor and builder, Samuel Jones, of Rawlinsville. The present number of communicants is thirty-two. The Methodist Circuit, of which Martic forms a part, was formerly called the Fulton Circuit. It was subsequently divided, the western part taking the name of the Mount Nebo Circuit. From its division to the present time (1883) the following-named persons officiated in the churches in a ministerial capacity: Joseph Magee, ____ Mauger, H. H. Bodine, N. W. Bennum, G. L. Schaeffer, Joseph Gregg, Samuel Harwell, W. W. McMichael, Frederick Illman, F. M. Collins, Thomas Montgomery, and Robert C. Wood.

Marticville Methodist Episcopal Church.-The first Methodist congregation in the northern part of the township was organized at Marticville in 1836. The congregation held their meetings in private houses, and occasionally in the public school-house until the year 1863, when they held meetings at a place known as Huber's Hall. The meetings were held in this place from 1863 to 1874, when the first Methodist Church was erected in Marticville. The land upon which the church is erected was purchased from Eli Eshleman, and was deeded to Henry Brooks, Samuel Bookman, Matthias Myers, Henry Charles, Abraham Charles, and John D. Sensenig, the first board of trustees. The church is built of stone, and was completed and dedicated to the worship of God in 1874. The members of the present board of trustees are Henry Brooks, David S. McElhaney, Gabriel Spence, David Fehl, and James Creamer. These persons who officiated at this church in a ministerial capacity, from its erection, in 1874, till the present time (1883) are Rev. John Herr, Rev. Frederick Brady, Rev. John W. Harkins, and Rev. J. A. Amther, the present incumbent. The communicants number at the present time forty-two. This church is in the Safe Harbor circuit.

Mount Nebo Presbyterian Church.-This place of worship is chartered under the name of the Presbyterian Congregation of Mount Nebo. It is located at what is commonly known as Clark's graveyard, an old burial ground of the forefathers of the present generation. When the first interment took place we have no means of knowing. The oldest tombstone in the yard bears this inscription, "William Neil, 1 Feb. 9, 1814," although, as is well known, it was used as a burial ground long before that time. The charter was granted April 23, 1854 (D. W. Patterson, attorney), to John Bear, York County, Maris Hoopers, John J. Porter, Thomas Stewart, and George Campbell, who composed the first board of trustees. This board held their first meeting May 15, 1854. The church was dedicated in Oct. 1855. Rev. Alfred Nevin preached the dedicatory sermon, assisted by Rev. Lindley C. Rutter. The church was supplied with preaching by Rev. L. C. Rutter, of Chestnut Level; Rev. Mr. Farquhar, of Chanceford, York Co.; by Rev. Mr. Gamble (Farquhar's successor), and occasionally by others until the installation of the first pastor, Rev. Ezra S. Heaney, who was installed in June, 1879. The present board of trustees are George Campbell (president), Joseph Clark (secretary and treasurer), Joseph Armstrong, A. L. Pegan, Lewis Jenkins, and Isaac Walton.

Graveyards.-The oldest graveyard in this township is the one attached to the Methodist Episcopal Church at Marticville. The date of the first interment is not definitely known, but it antedates the French and Indian war. It was used as a burying-ground by the miners who worked the mines now known as the Pequea Silver Mines, in Pequea township.
The next in point of age is the one attached to the Muddy Run Presbyterian Church, better known as the "Old Log Church." The first interment, according to the inscription upon the tombstone, is that of William Duncan, whose interment bears date 1744. This is followed by Sarah Rannels interment, bearing date 1750; William Leaman, interred in 1760; and Hugh Gray, in 1760.
The old graveyard at the Mount Nebo Presbyterian Church, known as Clark's graveyard, has also been used for a long time as a place of interment, but as the date of the first burial at this place has faded from the recollection of the oldest inhabitants, we have no other data by which we might be able to fix the exact time at which its spot was used as a place of burial for the dead.
There is also a graveyard adjoining the Methodist Episcopal Church at Mount Nebo, which was occupied as such as early as the building of the first Methodist Church at that place.

Kosciusko Lodge, No. 374, I. O. O. F.-This lodge was instituted Sept. 29, 1849, and was at that time located in the village of Mount Nebo. The first officers consisted of the following: N. G., Mifflin Elliott; V. G., John Hess; Sec., George Campbell; Assist. Sec., George McCombs; Treas., Samuel Harnish. The lodge continued to meet in the hall at Mount Nebo until 1853, when, to secure more commodious quarters, the hall of the Sons of Temperance at Rawlinsville was purchased and the lodge removed there.

1. William Neil was at this time constable of Martic township, and in attempting to arrest Hugh McFalls, met his death in the following manner; McFalls warned him to stay away or he would shoot him. Neil endeavored to arrest him before he could load his gun, and as McFalls had not time to put a load of shot in his gun, he turned quickly and shot him with the ramrod.


976
HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

Since its removal to Rawlinsville the lodge has enjoyed a degree of prosperity seldom equaled by lodges outside the cities. At present the lodge owns its own hall, and has between four thousand and five thousand dollars at interest. This lodge is centrally located, in a good neighborhood, and must continue to prosper in the future as it has done in the past. Below we give the names of those who have filled the chair of Noble Grand from September, 1849, to October, 1883;
Mifflin Elliot, John Hess, Samuel Harnish, J. Proudfoot, Thomas Stewart, Benjamin Gontner, William Crawford, F. Shoffstall, L. D. Taylor, Hugh O' Neal, John Alexander, John Monteith, Thomas Labezius, J. C. Otto, Frederick Hill, D. M. Dunkle, William Ramsay, T. R. Johnson, H. Harmon, F. Brenneman, William N. Gibson, John Conrod, C. T. Soulsby, John McFalls, W. B. Langert, Elias Aument, D. M. Moore, C. A. Derrick, John Galen, S. C. Stevenson, J. B. Laird, David Smith, Henry Shoffstall, Albert Hagen, Hugh Armstrong, B. F. Armstrong, J. B. Dunkle, Brice Clark, Henry Brenberger, Amos Groff, F. S. Hess, George A. Dunkle, William Heaps, Ambrose Singleton, James S. Ewing, Alfred Stewart, William K. McFalls, John H. Carter, C. H. Armstrong, David Ernhart, T. J. Armstrong, B. F. Jones, Samuel Hart, J. R. Shank. The following named members have served as secretary for the terms set opposite their names: George S. Campbell, one term; W. H. Conway, one term; William A. Crawford, four terms; Franklin Young, one term; Samuel Allison, one term; John Alexander, one term; J. W.. Deaver, one term; Mifflin Elliot, seven terms; George Tangert, four terms; L.D. Taylor, one term; D. M. Dunkle, one term; William N. Gibson, one term; F. Brenneman, one term; John Conrad, four terms; Thomas Lebazius sixteen terms; John Galen, six terms; S. C. Stevenson, seventeen terms.
Treasurers for the same time have been as follows; Samuel Harnish, two terms; John Monteith, thirty-one terms; Richard Donaldson, two terms; Amos Groff, four terms; Mifflin Elliot, one term; Hugh O'Neal, eleven terms; Thomas Lebazius, six terms; Frank Breneman, four terms; Jacob Reese, six terms. Present membership of this lodge, one hundred and forty-three.

Pliny Lodge, No. 423, Knights of Pythias.-This lodge was organized March 11, 1874. It meets at Rawlinsville in the Odd-Fellows Hall on Wednesday evening of each week. It was organized with thirty-six charter members. The lodge is at present in a very prosperous condition, numbering eighty members. The following persons have filled the chair of Chancellor Commander from its organization, in 1874, to the present date (1883): Samuel Jones, S. C. Stevenson, S. A. Wright, D. M. Moore, B. F. Armstrong, J. F. Yost, M. D.; L. R. McClune, William H. Wentz, Amos McFalls, Daniel Creamer, George W. Shade, John Duffy, F. P. Duffy, H. C. Cloud, B. F. Huber, C. H. Armstrong, Daniel Armstrong, Bayard Reinhart, John Drumm.

Martic Forge.-The oldest industry in Martic township is the iron industry, which commenced in the township at Martic Forge, prior to the Revolutionary war. The records of the first establishment of this place of business are lost, and hence we have no means of arriving at the exact date of the starting of this place. In looking over the records, as far was they have been accessible to us, we find that on March 17, 1737, a warrant was issued to Abram Smith, James Smith, and Thomas Smith. This is probably the first recorded sale of any portion of the property now known as Martic Forge. For the purpose of showing through what changes this property has passed we subjoin the following brief of title:
Sept. 6, 1769. James Webb, Esq., sold furnace and forge and 3404 acres of land in Martic township to Ferguson & McIlvaine, as the property of Thomas Smith & Co.
Sept. 12. Ferguson & McIlvain sold furnace and forge to Adam Hoopers.
June 2, 1770. Adam Hoopers and wife conveyed furnace and forge to John Malcolm, George Monroe, Samuel Patterson, and John McCalmont, to each one-forth.
May 23, 1771. John McCalmont and others sold the one-eighth part of Martic and 1275 acres of land to Joseph Musgrove.
June 22, 1772. John McCalmont and others sold the one-forth part of Martic Forge to John Fox and Daniel Longstreth in trust for William Juto, Robert Morris, James Haldane, William Hazelwood, Nicholas Bernard, Stacy Nepham, Peter Sutter, James Fulton, Alexander Gresham, John Kidd , Peter Young, Anthony Yeldale, James Berwick, James Longhead, John Clark, Zachariah Neiman, Robert Graves, and the said John Fox and Daniel Longstreth, William Hazelwood, Peter Sutter and Alexander Gresham each to have one thirty-fifth part, the rest to have two thirty-fifths parts each.
Feb. 18, 1774. John Malcolm and others sold one fourth part of Martic Forge to William Montgomery and Matthias Wilkins, to each a moiety of the fourth part. John Malcolm and others sold one-eighth part of Martic Forge to Michael Hilligas.
Feb. 23, 1775. John Malcolm and others sold one-eight part of Martic Forge to Michael Welsh.
Sept. 28, 1777. Matthias Wilkins sold a moiety of one-forth part of Martic Forge to William Montgomery, who then sold one forth part of the forge and land.
Dec. 8, William Montgomery sold one-fourth part of Martic Forge to Michael Hilligas.
Sept. 5, 1777. Joseph Montgomery and wife sold his one-fourth part of Martic Forge to Michael Hilligas.
To the preceding conveyance to Michael Hilligas



977

MARTIC TOWNSHIP

the one undivided fourth part of Martic, equal to six twenty-fourths, purchased from William Montgomery, the one-eighth part, equal to three twenty-fourths, purchased from Joseph Musgrove, and the one-fourth part, equal to six twenty-fourths, purchased from James Fulton and others, amounting in the whole to fifteen twenty-fourths parts, were purchased by the said Michael Hilligas, in partnership with Matthias Slough and George Ege, though the deed was in the name of M. Hilligas alone, there are only conveyances for twenty-one thirty-fifth parts of the fourth purchased from James Fulton and others, the remaining fourteen thirty-fifths parts being unclaimed or released.
June 26, 1783. George Ege released his interest, amounting to five twenty-fourths parts, to Matthias Slough, who then held ten twenty-fourths parts.
Sept. 27, 1792. Michael Hilligas conveyed to Richard Footman and others, surviving assignees of Mathias Slough, then a bankrupt, the interest which Matthias Slough owned in the works, the title to which was in his own name, as well as Mr. Ege's share, which had previously been sold by him to Slough, amounting in the whole to fifteen twenty-fourths parts of the forge, etc.
March 11, 1793. Richard Footman and others, surviving assignees of Matthias Slough, sold his share in the estate (viz., ten twenty-fourths parts thereof) to George Ege.
March 13, Michael Hilligas sold to Robert Coleman and George Ege the one-eighth part, equal to three twenty-fourths, purchased from John Malcolm and others, and his one-third part of fifteen twenty-fourths, equal to five twenty-fourths, which he held in partnership with Matthias Slough and George Ege, the whole amounting to eight twenty-fourths.
Sept. 30, 1793. John Miller, sheriff, sold the one eighth part of Martic Forge and land to Robert Coleman and George Ege, late the property of John Welsh.
July 8, 1803. George Ege sold to Robert Coleman his one-half of all the Martic lands purchased and held by Robert Coleman and George Ege in company, or granted and conveyed to them in fee as tenants in common; purchase-money two thousand five hundred pounds.
Same day. George Ege sold to Robert Coleman all the share and interest in the Martic property which formerly belonged to Matthias Slough, and which he purchased from the assignees; consideration money four hundred pounds.
Jan. 30, 1804. Robert Coleman, his one undivided half part of forge and lands to Edward Brien, for six thousand five hundred pounds.
1825 or 1826. James Coleman inherited Martic Forge from his father's estate, and in 1831 he erected a steel furnace. This property at that time consisted of six thousand four hundred and seventy-four acres, valued at $72,160.
1855. Heirs of James Coleman sold the forge to George Steele.
1858. Assignees of George Steele sold the forge to Robert Potts.
1862. Sheriff of Lancaster sold Martic Forge to the firm of Davis & Potts, the present owners (1883).
Robert S. Potts, the present manager of the Martic Works, is a relative of Isaac Potts, who is mentioned in Weems' "Biography of Washington" as being a man of note during the struggle of the colonies for independence.
What was known as Martic Furnace was not within the present limits of Martic township, but was situated in what is now Providence township, near the present site of Breneman's mill. The forge, down to and during the time of Edward Brien, was run mainly by slave labor. The burial ground of these slaves may still be seen in this township, in a piece of wood on the left hand side of the public road leading from Marticville to Mount Nebo.

Distilleries.-the next oldest industry of the township were the distilleries. The first distillery was on the road leading from Bethesda to Snavely's mill, on Muddy Run. The date of its establishment, owing to the lack of records, cannot be ascertained. A second distillery was operated in the neighborhood of Martic Forge. A third stood upon the property now occupied by David Fehl, near Marticville. A fourth was in existence on the property now owned by John G. Good. Of three of these, namely, the one upon Fehl's property, the one at Martic Forge, and the one upon Good's property, no authentic date of their erection and discontinuance can be given, in consequence of the paucity of the records relating thereto. A fifth distillery was operated upon a piece of land now owned (1883) by the Goods, and known as Good's mill. It was built by a man named Shank, and was called Shank's distillery. This last named distillery was built in 1793, discontinued as a distillery in 1830, and converted into a flour and feed-mill, which is carried on at the present date. (1883)

The Hagen Axe-Factory.-A third industry for which this township is noted, and which is peculiarly a child of the township, was the manufacture of the celebrated "Hagen Axe." The exact date at which the manufacture of this instrument was commenced is not definitely known. John Hagen, the grandfather of the present Hagen family in this section was the first person of the name who manufactured these axes in this township. He died before this oldest son, Joshua, was of age. This son learned the trade and taught it to his two brothers, Davis and Elijah. Elijah Hagen discontinued the trade, but David continued to work at the business until within a short time of his death. He taught the art to his five sons, Bascom, John, Albert, Davis and William. These descendants of the pioneers of this business continue



978
HISTORY OF LANCASTER COUNTY

the manufacture of the Hagen axe in the neighborhood of Mount Nebo at the present day.

Brick-Yards.-A fourth industry carried on in the township in the neighborhood of Marticville is the manufacture of brick. This business is carried on upon the spot where the first brick-yard was opened. The first brick made here was made by Isaac Heiney in 1813, but the first brick-yard was opened by D. S. McElhaney in 1847, and continued by him up to the present day. The clay from which these brick are made is a lacustrian formation covering an area of about ten acres, and the brick made from it are in demand all over the county.

Furniture Manufactory.-A fifth industry is the manufacture of furniture, carried on at Mount Nebo by S. C. Stevenson. At this place are manufactured all kinds of bedroom and kitchen furniture. The proprietor of the furniture warerooms is also engaged in the business of undertaking, and in a period of fifteen years has committed to the earth more than five hundred persons.

Other Trades.-The following-named persons carry on the trades of blacksmith and wheelwright; Marticville, James Creamer, blacksmith; Albert Guiles, wheelwright. Rawlinsville, wheelwright, Henry Heiney; blacksmith, John Hagen. Bethesda, blacksmith, John W. Sweigart. Drytown, blacksmith, John Miles. Mount Nebo, Albert Hages, wheelwright; John Brown, Blacksmith..

Mills.-Martic township has three mills, situated as follows: One near Marticville, called Good's mill; Snavely's mill, on Muddy Run, and Wentz's mill, also on Muddy Run, not far from the village of Bethesda.

Hotels.-The first hotel within the limits of Martic township was called the Cob Hotel, and stood upon the road leading from Mount Nebo to Rawlinsville, about one mile from the latter place. The ruins of this hotel may still be seen upon the farm of John Seigfrieid, near Rawlinsville, and the hill near the site upon which the hotel stood still retains the name of Cob Hill. Though the memory of this, the first hotel, still lingers, the recollection of the date of its building has faded from the memory of man. Another famous hostelry was one in the village of Rawlinsville, known as Oldfield's Hotel, from the circumstance of a man named Oldfield having been the proprietor for a number of years. The house in which this famous place of entertainment was kept was erected about the beginning of the present century. It still stands in the village of Rawlinsville, and is now used as a horse-stable. It was the first, and for a number of years the only building in the village. We append the following list of hotel licenses granted in Martic township for the years named:
The tavern licenses granted in Martic in 1804 were as follows: Sebastian Swiegart, "Seven Stars" on the road from Lancaster to Martic Forge; James Brown "Mermaid," on the road from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry.
In 1805; John McCanless, "Spread Eagle," on the road from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry'; Sebastian Sweigart, "Seven Stars", on the road from Columbia to Frogtown; James Brown, "Mermaid", on the road from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry.
In 1806: John McCanless, "Spread Eagle, " on the road from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry; Henry Herr; Thomas Robinson; Sebastian Sweigart, "Seven Stars," on the road from Lancaster to Martic Forge.
In 1809; John Sheup, on the road from Lancaster to McCall's Ferry'; Mary Sweigart, "Seven Stars," on the road from Shenk's Mill to Newport; James Brown, "Mermaid", on the road from McCall's Ferry to Christiana.
A hotel was opened about the year 1780 upon a property now occupied by Daniel Carrol, about one mile east of McCall's Ferry. It was opened by Willliam Patterson, and sold by him to William Neal in 1810, who discontinued the hotel. A hotel was erected at McCall's Ferry, on the Susquehanna River, and continues at the present day. The present list of hotels is as follows: F. B. Groff, "Cross-Keys," Marticville; Crispin Taylor, "Exchange Hotel", Rawlinsville; Amos McFalls, "Rawlinsville Hotel," Rawlinsville; Christian Uffleman, "Hotel de Uffleman", McCall's Ferry; "Fairview", better known as the "Slab".

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