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(Memories of Barbara Lindsay Hakanen)
Selders Store

Charles Lamb (Mom Millers father) owned 2 houses in Blain City. One was a two-family apartment in back and a butcher and barbershop in front. Mom Lamb Miller, (Euphamie) and Dad Miller (Merl) lived in one of the apartments. Dad opened up a butcher shop and went across the countryside selling meat from a panel truck. My mother (Marion Miller) also went with him to sell the meat, she was 6 or 7 years old, at the time. Dad was a butcher and also a salesman. He had quit school at age 8 when his father (Stanley Miller) was killed.

When Marion Richardson Lamb (Mom Millers Mother) died, Mom and Dad Miller and family moved in with Charles Lamb to care for him. Aunt May (Mom's youngest sister) also lived with them. Later when Charles Lamb died the house was sold.

A job opened at Twin Rock's. (Mine Superintendent) and John Hahn (who was married to Mom's sister Jessie Lamb) took the job. They moved into the Superintendent's house in Twin Rocks. (This is now across the street from the nursing home and beside the post office on Main Street.) George Lamb (Mom's brother) was hired by John Hahn in the mine and they lived by Lanzendorfers on Cardiff Road [now Expedite Road].

The Butcher Shop in Twin Rock's was owned by the mine and they needed a butcher. Dad Miller was hired. The Butcher Shop was across Main Street from the Big Bend Hotel and next to Goss's Gas Station. (on the up side of the hill) On the other side of the Butcher Shop was Levinsons Store. There was an apartment on top of the butcher shop and this is where Dad & Mom and family moved. Mother (Marion Miller) was 16 at that time, (approx. 1928).

After a fire that burned Levinsons the company moved the butcher shop up to where the Post Office is now. (Across from the Nursing Home).

In 1929 the Stock Market crashed and the depression hit. Dad lost his job as a butcher and they rented Sam Schall's house next to the Pilgrim Holiness Church on Main St. He got a job working on building the road Rt. 422 from Indiana to Ebensburg. Later he went to work at Glossers Store in Johnstown as a butcher. Then he went into the mine in Twin Rocks as a fire boss. At that time they bought the Selders Store in Expedit [Seldersville] (the top end of Twin Rocks, toward Belsano) and made it into a house. This was located on Main Street close to the Cardiff Road intersection.

Selders Store in Seldersville. Mom & Dad bought this and made it into their home.

Dad took pictures --- fixed cars --- had a big garden --- kept chickens--played piano and the fiddle. (Bob and Bill played guitar and banjo--Mother played mandolin and the potato bug.) Mom made the best cinnamon buns in the world--made braided rugs--tatted hankies had class meetings, garden club and an awesome flower garden. She also drove a car when other women hadn't thought of it yet, at Dad's encouraging.

When I (Barbara Lindsay Hakanen) was 10 or so, I got Meningitis and almost died. After a month in the Memorial Hospital in Johnstown, I went to live with Mom and Dad. Mother and Daddy both worked and I was able to rest more at Mom's. At this time TV was just becoming affordable and they bought one, mainly for me. The only request Dad ever had, was to watch the Friday Night Fights. That was my bed time and I never watched it but I still do not like boxing to this day. I remember sitting on Dad's lap even at my age of 10, as tall as I was, and he would read me the comics. They also fixed up a hammock on the front porch with a rope hooked to the banister. I could lay in the hammock and pull the rope and SWING, real high. I spent hours in Mom's back room with old wallpaper sample books, cutting out dresses for paper dolls. I remember going down to the Church (EUB across from Big Bend School) on Sun. Morning and watching Dad put on the CHIMES. It was a long play record (331/3 1 think) that would play hymns (sounded like bells) over a loud speaker in the bell tower. Somehow they kept me quiet and I got the rest I had to have.

Dad died on Aug 15, 1961 at age 74. He was working out in the yard, and that was very common but he came in and told Mom he didn't feel well, and that was very unusual. He lay down on the couch and a little later he was dead. It was a terrible shock to Mom.

Mom continued to live there until approx. 1971. At that time she was placed into the Cambria County Home in Ebensburg not knowing any of her family. She died at the Home in Ebensburg on Oct 18, 1973, but it felt like she had already been gone for some time.

Both Mom and Dad Miller are buried at Pleasant Hills Cemetery in Glasgow, PA.

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