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Emanuel and Mary (Leidy) Brallier

Emanuel BRALLIER
Sex: M
Birth: 26 OCT 1794 in Bedford Co., Pa.
Death: 9 DEC 1882 in Belsano, Blacklick Twp., Cambria Co., Pa.
Burial: Dunkard Cemetery, Blacklick Twp., Cambria Co., Pa.
Note:
Emanuel was one of the hardy pioneers of Western PA, and spent his early life in traveling from farm to farm and county to county carrying his kit of tools on his back, his gun in his hand, and making boots and shoes for the farmers as he rode his way through what was often a wilderness. By dint of industry and frugality he amassed a comfortable competence, and in 1839 purchased a tract of land in the
wilderness of Black Lick Township, Cambria Co., PA. He had previously lived at Leidy's Ore Mines, near Martinsburg, Blair Co., PA, where some of his children were born. He cleared away the growth of timber with his own hands in a reasonable length of time and had 175 acres under cultivation.

This farm had valuable coal deposits under it. He married Mary Leidy on Sept. 25, 1823. Mary Leidy was a daughter of Samuel Leidy (sometimes spelled Leighty) and Mary Goughnour Leidy. Samuel Leidy was born in 1757 in Northampton Co., PA of Dutch descent. He was a soldier in the American Revolution, serving a two-month term in PA militia and a four-month term in the Virginia militia. His service is descrlbed in detail in his pension claim declaration S-5681 on file in the National Archives Bldg., Washington, D.C; and is copied in full in the Appendix at the back of this book for use of those interested in joining either the Sons of the American Revolution or the Daughters of the American Revolution. The writer is a member of Pittsburgh, PA Chapter of the S.A. R., state number 4980, national number 69,877. M. Virginia Brallier, S 1582, is a member of the Donegal Chapter, D.A.R., Lancaster, PA, chapter number 569, national number 391065.Both of the above obtained membershipon basis of Revolutionary War service of Samuel Leidy. Mary Goughnour Leidy, Mary Leidy Brallier's mother, was the daughter of Jacob Goughnour and Mary Sheets Goughnour, and was born about 1776. The Gouhnours came to America from Switzerland prior to 1772 and located in the vicinity of New Jerusalem or Funkstown, near Hagerstown, Md., where Jacob died in 1800.

Record of Revolutionary War pension to Samuel Leidy is also found in United States Pension Roll for Northern and Eastern States, printed in Washington, D.C. by Duff, Green in 1835,under Peansylvania Pension Roll, vol. 514, page l35. Amount of pension was $20 annually, placed on pension roll February 25, 1834, beginning of pension March 4, 1831. This book can be found at Library of Congress under catalog nunber E 255 U53.

Samuel Leidy died Jan. 28, 1845 in Jackson Township, Cambria Co., PA and is buried in Angus School Cemetery, east side of Good's Corner, back of Ralph Rose's residence, near Johnstown, PA Letters of administration on file at Cambria County Courthouse, Ebensburg, Cambria Co., PA.

From the menoirs of John. K. Brallier I, S 1-10-4, we have the following account of Emanuel and Mary Brallier: 'I was only six years of age when Grandfather Brallier died, but his memory lasted many years after, on account of his kindness to others. 'Daddy' Brallier,' as he was affectionately known to all, besides being hardworking and thrifty, was always willing to help others in time of trouble and sadness. Many years after his death people would say in my presence, 'Daddy' Brallier has been missed more than any other man in this community on account of his wise council and kindness to his neighbors. What greater tribute can be left for any man? As a little fellow I can remember grandfather, then in his eighties, overseeing, the farm-work, riding horseback to the more distant part of the two farms.

Grandmother Brallier was a kind, loving woman, coupled with poise and refinement which you could understand, knowing her ancestors, the Leidys of Philadelphia, PA, owners of the Leidy Ore mines. She was a cousin of the celebrated Dr. Joseph Leidy. Grandmother was much younger than grandfather, but even in her seventies, I would see her bridle and saddle her riding hourse, lead him to the stepping stone, and in her long riding-skirt would mount the side-saddle and off she would go on business to Ebensburg, nine miles away. I often wanted to go along, but she said it was too dangerous. "My visits were never so pleasant after grandfather died, as Levi GOOD, a "Forty-niner" who had married Aunt Hannah, had charge of the farms. He was tight-fisted, narrow-minded, with a quick and violent temper. Aunt Hannah was as dear, sweet and patient as Levi GOOD was unlikeable.

Poor soul, she spent most of her life smoothing things over to keep peace, not only in the family, but in the neighborhood as well. After grandfather's death, often I would find grandmother off by herself in some quite spot, crying, the tears rolling down her cheeks. I would ask her why she was crying and she would always say, "Things are so different since your grandfather died." I told my father about grandmother's sorrow and he tried to be so good to her by making frequent visits to the old home. When it got difficult for grandmother to get around, he had a special phaeton made for her, built close to the ground and easy to step into. Father also bought a gentle mare that would not frighten easily for the use of grandmother and Aunt Hannah to drive in the phaeton. "Unfortunately this kind gift of father's was the cause of grandmother's death. Aunt Hannah and grandmother went to visit Aunt Ellen Ferguson some miles from their home, and Aunt Hannah, wanting grandmother to be more comfortable, told her to stay in the phaeton until she unhitched the mare. The phaeton was on a slight slop and when the mare stepped out of the phaeton shafts, the phaeton started rolling down the slope, injuring grandmother, from which she never recovered, dying shortly after the accident.

Emanuel and Mary are both buried in the cemetery at the old BRALLIER Meeting House near Belsano, Cambria Co., PA

Father: Samuel BRALLIER b: 1762 in Upper Alsace, France
Mother: Christina BRUMBAUGH b: 1772

Marriage 1 Mary LEIDY b: 11 OCT 1803 in Bedford Co., Pa.
Married: 25 SEP 1823 in Martinsburg, Bedford Co., Pa. 1
Children
Mary BRALLIER b: 30 NOV 1836

Sources:
Title: Clare Constable FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Family Archive CD
Title: Dunkard Cemetery Listing
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Text: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pacambri/CemIndex.html
Source: http://genforum.genealogy.com/brallier/messages/35.html

 

 

Daniel Webster Brallier

Daniel Webster Brallier, now a resident of Jackson Township, and well known for energy, thoroughgoingness and success, is a son of Rev. Samuel and Susannah (Good) Brallier, and was born at Belsano, Blacklick Township, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, April 26, 1851. The Bralliers are of French-German descent, and many of them in the new world have inherited the good qualities of both races. In this State the Bralliers were first resident in the eastern part, where Emanuel Brallier, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born and reared. He was a shoemaker by trade and a farmer by occupation, and came to Belsano, this county, where he died in December, 1882, aged eighty-eight years. He was a member of the German Baptist church, and his son, Rev. Samuel Brallier, was a native of Morrison's Cove, Bedford County. He came when a young man to Blacklick Township, but afterwards removed to Jackson Township, where he passed the last twenty-five years of his life. He was born September 2, 1824, followed farming and lumbering for a livelihood, and died October 1,1894, just past the seventieth year of his age. He became a member of the German Baptist church at an early age, and served acceptably and with profit in its ministry for many years. He was a man of enterprise, and highly respected by all who knew him. His wife, Susannah (Good) Brallier, was born in East Taylor Township, March, 29, 1833, and died November 19, 1887. She was a member of the German Baptist church, and her father, Jacob Good, was a son of Christian Good, a large land-owner and substantial citizen of East Taylor Township. The Goods were of German descent, and Jacob Good married Elizabeth Goucher, whose father, Christian Goucher, was a German Baptist and an excellent citizen.

Daniel Webster Brallier was reared in his native township until he was seventeen years of age, and then removed into Jackson Township, which has been his residence ever since. He received his education in the public schools, and learned the trade of carpenter, at which he worked steadily at various places until 1873. In that year he commenced his present prosperous business of contracting and building. He is an excellent and skilled workman, and a man of energy and push, and has built a large number of houses, including the erection of some fine and tasteful residences. In connection with his numerous contracting and building operations, he takes time to manage the fine, productive farm which he owns in Jackson Township. Skilled as a workman, successful as a farmer and energetic as a business man, Mr. Brallier is recognized as an intelligent and useful factor in the progress of the community in which he resides. A strong Baptist in his religious faith, he is a member of the First Baptist Church of Johnstown. He is a democrat in political opinion, and, while interested, yet is not active to leadership in the field of politics. He has filled most of the township offices, and has been elected consecutively for nine years as auditor of Jackson Township. On October 28, 1873, Mr. Brallier was united in marriage with Mollie A. Long, a daughter of John Long, a resident of Chambersville, Indiana County.(Samuel Wiley's Biographical Cyclopedia, Cambria Co, PA)

John Kinports Brallier, D.D.S

JOHN KINPORTS BRALLIER, D. D. S. --The Bralliers, originally from Alsace-Lorraine, that much disputed territory, alternately a French or German possession, first made their American settlement in what is now Blair county, Permsylvania, where Emanuel Brallier, son of Samuel and Christine (Brumbaugh) Brallier, was born October 11, 1794. He was a shoemaker by trade, one of, those hardy pioneers who with his kit of tools and his rifle traveled from farm to farm, from county to county, making shoes for the farmers, as he made his way through what was then a wildernes. His earnings were not large, neither were his expenses, and in time he had acquired sufficient funds to purchase land of his own. In 1839 he bought a tract in the wilderness near Belsano, Black Lick township, Cambria county, and there settled with his wife and children, some of them born at Lidy Ore Mines, the former family home. As soon as settled in their new home, Emanuel Brallier began the work of clearing the land he had purchased, and in course of time had one hundred and seventy-five acres under cultivation. This farm, a valuable one, is yet in the possession of the family. He was a member of the German Baptist church, reared his family in the most careful manner, and from that forest home went forth sons and daughters who lived lives of honor and usefulness. Emanuel Brallier lived to the great age of eighty-eight years, dying at Belsano, in December, 1882. He married Mary, daughter of Samuel Lidy, a soldier of the Revolution and of Dutch descent. They had twelve children: Rev. Samuel Brallier, a minister of the German Baptist church; Elizabeth, married John Gillan; Catherine, died young; Hannah, married Levi Good, a "Forty-niner;" Rev. Daniel S. Brallier, a minister of the German Baptist church; David, died in infancy; Jacob L., a physician and veteran of the Civil War, serving as adjutant of the Eleventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry; Mary, married William Stuver; Barbara, died in infancy; Emanuel, of further mention; Levi R., a merchant; Ellen, married Robert Ferguson.

Dr. Emanuel Brallier was born at the homestead farm near Belsano, Black Lick township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, in 1841, died at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1890. He obtained a good English education, chose medicine as his profession, prepared at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and at the close of an active, useful life was engaged in the practice of his profession at Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. Most of his professional life had been spent in Chambersburg and there he was held in high esteem as an honorable, skillful physician. During the Civil War he enlisted as a private, was promoted for bravery on the field of battle to the rank of sergeant, and for "gallant and meritorious service," was later commissioned lieutenant and finally captain. Dr. Brallier married Lucy Kinports, born in 1841, died March 10, 1907, daughter of John and Mary (Pershane) Kinports, of Cherry tree, Indiana county, Pennsylvania. The Kinports, an old family of Blair county, residing near Hollidaysburg. Dr. and Mrs. Brallier had eight children: Dr. Stanley Brallier, of Conemaugh, Pennsylvania; Anna, married Robert E. Young; Lou, married John H. Shores, of Kelseyville, California; John Kinports, of further mention; Emma and Amanda, twins, both deceased; an infant, died unnamed; Dr. James P. Brallier, of Alexandria, Pennsylvania, who met a tragic death in an automobile accident, he was a graduate of Medico-Chirurgical Medical College, Philadelphia, and had just returned from post-graduate courses in European medical centers, when he met his untimely death.

Dr. John Kinports Brallier, fourth child of Dr. Emanuel and Lucy (Kinports) Brallier, was born at Cherry tree, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1876. The early years of his life were passed in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, but at the age of thirteen he was taken to Indiana, Pennsylvania, where he attended the public schools and completed courses at Indiana State Normal College. He spent one year at Washington and Jefferson College, and a year at the University of West Virginia, then entered the School of Dentistry, Medico-Chirurgical Medical College, whence he was graduated, Doctor of Dental Surgery, class of 1902. During these college years, he had become famous as an all-around athletic star, excelling in football, baseball and tennis. He was captain of the varsity football team at Medico-Chi for three years, and neither the dignity supposed to be inseparable from a professional man nor the years have dulled his interest in these games. For six years he piloted the Latrobe football team through their many encounters on the gridiron, and in that time suffered but one defeat.

After receiving his degree, Dr. Brallier located in Latrobe, where he has become the leading dental practitioner of the city. He is a member of the Pennsylvania State Odontological Society, and the Westmoreland County Dental Association, and is in closest touch with all professional advancement. He is a Republican in politics, now serving his second term as member of the Board of Education; belongs to the Masonic order, the Latrobe Club; his fraternity, Psi Omega.

Dr. Brallier married, April 17, 1904, Bessie Garnet Morehead, daughter of Alexander Thompson and Margaret (Speedy) Morehead, of old and prominent Indiana county families. The Morehead ancestors were among the first settlers of Indiana county, Alexander T. Morehead's great-grandfather having been captured by the Indians about 1760, taken to Quebec, Canada, where he was subsequently exchanged for French prisoners captured by the English and Colonial soldiers, and his descendants have a conspicuous place in Western Pennsylvania history and have contributed many leaders in business and the professions. Mrs. Brallier is deeply interested in church and charitable work, active in th,e Women's Club and in the Women's Missionary Society of the Presbyterian church. Their children: Infant, deceased; Margaret Louise, deceased; Elizabeth Morehead, Nancy Anne, John Kinports, Jr.

Source: Boucher, John Newton, "Old and New Westmoreland", Vol. 3, New York : The American Historical Society, 1918. p. 229

Levi Roberts Brallier

LEVI ROBERTS BRALLIER, for many years closely identified with business interests in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, and at present conducting a meat and grocery business in Dale borough, is a highly respected citizen of this town, and is a descendant of French ancestors, who emigrated to this country from the Rhine provinces.

Samuel Brallier, grandfather of Levi Roberts Brallier, is the first of this family of whom we have any definite record. He married Christianne Brumbaugh, and among his children was a son named Emanuel.

Emanuel Brallier, son of Samuel and Christianne (Brumbaugh) Brallier, was born in what is now (1906) Blair county, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1794. He was one of the hardy pioneers of western Pennsylvania, and spent his early life in tramping from farm to farm, from county to county, carrying his kit of tools upon his back, his gun in his hand, and making shoes for the farmers as he made his way through what was often a wilderness. By dint of industry and frugality he amassed a comfortable competence, and in 1839 purchased a tract of land in the wilderness, at Black Lick township, Cambria county, previously having lived at Lidy ore mines, where some of his children were born. He cleared away the growth of timber with his own hands, and within a reasonable length of time had one hundred and seventy-five acres of land under cultivation. This farm is still in the possession of the Brallier family, and is said to contain valuable coal deposits. He married Mary Lidy, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Goughenour. Her father was a soldier in the war of the revolution, and was of Dutch descent. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Brallier were: 1. Rev. Samuel, married Susannah Good. 2. Elizabeth, married John Gillan. 3. Catherine, died in youth. 4. Hannah, married Levi Good, a "Forty-niner." 5. Rev. Daniel S., married Susan Orner. 6. David, died in infancy. 7. Dr. Jacob L., married (first) Maggie Klockner, (second) Mary Reber; he served in the Civil war as adjutant of the Eleventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry. 8. Mary, married William Stuver. 9. Barbara, died in infancy. 10. Dr. Emanuel, married Lucy Kinport; he served in the Civil war, enlisting as a private, was promoted on the battlefield for bravery to the rank of sergeant, and finally reached the rank of captain. 11. Levi Roberts, see forward. 12. Ellen, married Robert Ferguson.

Levi Roberts Brallier, sixth son and eleventh child of Emanuel and Mary (Lidy) Brallier, was born near Belsano, Black Lick township, Cambria county, Pennsylvania, May 1, 1844. His early life was spent on the farm of his father, whom he assisted, and it was not long before he was a valued help to him. The opportunities for obtaining a good education were but limited in those days, and, although young Levi attended the public schools whenever this was possible, he owes the greater part of the knowledge be has acquired to his own earnest efforts throughout life and to a varied and extensive course of reading. He is now the only survivor of a once large family, and though sixty-two years of age is still actively engaged in the discharge of his duties. He went to Illinois in 1879 and engaged in farming there, in which undertaking he was very successful. He returned to the east in 1883, settled in Johnstown, and established himself in the meat business, associating himself in a business partnership with his sister, Mrs. Stuver, and carrying on one business at Minersville and the other at Coopersdale, while he resided in Rosedale. He dressed all the meats himself and continued business in the two boroughs until the death of Mrs. Stuver in 1894, when he wound up his business affairs there, and, a good opportunity presenting itself at Dale, he removed there and opened a meat and grocery market which he is conducting very successfully at the present time. He enlisted in the fall of 1864 in the Two Hundred and Sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and though this regiment was never actually engaged with the enemy, its discipline and good character were such that it was selected to be the first to carry the stars and stripes into the city of Richmond after the surrender of Lee. Mr. Brallier was honorably discharged from the army July 1, 1865. In all the various places in which he has resided since his manhood, Mr. Brallier has always displayed particular interest in furthering the cause of education, and has invariably held the office of school director. He is an active member of the German Baptist Brethren church, in which he has held the office of deacon since 1872. Mr. Brallier is noted and highly respected for his liberal, kind-hearted views, and his readiness to assist whenever a plan is broached which has for its object the improvement and advancement of the interests of the borough, and his interest in educational matters is particularly noteworthy.

Mr. Brallier, on October 16, 1867, married Susie Wareham, a daughter of Silas and Catherine (Lloyd) Wareham. Silas is still living, and is in his eighty-eighth year. He was for many years engaged in the milling business, but for the past thirty years has not undertaken any active work. His wife, Catherine, was a daughter of Henry Lloyd, of Welsh descent. Her mother was of French origin.
Source: Storey, Henry Wilson, History of Cambria County Pennsylvania, Volume 3", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1907.

Dr. Stanley Allen Emanuel Brallier

Dr. Stanley Allen Emanuel Brallier, one of the leading physicians of Johnstown, is a representative of one of the very earliest families of Cambria County. He was born at Cherry Tree, Indiana County, Pa., April 11, 1869, and is the son of Emanuel and Lucy M. (Kinports) Brallier.

Samuel Brallier, great grandfather of Stanley A. E. Brallier, is the first of the family of whom we have any definite record. He married Christianne Brumbaugh, and among his children was a son named Emanuel.

Emanuel Brallier, son of Samuel and Christianne (Brumbaugh) Brallier, was born in what is now Blair County, Pa., Oct. 11, 1794. He was one of the hardy pioneers of Western Pennsylvania, and spent his early life in tramping from farm to farm, from county to county, carrying his kit of tools upon his back, his gun in his hand, and making shoes for the farmers as he made his way through what was often a wilderness. By dint of industry and frugality he amassed a comfortable competence, and in 1839 he purchased a tract of land in the wilderness, at Black Lick Township, Cambria County. He cleared away the growth of timber with his own hands, and within a reasonable length of time had 175 acres of land under cultivation.

He married Mary Leidy, the daughter of Samuel Leidy, who had been a soldier in the Revolution and was of Dutch descent. The children of Emanuel and Mary (Leidy) Brallier were: 1. Rev. Samuel, married Susannah Good. 2. Elizabeth, married John Gillian. 3. Catherine, died in youth. 4. Hannah, married Levi Good, a "Forty-Niner." 5. Rev. Daniel S., married Susan Orner. 6. David, died in infancy. 7. Dr. Jacob L., married (first) Maggie Klockner, (second) Mary Reber; he served in the Civil War as an adjutant of the 11th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry. 8. Mary, married William Stuver. 9. Barbara, died in infancy. 10. Dr. Emanuel, married Lucy M. Kinports. 11. Levi Roberts, married Susie Wareham. 12. Ellen, married Robert Ferguson.

Dr. Emanuel Brallier, 10th child of Emanuel and Mary (Leidy) Brallier, was born at Belsano, near Ebensburg, Cambria County, Pa., March 20, 1841. He spent his early life on the farm with his parents, attending school and working upon the farm. After receiving a liberal education, he began teaching school in 1858, which occupation he followed until 1862, his last school being the Cherry Tree Academy, of which he was the principal. Closing his school, he enlisted in the Union Army on Sept. 7, 1862. Shortly after going out he was promoted corporal and held that position until May 2, 1863, when, while on the battle field at Chancellorsville, he was promoted to second sergeant, which rank he held for some time, being then promoted to first sergeant, serving as such until near the close of the war, when he received his commission as captain. At the organization of the company he was chosen company clerk, and occupied that position until the dissolution of the company at Harrisburg, Pa., June 1, 1865. During the war he was engaged in 17 battles and several skirmishes, and was the first man to mount the enemy's works at Hatcher's Run, Feb 5, 1865. He was also present at the surrender of General Lee to General Grant at Appomattox, April 9, 1865.

A few weeks after returning from the army, in 1865, he was nominated for and duly elected to the office of County Auditor in Cambria County for a term of three years, from October of that year. Finding that the duties of the office interfered with the pursuit of his studies, after serving one year, he resigned. He first began the study of medicine in 1860, but never regularly entered the office of any physician until his return from the army, in June, 1865, when he registered and studied with the late Dr. R. S. Bunn, of Ebensburg, Pa. In October, 1866, he matriculated in both Jefferson Medical College and the Lying-in Charity of Philadelphia. On March 7, 1868, he received his diploma from the Lying-in Charity, and on March 7, 1868, the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Jefferson College. In about two weeks after graduation he located in Cherry Tree, Indiana County, Pa., and established a general practice, but gave special attention to gynecology and pediatric medicine. On July 7, 1868, Doctor Brallier married Lucy M., daughter of the late John and Mary Kinports of Cherry Tree Borough.

In 1870 Doctor Brallier became a member of the Indiana Medical Society, and in 1876 was made a permanent member of the State Medical Society of Pennsylvania, and of the American Medical Association, representing Indiana County in the former society once, and in the latter twice. Doctor Brallier filled several offices in the Indiana County Medical Society, and was its president in the year 1879. In April, 1880, the Brallier family removed to Chambersburg, Pa., and in 1881 Doctor Brallier associated himself with the Franklin County Medical Society. In 1882 he was appointed physician to the Franklin County jail and in the same year was also elected to the office of school director in Chambersburg. Doctor Brallier's death occurred in Chambersburg in 1889.
Dr. Emanuel and Lucy M. (Kinports) Brallier were the parents of eight children: 1. Stanley Allen Emanuel, married (first) Emma Hillock Pfau, (second) Mary Gertrude Brannon; 2. Anna May, married Robert E. Young; 3. Lulu Veronica, married John Howard Shores; 4. Dr. John Kinports, married Bess Morehead; 5. and 6. twins, Emma Jane and Amanda Maggie, who died in infancy; 7. son, who died at birth; 8. Dr. James Porter, killed in an automobile accident in 1914.

Dr. Stanley Allen Emanuel Brallier was educated in the Chambersburg public schools and graduated from the Chambersburg Academy in the class of 1888. He then entered Lafayette College, at Easton, Pa., where he remained until February, 1889, the time of his father's death, when upon the advice of his physicians he was sent west among the Rocky Mountains, to Rawlins, Wyo. Here he began to study medicine, and associated himself with a cousin, Dr. Emanuel Stuver, in the drug business. After several years in the mountains, he returned East with renewed health, and entered the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, from which institution he graduated in 1894. While at the College of Pharmacy, he clerked in the drug store of Henry A. Newbold at 41st and Chestnut streets, Philadelphia, but after his graduation he assumed the position of manager and chief prescription clerk in the drug store of Rush P. Marshall, at 16th and Race streets, Philadelphia. Finding the life in the drug store too confining, he entered upon his deferred medical course at Medico-Chirurgical College in the fall of 1896, and graduated from there in 1899 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. After successfully passing the State Board of Medical Examiners Doctor Brallier was appointed interne at the Samaritan Hospital, in Philadelphia. Upon the completion of his internship he came to Jamestown, and in 1903 located his offices at 322 Railroad Street, Conemaugh, and remained here until 1906, then removed to 312 Greeve Street and opened his present offices.

Doctor Brallier was first married in September, 1906, to Mrs. Emma Hillock Pfau, a daughter of Dr. Joseph Bruce and Eliza Jane (Stauffer) Hillock of Lancaster, Ohio. Mrs. Brallier died Feb. 27, 1917. On Nov. 17, 1920, he married Mary Gertrude Brannon, daughter of the late Andrew H. and Anna Harrison (Auchmuty) Brannon. Through the Auchmuty family Mrs. Brallier is a direct descendant of Samuel Auchmuty, who served in the Revolutionary War under General Washington, and who was with him during the winter at Valley Forge.

Doctor Brallier is a member of the Cambria County Medical Society, the Pennsylvania Medical Society, the American Medical Society, Elks Lodge, No. 175, Patriotic Order Sons of America, Protected Home Circle, the Woodmen of the World at Johnstown, also the Pennsylvania Society of New York. He has been surgeon for the Pennsylvania Railroad for a number of years, also Conemaugh borough physician and a member of the Board of Health, having served several terms as its president. He was first vice president of the Conemaugh Deposit Bank, which is now merged with the United States Savings and Trust Company of Conemaugh. Doctor Brallier is a member of the Conemaugh Presbyterian Church and in politics is a staunch Republican.
Source: Gable, John E., "History of Cambria County Pennsylvania in Two Volumes Illustrated, Volume Two," Historical Publishing Company, Topeka - Indianapolis, 1926, p. 1120

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