HISTORY OF CLARION COUNTY

edited by A. J. Davis, 1887


BRIEF PERSONALS.

C to F

transcribed by
Gene Shirey

[p. ix]

Carley, John, Mill Creek, one of the substantial farmers of Mill Creek, owning two hundred and forty acres, was born in Beaver county, in 1833, and settled in Clarion county in 1859. He was married in 1869 to Rebecca J. McCloskey, of Clarion county. They have had a family of nine children -- Alice J., Emma M., George L., Flora E., John S., Anna M., Arthur W., Frankie (deceased), and one who died in infancy. Mr. Carley held the office of justice of the peace for fifteen years, and has also been constable and school director. His father, Job M., was born in Washington county, N. Y., in 1796, and now makes his home with his son John. His mother, Elinor (Hickman) Carley, was born in 1800 and died in 1882.

Carmody, Daniel, East Brady, dealer in furniture, picture frames, wall paper, and carrying a full line of fancy goods, was born in Armstrong county in 1855, and was a son of Patrick and Mary (Parker) Carmody, who settled in East Brady in 1881. Daniel was married on April 15, 1878, to Kate Yung, who was born in Germany in 1853. They have had a family of four children -- John Edgar, Clara May, Rosa Myrtle, and Joseph Addison. Kate was a daughter of Christjohn and Mary Yung, natives of Germany, who came to Pennsylvania in 1855. Daniel Carmody was engaged in the grocery business in 1877, was burned out, and after embarked in the furniture business in 1883.

Carroll, S. A., Alum Rock p. o., Perry, was born in Clarion county, Pa., in 1852, and married Barbara Heeter. They have had a family of four children -- John B., M. Edward, Lawrence L., and Samuel A. Mr. Carroll is engaged in boat building, and also runs a saw-mill in connection with his business. His father, James S., was born in 1820, and married Elizabeth McClatchey, who died in 1875, leaving a family of ten children, four of whom are now living.

Carroll, W. W., West Freedom p. o., Perry, was born in Clarion county, Pa., in 1848, and was married in 1874, to Juliet Logue. They have had one child -- Samuel A. Mr. Carroll is engaged in boat building, and also has a large saw-mill.

Clark, Oliver Henry, North Pine Grove p. o., Farmington, was born in Highland township, Pa., on February 22, 1847. He was the fourth of eleven children born to James and Maria Clark. Until 1864 Oliver lived at home, where with his father he learned the blacksmith trade. He then enlisted in Company A, Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. On his return home, Mr. Clark married Catherine Bittendbender, of Highland township, Pa. They had nine children. Oliver Clark is an industrious, energetic mechanic, a master of his trade, who, by patience, has acquired a comfortable fortune. In politics he takes an active interest. He is a Republican, and has frequently held town offices.

Clover, S. W., Knox p. o., Edenburg, was born in Strattanville, Clarion county, on May 24, 1847, and is the proprietor of the Clover House. His parents were Judge Isaac and Sarah (Whren) [sic] Clover. Mr. Clover was born in this county and his wife in Centre county. S. W. was married on November 17, 1877, to Mattie Orr. They had two [p. x] children -- Isaac and Orr. He was married the second time on October 17, 1882, to Rosey Porter. They have also had two children -- Mattie and S. W., jr.

Cobler, David, Elk City p. o., Beaver, was born where he now resides on April 13, 1844, is a farmer and owns fifty acres, with coal banks. His parents were Frederick and Sarah (Chambers) Cobler, who came here from Germany at an early day, so early that his father bought the farm now owned by his sons for one dollar per acre. David was married on December 24, 1868, to Hannah Shakley, a daughter of Henry P. and Margaret R. (Smith) Shakley, formerly of Butler county. They have had a family of three children -- Presley A., Mary J., and Maud M.

Cochran, James, Lamartine p. o., Salem, was born in Butler county on March 20, 1816, and came to Clarion county in 1826. He has been assessor, school director, -auditor, township clerk, and has held the office of justice of the peace for twenty-four years. He is now engaged in farming, and owns and occupies a farm of one hundred and forty-five acres. He was a son of John and Margaret (Rimes) Cochran. He was married on June 25, 1846, to Elizabeth McCall, a daughter of William and Margaret (Cotton) McCall, natives of this county. James has had two children -- Lemuel E. and Mary E., now the wife of Charles D. Masters, of Salem.

Collner, Calvin, St. Petersburg p. o., Richland, was born in St. Petersburg on April 3, 1856, and is a member of the firm of H. Collner Brothers, general merchants and oil producers. He is now councilman of the borough. His parents are Lewis and Sarah (Fry) Collner, who settled here in 1836. Calvin Collner was married on June 10, 1880, to Anna Thompson, of Sheakleyville. They have had two children -- Verne T. and Sarah L.

Collner, Harrison, St. Petersburg p. o., Richland, was born in St. Petersburg on February 27, 1849, and is a member of the firm of H. Collner Bros., general merchants and oil producers. His parents were Lewis and Sarah (Fry) Collner, who settled here in 1836. Harrison Collner was married on May 28, 1874, to Lizzie Caldwell, of Greensburgh, Westmoreland county. They have had a family of five children -- Bertha, Mary H., Sarah R., William H., and Lewis C.

Collner, Levi, St. Petersburg p. o., Richland, was born in Richland township on July 24, 1842, is a farmer, and now owns seventy-five acres. His parents were Lewis and Sarah (Fry) Collner, who settled here about 1836. His wife was Sarah Ashbach, a daughter of John and Diretta (Whittling) Ashbach, old settlers in Clarion county, to whom he was married on March 22, 1868. They have had three children -- Howard C., Elmer H., and John L.

Cook, Philip, Scotch Hill p. o., Farmington, was born in Beaver township, then a part of Venango county, on January 15, 1822. His father, John Cook, was twice married, and Philip was one of ten children of his marriage with Susan Helpman. The children of the second marriage were seven in number. About 1831 or 1832 the family moved to the mouth of Tom's Run on the Clarion River, where Cooksburg is now situated, and where they became engaged in the lumber business. At the age of twenty-eight years Philip started out in life for himself and became engaged in lumbering and boat-building on the Clarion River. He enlisted in 1861 in Co. E, 10th Pennsylvania Reserves, but was rejected on account of physical disability. He rejoined the regiment at Fort Pierpoint and served three months without compensation. He was married on June 1, 1878, to Louisa B. Barrett, a teacher in the public schools of Bucyrus, O. They had three children -- Susan E., Arthur P., and Louisa B. Arthur died in 1884, aged two years. In politics Mr. Cook was an old line Whig, but became a Republican upon the formation of that party. Religiously he is a Universalist, being almost the only one in the township.

Cooper, William R. (deceased), West Freedom p. o., Perry, was born in Philadelphia in 1821; was left an orphan in infancy, and settled in Clarion county in 1840. He was married in 1850 to Rebecca Martin, who died in 1858, aged twenty-six vears. He was married the second time, in 1861, to Margaret Jane Steele, of Clarion county. They have had a family of four children, two of whom are now living -- William Ellsworth [p. xi] and John Franklin. Mr. Cooper was a successful farmer, and died in 1873, leaving a farm of seventy acres.

Corbett, James M., New Bethlehem, was born in Clarion county, Pa., in 1840, and was married in 1869 to Sarah J. Space. They have had a family of three children -- Herbert G., Clara M., and Joseph P. James M. enlisted in Company L, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, in August, 1862, and remained in the army until the close of the war.

Corbett, Philip, New Bethlehem, a retired gentleman, was born in Clarion township in 1819, and was a son of John and Mary (Mitchel) Corbett, of Mifflin county. John was born in 1778 and his wife Mary was born in 1782. They settled here in 1802, and had a family of twelve children, eight of whom are now living -- Ross M., James H., Philip, Amos W., Isaac, Polly, Electa, and Nancy J. Philip married Ruth Galbraith, of Centre county, in 1838. She died on August 31, 1878, leaving a family of six children -- John H., Mary C., Clara J., George W., Oscar W., and Foster G. He married his second wife, Annie Thompson, in 1878. He has been a justice of the peace for one term. He is a lumber dealer, oil producer, and general insurance agent.

Corbett, Ross M., Leatherwood p. o., New Bethlehem, one of the leading and influential men of his county, was born in Clarion township in 1810, and was married in 1834 to Fanny Culbertson Orr, who was born in Clarion county in 1815. They had a family of seven children, four of whom are now living -- Rev. Hunter, Samuel C., Winfield S., and David L. Hunter is a graduate of. Princeton Theological Seminary, and has been a missionary for over twenty years in China. John Newton, the second son, enlisted in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed while in service, in 1864. Samuel enlisted in the same regiment in 1863, and served to the close of the war in Company L, under Captain Loomus's command. Ross M. Corbett was a son of John C. and Mary (Mitchell) Corbett, of Mifflin county, who were married in 1800, and settled in Clarion county in 1801, where they died. They had a family of twelve children, of whom Ross, Isaac, James, Hamilton, Philip, Mrs. Mary Fulton, Mrs. Electa Packer, and Nancy Jane are now living. Fanny was a daughter of Samuel C. and Margaret (Sloan) Orr, who were natives of Westmoreland county, and settled in Clarion county at an early day.

Corbett, Samuel B., New Bethlehem, a general dry goods dealer, was born in Clarion county in 1840, and was a son of Samuel L. and Ruth (Kirkpatrick) Corbett, who came here in 1818. Samuel died in 1869, leaving a widow and ten children, nine boys and one girl -- Dewitt, Lee, Jared, Samuel B. and James N. (twins), Nelson, Albert, Frank, William, and Sarah. Samuel B. and James N. (twins) enlisted in 1863 in Company L, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served to the close of the war. Seven Corbetts, two brothers and five cousins, served in that same company; one died at Andersonville prison and one was killed. Samuel B. was married in 1866 to Susan Pace. They had one daughter -- Bertie, who died in 1878, at the age of ten years. Sarah was a daughter of George and Sarah (Cribbs) Space.

Corbett, William S., New Bethlehem, was born in Clarion county in 1849, and was married in 1874 to Priscilla McClellan, of Clarion countv. They have had one son -- Franklin C. Priscilla was a daughter of William McClellan. William S. Corbett was a son of Samuel T. and Ruth (Kirkpatrick) Corbett, who settled in Clarion county in 1818. Samuel died in 1869, leaving a widow and ten children -- Dewitt C., Lee, Jared E., Samuel B. and James N. (twins), Nelson, Albert G., Frank S., William S., and Sarah.

Cowan, George E., New Bethlehem, was born in Armstrong county, Pa., it 1843, and was married in 1865 to Miss E. J. Keller. They have had a family of seven children -- James E. (deceased), Charles O., Mary B., John H., William, Norah, and Ella May. George E. Cowan was a son of David and Mary (King) Cowan. David was born in 1810 and died in 1850, and his wife Mary was born in 1815. They had a family of four children -- Mary C., Rachel J., George E., and Mary Ellen. George E. Cowan enlisted in Company H, Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, in 1861, and re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Ninety-first, serving for four and one-quarter years. He was [p.xii] taken prisoner,, and boarded for seven months at the Libby and Salisbury prisons. George E. Cowan organized his present business firm in March, 1883, and is now engaged in the hardware and foundry business. He settled in New Bethlehem, Pa., in 1865.

Craig, jr., W., Callensburg, p. o., Licking, was born in Clarion county in 1836, and followed farming for twenty years. He was married in 1859 to Eliza Young, of Redbank township. They had a family of seven children -- Melissa J., Alvin E., Eivira A., Horace A., Minnie M., Anna L, and Ida M. In 1863 Mr. Craig became proprietor of the Callensburg flour and grist-mill, but still continues his farming interests, owning a fine farm of ninety-six acres. His parents were Washington and Nancy (Thompson) Craig. Washington was born in 1807 and died in 1881. His wife Nancy was born in 1808, and is now living.

Craig, W. F., Sligo p. o., Licking, was born in Armstrong county in 1825, and married Maggie A. Fulmer. They have had three children -- H. Jennie, John F., and Myra. He became engaged in the milling business with his father in 1851, and with his brother, W. A. Craig, in 1866, and they now run a flour, grist and saw-mill under the firm name of W. F. & W. A. Craig. W. F. Craig also owns a fine farm of 40 acres. Their father, James, was born in 1803 and died in 1877. He was twice married. His first wife was Jane Furguson. They had a family of ten children. She died in 1857. He married for his second wife Mary McCain. There are six children now living.

Craig, W. H., Rimersburgh p. o., who is a general merchant, was born in Armstrong county, Pa., in 1845, and settled in Clarion county, Pa., in 1875, when he became engaged in the mercantile business, dealing in dry goods, groceries, and all leading goods found in a country store. He was married in 1868 to Nancy J. Foster a daughter of William A. Foster, of Armstrong county, Pa. They have had a family of three children -- Lizzie M., Mary M., and Nannie P. W. H. Craig was a son of John and Eliza (Huston) Craig. Eliza was born in Franklin county, Pa., and her husband John was born in Armstrong county. They had a family of nine children, five of whom are now living -- Nancy R., Mary, James M., W. H., and Ada L. The grandparents, Samuel and Mary (Milligan) Craig, died in Armstrong county, Pa.

Crawford, Ralph W., Redbank Furnace p. o., East Brady, ticket, freight and telegraph agent for the A. V. R. R., and also agent for Adams Express Company, was born at McKeesport, Allegheny county, in 1853. He was a son of Joel B. and Elizabeth (Bugh) Crawford. He commenced his railroad life in 1869, in the employ of the A. V. R. R., and fitted himself for a telegrapher, and in 1881 was appointed agent for the company. He was married in 1878 to Emma Chaney, of Armstrong county. They have had four children -- Lizzie, Mabel, Ralph, and Charles P.

Cresswell, Dr. Robert, West Millville p. o., Millville, a physician and surgeon of Millville, was born in Indiana county in 1842, and fitted himself for his profession and settled in Armstrong county in 1866, and in 1867 settled in Millville in the practice of his profession, where he now enjoys the confidence of his many friends. He was married in 1870 to Phyanna Cribbs. They have had two children -- Clara and Ralph. Robert is a brother of Dr. John Cresswell, of New Bethlehem.

Crisman, Carson S., North Pine Grove p. o., Farmington, was born at Blairsville, Indiana county, on September 29, 1826. He was of the third children (twin to Cornelius) in a family of six children of Benjamin and Sarah Crisman. Of this family of parents and children Carson is the only one now living. They first came to Clarion county in 1840. Carson learned the carpenter trade and worked at it for several years. In and about Clarion borough stand many of the evidences of his labor. For a time he was engaged in the mercantile business at Newmansville, but since 1875 he has been the leading merchant at North Pine Grove. Mr. Crisman never married and has been
content to travel life's devious path singly and alone. In politics he takes no active part, but generally supports the Republican nominees. Of German parentage, the
family have been associated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

Crum, O. J., Monroe p. o., Beaver, was born in the town of Beaver on April 5, 1840. [p. xiii] He is a carriage and wagon manufacturer at Monroeville. He enlisted in Company A, Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in March, 1865, and was discharged in June, 1865. His parents were John and Mary (Snyder) Crum. Mr. Crum was born in Westmoreland county, and came to Beaver about 1839. O. J. Crum was married on January 25, 1866, to Elizabeth Connor, a daughter of Francis and Elizabeth (Boyer) Connor, of Richland. They have had a family of six children, five of whom are now living -- Francis H., Celia C., Della I., Milda E., and Vertie L.

Dahle, Reuben J., Elk City p. o., Elk, is a farmer, and was born in Elk township on February 17, 1828. He was a son of Jacob and Sarah (Crousehoar) Dahle. His paternal grandfather, Philip Dahle, settled in Elk in 1820. His children were George, John, Peter, Jacob, David, Daniel, and Philip. The children of Jacob were Maria, Lavina, Urias S., Reuben J., Sarah, Lucinda, George W., Clara A., and Franklin. Reuben J. Dahle was married in 18-- to Margaret Thompson. They have had a family of six children -- Nancy, Thomas, Andrew, Mahal, Clara A., and Ida. Margaret was a daughter of Thomas E. Thompson, of Beaver.

Davis, William, Fisher p. o., Mill Creek, a son of Isaiah and Sarah (McVeigle) Davis, was born in Bedford county, Pa., in 1812, and settled in Clarion county in 1840. He was married in 1836 to Mary Copenhaven, of Centre county, who was born on January 31, 18l4. They had a family of nine children -- John C. (deceased), Thomas J., Rachel, William H., Winfield S., Sarah E., George D., Millard F. (deceased), and one who died in infancy. Mr. Davis is a blacksmith by trade, a business which he has followed for forty years. He also owns a farm of fifty acres.

Davis, Mrs. E. L., Callensburg p. o., Licking, a daughter of David Kister was born in Columbia county in 1822, and settled in Clarion county in 1835. She was married in 1840 to James Davis, who was born in Westmoreland county, Pa. They had a family of seven children, six of whom are now living -- William G. (deceased), John W., Mary J., David R., Thomas H., Adam H., James F. William G. enlisted in Company A and served to the close of the war.

Davis, Thomas, Fisher p. o., Mill Creek, was a son of William and Mary (Coopenshaven) Davis, and was born in Huntington county in 1845, and settled in Clarion county at an early age, and now owns a farm of ninety-nine acres. He enlisted in 1862 in Company H 103d Pennsylvania Volunteers; was taken prisoner at Plymouth, N. C., and held at Andersonville, Florence, and Charleston.

Dehner, J. L. Alum Rock p. o., Richland, was born in Allegheny City on August 20, 1843, is a farmer and oil producer, and owns 100 acres of land. He enlisted in Company G 155th Pennsylvania Volunteers in July, 1862, and served during the war, and participated in the battles of Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, and the battle of the Wilderness. His parents were John M. and Christine (Bomgardner) Dehner, who were natives of Germany. J. L. was married on September 17, 1872, to Mary A. Beatty, a daughter of William and Polly (Guthrie) Beatty, natives of Clarion county. J. L. and Mary have had a family of three children -- Arthur Laverne, Albert B., and Maud C.

Deitrich, John M., Fern p. o., Ashland, an oil producer, was born in Ashland township on December 13, 1856, and was a son of William and Catherine (Beausang) Deitrich, both natives of Prussia. They settled in Ashland in 1854, and cleared and improved a farm, a part of which is now owned by their son, John M. Their children now living are Elizabeth, Minnie, John M., Mary E., William, and Charlie. John M. was married in 1885 to Lura A., daughter of John Lindsay, of Elk township. John M. is prominently identified with the oil business and owns an interest in thirty-two producing wells, and enjoys the distinction of putting down the first well in the Fern district.

Dietterich, L. W., Wentling Corners p. o., Beaver, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, on May 19, 1848, and came to Clarion county in 1868, and to Wentling's Corners in 1880, where he has a general store and is now postmaster. His parents were Rev. John F. and Elizabeth (Rheinhard) Dietterich, of Salem. L. W. was married on December 31, 1872, to E. A. Shaner, a daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah (Mong) Shaner, of Salem. L. W. and E. A. have had one child -- Howard K. [p.xiv]

Delo, William B., Knox p. o., Edenburg, was born in Beaver township on November 16, 1851, and was a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Wilds) Delo, of Beaver township. Mr. Delo was appointed postmaster on May 5, 1885. He was married on September 23, 1873, to Alice J. Kanan, of Strattanville, Clarion county. They have had a family of six children -- James M., Edward L., Maude M., George A., and Blanche.

Delp, George, Piolett p. o., New Bethlehem, undertaker, and farmer, was born in the township of Porter, Pa., in 1839, and was married in 1860 to Elizabeth A. Pence, who was born in Porter, Pa., in 1837. She was a daughter of Jacob and Lydia (Doverspike) Pence. They were among the early families of New Bethlehem, Pa., and died in Porter, Pa., she in 1878, and her husband, Jacob, died in 1881. Jacob and Lydia had a family of eleven children, seven of whom are now living. Their son George enlisted in the 103d; was taken prisoner and died while confined in Andersonville prison on August 19, 1864. George Delp was a son of Nicholas and Sarah (Foringer) Delp. Nicholas was born in Porter, Pa., in 1812, and died in 1874, and his wife, Sarah, was born in Armstrong county, Pa., in 1819. They were married in 1838, and had a family of nine children, four of whom are now living -- George, Lewis, Margaret M., and Sarah Jane. Nicholas was a son of Lewis and Elizabeth Delp, who were early settlers in Porter, Pa. Sarah was a daughter of DeWald and Mary Forenger.

Denniston, Francis M., Knox p. o., Beaver, dealer in torpedoes and nitro-glycerine, and now burgess of the borough, was born in Leesburg, Mercer county, Pa., on February 26, 1845, and came to Clarion county in 1876. His parents are Edward and Mary J. (Coulter) Denniston, of Mercer county. Francis M. Denniston was married on July 13, 1880, to Annie M. Schmader, a daughter of Simon and Annie (Gates) Schmader, of Clarion county. They have one child -- Carrie J.

Detar, David, Fryburg p. o., Washington, a son of Joseph Detar, a pioneer of Beaver, was born in Westmoreland county on December 3, 1833. David came to Fryburg in 1860, and being learned in the trade of a machinist and wheelwright, bought the foundry property in that place. Here are manufactured threshers, plows, stoves, and general castings usual to a well-regulated foundry and machine shop. David Detar married Sarah Jane Hollis, who bore him six children. In every sense Mr. Detar is a self made man; having but little capital at the start, he has by industry and perseverance built up a comfortable property, and believes in making life pleasant for his whole family, as well as himself. He is a prominent member of the Lutheran Church.

Dinger, Michael, Shannondale p. o., Millville, one of the representative and successful farmers of Clarion county, was born in Schuylkill county in 1825, and was a son of Jacob and Catherine Dinger, who were married and settled in Red Bank township in 1833. They had a family of thirteen children, five of whom are now living -- Peter, John, Michael, Barbara, and Lydia. Jacob was born in 1781, and died in 1835, and his wife, Lydia, was born in 1792, and died in 1874. Jacob held several of the town offices, and purchased on settlement eleven hundred acres. Michael was married in 1854 to Sarah Craft, of Beaver township, who was born in 1834. Their children are as follows: Philip, Henry, Katie, Annie, John Franklin, Emma Frances, George Irvin, Celesta Louisa, Minnie Ida, and Michael Calvin. Sarah was a daughter of Jacob and Fanny (Inhoof) Craft. They were born in Switzerland, and came to Lancaster county in 1805, and settled in Red Bank township in 1815, where they died, leaving a family of seven children. Michael Dinger has been collector and school director. He is a large farmer, and is also largely engaged in stock raising.

Dougherty, Andrew, Frogtown p. o., Millville, was born in Ireland in 1814, and was a son of James and Catharine Dougherty, who had a family of three children -- Jane, Margaret, and Andrew. Andrew came to America in 1830, and settled in Chester county as a stone-worker on the Girard College building. In 1834 he purchased his present homestead farm of 218 acres, and in 1835 brought his parents out from Ireland. His father died in Jefferson county in 1863, at the age of eighty-four years. Andrew was married in 1850 to Eliza Pheley, who was born in Ireland in 1824. They had a family of eight children, seven of whom are now living -- William James, Catharine, [p. xv] John, Mary, Eliza, Anna, and Andrew, jr., who died at the age of eleven and one-half years. Catharine married Edward Dougherty. They have had two children -- Mary G., and Thomas Andrew.

Dougherty, Thomas, Fisher p. o., Mill Creek, a merchant, was born in 1820, and was a son of Neal and Nancy (McLaughlin) Dougherty. He came to America with his father, Neal, who first settled in St. Johns, N. B., in 1823, and in 1834 they settled in Clarion county, Pa. Thomas was married in 1841 to Rosanna Thompson, a daughter of Samuel Thomson, who was one of the pioneers of Clarion county. They had a family of seven children -- Samuel T., Josephine, George D., James P., Jennie, William T., Clarissa (deceased). Thomas Dougherty spent his early days engaged in farming, and commenced his mercantile life by clerking, at first for five years, after which he went into business for himself.

Dunkle, R. B., Callensburg p. o., Licking, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Morgan) Dunkle, was born in Clarion county in 1853, and commenced business for himself in 1872, opening a wagon-making and repairing shop, and now has a large and increasing business. He was married in 1872 to Jemima Barr, a daughter of Henry and Susan Barr. Jemima died in 1886, leaving two daughters -- Lizzie May and Jessie Maud. His father, Thomas, was born in Centre county in 1821; enlisted in May, 1861, in Co. A, 103d Pennsylvania Regiment, and was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks; after serving three years and three months he returned to Callensburg, where he resided, following his occupation, that of cabinet-maker, until April, 1882, when he returned to his native county. His oldest son, W. L. Dunkle, now occupies the old furniture store at Callensburg. The other sons, J. C. and E. W., reside at Pittsburgh.

Edwards, William H., Foxburg p. o., Richland, was born in Canada on February 6, 1845, and came to the United States in 1862, and to Clarion county in 1870. He is the head of the firm of W. H. Edwards & Co., oil-well tool manufacturers. He was married on January 13, 1868, to Adelia Cox, of Titusville, Pa. They have had seven children -- Mary C., William H., Agnes E., Nellie, Frank, Rose and Ella.

Eicke, C. W. H., West Monterey p. o., general manager and now part owner of the the [sic] Mineral Ridge Coal Company, was born in Germany, and came to America in 1857, residing in New York until 1871. He then settled in Clarion county as manager of the mines, and was the first to introduce coal mined from this section in the northern markets. After a test with coal from different mines for steam producing qualities, received a large contract from N. Y. C. R. R., which continued for ten years; capacity 80,000 tons per year. The company, now conisting [sic] of T. T. Skidmore, Colonel Smith's heirs and Mr. Eicke, own the mineral right to five hundred acres, forty houses and a farm of 106 acres. Mr. Eicke has a fine herd of Jersey cattle, among which is one of the most valuable cows in the country.

Elder, Samuel, Rimersburg, was born in Clarion county on December 28, 1813, and was married in 1844 to Jane Mortimer, who was born in Madison township on October 5, 1817. They had a family of ten children, six of whom are now living -- Sarah Elizabeth, Mary E., Maggie, Nannie E., Samuel B., and John. Samuel B., was married in 1881 to Maggie L. Thompson; John married Mary B. Summerville in 1886; Sarah E. now resides with her mother. The father, Samuel, died on September 22, 1884. He was a son of John and Betsey (Corson) Elder, who had a family of eight children, two of whom are now living -- Nancy and Polly Jane Mortimer. David was born in Clarion county, and was a son of John and Polly (Mortimer) Elder, who were among the pioneers of the county. They had a family of twelve children, seven of whom are now living.

Faller, Jacob, Fryburg p. o., Washington. In the year 1842 Jacob Faller came to Washington township, Pa., and erected a cabin in the southeast part of the township. The family comprised nine children, four of whom were born in Philadelphia, and five were natives of this town. These children were Susan, Jacob, Rebecca, John, Conrad, Sarah, Michael, Frank, and Mary Ann. Jacob, the second child, is one of the most respected and substantial residents of the township of Washington. For twenty-five years he has held the office of justice of the peace, and has also frequently held other [p. xvi] town offices. He married Mary A. Gribel. They have had a family of nine children. Mr. Faller learned the trade of carriage-making, but recently has turned his attention to farming, and is now one of the most thrifty farmers of the town. In politics he is a consistent Democrat. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Fassenmeyer, Baltzer, Fryburg p. o., Washington, and his family emigrated from Baden, Germany, to this country in 1828. In the family were seven children, four of whom were born abroad -- Felix, Catherine, Igatha, and Casper, who were natives of Baden, and Magdalena, Jacob, and Joseph were born in Washington, Clarion county, Pa. Baltzer Fassenmeyer died on May 3, 1868. He was a soldier in the old country, having served under Napoleon, was captured and confined on the island of Galarera, but escaped and returned to his home. Joseph, the youngest child, was born August 19, 1837. He was married in 1859 to Francisca Spiegle. They had one child, who was born in 1862. Francisca died in 1863. He married for his second wife Philomena Dotz. They have had a family of eleven children. In 1875 Mr. Fassennleyer started the Jamestown Hotel, having received quite an estate from his father, upon which he has enlarged, and is now counted among the progressive residents of Jamestown. In politics he is a Democrat, and has frequently held town offices.

Fellers, William, Newmansville p. o., Washington, son of Andrew and Mary Fellers, was born in Centre county, Pa., on April 8, 1817. When William was fourteen years of age the family went to Stark county, O., where they resided for about seven years. William then returned to Pennsylvania, where, in 1840, he was married to Barbara Ann Singhose. In August, 1853, they took up their residence in Washington township, Pa., on lands bought from Rev. John Leech. William Fellers is one of the progressive men of the town. In every enterprise for the welfare of his people he is foremost. Although a strong Republican, he has frequently held town office in his township with a strong Democratic majority. He had a family of twelve children, nine of whom are now living. Both he and his wife are faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Ferguson, J. E., New Bethlehem, was born in Armstrong county in 1861, and settled in Clarion county in 1886. He became engaged in the general livery and exchange stable business upon settlement here. He was married in 1883 to Sarah Jane Seanor, of Armstrong county. They have had one son -- Noah E.

Fisher, Charles, Valley p. o., Elk, is a farmer, and was born in Hanover, Germany, -on March 7, 1836, and was a son of Philip and Caroline (Pirl) Fisher. He settled in Beaver township in 1864, and located in Elk in 1869. He was married that same year to Charlotte, a daughter of Frederick Wedekind, of Elk township. They had a family -of nine children -- Charles, Henry, Amos, Christena, Frank, William, Louisa, Regina, and May.

Flaherty, Matt S., New Bethlehem, was born in West Virginia in 1857, and was a son of John and Bridget (O'Neil) Flaherty, who were born in Ireland and married in Baltimore. They had a family of nine children, eight of whom are now living -- John, Maggie, Matt S., Delia, Pat, Mary, Kate, Jane, and Ella. They settled in Clarion county in 1872. Matt S. became a clerk at an early age, and had but few advantages in obtaining an education, but he fitted himself and graduated from the commercial college, and in 1882 became manager for Jones & Bronker, and in 1883 he became the manager of the Northwestern Coal and Mining Company. He has also held other important offices of trust.

Foster, John Redick, New Bethlehem, a banker of the borough, was born in Armstrong county, Pa., in 1844, and settled in Clarion county in 1872. He was one of the founders of the New Bethlehem Savings Bank, and became cashier and a director. He is president of the gas company, and has also held several of the borough offices. He was graduated from the Elder Ridge Academy, and also from the Iron City Mercantile College, and was an early merchant in Armstrong county, Pa., and retired in 1872. He was married in 1870 to Mellie B. Belville, of Illinois. They have had two daughters -- Minnie Maud and Syd Carl. John Redick Foster was a son of Thomas H. and Eliza Jane (Redick) Foster, who died, leaving a family of five children -- John R., Clarissa, Mary L., Lizzie E., and Lulu E. [p. xvii]

Fox, John W., Pollock p. o., Perry, was born in Clarion county in 1849. His parents were George W. and Addie (Coursin) Fox. John W. was married in 1870 to Sarah E. Best, of Clarion county. They have had a family of nine children -- Charles H., Edwin I., John W., William F., David S., Roy L. E., Celia E., Herbert G., and Robert C. [See note below] Mr. Fox has followed the milling business alt his life, and business which his father followed before him, and is considered one of the best in his section. He now holds the office of school director. He was a candidate for the Legislature in 1886.

Frazier, William H., New Bethlehem, was born in Monroe township, Pa., in 1839. He was a son of Henry and Margaret (Delp) Frazier. Margaret was born in Clarion county, Pa., in 1818, and died in 1874; her husband was born in Westmoreland county, Pa., in 1812, and died in 1882. They were married in 1832. Henry settled in this county with his mother and brother John. Henry and Margaret had a family of eleven children, eight of whom are now living. Three sons enlisted and served in the late war -- George W. enlisted in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Regiment, served out his term of enlistment, enlisted again, and served to the close of the war; William H., in Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Regiment, enlisted on August 29, 1862, was wounded, losing two fingers of the right hand, for which he now receives a pension. He was discharged on October 26, 1863. Thomas M. enlisted in Company F, Sixty-third Pennsylvania Regiment, in 1861, served out his term of enlistment, re-enlisted, and died at Yorktown, Va. The rest of the children now living are James W., John S., Calvin R., Harlon R., Mary A., and Ella Silva. William H. Frazier was married in 1860 to Rachel Shankle, who died in 1870, leaving a family of three children -- Oscar L., Elfida E., and William M. A. Mr. Frazier then married his second wife, Catharine Shankle, in 1871. She died in 1885, leaving two children -- Charles E. and Sarah E. He then married his third wife, Eliza A. Nolf, in 1886.

Fritz, Hezekiah R., Leeper p. o., Farmington, was born in Berks county, Pa., on August 19, 1821. He was the third of eight children born to John and Catharine Fritz, an old and respected family of Berks county. Hezekiah came to Richland in 1840, where, in the same year, he married Caroline Klingler, by whom he had fourteen children, eleven of whom are now living. Mr. Fritz was always known as an industrious, honest citizen. He was often honored by his fellow townsmen with town offices, and held the position of justice acceptably for a term of five years. By trade he was a millwright, but most of his latter years were spent in farming and lumbering. He died on January 25, 1883. He was an earnest member of the German Reformed Church of  Beaver township, but for many years past the family have resided in Farmington, Pa.

Fuller, William, West Freedom p. o., Perry, of the St. Clair Hotel, West Freedom, was born in Otsego county, N. Y., in 1814 and was a son of Jabiel and Betsey (Ransier) Fuller. At an early age he fitted himself for a physician; retiring from the profession he gave his attention to farming. He was married in 1835 to Lauretta Colton. They have had four children, two are now living -- Charles and William H. H. She died on June 11, 1855, at the age of forty-two years. In December, 1855, lie married Miss Amanda R. Covert, of Lawrence county. They have also had four children, two are now living -- Thomas Sankey, Eldridge Frank, Edwin F. (deceased), and Lily May. In 1881 he purchased the St. Clair Hotel, which he has lately remodeled, and is now known as one of the best kept hotels in the county.

Fulton, James Jackson, Rimersburg, an active man of this county, was reared under the strict discipline of the old Associate Church. He was born in Armstrong county on August 25, 1829, and was married on April 19, 1855, to Miss Eliza Huey, who died on June 8, 1861. They had three children, two of whom are now living -- Jennie L. and George L. James Jackson was drafted into the late war, but rejected on account of a crippled foot. He married for his second wife Martha J. Henry. They also had three children, two of whom are now living -- Pearl E. and Minden Orr. Martha died on July 12, 1867, and he married his third wife, Nannie P. Johnston, a daughter of James and Mary Patton, and the widow of Lieutenant W. H. Johnston, who was killed at the battle of the Wilderness. J. J. Fulton was a son of James and Jane (Templeton) Fulton. [p.xviii] James was born on August 15, 1780, in County Derry, Ireland, and his wife on September 15, 1787. His mother's name was Agnes. She, with her four sons, emigrated to America in 1794, and landed in Philadelphia after a voyage of thirteen weeks and three days. From here they went to Westmoreland county, where Robert, one of the sons died. They remained here until the spring of 1801, when they, with other families living in the same vicinity, moved into Armstrong county, now Clarion county, and settled not far from where the town of Clarion now stands, and which was then an unbroken wilderness. This family consisted of the mother and her three sons, James, Henry, and Cochran. On the 19th of March, 1805, James Fulton and Jane Templeton Reid were united in marriage. They had a family of twelve children -- Cochran, Joseph R., Henry, Robert R., William, David, James Jackson, Mary, Nancy, Jane H., Elizabeth W., and Salina M. Of these, Mary, William T., and Nancy are now deceased. Mr. Fulton was one of the founders of Piney Church, and was chosen ruling elder. He was drafted during the War of 1812, but was discharged on account of cessation of hostilities. Little does the present generation know of the hardships, suffering, and the vast amount of labor through which the brave men and women, the early pioneers, had to pass. About the year 1804 business called Mr. Fulton to the eastern part of the State. At this period of our country's history houses were few. This trip was made in winter and on foot. Reaching his place of destination he transacted his business and then started on his return trip. Leaving Bloom's Tavern, on the Susquehanna River, early in the morning, he had thirty-three miles to travel by the old State Road in order to reach Port Barnett, there being no inhabited house between these two points. Soon after starting it began to snow and continued to do so all day, which made travel very fatiguing. He reached Sandy Lick Creek about three o'clock, and yet had ten miles of his journey before him, which was by far the most perilous and fatiguing. During the latter part of the day a man on horseback had passed over the road, and, with the exception of this track, he had the road to break. The shadows of evening began to appear, and the sun was fast sinking in the west; darkness was gathering about him, and he yet alone in the wilderness. Seeing a dead tree by the roadside, and going to it he thought to gather some dry material and make a fire. After making all of his preparations he undertook to strike fire with his steel and dint, but from long exposure his hands refused to fulfill their office; and disappointed in this he felt that he must push on. The last ray of day had faded from the western horizon; night, with all its darkness and horrors, was upon him, and he could hear all around him the howls of the hungry wolves, who were ready to devour him should he for one moment hesitate and give up. After night set in, in order to keep in the road he had to get down and feel for the horse tracks, which were now almost filled with snow. Cold, numb, and wearied from the half-bent position in which he had to travel made his progress slow, but "onward" was his watchword. At last, nearly exhausted and almost ready to yield himself to the hungry wolves, he raised his head, and to his joy saw a dim light in the distance. Gradually the distance between him and the light became shorter, and he at last reached the house, but he was so exhausted that he could not walk up the steps. He finally succeeded in throwing himself against the door, when Mr. Barnett opened it, and seeing who it was helped him in and supplied all his wants. This was about three o'clock in the morning. The remaining part of his trip was made in safety. His wife died on January 20, 1833. On the 14th of May, 1836, he married Elizabeth English. They had two children -- John M. and Sarah E. Elizabeth, his wife, died on April 11, 1862. During the early "fifties" Mr. Fulton and his son J. J. were conductors of what was called the Underground Railroad. The escaping fugitives came to his house in numbers from two to nine. One Saturday evening nine came, and he fed and sheltered them in his barn over the Sabbath, and Monday morning, before daylight, conveyed them to the next station. This same act was done frequently, both by father and son.



NOTES:

Fox, John W. -- According to Cassandra Logue Jeffries <logues58@aol.com>, a great-grandchild of John W. FOX, this list of children is inaccurate.  She reports that according to John Winfield Scott FOX's and Sarah Ellen BEST FOX's obituitaries, they had 10 children: Sara Rebecca FOX (m. Ivan L. LOGUE, Sr.), Addie FOX (m. Grover Cleveland GARRIS), Mildred FOX (m. Carlton GARRIS), Celie FOX (m. Harry WECKERLY), David FOX, Wesley FOX, Robert FOX, Roy FOX, Edward FOX, and Will FOX.


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