Erie County, Pennsylvania

History of Erie County, Pennsylvania 1884

by Samuel P. Bates, 

Submitted by Gaylene Kerr Banister


 

Chapter XXI - Political History -- Annual Record

 
1788-1829     1830-1839     1840-1849     1850-1859     1860-1869     1870-1879     1880-1883     List of Public Officers
 
1840
Before this year, each township took care of its own poor. A proposition to build a county poor house met with much opposition, but on being submitted to a vote of the people at the spring elections, was carried by a vote of 1,599 in favor to 1,515 against. At this election, Justices of the Peace were chosen by popular vote for the first time, their selection having been previously vested in the Governor.

The Anti-Masonic party had by this time given up the ghost, and the Whig party was organized upon its remains. The Whig candidates for Congress was William A. Irvine, of Warren County; the Democratic, Arnold Plumer, of Venango, the latter being elected. The following is the vote in the district:

 
Irvine
 
Plumer
Erie  
3,301
 
2,005
Crawford  
2,175
 
2,640
Venango  
679
 
1,007
Warren  
835
 
925
Clarion  
610
 
1,329
---------
---------
     Total  
7.600
 
7,906



The county tickets, with the vote for each candidate, were as follows:

Whig -- Assembly, Stephen Skinner, McKean, 3,289; James D. Dunlap, Erie, 3,281; Sheriff, E. W. M. Blaine, North East, 3,206; Commissioner, Russell Stancliff, Washington, 3,284; Auditor, James Miles, Girard Township, 3,247.

Democratic -- Assembly, William Townsend, Springfield, 2,033; Anthony Saltsman, Mill Creek, 2,030; Sheriff, Benjamin F. Norris, Greene, 2,012; Commissioner, James Duncan, North East, 2,004; Auditor, G. J. Stranahan, Concord, 2,002.

At this election, Directors of the Poor were chosen for the first time, each township having before elected its own Overseers. The candidates on the Whig ticket were Thomas R. Miller, Springfield; James Benson, Waterford Township; and George W. Walker, Harbor Creek, all of whom were elected. The Democratic candidates were William W. Warner, Fairview; Sherburn Smith, Erie; and William Wyatt, Harbor Creek.

At the general election following, the Whig candidates were: For President, gen. William H. Harrison, of Ohio; for Vice President, John Tyler, of Virginia. John Dick, of Crawford County, was the Whig elector for this district. The Democrats again supported Van Buren and Johnson. Stephen Barlow, of Crawford County, was the electoral candidate. The following is the vote of the county:

 
Harrison
 
Van Buren
Erie, West Ward  
175
 
96
Erie, East Ward  
208
 
83
McKean  
208
 
71
Fairview  
247
 
53
Springfield  
285
 
87
Conneaut  
197
 
125
Waterford Township  
172
 
67
Harbor Creek  
227
 
106
North East Township  
158
 
174
Greenfield  
91
 
55
Union  
81
 
36
Venango and Wattsburg  
122
 
69
Washington and Edinboro  
244
 
71
Greene  
112
 
66
Elk Creek  
163
 
137
Concord  
38
 
81
Amity  
46
 
61
Wayne  
85
 
51
LeBoeuf  
71
 
93
Girard  
301
 
229
Mill Creek  
319
 
182
North East Borough  
43
 
38
Waterford Borough  
46
 
30
---------
---------
     Total  
3.636
 
2,061


In the State -- Harrison, 144,021; Van Buren, 143,672. Harrison's majority, 349.

Harrison & Tyler were elected. The former served only one month, when he died in office, and was succeeded by John Tyler, who soon became unpopular with the party that elected him.

The Whigs and Democrats both held conventions in Erie this year, on the 10th of September. The assemblage was the largest ever known in the Northwest up to that time. -- [See Notable Events.]

1841
The Whig candidate for Governor was John Banks, of Berks County; the Democrats again supported David R. Porter, of Huntingdon. The county gave Banks 2,956 votes, and Porter 1,855. In the State the vote was as follows:

David R. Porter, Democrat, 136,504; John Banks, Whig, 113,473. Majority for the Democrats, 23,031.

The Abolitionists held their first convention in Pennsylvania this year, and nominated Dr. Francis J. LeMoyne, of Washington County, for Governor, who received 736 votes in all of these, forty were cast in Erie County, as follows:

Elk Creek  
2
East Ward of Erie  
2
West Ward of Erie  
4
Fairview  
1
Harbor Creek  
12
LeBoeuf  
1
North East Township  
9
North East Borough  
5
Venango  
4
Wattsburg  
6
Waterford Borough  
1


The Democrats made no nomination for the State Senate and supported John W. Farrelly, of Crawford, who ran as an independent Whig candidate. John Dick, of Crawford, was the regular Whig candidate. The vote of the district was as follows:

 
Dick
 
Farrelly
Erie  
2,663
 
1,955
Crawford  
1,887
 
2,774
---------
---------
     Total  
4,550
 
4,729



The county tickets, with the votes, were as follows:

Whig -- Assembly, James D. Dunlap, Erie, 2,683; Stephen C. Lee, Greene, 2,640; Commissioner, David Sawdy, Conneaut, 2,489; Treasurer, James Williams, Erie, 2,589; Auditor, Moses Barnett, Fairview, 2,571; Director of the Poor, Conrad Brown, of Mill Creek (no opposition).

The Democrats made no nominations, but supported Independent candidates, as follows:

Assembly, Robert S. Hunter, Erie, 1,696; William Miner, Harbor Creek, 1,667; Commissioner, Ira Parker, Mill Creek, 1,465; Treasurer, John Hughes, Erie, 1,366; Auditor, Joseph Y. Moorhead, Harbor Creek, 1,327. Mr. Williams was the first County Treasurer chosen by popular vote.

1842
The Whig county ticket, with the vote for each candidate, was as follows: Assembly, Stephen Skinner, McKean, 1,880; Lyman Robinson, Wattsburg, 1,864; Prothonotary, Wilson King, Erie, 1,928; Register, Thomas Moorhead, Jr., Erie, 2,430; Commissioner, Joseph Henderson, Mill Creek, 2,075; Coroner, Hezekiah Bates, Erie, 1,971; Auditor, Benjamin Gunnison, Greene, 2,027; Director of the Poor, John Evans, Sr., Mill Creek, 1,982.

The Democrats made no regular nominations, but supported Independent candidates for the various offices. The abolitionists had a regular ticket in the field for every office except Director of the Poor. Below is a list of all the candidates, with their votes.

Assembly, Dr. William Johns, Erie (Independent Whig), 989; Sylvester W. Randall (Democrat), Erie, 1,358; Joseph Neely (Working Men's), Harbor Creek, 117; David H. Chapman (Abolitionist), Fairview, 216; James M. Moorhead (Abolitionist), Harbor Creek, 238; Prothonotary, James C. Marshall (Democrat), Girard, 1,627; George Kellogg (Abolitionist), Erie, 179; Register, William Gray (Abolitionist), Wayne, 134; Commissioner, Matthew Greer (Democrat), North East, 781; William Himrod (Abolitionist), Erie, 166; Coroner, Alex Mehaffey (Abolitionist), Erie, 301; Auditor, William Vincent (Abolitionist), Waterford, 162; Director of the Poor, John Gingrich (Democrat), Mill Creek, 717.

1843
The first canal Commissioners elected by popular vote were chosen this year. The Whig candidates were William Tweed, Benjamin Weaver and Simeon Gulliford; the Democratic, James Clark, Jesse Miller and William B. Foster, Jr. The average Whig majority in the county was about 1,150. The Democrats carried the State by an average majority of 14,500. Hugh Mehaffey, Hugh D. King and James Moorhead ran as Independent Anti-Masons, and received about 270 votes in the State.

The Whig candidate for Congress was Charles M. Reed, of Erie; the Democratic, Dr. Galbraith A. Irvine, of Warren. The vote of the district was as follows:

 
Reed
 
Irvine
Erie  
2,867
 
1,560
Warren  
620
 
860
McKean  
259
 
342
Potter  
135
 
405
Jefferson  
449
 
536
Clarion  
743
 
1,330
---------
---------
     Total  
5,073
 
5,032


The apportionment bill of 1842 made a Senatorial district of Erie County alone. Elijah Babbitt was the Whig candidate, and James C. Marshall the Democratic. The vote was for Babbitt 2,646, for Marshall, 1,554 -- Babbitt's majority, 1,092. Galen Forster, Abolition candidate, received 73 votes.

The following was the vote for other candidates:

Whig -- Assembly, James D. Dunlap, Erie, 2,536; David A. Gould, Springfield, 1,573; Sheriff, William E. McNair, Mill Creek, 2,465; Commissioner, Robert Gray, Union, 2,648; Treasurer, Gideon J. Ball, Erie, 2,595; Auditor, William M. Arbuckle, Erie, 2,574; Director of the Poor, James Anderson, Waterford Township, 2,544.

Democratic -- Assembly, Martin Strong, Greene, 1,657; George H. Cutler, Elk Creek, 1,639; Sheriff, James Lytle, Erie, 1,729; Commissioner, G. J. Stranahan, Concord, 1,504; Treasurer, Stephen C. Walker, Erie, 1,481; Auditor, Eli Webster, Greene, 1,561; Director of the Poor, Joseph E. Lee, North East, 1,512.

Abolition -- Assembly, William Gray, Wayne, 79; James M. Moorhead, Harbor Creek, 87; Sheriff, Alex McClellan, Mill Creek, 86; Commissioner, John B. Fluke, Erie, 73; Treasurer, Clinton George, Erie, 85; Auditor, Ambrose Shelly, Harbor Creek, 90; Director of the Poor, Samuel Brecht, Fairview, 96.

1844
For Governor, the Democrats nominated Francis R. Shunk, Allegheny County, the Whigs, Gen. Joseph Markle, Westmoreland; the Abolitionists, F. J. LeMoyne, Washington. Erie County gave Markle 3,501 votes, Shunk, 2,207, and LeMoyne, 69.

The vote of the State was as follows:

Shunk, 160,403; Markle, 156,120; LeMoyne, 2,675. Shunk's majority over Markle, 4,283.

The candidates for Canal Commissioner were Simon Guilford, Whig; Joshua Hartshorn, Democrat; William Larimer, Jr., Abolition. The vote was about the same as that for Governor.

Gen. Reed was re-nominated by the Whigs for Congress. James Thompson, Erie, was the Democratic, and John Mann, Potter, the Abolition candidate. The vote of the district was as follows:

 
Reed
 
Thompson
Erie  
3,554
 
2,180
Warren  
856
 
1,061
McKean  
311
 
415
Potter  
206
 
531
Jefferson  
638
 
777
Clarion  
799
 
1,868
---------
---------
     Total  
6,364
 
6,832


Mr. Mann received but 90 votes in all, of which 45 were cast in Erie County. Hamlin Russell, Abolition, also received 14 votes in this county for the same office.

The county tickets, with the vote for each candidate, were as follows:

Whig -- Assembly, Mark Baldwin, North East, 3,442; James D. Dunlap, Erie, 3,445; Commissioner, Isaac Webster, Fairview, 3,343; Auditor, Thomas Pierce, LeBoeuf, 3,380; Director of Poor, David Kennedy, Erie, 3,332 -- all being elected.

Democratic -- Assembly, George H. Cutler, Girard, 2,147; David Allison, North East, 2,135; Commissioner, James Wilson, Greenfield, 2,210; Auditor, Michael Jackson, Conneaut, 2,148; Director of Poor, James M. Reed, Mill Creek, 2,156.

Abolition -- Assembly, David H. Chapman, Fairview; Aaron Kellogg, Erie; Commissioner, Nathaniel Wilson, Union; Auditor, Alexander McClellan, Mill Creek; Director of Poor, Silas Walker, Harbor Creek. This ticket received an average of about 70 votes.

A vote was taken to decide whether the main line of the State public works should be sold or not. The proposition received a majority of 447 in Erie County, but was defeated in the general vote of the State by a majority of 21,433.

The Whig party nominated Henry Clay, of Kentucky, for President, and Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey, for Vice President. William A. Irvine was the electoral candidate for this district. The Democratic nominees were James K. Polk, of Tennessee, for President, and George M. Dallas, of Pennsylvania for Vice President. Christian Myers, of Clarion County, was the candidate for elector. The Abolitionists ran James G. Birney, of Michigan, for President, who received 74 votes in the county and 3,138 in the State. James M. Moorhead, of Harbor Creek, was the candidate for elector. The following was the Whig and Democratic vote in the county:

 
Clay
 
Polk
Amity  
37
 
77
Concord  
45
 
89
Conneaut  
201
 
110
Edinboro  
30
 
11
Elk Creek  
108
 
121
Erie, West Ward  
151
 
118
Erie, East Ward  
170
 
112
Fairview  
244
 
52
Franklin  
62
 
10
Girard  
344
 
166
Greene  
104
 
99
Greenfield  
73
 
32
Harbor Creek  
203
 
127
Le Boeuf  
88
 
114
Mill Creek  
350
 
209
McKean  
223
 
79
North East Township  
168
 
192
North East Borough  
48
 
34
Springfield  
269
 
103
Union  
73
 
53
Venango  
102
 
55
Wattsburg  
20
 
13
Washington  
215
 
79
Waterford Borough  
54
 
25
Waterford Township  
178
 
78
Wayne  
55
 
68
---------
---------
     Total  
3,630
 
2,226


The vote of the State was as follows:

Clay, 161,863; Polk, 167,245. Polk's majority, 6,382.

Polk and Dallas were elected by a large majority of the electoral votes of the Union.

1845
The Democratic candidate for Canal Commissioner was James Burns, Mifflin County; the Whig candidate was Samuel D. Karns, Dauphin, the Abolition, William Larimer, Allegheny. In Erie County, Burns received 1,103 votes, Karns 1,831, Larimer 82. In the State, Burns had 119,510, Karns 89,118 and Larimer 2,857. The Native American party placed a ticket in the field for the first time this year, and George Morton, their candidate, received 22,934 votes, most of them being cast in Philadelphia and the neighboring counties.

Elijah Babbitt, elected State Senator in 1843, resigned his seat at the close of his second session, and candidates were nominated to supply the vacancy. The Whigs supported James D. Dunlap, the Democrats Carson Graham, and the Abolitionists David H. Chapman. The vote was 1,794 for Dunlap, 1,192 for Graham, and 89 for Chapman.

The Democrats made no county nominations, and appear to have allowed the election of local officers to go by default. The following are the candidates voted for:

Whig -- Assembly, J. B. Johnson, Erie, 1,755; Lyman Robinson, Wattsburg, 1,785; Prothonotary, Wilson King, Erie, 1,888; Register, Thomas Moorhead, Jr., Erie, 1,810; Commissioner, William E. Marvin, Greenfield, 1,768; Auditor, three years, James H. Campbell, Edinboro, 1,699; Auditor, to supply vacancy, Simeon Hunt, Waterford, 1,694; Coroner, Thomas Dillon, Erie, 1,703; Director of Poor, Curtis Heidler, Fairview, 1,693.

Abolition -- Assembly, Samuel Kingsbury, North East, 191; Nathan Gould, Springfield, 190; Prothonotary, N. Wilson, Union, 160; Register, John B. Fluke, Erie, 163; Commissioner, William Robinson, North East, 154; Auditor, A. N. Wood, Venango, 156; David Nellis, Harbor Creek, 153; Coroner, Alex. McClellan, Mill Creek, 168; Director of Poor, Richard Barnett, Fairview, 169.

1846
The Democratic candidate for Canal Commissioner was William B. Foster; the Whig, James M. Power; the Abolitionist, William Elder, and the Native American, George Morton. Owing to a prejudice against Mr. Foster's re-election, the State went heavily in favor of the Whig party. In Erie County, Power had 1,801 votes, Foster 895, and Elder, 74. The State gave Power 97,913, Foster 89,084, Morton 15,438, Elder 2,097.

James Thompson was re-nominated by the Democrats for Congress, and again elected. The Whig candidate was James Campbell, of Clarion, and the Abolition, John Mann, of Potter. The vote of the district was as follows:

 
Campbell
 
Thompson
 
Mann
Erie  
1,792
 
942
 
77
Clarion  
617
 
1,199
 
--
Warren  
436
 
684
 
19
Jefferson  
278
 
333
 
--
McKean  
168
 
256
 
--
Potter  
99
 
237
 
54
Elk  
113
 
128
 
--
----------
----------
-------
     Total  
3,553
 
3,779
 
150


The Democratic candidate for State Senate was Smith Jackson, Erie; the Whig, J. B. Johnson, Erie, and the Abolition, Nathan Gould, of Springfield. Johnson received 1,708 votes, Jackson 873, and Gould 86.

The county tickets and their votes were as follows. The Democrats made no nomination for Sheriff:

Whig -- Assembly, William Sanborn, Amity, 1,719; David A. Gould, Springfield, 1,668; Sheriff, Miles W. Caughey, Fairview, 1,723; Commissioner, William Campbell, Washington, 1,710; Treasurer, John S. Brown, Erie, 1,709; Auditor, James Chambers, Harbor Creek, 1,703; Director of Poor, William Bracken, Le Boeuf, 1,680.

Democratic -- Assembly, E. Duncombe, Amity, 876; Newton Lounsbury, North East, 857; Commissioner, James Wilson, Greenfield, 781; Treasurer, John S. Carter, Erie, 846; Auditor, Martin Strong, Jr., Waterford, 796; Director of Poor, Isaac R. Taylor, Washington, 806.

Abolitionist -- Assembly, William Gray, Wayne, 84; R. Barnett, Fairview, 84; Sheriff, Aaron Kellogg, North East, 182; Commissioner, Thomas McClellan, Mill Creek, 80; Treasurer, Alexander Mehaffey, Erie, 83; Auditor, Abner H. Gould, Springfield, 79; Director of Poor, Alvah Francis, Franklin, 85.

1847
A vote was taken at the spring election whether or not licenses to sell liquor should be granted in the county. The vote was 2,416 in favor of license, and 2,183 against.

The Whigs nominated for Governor James Irvin, of Centre County; the Democrats supported Francis R. Shunk; the Abolitionists, F. J. LeMoyne; and the Native Americans, E. C. Reigart, Lancaster. Erie County gave Irvin 2,586 votes; Shunk, 1,728; LeMoyne, 130.

The vote of the State was as follows: Shunk, 146,084; Irvin, 129,148; Reigart, 11,247; LeMoyne, 1,861; Shunk's majority over Irvin, 18,936.

For Canal Commissioner, Joseph W. Patton, Cumberland, was the Whig candidate; Morris Longstreth, Montgomery, the Democratic; William B. Thomas, Philadelphia, the Abolition; and George Morton, Dauphin, the Native American, Longstreth being elected by about the same vote as Shunk.

The Pennsylvania soldiers in the Mexican war voted for State officers, and gave a large majority for the Democratic candidates.

The Democrats made no nominations for county officers, leaving the field clear for the Whigs and Abolitionists. The following were the candidates with the vote for each:

Whig -- Assembly, Gideon J. Ball, Erie, 2,545; William Sanborn, Amity, 2,478; Commissioner H. A. Hills, Conneaut, 2,359; Auditor, John Wood, LeBoeuf, 2,421; Director of Poor, David Sterrett, McKean, no opposition.

Abolition -- Assembly, Nathaniel Wilson, Union, 158; Orange Selkrigg, North East, 158; Commissioner B. Beebe, Wayne, 152; Auditor, E. N. Wood, Venango, 148.

1848
The Democratic State candidates were for Governor, Morris Longstreth, Montgomery; for Canal Commissioner, Israel Painter, Westmoreland. The Whig candidates were William F. Johnson, Armstrong, for Governor, and Ner Middleswarth, Union, for Canal Commissioner. Gov. Shunk had died before the expiration of his term, and Mr. Johnson, who was Speaker of the Senate, became Governor. The gubernatorial vote was the closest that ever occurred in Pennsylvania, Johnson having succeeded by only 302 majority. Mr. Longstreth's defeat was occasioned by the fact of his having been Canal Commissioner, which enabled his political enemies to create a considerable degree of prejudice against him. The Democratic nominee for Canal Commissioner was elected by 2,958 majority. Erie County gave Johnson 3,500 votes, Longstreth, 2,087; Middleswarth, 3,305, and Painter, 2,096. The Abolitionists and Native Americans had no State ticket in the field.

The candidates for Congress were the same as in 1846, and James Thompson was again elected by 483 majority over Mr. Campbell.

The county tickets were as follows:

Whig -- Assembly, G. J. Ball, Erie, 3,169; Theodore Ryman, Girard, 3,165; Prothonotary, James Skinner, Erie, 3,162; Register, R. J. Sibley, Waterford, 3,077; Commissioner, George W. Brecht, Mill Creek, 3,067; Auditor, John Eagley, Springfield, 3,059; Treasurer, John Hughes, Erie, 3,101; Director of Poor, David Kennedy, Erie, 3,025; Coroner, Samuel L. Foster, Erie, 3,030.

Democratic -- Assembly, Smith Jackson, Erie, 1,623; John S. Barnes, Girard, 1,628; Commissioner, James Wilson, Greenfield, 1,631; Auditor, D. W. Howard, Amity, 1,585; Director of Poor, Henry Colt, Waterford, 1,555. There were no candidates for Prothonotary, Register, Treasurer or Coroner.

Abolition -- Assembly, William Beatty, Erie, 371; Job Stafford, McKean, 367; Prothonotary, Aaron Kellogg, North East, 1,303; Register, Ira Sherwin, Harbor Creek, 487; Commissioner, James M. Moorhead, Harbor Creek, 382; Auditor, B. Beebe, Concord, 325; Treasurer, Henry Cadwell, Erie, 377; Director of Poor, Eli Perkins, Wayne, 357; Coroner, John B. Fluke, Erie, 470.

The National tickets were as follows: Whig -- for President, Zachary Taylor, Louisiana; Vice President, Millard Fillmore, New York. Democratic -- for President, Lewis Cass, Michigan; for Vice President, William O. Butler, Kentucky. Free-Soil -- for President, Martin Van Buren, New York; for Vice President, Charles Francis Adams, Massachusetts. The Whig candidate for Elector in our district was Thomas H. Sill, Erie; the Democratic, Timothy Ives, Potter; the Free Soil, William F. Clark, Crawford. Below is the vote of the county:

 
Taylor
 
Cass
 
Van Buren
Erie, East Ward  
209
 
151
 
12
Erie, West Ward  
260
 
152
 
4
Mill Creek  
317
 
159
 
3
Fairview  
249
 
40
 
6
Girard Borough  
46
 
29
 
2
Girard Township  
263
 
154
 
16
Springfield  
234
 
87
 
31
Conneaut  
202
 
87
 
5
Elk Creek  
122
 
125
 
4
Franklin  
45
 
4
 
20
Washington  
196
 
63
 
--
Edinboro  
40
 
14
 
--
McKean  
182
 
58
 
30
Greene  
109
 
116
 
--
Waterford Borough  
62
 
42
 
1
Waterford Township  
161
 
49
 
--
LeBoeuf  
63
 
72
 
--
Union  
73
 
48
 
23
Concord  
32
 
35
 
43
Wayne  
7
 
37
 
39
Wattsburg  
24
 
15
 
3
Venango  
62
 
48
 
34
Greenfield  
60
 
28
 
20
North East Borough  
44
 
37
 
7
North East Township  
133
 
178
 
27
Harbor Creek  
184
 
113
 
26
---------
---------
-------
     Total  
3,418
 
2,022
 
356


The vote of the State was as follows: Taylor, 185,514; Cass 171,998; Van Buren, 11,263.

Taylor and Fillmore were elected. The former died after being in office about a year and a half, and Mr. Fillmore served out the balance of the term.

1849
The Whig candidate for Canal Commissioner was Henry M. Fuller, of Luzerne; the Democratic, John A. Gamble, of Lycoming. The vote of the county was 2,503 for Fuller and 1,369 for Gamble. Mr. Gamble was elected, receiving 135,840 votes to 133,111 for Fuller. Kimber Cleaver, of Schuylkill, the Native American candidate, received 3,259 votes in the State, but none in Erie County.

The candidates for State Senate were John H. Walker, Whig, and Murray Whallon, Democrat. Mr. Walker was elected by a vote of 2,417; 1,399 for Whallon.

The county tickets were as follows:

Whig -- Assembly, James C. Reid, Erie, 2,487; Leffert Hart, Girard, 2,302; Sheriff, P. E. Burton, Erie, 2,474; Commissioner, Simeon Stewart, Concord, 2,467; Auditor, John L. Way, Greene, 2,474; Director of Poor, George Fritts, Waterford, 2,457.

Democratic -- Assembly, David Olin, Girard, 1,349; William Griffeth, North East, 1,350; Sheriff, E. W. Gerrish, Edinboro, 1,370; Commissioner, Truman Stewart, Concord, 1,355; Auditor, Henry Teller, Girard, 1,357; Director of Poor; Henry Gingrich, Mill Creek, 1,363.
 
1788-1829     1830-1839     1840-1849     1850-1859     1860-1869     1870-1879     1880-1883     List of Public Officers
 

 

Bibliography: Samuel P. Bates, History of Erie County, Pennsylvania, (Warner, Beers & Co.: Chicago, 1884), Part II, Chapter XXI, pp. 340-430.
 

 


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