Erie County (PA) Genealogy

From Farm Field to Battle Field - Springfield Township and the Civil War

Contributed by Evelyn Baker


The article below has been written by Evelyn Baker. She has put about 8 months of work, on and off, in researching, transcribing, and documenting events in Springfield Township region, focusing on the Civil War. Information has been obtained from the following sources: Bayfront Library, Erie Weekly Gazette microfilm; Conneaut Library, The Conneaut Reporter microfilm in Ohio; Civil War collection of Constable Harry Woomer, Elk Creek Township. Anyone having questions of comments concerning this material, please send your inquiry directly to Evelyn Baker.


From FARM FIELDS ... to BATTLE FIELDS

1861

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP AREA EVENTS

January 17 ... A Union meeting in Girard was well attended. Elder FLOWER, S. E. WOODRUFF, L. W. SAVAGE,  Col. F. MANTOUR, Elder STUNTZ, GEORGE H. CUTLER, Democratic leader of Erie Co., all spoke in favor or sustaining the Union. The Girard Guard, commanded by D. W. HUTCHINSON, Esq., paraded during the day, ready to obey any call in defense of their country.

February 7 ... A reunion of the Wayne Guards will take place at Farrar Hall. The grand affair will be catered by HARRIS with TOMPKINS Band to "tip the light fantastic toe". A large turnout is anticipated to replenish the exhausted treasury of the Guards. There is a charge of $3.00 per couple for the Ball and dinner.

The Springfield home of SAMUEL WALDO was destroyed by fire. The family was not at home, and all possessions were lost.

February 21 ... President LINCOLN passed through the Springfield Township area about midnight enroute from Cleveland to Buffalo. An estimated 2,000 people lined both sides of the railroad tracks. The train consisted of the engine, tender, and three passenger cars. Upon each forward corner of the engine were fixed the 'Stars & Stripes' of the Union flag. One gentleman was heard to remark, " It will cost the nation a good deal to get him as fat as "Old  Buck" [ in reference to President JAMES BUCHANAN, Democrat of Pa ].  The event passed pleasantly, until LINCOLN arrived at Buffalo. The Lake Shore & Central Depot was crowded, and a double line of soldiers were stationed to ensure safe passage for the Presidential entourage. Rabble rousers burst through, totally broke the soldier’s line, and then rushed after the president. Carriages were broken and some onlookers were knocked to the ground. LINCOLN narrowly escaped injury. Many of the entourage were obligated to walk to their night's lodging at the American Hotel.

March 28 ... Hoop skirts were selling for 4¢

Sugar sold for 10¢ lb.

April 12 ... In the early morning hours, church bells pealed as the signal shot, the retort, fires, and tears at a little known place in the south would forever leave a sad legacy in our nations history.  The Springfield home folks were to see young lads leave their farms and put themselves in peril. The Civil War had begun.

April 23 ... In Conneaut [Twsp.] Pa., Rev. L. D. AMES officiated at the wedding of ANDREW ARMSTRONG to Miss MARIA GRIFFEY.

April 25, 1861 ... Roll of Pa. Volunteers:

 The Girard Guards - Company G

Captain ............. D.W. HUTCHINSON

1st  Lieutenant ............... J. GODFREY

2nd Lieutenant ...... C. A. PETTIBONE

3rd  Lieutenant ................. A. B. HALL

Privates:

C. F. BARBER

W. BARLOW

P. BENDER

M. BENNETT

C. BILLINGS

C. D. BILLING

A. BIRD

P. A. BROTT

H. BROWN

E. CALDER

E. CAMPBELL

R. A. CAMPBELL

F. COOK

J. COON

H. B. CUSTARD

N. DEO

D. DRINKS

K. EAGER

J. D. EVANS

D. FAILS

J. P. FERGUSON

J. C. FLAGG

J. GARBER

F. GIDDING

L. A. GODFREY

N. L. GODFREY

O. M. GODFREY

W. GODFREY

W. K. GODFREY

M. H. GOULD

H. GRAYLETTER

A. HALL

S. A. HARRIS

O. HARTSBORO

A. D. HILMAN

D. HOLDEN

W. HOPKINS

S. KALKINS

L. KELLOGG

S. R. KELSEY

G. KIMMEL

J. C. KOCKWELL

K. C. LANFEAR

D. McCLURE

A. J. McKEE

S. K. MILLER

H. C. NEWHALL

F. NICHOLS

O. W. NORTON

E. F. OAKLEY

E. F. OGILL

N. OLIPHANT

H. OSBORN

J. E. PETTIBONE

N. PETTIS

J. K. PHILLIPS

WM. PLATT

C. J. RANDALL

G. ROBERTS

L. T. ROBINSON

S. SALSBURY

B. F. SCOTT

W. D. SHAWL

J. SHERMAN

J. W. SHERMAN

C. S. SIMMONS

J. SMITH

H. SNEER

M. A. STERN

A. M. TELLER

J. C. TELLER

A. W. VAN CAMP

J. VAN CAMP

N. WAIDLEY

J. P. WARD

W. WARD

P. WARE,

Z. WHEELER

Z. L. WHEELER

O. WICKS

H. WILLIAMS

A. J. WOLVERSON

The Volunteers listed, joined the Regiment leaving for the Camp Ground in Pittsburg and will remain there under constant drill until called into service.

April 26 ... A sudden rush for the 'Stars & Stripes' is unparallelled in U. S. history. Price of the material has doubled, then tripled in a few weeks. It is said that it is difficult to obtain 'for love or money'. Buntings, badges, envelopes, etc. are being manufactured with haste and are being worn or displayed everywhere.

May 2 ... Mr. ALBERT S. FULLER of  Jackson, Wisconsin, married Miss MARY E. GOULD of West Springfield. Mr. A. JUDSON GOULD is wed to Miss SARAH W. THOMAS. Both ceremonies were officiated by Rev. P. W. MILLS.

May 1861 ... WILLIAM CROSS, of Girard Township, gave the hometown soldiers $300 with an equal amount to support their families in necessary cases.

May 9 ...... There are about 2,000 troops camped in Erie, due to board the train for Harrisburg. The 10 companies forming the Erie Regiment are: Co.s A, B, & C., Wayne Guards, Franklin Pierce Rifle Co., Reed Union Grenadiers, Girard Guards, Watson Guards, Conneautville Rifle Co., LeBoeuff Guards,  and Parson Guards.

A spirited and well disciplined company from Fairview were turned away from the Erie Regiment, due to their late arrival. A full compliment of recruits had already been filled, but another was scheduled to be formed immediately.

May 1861 ...  OLIVER WILCOX NORTON responded to PRESIDENT LINCOLN’S call for 7,500 men on April 19, 1861 at Springfield, Pennsylvania. Volunteers from Springfield merged with Girard enlistees to form a regiment with those from Erie, Pa. This Regiment, after serving 3 months, was organized as 83rd Regiment of Pa. Volunteers. They entered into service of the U. S. for three years, or the duration of the war. NORTON signed his enlistment papers as a teacher.

OLIVER WILCOX NORTON was born in Allegany Co., N. Y., about 100 miles east of Erie on December 17, 1839. He was the son of  Rev. OLIVER WILLIAM & HENRIETTA NORTON.  His Springfield home still stands today on Sanford Road. It was moved by PAUL DURST from its original Rt. 6N location, at the exit ramp, during the construction of I - 90.

Excerpts of his letters home are recorded here:

Camp Wilkins, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Friday, May 10, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

... I have a severe cold ... but a wet towel cured that ... I feel well this morning and had a good breakfast, milk in my coffee, and last night, we had butter. The day I had the sick headache, I got nothing for breakfast but a piece of dry bread, and at noon we had rice soup that was burnt so as to be nauseous ... I consequently, unate it ...

Four of us occupy a shed about 10’  x 10' ... lumber was furnished and we covered  [shed]  ... except a little hole to crawl into. Inside we have a bunk for one  and straw on the bottom for the rest. A first rate camp. We have lots of  papers - N. Y., Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Cleveland, & Pittsburgh dailies ... I got a pass and went into the city ... took the mornings mail ... about 100 papers and 48 letters. Our Company has been selected to bear the regimental flag ... my place is very near the flag ... news received from Girard caused a good laugh in our company, viz: that the young ladies of Girard had presented ex-lieutenant S. with a wooden sword.

O. W. NORTON

 

June 6, 1861 ... DAN RICE on the crisis: "I wish to assure you, men of arms, that you are not to meet ordinary men ... the southern soldiers are not cowards ... you will encounter foemen worthy of your steel. But your cause is a holy one ... to defend a triumph acquired by the pioneers of liberty. You wish the Banner of Independence to stand where your forefathers planted it ... although the field of carnage may be more deeply reddened by your blood ... remember ... your country must never be stained by the touch of tyrants."  ( a condensed excerpt )

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Saturday, June 8, 1861

Dear Sister H ...

... we have a splendid place, 15 miles from Pittsburgh on the south bank of the Alleghany. The barracks of the Erie Regiment are sheds 75’ x 20’ ... we are to sleep on the bare floor. We have just the best spring water and it tastes good after drinking the nasty river water in Pittsburg. Colonel McLANE  received a dispatch ... we were accepted ... to be mustered in the U. S. service immediately ... those who are willing, for 3 years, others for 3 months ... those who will not enlist for 3 months will be sent home ... we are to be uniformed and equipped immediately. We expect to be ordered to western Va., or Harper’s Ferry ... tho we are not told where ... O. W. NORTON

 

June 13 ... Mr. MILLS, of Girard, is killed falling into one of the Erie Canal locks. He fell between the boat and the side of the lock.

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Saturday, June 15, 1861

Dear Father ...

... a row broke out in a beer saloon ... some the Pittsburg boys ... broke doors and windows, smashed glass and furniture ... Colonel GRANT called out Companies B, G, and I with their guns to disperse them. They made quite a determined stand and 6 or 8 were wounded ... A man stood before me and I called to him twice to stand back. He did not move, so I ran my bayonet into his side an inch or two ... he was awful mad. The wound was only a flesh wound. M. W. GOULD pricked one man, GODFREY & WHEELER pricked some ... none serious.

The way we have been treated is enough to make a preacher swear, almost.

We are cheated in our rations about half the time. Our clothes are all dropping off from us ... we don’t know whether we will ever get any pay. ... write often ... letters are like angel visits ...  it was 102 yesterday at noon. At 12 m. it is definitely settled ... we are to stay in the State service ... no companies will leave the regiment. According to past experience, we expect this changed in a couple of hours. O. W. NORTON

 

June 20 ... Reports of army worms and cut worms devastating this years timothy meadows, wheat and corn fields.

June 21 ... Two Pa. Regiments were commanded by Colonels of  similar names:

Colonel McLEAN of the Pa. 83rd  -  Colonel McLANE of the Pa. 88th

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Saturday, June 22, 1961

Dear Mother ...

... the 4th time, we have had marching orders countermanded. Colonel McLANE  telegraphed to Harrisburg, that he should start for Harrisburg or Erie on Monday. If this regiment was not ordered off, he would take them home ... arms were distributed ... we are having the most severe drills ... 100 degrees most of the time.

O. W. NORTON

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Thursday, June 27, 1861

Dear Brother E ...

We’ve had pretty spicy times in camp ... marching orders are given and immediately countermanded. One of the boys stuck up a picture - a courier driving at top speed, shouting, “Hurrah, Marching orders,” and another following, calling out, “Hold on, blast ye, they’re countermanded”. They call it, “The Erie boys’ experience”, and it is a pretty good hit. ... write often, direct your letter to Camp Wright, Hulton, care of CAPTAIN D. W. HUTCHINSON. ... O. W. NORTON

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Thursday, June 27, 1861

Dear Father ...

... it was announced the Governor was not dead, as before reported, only dead drunk, and he and his aide would be here on Tuesday to dispose, finally, of the Erie Regiment ... Well, Tuesday came and the Governor didn't, so he was announced to come on Wednesday. Wednesday came and the Governor didn't ... the whole thing was a canard ... just to keep the boys quiet. Company E had a comic picture representing a very milingtary man with a fierce mustache ... turned upside down it was a complete jackass. That is just about our situation. ... O. W. NORTON

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

Sunday, June 30, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

Major General McCALL was here and organized 2 new regiments ... in this camp and Camp Wilkins ... about 5,000 men.

Colonel McLANE has gone to Erie and some say he expects to have us there on The Fourth ... It is ascertained that our officers are cheating on us in a rascally manner. Each Co. is allowed 77 rations per day. Properly cooked and distributed, 1 ration is all a man can eat, and it almost always happens that some are absent ... and the law says, "that, if anything is saved from their rations, the company may sell it and raise a company fund". Co. B now has a fund of $200. Well, our 3 officers, instead of drawing their own rations, have boarded themselves and servants, all this time, out of ours, ... keeping us half the time without enough to eat, and depriving us of selling any extra allowance ... a ration is valued at 30¢ ... each officer saves $1.20 a day, besides the ration for his servant, making $1.50 a day ... amounting to $45 a month for each officer.

... farmer BLACK sent 9 dozen eggs and several lbs. of butter marked for the privates of Co. G. Not a private in the company got an egg and only a little butter. Now I call that decidedly mean. The boys of Girard say they have not had a cent of the money that was put into the officers hands for them and cannot get postage stamps without paying 10¢ for 3.  I can't tell what has become of all the money for the Springfield boys. There are not more than 30 in the company.

$150 would make $5 apiece, and I can't find anyone who says he has had a dollar. I have had 25¢ and 7 stamps. What has become of the money? Any talk like that make the officers d ... n us up one hill and down. There will be talk about it though, if we ever get back to Girard. I must close.   ... O.W. NORTON

 

July 6 - SARAH JANE HATHAWAY died, daughter of JOHN & ESTHER HATHAWAY. She was 6 years old.

July 12 ... The 3 month men of the Erie Regiment took up their march homeward and arrived at the Conneaut train station, greeted by family, friends, and a 3 gun salute by the Conneaut Light Artillery. Those returning were:

SAMUEL FENTON

HENRY WRIGHT

GEORGE WOODWORTH

JAMES BARNETT

JAMES CUMMINS

PETER OLSON

THOMAS FOSTER

 

Camp Wright, Hulton, Pa.

July 14, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

... there has been considerable excitement in reference to our pay. Seven different days have been set ... to receive our $17.23 ... payment is now postponed. The latest reliable news is that we are neither in the United States or States service, nor ever have been, and that we will all have to be mustered in for 3 months before we can draw a cent of pay. This will be done tomorrow.

The Erie Regiment is one grand fizzle out. ... Pennsylvania cannot furnish a better regiment, and yet, where is it? ... O. W. NORTON

 

July 15 ... ELIZABETH RICHARDS died at age 37 ... spouse: P. RICHARDS

Father: LOCKWOOD

July 24, 1861 ... An extract from a letter written by Lieutenant EDWARD P. GOULD to the Rochester Democrat:

Washington

No one who has not been on the battlefield can conceive of the horrors of war. Little did I think that I should see the awful tragedy that was enacted Sunday. One of my shoulder straps was shot off, a hook on my belt was hit and my sword was struck and 2 men fell dead at my feet. Yet, I came out unharmed, and am well, with the exception of some stiffness caused by a 70 miles march with no food or water, except what came out of mud holes.

August 1861 ... Lieutenant EDWARD P. GOULD, son of NATHAN GOULD, ESQ., of Springfield Township, took part in the Battle of Bull Run. He was home on furlough with a sword captured from the enemy during that engagement.

August 7 ... The wool crop is unusually large and probably will amount to 11 or 12 million lbs. It remains unsold in many places.

August 15 ... A pair of grey horses and buggy were stolen from WILLIAM LUTHER at Albion. Horse stealing has become frequent in this area. Horses are now in good demand. There is an organized gang selling them to army agents south of the Ohio River.

 

Camp Chase, Ohio

Carlin's Battery

August 17 ... Pennsylvania men enlisting in the Conneaut Light Artillery [Ohio]:

L. T. ROBINSON, 3rd Sergeant of Springfield X Roads.

ELI  CALKINS,   Springfield X Roads

JOHN MORTON, Springfield X Roads

JAMES MOORE, Springfield X Roads.

J.  C.  SWEET,  West Springfield

S. F. GIDDINGS, West Springfield

STILLMAN RICHARDSON, West Springfield

ROBERT CALDER, 6th Corporal of Girard

DANIE BETTS, Girard

HENRY GERALD, Girard

CYRENUS FLOYD, Girard

JOHN TISDALE, Girard

A. H. HURD, Wagoner of North East

H. H. BONNEY, PennLine

COLLATTIMUS COLE, Albion

A. H. WOOD, Albion

JOHN WOOD, Platea

JOHN MILLER, Spring Corners

JOHN PALMER, Beaver Center

CHARLES J. H. RHIVES, Conneautville

August ... Mathews Chocolate Worm Drops for sale to cure intestinal distress.

August 30 ... J. H. HUNT married LIZZIE HART, both of Springfield. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A. FONTS.

September 5, 1861 ... For the past 10 days, there has been active recruiting in Girard, Springfield, Conneaut, and Elk Creek townships. About 200 men have enlisted with about half of them joining General McLANE's regiment. Volunteers named were:

JOHN ROCKWELL & CALVIN RANDALL of Girard

A. J. McKEE & ALIRA HALL of Springfield

JOHN & ISACC VAN CAMP of Girard Township

They are in the Company commanded by Captain P. B. CARPENTER.

September 11 ... G.F. TOWER & Miss A. G. CHEENEY were married in Springfield by Rev. P. W. MILLS.

September 24 ... President LINCOLN set aside a National Day of fasting and prayer. Business' closed and churchs were filled across the land to remember those who imperil their lives for freedom.

Camp Corcoran, Arlington Heights, Va.

Monday Sept. 30, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

My soldiering now is not play, it is work. The last time I wrote you, we were in Camp Casey, above Washington. We marched at sunset ... past the Capitol, across the Long Bridge, and set our feet on the sacred soil of the "Mother of Presidents". After marching 8 miles, we halted ... and laid down to rest. We were hungry, but we had nothing to eat. D. H. and I had each a blanket. We spread one down and the other to cover us ... it was so cold, we could not sleep much. The dew wetted our blanket through ... so we had rather a sorry night. ... after sunrise, we marched about ½ mile to our camp ... had dinner of bread and raw pork at noon. We are on Arlington Heights, about 4 miles southwest of the Capitol ... as far as I can see ... the white tents of our enemy dot every hilltop. Rebel camps are within 2 miles of us ... the impression is that a great battle is on the taps.

Address O. W. N., care Captain T. M. AUSTIN, McLANE'S Regiment, Camp Corcoran, Washington, D. C.  ... O. W. NORTON

 

Camp Leslie, near Falls Church, Fairfax County, Va.

October 4, 1861

Dear Friends at Home ...

The Colonel  presented us to McCLELLAN  ... and asked the privilege of taking a position in the advance ... our camp is right on the scene of the Hall's Hill skirmish. Falls Church lies at the foot of the hill to the southeast ... the rebel pickets are about a mile from Falls Church. My time is so limited that ... I must write to all at once.We can get no stamps here ... so the letters have to be franked by the Major and sent on. I wish you could send a few stamps. My money is gone, although pay is due, I can't tell when we will get it.

A field of potatoes, 5 acres, was emptied in short order ... and some parsnips. You ought to see us clean out the fences. The rails answer first-rate to boil our rations. You need not envy  your vegetables. They seem to be a failure. Our cooks don't know how to cook them and no one likes them.

Direct care Captain A., Colonel J. W. McLANE's Regiment, Camp Leslie, Washington, D. C.  ... O. W. NORTON

 

Camp Leslie, near Falls Church, Fairfax County, Va.

October 8, 1861

Friend P ...

... we crossed the Long Bridge and set foot on the 'sacred soil'; the soil may be sacred, but we sacrilegious Yankees can't help observing that it is awfully deficient in manure. It is so poor that buckwheat or beans won't grow more than an inch high, and pennyroyal just sticks out. Our cooking is done in the open air, by swinging camp kettles on poles over the fire. We live on salt beef, bacon, hard bread, and beans.

First thing in the morning is drill, then drill, then drill again. Then drill, drill, a little more drill. Then drill and lastly drill. Between drills, we drill, and sometimes stop to eat a little and have roll call. We look on it as an honor to be selected for pickets.  We have had a tremendous storm ... hail and furious wind ... tents were blown flat. We saved ours by holding it down, but were almost flooded out with water. A baggage wagon, weighing nearly a ton, was lifted clear from the ground, and blown with 4 horses some 10 - 12 rods into the marsh. ... O. W. NORTON

Oct. 10 ... GEORGE PIKE & M. CALKINS, both of Springfield are married by Elder J. E. CHURCH

Oct. 16 ........ Rev. JAMES T. READ, pastor of the Springfield Presbyterian  Church is now serving as Chaplin of Col. Black's Regiment in the Grand Army of the Potomac. Dr. J. L. STEWART, Erie, has been accepted as a volunteer surgeon. Drs, J. S. WHILLDIN & JOHN NICHOLSON, Erie; and F. S. CHAPIN, Wattsburg, enlisted as Assistant surgeons. Rev. J. P. FLOWER delivered his farwell to the Methodist Episcopal Church, Girard, to assume duties as Chaplain of McLANE's Regiment.

Report of the Ladies Soldiers Aid Society:

Contributions:

United Presbyterian Church .. $11.62

Park Church ......................... $25.00

German Evangelist ................ $54.00

St. Patrick's Cathedral .......... $11.00

First Presbyterian Church ..... $32.00

St. Paul's .............................. $10.14

October 25 ... First death of the Erie Regiment: Pvt. JOHN CARN, a soldier in Captain Knox's company from Tionesta.

Camp Leslie, Hall's Hill, Fairfax County, Va.

October 26, 1861

Friend P ...

We are attached to General BUTTERFIELD's Brigade. My health is good. I feel the effects of severe drill. One poor fellow [ADAM PICKARD] in our Regiment, died last night. The first one, since we left home. I am satisfied that the war cannot be ended without the Emancipation Proclamation. I am in for thorough work while we're at it, but shudder for the results of continuance of the war. Tomorrow we do guard duty ... tiresome work ... but some fun occurs. An Irishman challenged a party the other night with, "Halt ! Who goes there?"

Answer - "Grand rounds"  ... "Och, to the divil wid yez grand rounds; I thought it was the relafe guard." ... O. W. NORTON

November 1861 .... Col. SCHLAUDECKER acknowledged gifts from the Fairview Ladies Soldiers Aid Society:

26 pairs of socks

15 woolen shirts

13 cotton flannel shirts

4 pairs flannel drawers

2 quilts

1 coat

2 pairs of socks knitted by 83 year old Mrs. W. W. EATON

Serving on the committee were Mr. & Mrs. R. ANDERSON and Mrs. F. McCREARY.

November 12 ... AMASA STEWART, b. 1775, died in West Springfield at 86 years of age. He was an 1814 pioneer settler with his wife, LOIS, and son, JAMES BOND STEWART.

November 13 ... GUY C. SCHOFIELD of Conneautville married Miss HELEN DEWEY of PennLine with Rev. F. HITCHCOCK officiating.

SAMUEL REA, Jr. of Springfield married Miss PHEBE M., daughter of WILLIAM VINCENT of Waterford. Rev. T. T. BRADFORD officiated.

November 14 ... C. W. BRIGGS of Conneautville weds Miss CARRIE STANTON in Springfield by Rev. MILLER

November 15 ... GEORGE HALL of Erie Co. married Miss ELISA TURNER of Pierpont. Rev. L. E. BEARDSLY officiated.

November 1861 ... Prof. L. D. WILLIAMS accepts Chaplin and Dr. J. NICHOLSON accepts surgeon of Col. SCHLAUDECKER's Regiment.

 

Camp of the 83rd Regiment, Penn. Volunteers, Hall's Hill, Va.

November 15, 1861

Dear Friend P ...

A suit of fancy uniforms ( Zouave ) was present to General P. with instructions to give them to the best drilled regiment in his division. Some 20,000 troops were there to compete. A committee from General McCLELLAN's staff were to award the prize at the review. They were ununanimous in awarding the uniforms to the 83rd Regiment, Penn. Volunteers. It is no small thing to beat the far famed "Ellsworth Avengers" but we have done it. We now have the post of honor and of danger - that of rifle skirmishers to be thrown out in advance of the army in action.

O. W. NORTON

November 21 ... Erie Canal will be open until Dec. 5th, unless it is closed by ice.

December 1861 ... The Girard Union reports JACOB FICKINGER of Springfield Twsp. has a government contract to make 10,000 black walnut musket and rifle stocks. He has a steam engine for sale.

Camp of the 83rd P. V., Hall's Hill, Va.

December 4, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

6 companies started for the picket lines ... a pace of 4 miles an hour ... each carried about 50 lbs ... we passed Falls Church and followed the Leesburg turnpike. I stopped at a house near a RxR. A respectable colored woman with her family seemed to be the only occupants. She had pies and cakes and set some out for me ... I entered into conversation with her.

She and her 5 children were slaves and her master was in the rebel army. Her husband was hired to the rebels as a teamster and escaped at the battle of Bull Run and is now in the north. She would like to escape. She seemed intelligent and understood well the causes of the war. ... O. W. NORTON

Camp of the 83rd P. V., Hall's Hill, Va.

December 8, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

I got leave to go to the New York 49th. I found friends that I had not seen for a long time, NEHEMIAH SPERRY, SHERMAN WILLIAMS, ROLLIN HART ... Our new uniforms arrived ... 15 wagons with 6 mules to each wagon. It came from France, even to the pins for staking tents. An agent from the French government is here to fit each man with his uniform.

Our tents hold 10 ... we are to have folding chairs ... knapsacks covered with calfskin to be removed and used as a blanket ... small skirmish tents to be carried on the march. Our boys are overjoyed at this good fortune. It is almost time for tattoo and I must close.   ... O. W. NORTON

December 12 ... Sleighing conditions are fine. A day's thaw has rendered the tracks icy, but dangerous for walking. Well shod teams go without hinderance. Calicoes and furs are in great demand.

December 14 ... SARAH A. BALDWIN, wife of ISAAC C. BALDWIN, passed away at 19 years of age. Interment was in the Springfield Cemetery.

Hall's Hill, Va.

December 19, 1861

Dear Sister L ...

We 've been moving into our new tents and fixing ourselves comfortable for winter. Our tents are round, 2 doors that can be closed tight ... tables ...bunks ... racks for guns, and a sheet iron stove with 3 griddles. The stove pipe costs $4.

H. is in the hospital with measles. I am gaining. I weigh 135 lbs. Everything looks as though we will winter here. I did wish I could be up in the land of snows long enough to have one evening's sleigh-ride.   ... O. W. NORTON

December 21 ... Mrs. BETSEY LATHROP SMITH died in Springfield at age 85. She was born in 1776 and married in Connecticut. In May 1801, they landed in Springfield, after a perilous voyage in an open boat from Onandaga Co., N. Y. Her husband, OLIVER, died in 1838. Her son, AMOS then took the homestead until he died in 1851. She retained her mental powers and was very composed as death approached. We trust she made a happy exchange and will bloom forever in the paradise of God. [obituary excerpt]

December 25 ... EDWARD P. TIMBY married Miss CORNELIA C. RING of Conneaut, in Cherry Hill, with GEORGE SHERMAN, Esq. officiating.

1861 Deaths - Month and date unknown.

                        All interments are in the Springfield Cemetery:

BALL, CHARLOTTE BRISTOL - 2nd wife of SAMUEL BALL. They were married March 1, 1857 by Justice of Peace, J. DAVIS.

b. 1786 - BARNEY, PHILEMON ...... Spouse: LUCY

b. 1847 - BILLINGS, EDGAR  D.

b. 1841 - DICKINSON, MERCY S. .. Mother: BETSEY M.

                                                               Father: HIRIAM DICKINSON

b. 1837 - GERE, LAURA B. .............. Mother: LOIS

                                                               Father: F. TRUMAN GERE

b. 1843 - GRAVES, ANDREW J. ...... Mother: MIRANDA

                                                                Father:  JAMES C. GRAVES

b. 1844 - HARRIS, JOHN C.   ............ Mother: REBECCA CRAVEN

                                                                Father: LUKE HARRIS

b. 1855 - McKEE, CHARLES R. ....... Mother: ELIZA J.

                                                                Father: JAMES L. McKEE

b. 1837 - MILLER, SARAH A. ........... Mother: PHEBE F.

                                                                Father: CYRUS B. MILLER

b. 1807 - NELSON, JANE P.

b. 1846 - PALMER, WILLIAM B.

b. 1788 - SCOTT, PATIENCE ........... Spouse: JOHN SCOTT

b. 1848 - SWEET, JOHN H.

b. 1840 - TAYLOR, ESTHER ANN ... Spouse: ELIAS W. TAYLOR

 

Military personnel on active duty at the close of  1861 was reported to be 217,112


This page was last updated on  Wednesday, October 29, 2003 .

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