Pauline Holcombe Room
Sullivan County Historical Society and Museum
Laporte, PA
July 2006
Source: Sullivan Review, July 27, 2006

 

Settlers XLIII: Ancestors of Paulie-Pauline Cook Holcombe

Contributed by Linda Mutzer
February 2006

Editor's Note: You can read Pauline's history of the early times in Sullivan County at Pioneering wtih Sullivan County Pioneers by Pauline Holcombe and Mildred Lundy. The reader may also enjoy V. B. Holcombe and Sons, which appeared in the Benton News in June 2008.

 


Pauline Holcombe in Womens' Army Corps Uniform
1944

 


Pauline Holcombe as a Young Woman
Source: Frank Snyder Collection

 

This story is presented in the spirit of historic preservation that cousin Pauline promoted.Although visits with her were on rare occasions, she impacted my own interests in family history and encouraged me by sharing Holcombe family history in Bradford and Sullivan Counties in Pennsylvania with my late mother, Beatrice Comfort Ludwig. Pauline and her first cousin, my grandmother, Goldie Shadduck * Comfort corresponded often between SC and PA.  My grandmother would tell us all about Pauline's letters and that's why I felt like I knew her personally.  My mother spoke her name, Pauline, with respect, admiration and love.

Linda Ludwig Mutzer 
* Editor's Note: You can see a color photo of the Shadduck Family Reunion 2009 participants, courtesy of Bill Brenchley. The family is still going strong in the modern era.

 


The Reverend Glenn Comfort, Pauline and Bea Comfort Ludwig
At Pauline's Home in Dushore PA
1989

 

Generation No. 1

 

1.       Paulie-Pauline Cook Holcombe, born June 01, 1903 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died

 

 

August 18, 1992 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 2. Vell-Survellon Burr Holcombe and 3. Jennie-Roseanna Jane Koch Cook. Burial: August 21, 1992, St Basils Catholic Cemetery, Cemetery Rd, Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Pauline Holcombe was known as Aunt Paulie to her nieces and nephews and included in this document are some of Pauline's writings.  They will be noted as from "Aunt Paulie's Book" as are the following excerpts.  Mary Eleanor McMahon writes, "For many years Aunt Paulie kept a diary and a few excerps have been reprinted . . .  It is a compilation of events in the long life of a very beautiful woman we all loved, admired and respected.  Au revoir, Aunt Paulie." 

From a poem "An Ode to Aunt Paulie" by Irene Tubach

"We’ll always remember that Aunt Paulie taught us

      to recognize trees, ferns and wildflowers -

      to draw, to sketch and to take pictures -

      to sew and to iron -

      to braid and hook rugs -

      to read, to write, to research and to correspond -

      to cook, to bake and to make real lemonade -

      to take risks and to complete tasks -

      to respect our environment, our heritage and ourselves.

      Thank you, Aunt Paulie"

Pauline remembers, "MY FIRST CAR RIDE  My father was going to Eagles Mere himself to measure windows in the Lakeside Hotel for shades.  It was about 1908 or 1909.  It was a pleasant early summer day and Dad decided to take me along.  I had my best white dress on, and the red ribbon that pictures show that I wore at the time.  We went in a buggy with one horse.  He stopped at a corner at Celestia and talked to a man there while the horse drank at the watering trough.  In Eagles Mere, he stopped first on the left side of the main street at Charles Graff's where we sat on the porch with Mr. And Mrs. Graff.  Dad finished whatever he had stopped for and was about to take me and go, when Mrs. Graff said,  "Maybe Pauline would like to wait on the porch with us."  I was glad to stay.  We rocked and talked and watched the other people come and go from the porches along the street.  After a while Mrs. Graff said, "Charles, maybe Pauline would like to take a spin around the lake."  I couldn't believe my ears because that sounded like a car ride!

      After a while Mr. Graff came up the street with a most beautiful bright light red car - A Brush car.  It looked like a buggy with no top or doors and round tires.  It had only one seat, high up, with a big grey bulb which was a horn.  It had a lot of brass.  Mr. And Mrs. Graff wore big hats and veils.  I sat between them.  We "spun" around the lake on the dry, dusty streets at about 15 miles per hour I suppose, leaving a cloud of dust behind us.  He paused to let me see the beach and the swimmers and then back to the porch we went.  Dad came for me after a while and we came home.  We had all seen a car or two before, but when I told Mama, Alice and Pierson, the children cried and cried because they had not been along.

      Everything is still as clear in my mind as that day.  Years later, young Pier took Ada, Si and me to a great Car Rally in Connestient, NY and I asked to see the oldest on display.  There was a restored Brush in all its beauty."

Pauline graduated from Temple University, Phila PA and she was a high school teacher in Mansfield, Canton and Towanda and was principal of Dushore High School.

"While attending Temple University in Philadelphia, PA the University Weekly issue from 5-8-1925 praised Pauline for her work in student activities." from Seaver's "The Holcombe Genealogy"

She was an active member of the Bradford County Historical Society, 21 Main St, Towanda PA 18848

Phone 717  265-2240  Hrs Thurs. 10-4, Fri 2-8PM, Sat 10-4

"Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, PA" 1770-1825, by Heverly is just one of the publications available through the Bradford Co Historical Society.

She was founder of the Sullivan County Historical Society, PO Box 252, Meylert St, Laporte, PA 18626.  Her 1944-45 Women's Army Corps 29th Division uniform is on display there.

www.thedailyreview.com Towarda, PA Daily Review Glancing Backwards 04/30/2003  75 years ago -- 1928

There has been an epidemic of mumps in the high school at Dushore, and the school directors have ordered the high school closed for an indefinite period. Leon Crandell, principal of the school, is one of the victims of the disease, as is the assistant principal, Miss Holcomb. Many of the pupils are also ill with the mumps

www.thedailyreview.com Towanda PA Glancing Backward, locally By: The Review  10/10/2003  Today is Friday, Oct. 10, the 283rd day of 2003. There are 82 days left in the year. 50 years ago -- 1953

New teachers this year at Canton High School are Mrs. Jean Case, Miss Pauline Holcomb, Edward Sims, Andrew Huzinec, Edward Beardslee, Robert Sorth and Charles Savage

www.thedailyreview.com Towanda, PA Daily Review Glancing Backwards  11/27/2003  50 years ago -- 1953

The early history of Forksville was the subject on the program when the Sullivan County Historical Society met in the Dushore Methodist Church Wednesday. President Pauline Holcombe conducted a short business meeting. Speakers included Mrs. Beecher Ford of Laceyville and Mrs. John E. Bird of Corning.

From "Aunt Paulie's Book"

"Remembering Pauline Holcombe from The Sullivan Review - July 1994 by Mrs. Stefana Shoemaker -

      Pauline Holcombe, founder and staunch supporter of the Sullivan County Historical Society until the time of her death in 1992, would have been proud and pleased with the historical events that were held in the county over the past weekend.

      The parade and historical pageant marking the bicentennial of the first permanent settlers in the dense wilderness in 1794 of what is now Sullivan County would have given her great satisfaction after years of working to preserve the traditions, customs and artifacts of the county in what has now turned out to be a shining example of a fine small museum.

      Miss Holcombe had an abiding interest and great knowledge of local history passed down from her parents and through personal observations and memories.  At 89, she still had a remarkable memory and took great interest in her nieces and nephews, in wildflowers, in sewing, in making jellies and in hosting Easter Egg coloring gatherings for the youngsters of her family, and in holding her famous tea parties.

 


Pauline, Glenn and Bea Comfort Once More
1989

 

      In 1976 she took great pleasure in writing, along with Carol St Clair, the historical pageant which was presented on Sunday evening and think how pleased she would have been to see the great audience and the almost 300 people who gave of their time to re-create the pageant this year.

      And think how pleased she would have been with the parade and celebration in Laporte and with the large number of people who took the time to visit her museum and to examine the wonderful memories of Sullivan County it contains.

      Pauline Holcombe made us aware of the importance of our history and of preserving it for future generations."

 


Vell B. Holcombe and Jenny Cook
Wedding Picture 1900
Dushore, PA

 

Generation No. 2

 

      2.  Vell-Survellon Burr Holcombe, born March 16, 1871 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 1952 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 4. Pierson Alonzo Holcomb Holcombe, Sergeant and 5. Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott.  He married 3. Jennie-Roseanna Jane Koch Cook November 29, 1900 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

      3.  Jennie-Roseanna Jane Koch Cook, born August 22, 1876 in Cherry Mills, Cherry Township, Pennsylvania; died January 19, 1969 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 6. Joseph C Koch Cook and 7. Hanna-Hannah Sick. Burial: St Basils Catholic Cemetery, Cemetery Rd, Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Residence: Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Political Party: Republican, Vell served 5 terms PA State Representative - he was in favor of Prohibition - campaign "Favors progressive legislature and law enforcement.  Helping war veterans.  Favors good roads for everybody.  Preserving the forests and game protection. From "Aunt Paulie's Book"  "At 4 years of age Vell started to go to school in the little red school house near his home where his teacher was Miss Emma Bush, a great-friend of the family.  He continued there till 10 years old when his family moved to Sullivan Co., PA for 3 years before moving back to LeRoy.  He continued school until 18 years of age. He moved to Dushore, PA April 17, 1893 and was the bookkeeper with Samuel Cole until Dec 22, 1898 when he and H.E. Obert purchased the furniture store and undertaker business.   In 1899 Holcombe and Obert became Holcombe and Lauer.  Later the business became Holcombe's Furniture, Main Street, Dushore, PA." *
* Editor's Note: The 2014 edition of the Sullivan County Historical Society Newsletter throws some more light on the history of the ongoing undertaking business in Dushore after Vell Burr Holcombe and Henry Obert became partners in 1898. Vell and Henry had purchased the furniture and undertaking business of Emil Tubach. Obert financed the venture and Vell went to embalming school to learn the trade. After a year, Obert dropped out and Vell took Charles Lauer of Laporte on as a replacement partner. In 1907, Lauer sold out to Vell, who then ran the business as his own until 1947. At that time, his sons took over-- Richard Holcombe took the furniture business while Vell Carl took over the funeral operations. Finally, in 1959, Vell Carl sold out to Russell P. McHenry who relocated to Dushore with his family and opened McHenry Funeral Home. You can read this obituary for Russell P. McHenry for more information.

"Vell and Jennie's yellow Victorian home had a beautiful stained glass window on the landing of the wood turned staircase.  The family certainly got their exercise ascending and descending the long stairway from the street to their home up on a hill overlooking Railroad St" - Bea Ludwig  THIS HOUSE from "Aunt Paulie's Book" tells more - "This house was built by Dr. William Waddell , finished in 1897.  Dr. Waddell had gone to Philadelphia and taken lectures at what I think was U. of P. Medical school and planned to be an up-to-date doctor.  I think he was 46 years old at the time he married Laura Pomeroy and moved into the house.  The living room with the fireplace was the waiting room if the patients could manage the steps.  If real sick persons wanted him he could go down the back steps where he kept horses and a man to care for things, jump in his buggy and go call on them.  There was a bathroom down stairs right off his office - with a copper hot water boiler and up to date toilet fixtures."

From "Aunt Paulie's Book", comments by his daughter, Pauline - "Dad always tipped his hat when he passed a woman.  He was always thin and Mama tried to give him extra nourishment with an eggnog in a glass for him to drink during the night.  (a beaten egg, sugar, a soupful of whiskey and some cinnamon)  When Dad was a young man, it was good to be a fine or fancy penman.  When Dad was dead, a distant cousin of Mom's, a Mr. Sick from Lovelton came to the funeral home and in a loud voice he said,  "He was a damm fine penman Jennie,  he was a damm fine penman."  He was, and he wrote with arm movement, a good swinging script."

Comments about Holcombe's Furniture Store on Main St in Dushore PA-

"He kept good furniture and seemed to be well-liked by most people in the whole area.  The store was big.  The second building where Taffee's Jewelry is now contained rugs, curtains and summer furniture, etc.  It had large racks in it on which 9x12 rugs could be displayed, etc.  If a person was over there measuring carpet, etc he could not watch the rest of the place very well.  A salesman from Towanda was used to walking in and if no one was in the store or office, going on back through to the porch where men might be unpacking goods, etc.  He used to tell about doing that, and finding one of the young boys with a can of red enamel (left open)  and a brush about to try it on a newly arrived dining room suite (sout as we said it)  and he saved the new piece.

Dad took orders to make porch awnings and even the canvas cover of one of the Eagles Mere Lake boats.  It was very hard to plan and cut the heavy canvas (usually plain white or sometimes green and white striped) and cut the scalloped edge and bind it with woven woolen braid.  We could see how to do it, but the machines seemed to plot against us and we did not have the skill years of experience had given Mom.

Once I asked Dad why we had to inventory and reorder sewing machine needles that sold for only a few cents.  He said, when people need things like that it brings them into our store.  Maybe they see something, and will come back later after thinking about it and buy it - like a dining room table for instance.

The boys took over the family business:  installing refrigerators, etc., redesigning kitchens, installing flooring, carpets, modern linoleum."

Pauline said, "Dad always sponsored what he thought was good for the people of the area - The Chautauqua, Boy Scouts, paving, electric lights.  He wouldn't put ashes in the creek."

Vell was a prominent manufacturer and dealer in furniture, and undertaker at Dushore, PA.  Since 1906 he has held many borough offices and has served six terms in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

www.thedailyreview.com  Towanda PA Daily Review Glancing Backward   03/23/2003 75 years ago -- 1928

The new board of directors of the Dushore Chamber of Commerce is S.W. Swingler, J.W. Learn, V.B. Holcomb, A.F. Snyder, Charles Fitzpatrick, Dr. Lynch, T.J. Litzelman, Charles Bealver and V.T. Martin

Jennie didn't like the name Roseanna, thus she is referred to, even on her tombstone as R Jennie

"R Jennie Cook Holcombe was a good homemaker and cook.  She made all the family clothes including coats and suits until the children were practically grown.  She had "good taste".  She worked hard for the Red Cross during World War I and II.  She was jolly and strong, living to be 92 years of age." per "Aunt Paulie's Book"

Vell-Survellon Holcombe and Jennie-Roseanna Cook's Marriage:  Minister: Rev X A Kaier

 

 



Vell & Jennie Holcombe’s Dushore PA home;
it later became Pauline’s home

 

      Children of Vell-Survellon Holcombe and Jennie-Roseanna Cook are:

       1             i.     Paulie-Pauline Cook Holcombe, born June 01, 1903 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died     August 18, 1992 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.     Alice Elizabeth Holcombe, born April 13, 1905 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died    February 22, 1955; married Jerry-Jeremiah Joseph McCarthy, Sr July 21, 1928 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; born October 31, 1893 in Dimmock, Susquehanna Co, Pennsylvania; died December 17, 1943 in Rushboro, Auburn Twp, Susquehanna Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: February 1955, St Basils Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania

www.thedailyreview.com Towanda PA Daily Review Glancing Backward By The Review  02/25/2004  50 years ago -- 1954 Band 2 of St. Basil's Altar and Rosary Society held a card party in the auditorium last Thursday with Mrs. Kenneth McCarty and Mrs. Joseph Murphy in charge. Winning prizes were: bridge, Mrs. Bernard Marshall; 500, Mrs. Alice McCarthy; pinochle, Mrs. A.N. Gainor; and pitch, Ralph Hunt

From the clippings of Celia Nichols Donahue Benscoter we find this obituary, no dates available nor the name of the paper. I suspect it to be the Montrose Independent Newspaper

Jeremiah Joseph McCarthy dies in Auburn Township. He was a stock buyer and on the local draft board. He died near Rushboro, Susquehanna County, PA. He had an incurable illness, which was being treated, at the Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, PA. His wife the former Alice Holcombe survives, as does a son Joseph Jerry, and two daughters Mary Eleanor and Pauline Ann. The deceased had a brother Charles and four sisters, Mrs. James Robinson, Mrs. Ambrose Connolly, Mrs. William Dunn and Mrs. Earl Carr. The burial was in Saint Basil's Cemetery.

        iii.     Si-Pierson Joseph Holcombe, Sr, born February 02, 1907 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania;                                 died August 21, 2002 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co, Pennsylvania; married Ada Lucille Comfort                         July 04, 1931 in Moundsville, Marshall Co, West Virginia; Ada born May 6, 1910 in Troy, Bradford Co,                      PA; died November 20, 2004 in Cherry Hill, Camden Co, New Jersey  Burial in Benton Cemetery,                              Benton, PA              

    Occupation: undertaker, owned and operated the P J Holcombe Funeral Home and The Holcombe

                              Furniture Store in Benton, PA, later he had an accounting business on Main St in Benton, PA 

                              Residences: Southampton Twp, NJ/Bloomsburg, PA/Benton, PA  Ada was a School Teacher

                              "When Pierson was little, we called him "Pierson," later Si after he made a hit in a school play where he was a "rube" called Si Perkins.

"Pierson was raised on canned milk; knocked down by a Brogan - broken front tooth. Loved a horse Aunt Lizzie gave him. He was round and roly-poly at about 2 years. He loved to see horses "there goes another one." Music practice and downtown fire crackers.

"Pierson always played in the local bands and usually was a member of a dance band he kept organized. He even played in one at college. Until after his operation for appendicitis he played trumpet. That summer the Michiganders were here and he and Alice Morris 'The Never Swek Club' had an excuse to sit around. He played banjo then.

"One night Pier took the band out to play somewhere. The members sat on quilt-like pieces used to protect finish on furniture. Some band members must have been smoking. It was a summer night when Pierson came home and I kept smelling smoke, and finally could see light down thru the door of the barn where Pier parked the truck he had used. I shouted, 'There's a fire in the garage.' Everyone hopped to his job. The boys had the truck backed out in no time, and the smoldering packing material shoveled into the creek. I phoned the fire company but everything was safe before they got here. Dad got up, got dressed, including necktie. Then we all went in the house and back to bed. Dad had often told each one what to do in case of fire. The plan worked."  per "Aunt Paulie's Book" 

Pierson joined his father in the furniture and undertaking business in Dushore.

The Sullivan Review August 29, 2002

Pierson J. “Si” Holcombe, 95, formerly of Benton and Bloomsburg, and currently of Brighton Gardens, Cherry Hill, NJ died August 21, 2002 at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia where he had been a patient since August 17. He had been in failing health for the past several years.

Born February 2, 1907 in Dushore, Sullivan County, he was a son of Vell B. Holcombe and R. Jennie (Cook) Holcombe. He and his wife, the former Ada Lucille Comfort of Troy, celebrated their 71st wedding anniversary this past July 4th.

Mr. Holcombe was a longtime Benton businessman. He owned and operated the P.J. Holcombe Funeral Home in Benton and also The Holcombe Furniture Store. He and his wife moved to Benton in 1947 when they took over the former Chapin Funeral Home, which they operated until 1965.

He later opened an accounting business on Main Street in Benton until his final retirement.

Mr. Holcombe served in WWII as a Technician Fifth Grade, Company C in the 66th infantry Training Battalion. He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal and was discharged on September 4, 1945.

While living in Benton, Mr. Holcombe was an active member of the Benton United Methodist Church. After moving to Bloomsburg in 1981 he and his wife joined St. Matthew Lutheran Church. In 1997 they moved to Cherry Hill.

Mr. Holcombe was a 1925 graduate of Dushore High School and a 1930 graduate of Penn State University where he earned his B.S. in Commerce and Finance. He received his mortuary school training at the Renard School of Embalming in Manhattan, NY, graduating in 1936.  Long active in community and civic affairs, Mr. Holcombe was a 50-year member of Washington Lodge, No. 265, F. & A.M. of Bloomsburg. He was also a member of the Bloomsburg American Legion; the Bloomsburg Elks Lodge; a former member of the Chimney Stack Rod and Gun Club in Red Rick; the “Stuffer’s Club” of Benton and the former Kiwanis Club of Benton.

Mr. Holcombe served on the board of directors for the Benton Cemetery Association for many years. He was involved with several professional organizations including the National Funeral Directors Association, the Pennsylvania Funeral Directors Association and he was a past president of the Central Pennsylvania Funeral Directors Association.

An avid Penn State fan, he was also a life member of the Penn State Alumni Association.  His hobbies included making furniture and woodworking. He was also a Civil War History buff.

Surviving in addition to his wife, Ada, are three children; Pierson J. Holcombe, JR. of Advance, NC; Mrs. Michael (Susan L.) Rhoads, of Medford, NJ; Mrs. Gary (Marianne) _________ [Editor's Note: Name withheld at request of living subject], of Prescott, AZ.

Also surviving are seven grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren and a brother, Richard L. Holcombe of Dushore.

He was preceded in death by two sisters, Pauline Holcombe and Alice McCarthy and by a brother, Vell H. Holcombe and by an infant grandson.

Funeral services were held Saturday, August 24th, 2002 at St. Matthew Lutheran Church, Bloomsburg, with the Rev. Ralph D. Sigler, presiding. Burial was in the Benton Cemetery with Military Rites accorded by the Benton V.F.W. and Benton Masonic Lodge conducted services at the graveside as well.

In lieu of flowers contributions may be made in his memory to the Sullivan County Historical Society, Laporte, PA 18626.

Arrangements were under the direction of the McMichael Funeral home, Benton

From Pat Mott Gobea, 2000  "Pierson and Ada Comfort Holcombe observe 65th

Pierson and Ada Holcombe

Pierson J. and Ada L. Holcombe of Bloomsburg, PA! Were honored at a family dinner at the Willow Run Inn and Golf Course in celebration of their 65th wedding anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Holcombe were married at the Christian Church, Wellsburg, and W V on July 4, 1931.

Mr. Holcombe is the son of the late Veil B. and Jennie Holcombe of Dushore, PA. Mr. Holcombe has two brothers, Veil Holcombe of Laporte, PA and Richard Holcombe of Dushore.

Mrs. Holcombe is the daughter of the late Burton and Alta Comfort of Troy, PA. Mrs. Holcombe has one brother, Laverne Comfort of Savona, NY.

The Holcombes are the parents of Pierson J. Holcombe II of Sterling, VA, Susan H. Rhodes of Medford, NJ and Marianne ______[Editor's Note: Name withheld at request of livinng subject. ] of Phoenix, AZ. There are seven grandchildren and four great grand children.

Mr. and Mrs. Holcombe are members of St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Bloomsburg. For many years they resided in Benton, PA and were owners of the Holcombe Funeral Home."

iv. Vell Carl Holcombe, born July 10, 1913 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died November 22,

       1999 in LaPorte, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Josephine-Mary Josephine Eck April 02,

       1934; born January 04, 1915; died October 13, 1989 in Laporte, Sullivan Co, PA. His Burial 

       November 24, 1999, Mountain Ash Cemetery, Laporte, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania  Her Burial:

       October 1989, St Basils Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania  Hobbies: carpentry,

       hunting-Vell along with his brother Dick conceived the idea of The Bowhunters Festival  Occupation:

       furniture dealer in Dushore, PA Residence: LaPorte, PA

                      v.   Dick-Richard Leroy Holcombe (1915-2014), born in Pennsylvania; married Anne Viola Driscoll June 15, 1937 in Towanda, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

Daily Review
Towanda, PA
August 13, 2014

Richard L. Holcombe, age 98, a highly respected businessman of Dushore, Pa., passed away on Monday, Aug. 11, 2014.
Dick was born in Dushore on Oct. 2, 1915, a son of the late Vell Burr and Roseanna Jane (Jennie) Cook Holcombe. He graduated from the Dushore High School a member of the Class of 1932. He married the former Ann Viola Driscoll of Towanda on June 15, 1937. She predeceased him on June 3, 2010, after 72 years of marriage. He served as a Corporal in the US Army Air Corps during WWII. Dick was a member of St. Basil's Church, Dushore, Pa. and a member of Loyalsock Post No. 996 American Legion, Dushore, Pa. and a past Post Commander for Post No. 996. Dick is well known for his historical reflection articles in "The Sullivan Review" with a byline of "Dick Holcombe Remembers." He has served on both local and council leadership positions for the Boy Scouts of America. Dick was a member of the Knights of Columbus of St. Basil's Parish. He served as Sullivan County Commissioner for a four-year term starting in 1964. He was one of the founding members and past fire chief for the Dushore Fire Company.
Mr. Holcombe grew up in the undertaking and furniture business and in 1934, he joined V. B. Holcombe and Sons with his two brothers and father and they ran a successful undertaking and furniture business in Dushore. Mr. Holcombe also worked for Harrington Dairy and was a successful business owner, owning his own furniture store and eventually a laundromat and dry cleaning facility.
He was responsible for the engineering and placement of the sewer lines for the Dushore Borough Sewer Authority and was an active member of Dushore Industries, which was the Economic Development Authority for Borough of Dushore.
He is most well known for being one of the founders of the PA Bowhunters Festival and the inventor of the famous running deer target. He was inducted into the Archery Hall of Fame and Museum in Springfield, Mo. in September 2006. He is one of the few non-archers in the Archery Hall of Fame.
Mr. Holcombe was known as an inventor and owns several patents for his inventions, entrepreneur, writer, but he is best known for being a great father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Surviving are his daughter and son-in-law, Marjorie A. and Thomas Gorsky of Penn Yan, N.Y.; son and daughter-in-law, Richard J. and Paula B. Holcombe of Laporte, Pa.; seven grandchildren, John Gorsky (Tor), Michael Gorsky (Kathy Dudek), and Thomas Gorsky (Stephanie), Eileen (Radencic) Sipe, Benjamin Radencic, Sara Holcombe Koutsioroumbas (Athan), and Philip S. Holcombe (Laura); and 11 great-grandchildren and numerous niece and nephews. He was predeceased by a daughter, Mary Kathryn (Mamie) Radencic Confar on July 28, 2006; and a son-in-law, George A. Radencic Jr. on June 20, 1996; and by two brothers, Vell Carl Holcombe and Pierson Joseph Holcombe; and two sisters, Alice Elizabeth (Holcombe) McCarthy and Pauline Cook Holcombe. A transfer service will be held at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 at the P. Dean Homer Funeral Home, 206 Water St., Dushore, Pa. and followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 1 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, Dushore, Pa. with his Pastor, Rev. Joseph R. Hornick, presiding. Interment will be in the adjoining parish cemetery.
Friends may call from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday morning, Aug. 16 at the funeral home.
The family will provide the flowers. Memorials may be directed to Dushore Fire Company, PO Box 1, Dushore, PA 18614.
To send condolences or sign the e-guestbook, please go to www.homerfuneralhome.com.

http://www.bentonnews.net/Archive/june03.htm  Tuesday, June 24, 2003.

We remember reading an article by Dick Holcombe, former Benton resident, Si Holcombe's brother, about an 1871 map, which showed 13 post offices in Sullivan County. Lopez, Mildred and Estella didn't even exist. Post offices dotted the now forgotten towns of Fox Center, Lincoln Falls, Millview, Davidson, Muncy Bottom and Plunketts Creek. The map showed 50 sawmills in Sullivan County.

 


Dick Holcome Remembers
Sullivan County Historical Society and Museum
Laporte, PA
Spring 2007
Dick decided to publish a book about the history of fire fighting in Sullivan County.
The book was based on a series of articles he previously wrote for the Sullivan Review.
Source: Linda Mutzer

 

Anne Viola Driscoll (1918-2010): Descends from the Bird family, one of the three founding families of Sullivan Co.

P. Dean Homer Funeral Home
Dushore, PA
June 3, 2010

Ann Viola Holcombe, age 91, of Dushore, PA passed away on Thursday, June 3, 2010 at the Highlands Care Center in Laporte, PA.
Ann was born in Towanda, PA on July 16, 1918 the youngest and last surviving of 10 children born to James & Clara Bird Driscoll. She graduated from St. Agnes High School a member of the class of 1935. She married Richard L. Holcombe of Dushore, PA on June 15, 1937. They would have celebrated their 73nd Wedding Anniversary next week. Ann was a homemaker and a loving spouse, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She was very active in her community with her church and civic associations. She was the first Den Mother of the Cub Scouts, Den1 and very instrumental in organizing bloodmobiles for many years. Ann was a very active member of St. Basil's Church, Dushore, PA where was a lifelong member of the Altar and Rosary Society and a very long and active member of the church choir. She also taught CCD for over 20 years preparing the youth for the Sacraments of First Communion and Confirmation. She was also a member of Loyalsock American Legion Post 996 Ladies Auxiliary and a member of the Sullivan County Republican Women and the Laporte Women's Club.
Surviving: Spouse: Richard L. Holcombe Dushore, PA
Daughter and son-in-law: Marjorie A. and Thomas Gorsky Penn Yan, NY
Son and daughter-in-law: Richard J. & Paula B. Holcombe Laporte, PA
Seven grandchildren, John, Michael & Thomas Gorsky; Eileen & Benjamin Radencic and Sara & Philip Holcombe; and nine great grandchildren and numerous niece and nephews. She was predeceased by a daughter Mary Kathryn (Mamie) Radencic Confar on July 28, 2006 and a son-in-law; George A. Radencic Jr. on June 20, 1996.
A Transfer Service will be held on Monday, June 7, 2010 at 11:30 A.M. from the P. Dean Homer Funeral Home, 206 Water St., Dushore, PA and followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 12:00 Noon at St. Basil’s Church, Dushore, PA with her pastor, Rev. Joseph R. Hornick, presiding. Interment will be in the adjoining parish cemetery.
Friends may call on Monday morning June 7th at the funeral home from 9:00 to 11:30 A.M.
The family will provide the flowers. Memorials may be directed to: St. Basil's Restoration Fund, PO Box 306, Dushore, PA 18614 or Troop 48, Boy's Scouts of American, PO Box 1, Dushore, PA 18614.
To send condolences or sign the e-guestbook, please go to homerfuneralhome.com.

1937 "ANNE DRISCOLL AND R L HOLCOMBE WED

TOWANDA, June 15-Anne V Driscoll, daughter of Mrs. Clara Driscoll of Second street and Richard L Holcombe, son of Mr. and Mrs. V B Holcombe of Dushore, where married this morning at 9 o'clock in SS Peter and Paul church by Rev J J McGuckin.

  The bride was attired in a white satin gown.  She carried a bouquet of white gardenias.  The bridesmaids were Betty Fitzgerald, Marjorie Ennis, Mary L Cain, and Marjorie Shores.  The matron of honor was Helen Calkins.  The best man was Vell Holcombe of Dushore, a brother of the groom.

  Previous to the nuptial mass James Sullivan sang "Mother at Your Feet is Kneeling" and "Oh What Could My Jesus Do More"  Florence Maloney was organist, playing the wedding march.  The ushers were Charles and Robert Driscoll of Towanda, Pearson Holcombe and Ralph Garey of Dushore.

  Following the ceremony the bridal party and relatives enjoyed a wedding breakfast at Ketcham's.  The newlyweds left today on a motor trip to Chicago and the Great Lakes region after which they will be at home in Dushore."

 

Generation No. 3

 

      4.  Pierson Alonzo Holcomb Holcombe, Sergeant, born March 09, 1842 in Corning, Steuben Co, New York2; died December 29, 1908 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 8. Alonzo B Holcomb Holcombe and 9. Lemira A Morse.  He married 5. Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott August 24, 1864 in Alba, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.

5.      Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott, born February 15, 1848 in Hamden, Delaware Co, New York; died

April 26, 1909 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 10. Matthew-Mathew Mott and 11. Mary Ann Knickerbocker.  A bull-wild boar killed his father, Alonzo, when Pierson was an infant.  Although his father had started out quite well off with a mill and farm, the high post war inflation rates (10% was common) meant his mother could not keep much money for him.  He settled on the farm where his father was killed. Pierson enlisted in the Union troops when Gen. Robert E. Lee threatened to invade the North in the summer of 1863.  He fought at the Battle of Gettysburg (See monument of 115th NY Engineers at Gettysburg).  He served in Co. J 15th NY E Core from 1863-65. His rifle from the Battle of Gettysburg remains in the family.  Served as Sergeant in the Civil War, he was wounded at Gettysburg.  He was the Justice of the Peace in Leroy for over 20 years in succession and handled the pension claims for veterans of the area. He officiated the marriage of Matt and Lizzie Holcomb.  On one occasion a man paid the 25C fee due the Justice of the Peace by bringing in a dozen heads of winter cabbage. (In 1880 they moved to Shunk, PA and a few years later returned to a house on Route 414 in LeRoy. Per Linda Mutzer and Matt Carl)  He was a farmer in Shunk, PA for a while, then he became a house painter as well as the Justice of the Peace in Leroy.  Burial: January 01, 1909, Mott Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Cause of Death: lead poisoning due to his occupation as a painter

From "Aunt Paulie's Book" referencing her Grandmother Sophia's 1908 Diary -

     "Dad (Vell) had been over in Leroy with Dr ME Herrmann from Dushore to examine grandfather (Pierson Alonzo).  Other doctors mentioned were from Canton.  Grandmother says in her diary that P.A.'s trouble was lead poisoning.  He had been a house painter and made his own paint as they did then, using lead and oil.

     Since Grandfather had been in the Civil War, Dr Randall, of Dushore, representing the Veterans' Administration pension provisions, plus Dr M.E. Herrmann of Dushore and two Canton doctors examined him.

     Grandfather used the wheel chair Dad got him as late as September to be wheeled down for the baseball game in Leroy.

     He apparently got worse as fall progressed and died and was buried in the Mott Cemetery December 1908."

Mott/McCraney Cemetery is located on the Southside of LeRoy, PA, on Rt414 go to center of LeRoy, cross bridge to 1st road past farmhouse on left - cemetery sits back off the road down a drive through the field to the fenced in cemetery.  There is also another small cemetery next the farmhouse where other Holcombs are buried referred to as the Holcombe West Cemetery.

7/10/2001  Yes, there is a monument at Gettysburg with our Holcombe listed on it. It is the New York Engineers monument, located to the southeast of the large Pennsylvania monument along an exit road that heads to the east.  It is located diagonally opposite a house that was there at the time of the battle also.  It is a relatively small monument, approximately 10x10, and maybe 12 feet high.  He went to Elmira to enlist because there was a train that went there from wherever they lived and he would have had to walk to the enlistment site in Pennsylvania and it was several days' journey.  Pierson J. Holcombe (1907), his grandson, and my Pier's father, told us this story several years ago. Beth Holcombe

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Queries 6/6/2001 What does the "GAR" means on the flag holders?  Grand Army of the Republic? If so, what does that mean? The Northern [Yankees} troops formed (similar to the American Legion VFW etc) "posts" and had meetings, the southerners did the same, in the early 1900's they met as a homogenous group, at different places, the most notable was Gettysburg where the re-enactment of Picketts charge to Cemetery ridge was started, until the GAR boys could not take the memory of the carnage and rushed down to hug and cry together. In the original battle the field was 6'8'corn and after - - -with chain and grape shot it was less than and inch high - - - - highly emotional event.  Roland Elliott  The GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) was a social service organization like the American Legion established by and for Union Veterans of the Civil War. You can check out its history at http://pages.prodigy.com/CGBD86A/garhp.htm  Ray Justus

From National Park Service Civil War Soldiers & Sailors 2002

Pierson A. Holcomb (First_Last)  Regiment Name 15 N.Y. Engineers (New)  Side Union   Company  I 

Soldier's Rank_In  Pvt.  Soldier's Rank_Out  Artif.  Alternate Name  Pierson/Holcomb 

Notes  Film Number M551 roll 66 UNION NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS 15th Regiment, New York Engineers (New) Organized at Washington, D. C., October 25, 1861, from 15th Regiment New York Infantry. Attached to Engineer Brigade, Army of the Potomac.  SERVICE.-Duty at Washington and Alexandria till March, 1862. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula March. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Advance up the Peninsula and constructing bridges on the Chickahominy River May. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Seven Pines June 27. White Oak Swamp and Charles City Cross Roads June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison Landing till August 16. Moved to Washington, D. C., August 16-22. Maryland Campaign September-October. Rappahannock Campaign November, 1862, to June, 1863. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Deep Run Ravine June 5-13. Mustered out June 25, 1863. Three years men consolidated to a Battalion of three Companies, "A," "B" and "C." Company "D" assigned December 9, 1863; Company "E" assigned March, 1864, and other seven Companies November, 1864. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June-July, 1863. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Rapidan Campaign May-June, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania Court House May 5-21; North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Crossing of James River June 15. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Deep Bottom July 27-28, 1864. Hatcher's Run February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Fall of Petersburg and Richmond April 2-3. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to reinforce General Sherman April 23-29. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 2-15. Grand Review May 23. (Cos. "A," "B" and "H" with Terry's Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Capture of Wilmington, N. C., February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty in Dept. of North Carolina till June.) Mustered out Companies "E," "F," "G," "H," "I," "K," "L" and "M" at Washington, D. C., June 13, 1865; Companies "C" June 14, 1865, and Companies "A," "B" and "D" July 2, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 119 Enlisted men by disease. Total 129.

Predecessor unit:  NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS 15th REGIMENT INFANTRY.  Organized at New York City and mustered in for two years service June 17, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 29. Duty as Infantry in the Defences of that city till October, 1861. Attached to McCune's Brigade July 30 to August 4, 1861. Franklin's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to September 26, and to Newton's Brigade to November, 1861. Designation of Regiment changed to 15th New York Engineers October 25, 1861. (See 15th Engineers.)

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS 50th REGIMENT INFANTRY. Organized at Elmira, N. Y., September 18, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 20, 1861. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Porter's Division, Army of the Potomac, September 22-30. Duty at Hall's Hill, Va., and near Navy Yard, Washington, till October. Detailed as sappers, miners and pontooners, and designated 50th New York Engineers October 22, 1861. (See 50th Regiment N. Y. Engineers.)

1850, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

1880 Fox Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Census

Pierson HOLCOMB Self M Male W 38 PA Farmer PA PA

Sophia E. HOLCOMB Wife M Female W 32 NY Keeping House NY NY

Myra A. HOLCOMB Dau S Female W 13 PA At Home PA NY

John M. HOLCOMB Son S Male W 11 PA At Home PA NY

Sevellin V. HOLCOMB Son S Male W 9 PA At Home PA NY

Phebe C. HOLCOMB Dau S Female W 4 PA At Home PA NY

http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/  Pierson A. Holcombe

  Author: Tina Pastusic  Date: 9 Nov 2003 10:11 PM GMT 

  Surnames: Holcombe, Shadduck, Liley

  Classification: Obituary

The Sullivan Review January 7, 1909

Pierson A. Holcombe, one of Leroy’s best known and most respected citizens, died on Tuesday morning, Dec. 29, after a long illness with paralysis.

He was a veteran of the Civil War and was about 66 years of age.

Besides his wife, he leaves the following sons and daughters: Mrs. J.B. Shadduck of Alba, Vell B. Holcombe of Dushore, Matthew K. Holcombe of Alba, Mrs. Carl Liley and Frank J. Holcombe of Laquin, and Sara and LaMar Holcombe at home.

The funeral was held on Tuesday at 10 o’clock-Sayre times Record.

Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott: In 1799 her family came from Glasgow, Scotland

Her youngest son Lamarr remembered going with his Grandmother Holcomb to West Franklin and Barclay, PA as she took her hats to customers.  Sometimes they'd be gone for several days from LeRoy, PA.

 


Pierson and Sophia (Mott) Holcombe
of Leroy, PA
Grandparents of Pauline Holcombe

 

Matt Carl found these articles at the Bradford County Historical Society in Towanda, PA:

 

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
April 26, 1888

Mrs. P.A. Holcomb has opened a millinery store at her house. Having just received a fine stock of millinery goods she will probably be well patronized.

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
April 26, 1888
(line ad)

MILLINERY STORE AT LEROY

Having just received a full and complete stock of Millinery goods, I am prepared to furnish the ladies of this vicinity with Spring and Summer Goods in all the latest styles. Your patronage is solicited. LeRoy, Pa. MRS. P.A. HOLCOMB

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
May 17, 1888

Mrs. P.A. Holcomb is away for more millinery goods. Miss Emma Haxton has charge of the shop and will trim your hats and bonnets on short notice.

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
September 13, 1888

Mrs. P.A. Holcomb has just received a large stock of Fall and Winter Millinery goods. It will pay you to examine her stock.

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
October 25, 1888

Mrs. P.A. Holcomb has just received a large stock of Millinery goods from Hill Bros., N.Y. She will give you a bargain.

Bradford Republican
Towanda, PA
May 7, 1895

LeRoy Correspondence

"While passing Mrs. Holcomb's recently we called and examined the
handsome new goods in her millinery store. She is having a large trade
this season."

 

Notes from Pauline Holcombe  "GRANDMOTHER SOPHIA

     Grandmother Sophia Mott Holcombe was an herbalist who according to relatives (Uncle Matt Holcombe and his daughter, Elizabeth) ofter prescribed cures for some ailments.  My cousin, Elizabeth got pneumonia.  she was so bad her hair all came out. Grandmother nursed her to health, but died of pneumonia herself. (no antibiotics then)

     Grandmother Holcombe was a naturally artistic person.  She had a successful millinary business for many years in Leroy, Pa.  She would go to New York City once a year, stay with a Knickerbocker relative for a week and buy supplies:  hat braids, hat forms, silks, velvets, ribbons, flowers, etc.  One bill someone has, shows she paid nearly a hundred dollars, which at that time would buy a lot of ribbons, etc.  Spring and fall she would arrange for herself or one of her girls to take the horse and buggy and go to Monroeton, stay for a week with friends and sell, or retrim peoples' own hats.

     She managed to have her girls get piano lessons so they could teach at home when they were married women later.  (I'm not sure about the oldest, Aunt Myra).  Grandma Holcombe died when I was only eight so I knew her very little."

"GRANDMOTHER SOPHIA'S DIARY

     Reading through Grandmother Sophia's 1908 diary again this week recalls just how the Holcombe home must have been in the years after the Civil War when the family was growing up.  They did live on a Shunk (PA) farm a while, but returned to Leroy in the early 1880's.  The Holcombes entered that valley in the 1800's from Connecticut.

     The LeRoy home of PA (Pierson Alonzo) & Sophia Mott Holcombe was on 414 W. toward Canton - a typical 1 1/2 story New England Connecticut house built on a bank- facing the road.  A giant elm tree stood in front when we visited there in 1908.  The porch was enclosed and was used for Sophia's millinery goods and shop.  Behind it were living rooms and downstairs was the dining room and kitchen.  Upstairs there were bedrooms with low ceilings and small windows.  The house had vines and a garden in 1908.  There was a barn for "Kit," the horse, and chicken coops.

  In Sept, 1908 Vell (Dad) went home to Leroy to visit and see what he could do as his father was unable to work any more.  Mama, Alice, Pierson and I went along (not clear how we got there).  Grandmother Sophia says in her diary that Vell, fixed the drain, got a load of wood ready with Lamar's help, repaired the roof; that Vell's family went for a walk, and left by "hack" after four days."

 Aunt Paulie continues about Sophia's 1908 diary -

     "Grandmother mentioned being sick, often during the year so it may be no wonder than when Uncle Matt's oldest girl got pneumonia Grandmother saved Elizabeth, but she (Grandmother) died.  Anyway with no antibotics, only her herbs and doctor's medicines she did not survive the pneumonia.

    Also she complained about toothache many times in her diary in 1908.  Her system was probably run down from the infected teeth also."

http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/  Sophia Holcombe

  Author: Tina Pastusic Date: 9 Nov 2003 10:15 PM GMT 

  Surnames: Holcombe

  Classification: Obituary

  In Reply to: Pierson A. Holcombe  by:  Tina Pastusic

The Sullivan Review May 6, 1909

Mrs. Sophia E. Holcombe, of Leroy, Bradford County, died at the old Homestead on Monday, April 26, of pneumonia and heart trouble combined.

She was the mother of our local furniture dealer, V.B. Holcombe. Since the death of her husband on Dec. 31, 1908, Mrs. Holcombe has been ailing. She contracted a cold which developed into pneumonia and that combined with heart trouble caused death. She was aged 59 years.

Deceased is survived by four sons and three daughters, Frank of Laquin, Vell B. of Dushore, Matthew and LaMar at home, Elizabeth of Laquin, Mira of Alba and Sarah at home. The funeral services were held from her late home last Thursday.

Marriage Notes for Pierson Holcombe and Sophi-Sophia Mott:

From the Sullivan Review, Dec 6, 1900

"V.B. Holcombe of the firm of Holcombe and Lauer and Miss Jennie Cook, daughter of Mrs. Joseph Cook of this place were married Thursday morning.  The Rev. X.A. Kaier officiated.  The marriage was by no means a surprise to their many friends.  In fact it had been expected for a year and the congratulations are many and hearty.

     The groom is a young man who is highly respected throughout a wide circle of acquaintances and with excellent business prospects.  The bride is one of the prettiest girls in Dushore and that is saying a good deal, as our town is famous of pretty girls."

More About Pierson Holcombe and Sophi-Sophia Mott:

Marriage Fact: E.J. Encel, minister in Alba, PA

      Children of Pierson Holcombe and Sophi-Sophia Mott are:

i.  Myra-Lemyra-LeMira Ann Holcolm Holcomb Holcombe, born February 06, 1867 in LeRoy,

    Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; died January 08, 1929 in Alba, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; she

    married J B-John Ball Shaddick Shadduck December 23, 1886 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,

    Pennsylvania born January 26, 1862 in Shunk, Fox Twp,  Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died February

    1953 in Greenville, Greenville Co, South Carolina. Burial: Alba Cemetery, Alba, Bradford Co, PA 

    John is the son of Lewis Henry and Amanda Malvina Dickerson Shadduck who resided in Fox Twp,

    Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Lewis being the son of Evert and Amy Porter Shadduck of Shunk, PA 

    and Malvina being the daughter of John Ball and Fanny-Hannah Sarah Williams Dickerson of 

    Sylvania, PA 

    Pauline's 1st Cousins, the children of Myra and JB:  Dean, Goldie, Louis

    Census: 1880, Fox Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania J B-John Ball Shaddick Shadduck

    Hobbies: played trumpet and violin, played fiddle at square dances Occupation: farmer-apple-up

    Armenia Mt Rd, Alba PA, grew celery in the murk fields of Erie Canal Pt Byron NY Residence: 1948

    to 1952 lived at105 Grove Rd, Greenville, SC/to 1948 lived at Alba, Bradford Co, PA/West of Port

    Byron, NY on the Erie Canal/1862 to ? Shunk, Sullivan Co, PA

    Myra A.Shadduck is how she signed her name in Goldie and Irving's wedding book. Her mother,

    Sophie spelled her name LeMira  In her 1904 "Holcombe Family History".  In 1904 her mother

    writes that she is married to John Shadduck and living in Port Byron, NY.  There is a document in

    the Hartford Connecticut Historical Society that shows 63 different spellings of Holcomb(e) 

    Hocombe are most often used.  The Holcombe family motto:  "TRUTH AND COURAGE"

From "Aunt Paulie's Book", notes by Pauline Holcombe - "Aunt Myra  . . . and Uncle John . . . lived near Alba when we visited them one Sunday long ago on their farm.  Louis Shadduck a little older than we, was home and showed us the store of nuts he had stored to dry to sell later.  It was a long day trip and we were leaving in the middle of the afternoon after a great chicken dinner, and as the family lingered around the car before we took off, Dickie who was always hungry, piped up, much to Mom's embarrassment - "Can I have a sandwich?"

     As it was, rain and darkness caught up with us, I remember the "touring car" with no top and our having to get pulled out of the mud hole at Middendorf's crossing, at midnight when nearly home."

In a letter written by Myra to her brother Lamarr, Feb 6, 1919

"Your letter of January received and today our from Vell written Jan 15.  I think they will need a entry bag if they even find you.  I know we have written and others.  John and I have had the flue.  I am feeling rite good again, we hope John will be out in a few days.  We have not had much snow yet, only on hill.  Armena men have been drawing paper wood by here a few days but the last two weeks have been more like spring.  Even robins and sparows.  Louis is boarding at home now and trying to finish his last year at Troy.  He goes back and forth in strain cars and now looks after the chores, 3 cows, 2 colls, 2 calf and 2 yearlings so you see we are farming yet on a small scale.  The lastest news here in Alba where Fitch is to have a market (post office will be now)

Dean and Marion have been quite well they are thinking of selling if they can.

Erwin and Goldie have had colds.  All have escaped flue they are at Northeast yet.  Granma keeps about there some all the rest are well so far.  Alvin was down and stayed over night with us a short time ago.  Well there have been some changes Ervin S came and took Granma over to his place Thursday afternoon.  The girl would not go with them.  Durwood was married at Thanksgiving time.  We had a Miss Woodhead with us 14 weeks one of Dr Molyeux cousins.  She works at Eagles Mere summer so would leave us soon anyway.  I wish you could tell us more where you are located.  We have a little snow again today.  No sleighing yet.  John is still gaining and well I am all alone once more, Miss Woodhead went yesterday.  We are still on the gain today PM.

Your sister, Myra A Shadduck"

She enclosed a Feb 1919 newspaper clipping  "LEROY

Mrs. Ernest Holcomb is in the Sayre hospital for an operation.  Miss Amy Kelley is alarmingly ill with heart trouble at Packer hospital.  Dr and Mrs Bevan and son and Thomas Mott and wife visited at R L Bevans in Franklindale Sunday.  James Holcomb and wife of West Franklin visitied his mother and sister in this place Sunday.  Dr Bevan had professional business in Sayre a couple of days last week. Mrs. Almanda Holcomb is confined to her bed by illness.  Miss Ida Walburn is helping to care for her.  Chester Whipple is in the Blossburg hospital where Dr. Molyneux performed a serious operation a few days ago, he is going well.  The ladies organized S. S. class drove over to Granville Center on Wednesday and spent the day with Rev and Mrs. Bryan.  Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Burton Saxon, H D Stone and wife, Frank Stone and wife, R E Palmer ad wife, J O Tomlinson and wife, Seymour Kelley and wife, R Morse and wife, Mrs. A T Lilley, Mrs. Ruby Lewis, Mrs. Jennie Holcomb, Mrs. Elon Mott, Mrs. Alma Mott, Mrs. Hazel Mott, Mrs. Hazel Morse, Mrs. Edith Masos, Mrs. Grace Tomlinson, Mrs. Electra Morse and daughter Phoebe Morse, Mrs. Effie Coon, Mrs. Ettie Morse, Mrs. Betsey Morse, Mrs. Elosia McCraney, Misses Carrie and Minnie Holcomb and Ida Walburn.  Mark Merritt and family of Cowley were visitors at Robert Chilsons' Sunday.  Robert Mason Sr is spending some time with relatives in Sayre.  Those on the sick list are:  Mrs. Effie Coon, Walter Colton, Mrs. J J Holzworth and Reed Klibora."

Her tombstone in the Alba Cemetery reads Myra A Shadduck 1867-1929

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Tri Co Mansfield's Soldiers Orphans School Soldiers’ Orphans' School Student Listing Page 487 from Pennsylvania's Soldier's Orphan Schools, by James Laugherty Paul, 1877 Typed for Tri-Counties by Rebecca Seehusen and formatted by Joyce M. Tice TRANSFERS   DATE OF DISCHARGES    

PUPIL' S NAME DATE OF BIRTH DATE OF ADMISSION ON ORDER OR BY TRANSFER WHERE TO WHERE FROM DATE OF TRANSFERS ON AGE, AT 16 YEARS ON ORDER POST OFFICE ADDRESS WHEN AT HOME REMARKS

Shaddick, John B. Jan. 26, 1862 Sept. 1, 1871    Jan. 29, 1874 Sylvania With his mother

JB was an acrobat with the circus as a young man. per Bernice Shadduck Snell Spencer

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm   8/11/2002

CANTON ONCE WAS HOME FOR "GREATEST SHOW"

Eleanor Parsons Keagle Towanda Review August 7, 1963

Few members of the modern generation probably realize that this Bradford County community was once the hub of a thriving circus.

Today, only a few buildings, one containing faded posters, the grave in Park Cemetery of one of the show’s greats, and a few photographs serve to recall the excitement that filled the town toward the end of the last century.

The circus era started here in 1887 when Charles Lee and Sam Schribner’s circus split at the close of the season, in Horseheads, N. Y. While passing through Canton enroute to Muncy, Lee spied a vacant house and decided to investigate the town’s possibilities as a future base of operations for the circus and his winter theater show, which he headed as Professor LeCardo.

He rented the house, and in October 1891, purchased 11 acres of land with a house and other buildings east of town, where he established winter training quarters for his outfit. Here he built a ring barn, several buildings for animals and enlarged the house.

The first mention of Lee’s Circus appears in the Canton Sentinel Aug. 12, 1887 and states, "Lee’s Circus will show here August 22 – Great London 25c R. R. Show" (It was strictly a wagon and not a railroad show, but Barnum had taught the value of ballyhoo).

The local press next noted on April 25, 1889, "Charles Lee closed his "gift show" season at Williamsport last Saturday night". The gift show reference indicates each patron received a small gift with his ticket.

On May 11, the paper carried an account of the Lee exhibition taken from the Springfield Press of April 25, stating, "This was one of the finest shows seen here in years. They made an excellent street parade with everything looking clean, new and bright, with some pleasing features new to the ordinary circus parade. At the grounds everyone was treated with utmost politeness. The circus performance given in one large ring and on an elevated stage was first class in every way – a 50c show for 25c".

On May 16, the circus gave two performances in Canton to "large and delighted audiences. Performances in every way were first class and the show free from objectionable features".

Little is known how the show fared until May 17, 1891 when Lee showed at Troy, in a downpour of rain. During the night the heavy circus wagons started toward Burlington. The first drawn by a four-horse team was crossing the old covered bridge at Long’s Mill when the flood weakened center pier gave way. Driver, team and heavy wagon were dropped into the current and carried over the dam. All came out alive.*

As Lee’s Great London Shows prepared for the 1892 season, it evidently had enlarged and improved the equipment and personnel for issues of the Sentinel for March 24 and 31 devoted much news space to extolling the glories of the outfit. It noted 112 persons were listed as circus employees, with eight Indian extras. A. F. Hagar led the Band Number One, and Bert Saulsman Band Number Two. Featured were Running Elk and Indians from the Blackfoot Agency. A cavalcade of horsemen and Turkish Brigade all combined to make this the "Greatest 25cc Show on Earth." The fact that no drunkards were tolerated on Lee’s show was stressed, and tough characters dubbed it "The Sunday School Show."

The circus continued to prosper until 1896 when Lee suffered a severe stroke in July. In April 1897 it was announced the circus would go on the road under new management and advertisements for attractions were appearing in trade papers.

Lee later sold his property just outside the borough and the circus moved elsewhere. The property now is owned by Roy Allen.

The small one-ring show had far reaching effects on the big-top circus world. One of these was Lee’s discovery of a boy turning cartwheels in a town where the circus was showing. Seeing possibilities in the youngster and learning he had no parental ties, Lee took him with his show.

The boy, known locally as Charles Lee for his foster-father but whose real name was Charles Patterson, was recognized by circus fans for 40 years as Charles Siegrist.

Siegrist first appeared on the Ringling lot in 1898 with the Siegrist-Selbon Aerial Troupe. While doing a flying stunt in Madison Square Garden in 1930, Siegrist fell. He hit the edge of the safety net and broke his neck. Orthopedic specialists agreed he would never "fly" again, but five months later he rejoined the show and was still aloft at age 72.

A Canton boy whose life work was shaped by contact with the Charles Lee show through Siegrist was Francis (Butch) Brann. Not wishing to follow his father’s meat business, Brann spent long hours with Siegrist whenever he was in Canton and eventually joined the circus.

As Francisco and Delores, Brann and his wife did acts with the Ringling-Barnum show for many years and later appeared on the Shrine Circus circuit. Both are now retired, spending part of their time in Canton and the rest in Florida and elsewhere.

Charles Lee died in 1905 and is buried in Park Cemetery here. Mrs. Lee known in the circus world as Madame Elnora, when she had a trained dog act, died a few years later and is buried beside her husband.

His grave is a shrine for circus people who come this way, and a memorial service is held there at intervals by circus friends who wish to keep his memory alive.

JB played trumpet in the old Voltus Band of Troy PA playing along with him were his sons Louis on coronet and Dean on baritone.  Bernice Spencer recalls that Grandpa was extremely musical, a natural with no training.  He had a wonderful bass voice and could play violin, trombone, cornet, etc.

The Shadducks lived up the mountain road (that leads to Armenia Mt.) from Alba, PA off Rt. 14, going toward Troy, make a left before the church (on left of Rt. 14) and the cemetery where he is buried (on right of Rt. 14).  This is where John had his apple farm, at the foot of Armenia Mt.  Bernice remembers there was "No inside plumbing - outhouse - There was a hand pump at a small sink in the kitchen.  Wood stove in kitchen and some kind of heating appliance in the living room.  I assume a wood stove.

Bernice says that "he had a small apple orchard and raised strawberries. I would stay with him and Louise and few days each summer and help pick berries and go with grandpa and try to sell them  2 qts - 25cents.  He had lovely red and yellow delicious apples, also Cortlands.  They were the best.  He had 1 cow for milk, which was cream used also to make butter, cottage cheese, buttermilk, etc.  Delicious!  A terrific amount of work for everyone.  No refrigeration, the coldest place - cellar bottom - on large flat stones - uncovered."  After LeMyra died he later remarried and his second wife's children took over the apple orchard.

JB never saw his father, Lewis, who died in the Civil War and is buried in Norfolk, VA but Glenn and Francis Comfort took him there so he could see his father's grave - he cried at the sight.

His grandaughter, Bernice said "Grandpa was in church every Sunday.  He had 1 dark blue suit and high laced black shiney shoes.  A felt hat in winter and a white Panama hat in summer.

Most of his life was spent in rural Alba, PA.

In 1952, at the time of his death he was living at the home of his daughter, Goldie Comfort in Greenville SC.  I knew him as an old man who would sit and watch me when I visited my Grandmother Comfort. 

 


John B. Shadduck
of Alba, PA
Pauline Holcombe's Uncle


Myra (Holcombe) Shadduck
Wife of John Shadduck and Pauline's Aunt

 

#64 John Ball 26Jan1862 he died in Greenville, SC although he is buried in Alba, PA you can use me as a source, I was in Greenville when he died and attended the funeral in Alba, PA.  His body was sent to PA by train.  We drove to PA.  From, Linda 8/13/2001

Bernice tells me that the house where Bea grew up first belonged to John and Myra

To get to Bea's house, which is no longer standing.  There's a dirt road that runs between the Milky Way and the farm, traveling down that dirt road you'd pass a 2-story house on the right, soon after the road bends to the left and there's a gate, my mom's house was on the left side of the gate and her grandparents house was on the right side of the gate.  This is where she lived when she attended the Thomas School in Troy Twp. PA, just North of Alba. per Linda 10/22/2001

www.thedailyreview.com 1/9/2002 Towanda PA Daily Review

Alba Christian Church choir taking 'America' to state, U.S. capitols

By Lisa Robinson January 09, 2002

Group to perform in Harrisburg on Friday; Washington presentation set for this spring

ALBA -- At noon on Friday, the state Capitol in Harrisburg will resound with heavenly voices.

The voices will not be those of the angels painted on the ceiling, nor will they be the voices of a world-renowned choir that last sang at Carnegie Hall.

No, the voices that will fill the Pennsylvania Capitol on Friday will be those of an adult choir from the Alba Christian Church -- a group of people who day in and day out live right here in Bradford County.

The choir will present its cantata, "America: A Pilgrim's Prayer, A Patriot's Dream," first performed by the group at the Alba church in October of 2001.

The choir plans to perform "America" in the spring too, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The performance will come on the four-month anniversary of the terrorist attacks that destroyed part of the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and completely demolished the World Trade Center in New York City, killing thousands of people in the process.

The members of the Alba Christian Church choir may not have been trained at the Berkeley School of Music, may not have traveled the world singing to millions, but to many the group's music is as majestic as if its members were singing for the Metropolitan Opera.

Alba is located along state Route 14 between Troy and Canton.

The congregation at the Alba Christian Church has been in existence for over 170 years . . .

The Alba Christian Church is rich in history, at one time being the second largest of its denomination in the state with more than 200 members.

The church has been located in Alba since 1817 when a group of pioneers founded the First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) there.

Church officials write in their history that "it was almost prophetic that the church clerk at their meeting June 4, 1818, entered the name simply as a church of Christ."

It was in May of 1830 that the congregation was organized as a Church of Christ, with Dr. Silas E. Shephard as pastor and R.R. Rogers as an elder.

A house of worship was built in 1834, and in 1859 the current church building was constructed on the same site.

History shows that it was under the leadership of Shephard that other churches began to be planted from the tree of worship that had formed from the first church, and soon there would be other Churches of Christ in East Smithfield, Granville, LeRoy, Canton, Sylvania and Grover.

In 1848, the Christian Register released a statistical report of the Christian churches in Europe and America. It read that Alba's church had 140 members, and at that time it was the second largest church in Pennsylvania, behind only Allegheny City.

There is not only a rich history in the foundation of the church, but also in the foundation of music at the church.

Doris Seeley, a senior member of the Alba Christian Church, said that as far as she knows, there has always been a choir at the church in one form or another.

"I cannot recall a time when there wasn't a choir participating in our worship services," Seeley said. "I have been a member of the Alba Christian Church for over 50 years and there has always been a choir during this time. Sometimes there were multiple choirs, from cherub choirs to youth choirs to adult choirs."

Seeley directed the adult choir for nearly three decades, from the 1960s through the 1980s.

She finally handed the baton over to current director Charlotte Morse in 1986. . . .

"Music is as much of a ministry as a minister can be," Blackall said. "I told this choir that they were better than a hymn on Sunday.’God didn't mean for you to simply sing a hymn on Sunday,' I told them.’You need to take this message to the world.'"

Marriage invitation for Myra-Lemyra-LeMira Holcombe and J Shadduck:

The card announcing their wedding reads exactly and is spelled exactly

        Mr. and Mrs. P.A. Holcomb

        desire your company to witness

        the marriage of their daughter

        Thursday, Dec.23, 1886 at 11 o'clock.

                                Leroy, Pa.

        J.B. Shadduck   Lemyra Holcomb

J B Shadduck and Myra-Lemyra-LeMira Holcombe wedding took place at Myra's parents' home in LeRoy, PA Ceremony performed by Anthony Kilmer, Justice of the Peace

                      ii.            John Mott Holcombe, born February 07, 1869 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; died September 01, 1885 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania  Cause of Death: Ruptured appendix

Census: 1880, Fox Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania Burial Mott/McCraney Cemetery, LeRoy, PA

       2             iii.   Vell-Survellon Burr Holcombe, born March 16, 1871 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 1952 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Jennie-Roseanna Jane Koch Cook November 29, 1900 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                        vi.  Lizzie-Pheby Phoebe Elizabeth Holcombe, born January 28, 1876 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,PA;

      died 1943 in Athens, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Carl Randall Lilley May 16, 1898 in

      LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA; born November 08, 1871 in Pennsylvania; died October 07, 1953 in Sayre,

      Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

      Pauline's 1st Cousin, the daughter of Lizzie and Carl:  Marion

      Occupation: Piano teacher  Residence: Athens, PA/Bernice, PA / 1909

      Laquin, PA  Carl was an accomplished musician, his Occupation: he ran the motor for hauling coal

      cars from a mine in Bernice, PA 

Daniel and Nancy adopted Carl Randall Lilley, natural son of Susan McIntosh and John Randall. per Joyce M Tice

He ran the motor that hauled coal cars from the mine in Bernice, PA and also an accomplished musican. Lilleys are of Norman descent from Sir Robert and John DeLille who were with William the Conqueror's army that in 1066 crossed from Normandy to England. per Pat Mott Gobea, 2001

The Troy Register Volume LI, #34, Friday, August 28, 1914

(Local News)  Mr. and Mrs. Carl Lilley and daughter of Bernice, Pa., and Mr. and Mrs. William Blake of Port Byron, N. Y., were recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Comfort and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Shadduck of Alba.

Carl Lilley and Lizzie-Pheby Holcombe Marriage performed by Pierson A. Holcombe, Justice of the Peace (bride's father)

                      v.   Matt-Mathew Knickerbocker Holcomb Holcombe, born July 15, 1880 in Shunk, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died January 04, 1976 in Elmira, Chemung Co, New York; married Ora Louise Thomas October 23, 1900 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born November 29, 1881 in Rochester, Monroe Co, New York; died November 19, 1953 in Sayre, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Burial: Lower Gillett Cemetery, Gillett, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Pauline's 1st Cousin, the children of Matt and Ora:  Elizabeth, Josephine, Helen, Don, Alvin

Residences: O-Kum-Inn was his cabin on the top of Armenia Mountain, 1907, Willow, Alba Borough, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Church Membership: Gillett Baptist Church, Gillett, PA for over 60 years  Service Organization: Charter Member of South Creek Lions Club District 14-G, Gillett Rebekah Lodge No 523 for over 50 years, Troy Senior Citizens Club, Gillett Grange

A note from Pauline Holcombe states "Uncle Matt was a natural "engineer."

She says in the "Aunt Paulie Book"- "I don't know what training Uncle Matthew . . . had but it seemed he could do almost anything.  His main work was in the Dairylea Creameries of lower New York State and northern PA as there were many in those days.  He would go to a creamery and overhaul the whole thing - plumbing, power plant, cooling system, etc.  He had a crew who went with him.  He began camping to have Aunt Ora and sometime other members of the family with him.  I remember Vell and Jennie going over near Wyalusing once where he was doing a creamery and camping with him."

 http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  1833-1983 South Creek Sesquicentennial

Reprinted on Tri-Counties site with permission of June SMITH Mickley  ReTyped by Paul Newell

REMEMBRANCES Wayne Ward  The first time I was in Gillett to see a minstrel show at the Grange Hall. I never forgot what the discussion between the endmen was.

   “You know Matt Holcomb has been ailing.”

   “So I hear.”

   “Matt said he had cramps in his stomach so he went to the doctors for an examination.”

   “What did he find?”

   “After asking many questions, he found out that Matt had swallowed a peach pit and it was      growing in his stomach!”

GILLETT GRANGE DRAMATIC CLUB The dramatic club presented dramas at the Gillett Grange Hall. During the year 1921 they presented a play entitled "The Old Oaken Bucket" on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. The cast of characters included:

  Character Actor

Reuben Hardacre – a square, honest old farmer Horton Berry

Tom – his son, a chip off the old block Erwin Cooper

Arthur Ames – true blue Kenneth Dunning

Mark Hayward – a wolf in sheep’s clothing Doris Vandermark

Jake Tompkins – in love with Teddy "not wisely but too well" Charles Vandermark

Mr. G. Willikens – a neighbor Sam Craig

Ezry Babb – postmaster who reads the postals M.K. Holcomb

Rev. William Mason – the peacemaker Ray Wood

Martha Hardacre – Reuben’s wife loved by everyone Pearl Youmans

Lizzie Lawrence – the light of Uncle Reuben’s eyes Grace Smith

Emily Lawrence – (otherwise known as Teddy) Helen Holcomb

Sapphira Scriggins – the village gossip Bernice Berry

Mrs. G. Willikins – very proper but not charitable Dora Harkness

Miry Jones – the village belle Ruth Berry

Admission: 15 and 25 cents. Reserved seats: 35 cents plus War Tax

LADY GILLETT REBEKAH LODGE Due to the efforts of Ora and Matthew Holcomb, Lady Gillett Rebekah Lodge was instituted on December 7, 1921 by District Deputy Laura Williams of Canton Lodge. That evening 28 persons signed the charter, two were taken by transfer from another Lodge and twelve were initiated. Names of the charter members were:

Elizabeth Ayers, Florence Balmer, Bernice Berry, Nettie Berry, Ruth Berry, Josephine Blodgett, Inez S. Carman, Belle M. Coursen, Charles Dewey, Harriett Dunning, Jane Gordon, Helen Holcomb, Ora L. Holcomb, Helen Porter, Maude French, Martha Forrest, Daisy Newell, Berdina Porter, Mabel Strong; Horton Berry, Jesse Carmon, Charles F. French, Merton S. Gordon, Matthew H. Holcomb, Isaac Kiersted, Clarence E. Newell, Leon B. Toby.

Two members were accepted by transfer, those being Ora Kerrick and Ethel Harkness. Those initiated the same evening were:

Vernon E. Ameigh, Virginia Ameigh, Florence DeWitt, Dora Harkness, Harry Kerrick, Blanche Lewis, Fred Lewis, Raymond Smith, Grace Smith, Louise Tears, Pearl Youmans, Densy Ward.

In the beginning meetings were held upstairs in the old Grange Hall and were there until January 1929 when they moved into the Old Town Hall in front of the present truck stop. Then the Odd Fellows (IOOF) bought the land where Neil’s Station is now and built a new hall. They met there until the Odd Fellows could no longer maintain the upkeep of the building and it was sold to Don Holcomb in April of 1941 for a garage. They then moved upstairs over the old Strong and French store and were there until September 9, 1963 when the store was sold and they had to move. They moved back to the old Grange Hall (now the Lion’s Club Building) and were there until the building was sold. On October 25, 1971 they moved into the church annex. They were there until the new Township Building was completed and in June of 1974 they moved into that building and were there until the Lodge consolidated with the Golden Star Rebekah Lodge No. 462 of Troy in Sept of 1980.

During those years, three members were honored for 50 years of service in their Lodge: Ora Kerrick, Maude French and Grace Smith. Six 40 year members were: Josephine Blodgett, Helen Cease, Mabel Strong, Marie Heath, Bernice Kilgore, and Charlotte Pettingill. Having Two District Deputy Presidents from their Lodge honored them: Charlotte Pettingill in 1948-49 and Florence Peet in 1960-61. On November 9, 1976 the Lodge was presented a bi-centennial flag in memory of Charlotte Pettingill’s mother, Myrtle Millard, who had been a very faithful worker in the lodge.

South Creek Lions Club Charter Members

Orson Bailey, Edward Ballard, Richard Berry, Edward Forcier, William Gordon, Donald T. Holcomb, Matthew K. Holcomb, Earl Kennedy, Alton Kingsley, Carl M. Oldroyd, Millard H. Sterling, Paul Sterling, Franklin A. Tillinghast, Fred Tillinghast, Benjamin C. Vandermark.

Officers – 1977 (there 24th anniversary)

President Terry Kennedy

1st Vice President LaRue Avery

2nd Vice President Elwin Fitzwater

3rd Vice President Neil Teribury

Secretary Max Morgan

Treasurer Arthur Culver

Membership: Llewellyn Ameigh, Dave Austin, LaRue Avery, Richard Berry, Llewellyn Brown, John Chambers, Arthur Culver, John Earley, Ron Finnerty, Elwin Fitzwater, Lynn Freeman, Dick Freeman, Tom Freeman, Richard Hall, Wendall Harkness, Donald Holcomb, Jerry Kennedy, Jim Kerr, Larry Keug, Ronald Leonard, Gerald May, Lester Maynard, Lynn Maynard, Gerald Morgan, Harmon Morgan, Max Morgan, Milo Morgan, Leo Newell, Carl Oldroyd, Dennis Oldroyd, Walter Oldroyd, Oliver Owens, Doug Phillips, Carl Reeser, David Saunders, Keith Seymour, Richard Shoff, Sr., Charles Silvernail, Richard Smith, Stanley Sterling, Steve Sterling, Paul Sterling, Don Stickley, Neil Teribury, Franklin Tillinghast, Benjamin Vandermark, Gary Webster, Richard Wood, Elmer Young.

An article from the newspaper about Uncle Matt (who did not add E to Holcomb)

"Carpenter Keeps Movin' at 90" by Dennis Miller

GILLETT - Just ask anyone in Gillett who the most ambitious and probably one of the busiest guys around, and they'll most likely tell you Matt Holcomb.

        He has this old barn out back, and he spends a seven or eight-hour day there every day, puffing his corncob pipe, making some pretty nice what-nots, teacup and saucer shelves, marble boards, rolling pins - just about anything.

        Matt is 90 years old.

        But that doesn't make any difference!  No sir!  He's out in his little shop, as he says, "every day but Sunday."  He doesn't have to work, "and that's why I do," he adds.

        He works mostly by the natural light coming in the windows on the south side, and during the winter keeps the place warm with an old wood stove on your left as you walk in the door.

        And cluttered!  Why, there's more tools, machines, pieces of wood, patterns, and tin cans in there than Santa's workshop . . . and there's probably just as much good work coming out of it, too.

        Holcomb is a retired carpenter, except he doesn't consider himself a fully-trained carpenter.  "I never learned a trade,"  he says, "though I come pretty close to learnin" the carpenter one."  Anyway, he's been doing carpentry since working for C.J. Case, a general contractor in Troy.

        "I worked for Mr. Case in the early '20's," he explains.  "And I learned more form him in the one year I worked for him than I have ever since.  The fever took him and his wife a year after I started."

        After that, Holcomb began working on his own, mostly building milk stations.  He started in Columbia Cross Roads where he worked a 10-hour day for $3 a day.  "We built a lot of them stations,"  he said.  "Build one up in Green, NY and that's still standin' I'll tell ya!  That one has a 20-inch base, three feet in the ground, with 16 inches on the top!"

        Holcomb admits he "can't remember the dates too well, mainly because all my records went in the '35 flood in Whitneyville," he explains, There aren't too many places in the area that he hasn't build houses, helped start them, or laid out the plans for them.

        He retired in "well, that's a good one"  he laughed, "cause I've worked off-and-on ever since.  But I'd say I retired in '48."  Since his wife died in 1951, Holcomb has been working in his shop, with very few vacations.  The things he makes are sold in his daughter's antique shop in Gillett.  She is Mrs. Helen Berry.

        "I don't make much money, but it gives me somthin' to do,"  he said.  The "what-not" shelves he makes take, "well, the way I work, each one takes about 18 hours,"  he said.  The shelves, which are intricate and lovely, are "made right from the tree."

        "I make 'em out of sumac,"  he said.  "I have to go out and find the stuff, cut it, straighten it out, and then commence to cut it for thickness.  After that I can fix it, put pattern on, bore it out, and put it on the jig saw.  Then I sand it all down, build three shelves and slap it together."  Altogether he has made 67 shelves and they go faster than he can make them.

        Holcomb's reason for keeping busy is a good one.  "Now there ya go again.  I know a lot of guys right around here - retire - sit around and it ain't a year 'fore they give out.  There's another guy up the road.  Henry Quail, he's 95, retired, good health.  You know why?  He keeps movin'!"

        Holcomb keeps moving.   He has 3 children, 8 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren, 8 great great grandchildren.  "And the way they grow up I expect to see one more generation!"  he exclaimed.

        And as far as what's he's doing now, "I love every minute of it.  I expect to be out here in the shop as long as I'm able to 'percolate' - and as far as I know I'm in good runnin' order yet."

5 years later . . . "Want To Live As Full A Life As Matt Holcombe - - Try Onion Sandwiches

by Pat Barber

Matt Holcombe, Gillett, had a birthday on July 15.  It was celebrated on Sunday with a family get-together at Lon Thomas' farm on Porter Road in Troy.  About 90 guests were greeted with a huge sign on the house saying, "Another Matt Holcombe Birthday Party".  It was Matt's 95th birthday and he looks and acts younger than many youngsters in their 80's.

    His son Don said, "His general health is very good.  His only problem is he is a little lame.  He wouldn't use a cane until he was 92-he was afraid people would think he was an old man."  Now Matt uses two canes but gets around with considerable speed and stood comfortably for long periods at the reception.

     He has a very good appetite and eats anything." continued his son.  "He's had a bedtime snack of an onion sandwich every night for years.  Then he goes to bed and sleeps like a baby."  Matt also smokes a pipe and enjoys a drink now and then.  His memory is excellent.

     "I feel very good and I've had a good and busy life."  then Matt Holcombe took the reporter back in time.  I was born in Sullivan Co between Wheelerville and Shunk and raised in LeRoy.  My mother was a milliner and my father was a painter and a Justice of the Peace.  I used to drive for mother peddling milliner goods over the mountain and help Dad paint."

     Obviously enjoying reminiscing, he continued, "When I was 15, I started to learn the blacksmith trade with Lou Mott in LeRoy.  Well, I got throwed out of the shop.  I was starting to shoe a pony and he kicked me right out into the road."  That was the end of his blacksmithing career, and he went to work helping his father paint the home of George Lewis.

     Soon he married Ora Thomas and they went to live in Alba where he had a meat business for a while, did some farming, and was "a jack of all trades".

     "One day I went up to Troy for a haircut and saw Charlie Case (FP Case's brother) outside the Barber Shop.  He wanted to know if I knew any good young men who wanted to learn the carpentry trade for $10 a week."  Matt decided he needed a trade and took the job, starting almost immediately.  This was after the Case brothers had dissolved the partnership they had formed in 1884.

    Matt worked for Charlie Case until and epidemic of typhoid fever broke out in Troy, costing the lives of Mr. Case and his wife, among many others.  "There were 14 men in our working gang," recalled Holcombe.  "They all vanished when the fever broke out.  Some of them died, some came back."

     Matt Holcombe remained basically a carpenter for the rest of his life and until this year he built cabinets, shelves birdhouses, etc., for members of the family.  He went to work for the Dairymen's Milk Co repairing, building and rebuilding milk stations all over the area, and for the Empire State Dairy Co building milk plants and ice plants in Columbia Cross Roads, Gillett, and New York State.

     He also worked for Sheffield's Milk Co, then the Dairymen's League, which bought up a number of other creameries.  As technology progressed, Matt Holcombe found himself tearing down icehouses he had built and putting in refrigeration.

     Matt Holcombe raised 5 children, but lost his youngest when he was 25.  "He was a prince," the father recalls sadly.  He lives with daughter Helen Berry in Gillett.  The other daughter is Elizabeth Ayres of Canton, and Lamarr Holcombe; Troy is a younger brother.  Other members of the family came from Canton, Troy, Dushore, Towanda, Rochester and Livonia, NY.

     Asked about his descendants, several members of the family had to take a quick inventory and came up with eight grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and 20 great great grandchildren.  He held several of the youngest on his lap during the afternoon's celebration.  There almost were no descendants.

     Son Don recalls a story from his earliest childhood on the farm in Alba when the girls found an old lantern and took it up the ladder in the barn to the haymow.  Don was on the first rung of the ladder when one of the girls tried to light it and the inevitable happened.  "If it hadn't been for our neighbor Milt Greenleaf, we all would have been burned to death," said Don.  The barn was a total loss.

Newspaper article Jan 1976  "Accident victim dies

   Matthew Holcomb, 95, of Gillett, injured in an automobile accident late New Year's Eve in front of the Gillett Grange Hall, died Sunday night at Arnot-Ogden Hospital.

   Dr Robert K Worman, a Chemung County medical examiner, said Mr. Holcomb died of bleeding caused by an injury to the brain.

   South Creek Township police said Mr. Holcomb was injured when a pick-up truck he was riding in was struck by a car driven by Walter E Arbogast, 28, of Canton RD 1, on Rt. 14 outside the Grange Hall.

   Arbogast was charged with driving while intoxicated.  Police said he was driving at a high rate of speed when his car struck the truck, driven by Richard Berry, 47, of Gillett.

   Mr. Holcomb worked for 40 years as building superintendent for Empire State, Sheffield Farms and Dairyman's League.

   He was a charter member of the South Creek Lions Club and Gillett Rebekah Lodge and was a former member of the Gillett Grange.

   Police said Berry was backing his truck from the Grange hall parking lot onto Rt. 14 when the accident happened.  A party was being held in the Grange hall at the time, police said."

Obit Jan 1976 ". . .

  This past November he visited Dushore as part of the Troy Kitchen Band at the Extension Service Christmas tea.

  He seldom missed attending the Forksville Fair and he loved camping at Lake Akela, Southwest of Dushore on Ringer Hill . ...

  The funeral will be held today, Thursday at 11 am from the Vickery Funeral Home, Troy, with the Rev Charles Root and Rev Charles Long officiating . . .....”

Matt-Mathew Holcombe and Ora Thomas Marriage officiated by Pierson A. Holcombe, Justice of the Peace (groom's father)

                      vi.   Frank Judson Judison Holcombe, born June 22, 1883 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died August 14, 1974 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Hila Roberts Abt. 1907; born 1887 in Pennsylvania; died 1920. Burial: 1920, Mott Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA

Graduated from Penn State, State College, PA Occupation: bookkeeper in store in Laquin, PA, tested cows with the Penn State official testing service Residence: 1914, Laquin, Bradford Co, PA

I have heard for many years that Frank Holcomb used to walk from LeRoy to Laquin everyday. He would get up at midnight and start walking up the mountain, and would arrive in Laquin the following morning, just in time to open the store.  Anyway, those are some notes on Laquin. Matt Carl

From "Aunt Paulie's Book" says -  "Uncle Frank Holcombe had some bookkeeping training and worked in the store at Laquin and other places.  He got a job with the Penn State official testing service for cattle and spent his main working life going where dairies had to have official production records.  He was efficient, precise, and good at his work and agreeable - living in the home of those whose cattle he tested.  When he was old he went to live with the Lilies in Athens, PA."

Frank and Hila had no children.  He served as a Representative of State College, PA.

Funeral Card:  "In Memory Of

Frank Judson Holcombe

Born June 22, 1883

Entered Into Rest August 14, 1974

Memorial Services Conducted

Ralph T Kleese Funeral Home Canton, Pa

Date and Hour of Services

2:00 PM, Friday, August 16, 1974

Officiating Rev J Sidney Kane

Final Resting Place

Mott Cemetery LeRoy, Pa

vii. Sarrah Sarah Arsenah Holcombe, born September 27, 1886 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA;

        died in Rochester, New York; married Lester A West Abt. 1906; born Abt. 1884 in LeRoy, Bradford

        Co, Pennsylvania; died in Rochester, New York.

        Pauline's 1st Cousin, daughter of Sarrah and Lester:  Margaret

        Once lived in Johnson City area of NY - called Triple Cities. Residence in 1914, Bernice, PA  Lester

        A West: Employed by the shoe and camera companies in Johnson City NY 1/28/2004 Elizabeth 

        (Holcomb) Ayres lived on Springbrook Drive in Canton in a small 2-story house. Per Matt Carl

                    viii.   Lamarr-LaMar-Hi-Hiram Lamarr Holcombe, born November 05, 1893 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died February 10, 1980 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Mabel Janet Jefferson February 12, 1920 in Towanda, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born April 23, 1898 in Oil City-Lake City, Erie Co, Pennsylvania; died January 22, 1985 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Burial: Glenwood Cemetery, Troy, Bradford Co, PA

Pauline's 1st cousin, daughter of Lamarr and Mabel:  Mary

Mabel was the eldest of 10 children. Church Membership: First Baptist Church, Troy, PA Mabel Graduated from Clarion University, Clarion, PA She was a founder of the Troy Music Club Occupation: School teacher, she taught the first class in Laquin, PA school, 1923, Principal of Grammar School, West Long Branch, NJ, she taught for 37 years in the Troy PA school system

Residence: 1925, 125 Canton St, Troy, PA Military: US Army War Served In: WW I in 108th Inf. in France  Lamarr in 1922, attended Henry Ford's Automotive School, Detroit, Michigan Occupation: sheep rancher-WY, 1914 miner-Quartz, Montana, 1915 cowboy-Washington, store clerk-Central PA Co Store-Laquin, PA, auto garage operator-Alba PA-skilled auto mechanic-learning as he worked, 1926 partner in Comfort & Holcombe Garage & Automobile Agency, Troy PA Service Organization: Troy American Legion Post 49, Troy VFW Post 8675

After his parents died he made a home with his sister until age 17 when he left to make his way west.  He worked on a sheep ranch in Wyoming and in 1914 he was a miner in Quartz, Montana.  His brother, Frank persuaded him to return to Laquin, PA where he worked as clerk in a lumber company store, the Central Pennsylvania Company Store. He married, served in WWI, went to Automotive School and became a skilled auto mechanic, opened a garage in Alba, PA and the 1926 moved to Troy PA and became partner in Comfort and Holcombe Garage and Automobile Agency.

There has been a question of Lamarr's date of birth, some have it as Nov 5 and some as Nov 6 so he had a search done Feb 17, 1939 by E.R. Innes, Clerk of the Orphans' Court for Bradford Co, PA which states that he was born on the 5th day of November, A.D. 1893 at LeRoy, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, as recorded December 7, 1893, in Register of Births Docket No. 1. 

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Tri Co Clippings 1936 Review CUMMINGS / INMAN  -  Shower Honors Bride-To-Be  -- Wednesday evening, December 16, a delightful shower was given in honor of Miss Virginia CUMMINGS who is soon to become the bride of Mr. Glenn INMAN.

The party was held at the home of Miss Alta NEWELL, who, with Mrs. Louis BENSON and Miss Eleanor WHITELTY, acted as hostess.  Christmas greens, poinsettias and candles made a festive setting for the shower.

Dessert was served and after an evening of games, kitchen articles were exchanged and then presented with many of the lovely gifts to the guest-of-honor.  Guests included:  Misses Virginia CUMMINGS, Virginia TUTON, Florence SLINGERLAND, Maude LYON, Elsie DUNBAR, Eleanor WHITELEY, Alta NEWELL and Mesdames Wayne ALEXANDER, Samuel CANEDY, Jr., Robert CHRISTIAN, Fred SNYDER, Louis BENSON and Lamarr HOLCOMBE.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm 1940 Clippings Troy Music Club Has Annual Guest Meeting - About 100 persons were present on Tuesday evening when the Troy Music Club  held its annual guest meeting in the parlors of the Presbyterian Church.  The President, Mrs. George McCABE, welcomed the guests and expressed the club's appreciation to the members of the orchestra, under the directions of Mrs. John L. PARSONS, for their participation in the program.  Mrs. Harry CRUMBLING was program chairman  and the following numbers were presented:

Orchestra - "Andante" - C. W. Gluck, "Sleeping Beauty" Op.66 Tschaikowsky;

Vocal Solo "Elsa's Dream" Lohengrin-Wagner, Mrs. John DEEMY accompanied by Mrs. Victor ELLENBERGER;

Piano solo "Prelude" Chopin, Miss Beatrice McNITT;

Choral Fantasia - from the opera "Lohengrin" Solo parts by Miss Alta NEWELL, Mr. John DEEMY, Mr. Fayette POMEROY, Mr. P. W. FURST. Directed by Mrs. John R. DEEMY, accompanied by Mrs. Victor ELLENBERGER

Reading - "Platform Performance" Cornelia OTIS SKINNER, Miss RuthGOODMAN

Vocal Solo - "Air of  Elizabeth" Tannhauser -Wagner Mrs. John L. PARSONS, accompanied by Miss Beatrice McNITT.

Choral Fantasia - from the opera Tannauser Solo parts by Mrs. C. H. COUCH, Mr. John DEEMY, Mr. Robert WILLIAMS, directed by Mrs. John L. PARSONS, accompanied by Mrs. Harry A. CRUMBLING.

Orchestra "Russian Overture" N. Glazaroff -"Naughty Marietta" Victor Herbert.  Personnel of orchestra: Director Mrs. John L. PAR SONS; piano Miss Beatrice McNITT; violins Mrs. George CASE, Mr. Oliver MITCHELL, Mrs. L. R. GULLIAUME, Mr. Richard TATE; flute Mr. Allen PRIOR; cello Mrs. John R. DEEMY; cornet Mr. Fred SNYDER; clarinet Mr. Robert WILLIAMS; trombone Mr. Walter DeWITT; alto horn Dr. Clifton b. DOANE; bass Mr. John BYNES, Mansfield.

Personnel of Choral Group - Soprano- Mrs. C. H. COUCH, Mrs. W. R. CROMAN, Mrs. H . A. CRUMBLING, Mrs. J. R. DEEMY, Miss Alta NEWELL, Mrs. John L. PARSONS, Miss Louise PARSONS, Mrs. James PECKHAM, Miss Henrietta PIERCE, Mrs. Lee SMITH, Miss Irene  VanNOY; Alto- Mrs. Lawrence BROWN, Mrs. Walter DeWITT, Mrs. C. B. DOANE, Mrs. L. R.GULLIAUME, Mrs. Lamar HOLCOMBE, Mrs. George McCABE, Mrs. Thomas MEIKLE, Mrs. Frederick POMEROY, Mrs. L. R. VanDEUSEN, Mrs. Glenn WOLFANGER; Tenor- Mr. John R. DEMMY, Rev. Phillip FURST; Bass- Mr. Fayette POMEROY, Mr. Robert WILLIAMS.

At the conclusion of the program a social hour was enjoyed and refreshments were served by the following hostesses: Mrs. Walter DeWITT, Mrs. W. R. CROMAN, Mrs. James PECKHAM, Mrs. Albert HARRINGTON, Mrs. Leonard SUMMERS, Mrs. O.W. JAQUISH, Mrs. Henry MITCHELL, Miss Henrietta PIERCE.

www.thedailyreview.com Towanda PA Daily Review 10/21/2002  Glancing Backwards  50 Years Ago 10/21/1952  The Troy High School Senior program on Friday afternoon, Oct. 17, was in the form of a play, which was arranged by the eighth grade, under the supervision of Mrs. Floyd Wright and Mrs. Lamar Holcombe.

Lamarr-LaMar-Hi-Hiram Holcombe and Mabel Jefferson Marriage took place at Methodist Episcopal Church Minister: Rev Howard I Andrews

 

      6.  Joseph C Koch Cook, born 1852 in Cherry Mills, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died July 22, 1893.  He was the son of 12. Conrad Koch Cook and 13. Matilda-Mechtunde Baumgartner.  He married 7. Hanna-Hannah Sick September 15, 1873 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

      7.  Hanna-Hannah Sick, born May 10, 1853; died March 14, 1924.  She was the daughter of 14. Frantz-Francis Charles-Franz Karl Sick and 15. Hannah Rheinfried Reinfried.

  http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/  Joseph Cook

  Author: Tina Pastusic  Date: 8 Sep 2002 1:08 AM GMT 

  Surnames: Cook

  Classification: Obituary

The Sullivan Gazette July 27, 1893

Joseph C. Cook, of this place, died Saturday morning of a complication of diseases from which he had been suffering for about six years, for the last two years compelling him to cease laboring at his trade.

Mr. Cook was born and reared in Cherry township and conducted a wagon shop at Cherry Mills for several years and about 11 years ago he moved to Dushore and continued at the same business here until his failing health compelled him to retire.

He was a kind neighbor and a model citizen and will be missed very much by the people of Dushore and vicinity. Mr. Cook was bout 41 years of age and in good circumstances.

He leaves a wife and three daughters.

The remains were interred at the cemetery of St. Basil’s church Monday. The family has the sympathy of the community in their bereavement.

Children of Joseph Cook and Hanna-Hannah Sick are:

       3              i.   Jennie-Roseanna Jane Koch Cook, born August 22, 1876 in Cherry Mills, Cherry Township, Pennsylvania; died January 19, 1969 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Vell-Survellon Burr Holcombe November 29, 1900 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

ii.   Belle-Anna Belle Cook, born October 02, 1878; died July 29, 1949; married Thomas Morris 1902;

      born December 21, 1876; died May 19, 1946.

                              Pauline's 1st cousins, children of Belle and Thomas:  Helen, Alice, Kathryn, Bernice

iii.     Emma Laura Cook, born June 03, 1890 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died March 09,

      1950; married Vincent James Lynch September 19, 1916 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania;

      born June 19, 1888; died January 14, 1948 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

      Pauline's 1st cousins, children of Emma and Vincent:  Pauline, Mary, Joseph, Georgiana

Vincent Lynch bought the candy store in Dushore in 1935 and remained there until he died suddenly in January, 1948.

 

Generation No. 4

 

      8.  Alonzo B Holcomb Holcombe, born April 01, 1808 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; died July 23, 1842 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 16. Hugh H Holcomb Holcombe and 17. Prudence Bailey.  He married 9. Lemira A Morse December 18, 1838 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

      9.  Lemira A Morse, born November 24, 1817 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 29, 1874 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 18. Perley-Purley Morse and 19. Lucy B Holcomb Holcombe. Alonzo was born April 1, 1808 in the forest where the LeRoy Cemetery now lies. Alonzo and Lemira were farmers on Towanda Creek, LeRoy, PA He was gored by a vicious bull. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, Rt. 414, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania


Matt Carl found these related articles at the Bradford County Historical Society in Towanda, PA:

Democratic Analyzer
Troy, PA
July 28, 1842

On Friday of last week, Mr. Alonzo Holcomb, of LeRoy Township, was killed by a malicious bull, owned by his father. The facts of this dreadful tragedy, as we have learned by the neighbors of Mr. Holcomb, are as follows: The deceased left his house on Friday for the purpose of going a short distance to attend a lawsuit. On his way he passed through the field in which the bull was chained. The next morning his wife became alarmed in consequence of his not returning to his home; she accordingly went in pursuit of him. In passing through the field spoken of, she found the body of her husband, mangled in the most shocking manner. It is supposed that Mr. Holcomb untied the bull for the purpose of leading him to water, and that on the way thither the bull made an attack upon him and killed him before he was prepared to make the least resistance.

Here is another version of the Alonzo story:


Bradford Porter
Towanda, PA
July 27, 1842

DEPLORABLE CASUALTY

We have just heard of an accident, resulting in the death of a worthy citizen of our county, more shocking to the sensibilities of human nature than any thing which has come under our notice for a long time. Mr. Alonzo B. Holcomb, a farmer, of LeRoy Township, was the owner of a valuable bull which he kept chained to a stake in a field on his farm. On Friday last, Mr. Holcomb, as is supposed, undertook to remove the stake to another part of the field, when he was attacked by the bull and gored to death. So furious were the assaults of the animal, that the man was literally torn piece-meal; not an article of clothing was found upon his person except the wrist band of his shirt. After accomplishing his work of destruction, the bull approached the house when his head and horns were observed by some of the family to be covered with blood, and on search being made, the mutilated remains of the unfortunate man were discovered, near where the bull had been chained.

One emotional experience for me was walking through the LeRoy Cemetery for the first time - it was like walking through my family tree, I knew their names but had never meet them, looked around and loved where they choose to live - it was a rather strange experience, not one I'd expected. Per Linda Mutzer 6/20/2001

Lemire Morse Holcomb's line continues back one step - same as Hugh Holcomb, brother of Truman.

Lemire, granddaughter of Truman H Holcomb married Alonzo Holcomb, son of Hugh Holcomb (Tremens' brother) her 2nd cousin.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm 1850 LeRoy PA Census

Morse David 23 M  InnKeeper PA 115 71

Morse Mary 18 F   NY 115 71

Holcomb Lamira 32 F   PA 115 71

Children of Alonzo Holcombe and Lemira Morse are:

       4              i.   Pierson Alonzo Holcomb Holcombe, Sergeant, born March 09, 1842 in Corning, Steuben Co, New York; died December 29, 1908 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; married Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott August 24, 1864 in Alba, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Mariann Marion Holcomb Holcombe, born Bat. 1839 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died Bat. 1840.  Census: 1850, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

 

      10.  Matthew-Mathew Mott, born May 19, 1808 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died March 12, 1877 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 20. John Mott II and 21. Elea Minner.  He married 11. Mary Ann Knickerbocker 1834 in New York.

      11.  Mary Ann Knickerbocker, born October 20, 1811 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died March 31, 1853 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 22. Laurence Lawrence Knickerbocker and 23. Pheobe Juliana Post. Burial Mott Cemetery, Southside of LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Occupation: 1853, Tanner, first in Shandakon, NY, then building the first tannery on Towanda Creek on the Southside of LeRoy, PA Will: September 15, 1879, Probated in Bradford Co, PA listing 12 of his children, 5 being minors

Matthew Mott is Pat Mott Gobea and my connecting ancestor.  Pat descends on his second wife Polly McCraney's line while I descend on his line from his first wife Mary Ann Knickerbocker  Per Linda Mutzer

MOTT, MOTE:  (English), dweller near a moat; or near a mound or embankment. - per "New Dictionary of American Family Names" by Elsdon C Smith

Pauline Holcombe's nieces finished putting together a book they call "Aunt Paulie's Book" in 1997 for a Holcombe Reunion that was held in LaPorte, PA.  This book is a collection of the information that Pauline had begun putting together before she died.  The following letter is printed on page 8 of that book:

A letter written April 6, 1904 by Sophi, the daughter of Matt, to her son Vell B Holcombe who was preparing a write up for Streby's History.  Sophi tells her son that she does not spell and write like she once did . . .

"Mathew Mott was borned in Delawer, Ulster County Nov. 6, 1808.  His father was John II second who was born in Glasco, England, in 1786-came to America in 1799-married Miss Elea Minner of Ulster County, 1804 and lived thare, was berried in Cold Brook cemety whare the Ulster and Delawar Rail Road runs whare they made a farm from once a heavy forest.  Matthews father died when he was a lad & his mother married a Mr. Haffry for her second husband, but Mathew lived with his Grand Parents on what is called sofsan creik in NY.  He marid Mary Ann Knickerbocker, daughter of Lawrance Knickerbocker whos mother was Anis Ingerham, of the city of deeds in England.  His brother's name was John Knickerbocker.  Lawrence married Phoebe J. Post, daughter of Adrean Post, their family names is Hiram, John, Hisskrah who staved in Andersan Vill Prison.  Andrew Jackson who was drummer in 1864-5, he returned & is still living.  Mary Ann, Eliza, Catherine, Harriet.

Mathew Mott was a tanor by trade, his first tanory was in NY Shandakon by name, his bark was ground by Horse Power. When he moved to LeRoy Pennsylvania in 1853 he used water Power. after mooving to LeRoy his

wife died but of this union 4 sons and 2 daughters, Knick, Hiram, Prat, Mathew, Phebe and Sophia.  He married again Miss Polly McCraney of this place when 4 daughters and 3 sons, Fremont, Tomas, Samuel, Mary, Mirty, Alice and Annie."

per "The History of Bradford Co" He bought a farm from Albert Pickord where he built a large tannery run by water power from the streams that flow down from the south mountains in the little Village of LeRoy, PA 

per Pat Mott Gobea, 2000  The only other clues on the family may be a Thomas Mott, listed on an 1810 Delaware Co., NY Census and some deeds with a Thomas and Susannah Mott signing with Matthew, plus the name of Thomas is a name that is carried down to the present generations. At the time Matthew removed from New York with his 1st wife Mary Ann in 1850 Delaware Co. was involved in a Rental War.  Was he involved? It is known that in February of 1850 he bought part of Donald Shaw's Tannery for $1,000 and in October he sold his share back to Donald Shaw for $3,550. (Good interest!) Did Matthew break with the Landlords (Mary Ann's parents)?  Was he a "BlackSheep".  No matter what, he was obviously an outstanding person of many strong and different characteristics. Matthew was listed as a farmer on the census records, but he was also a tanner, building the first Tanery on the Towanda Creek at Leroy. His will was probated the 15th of September 1879 in Bradford Co., PA listing 12 of his children, 5 being minors.

(The Knickerbocker Genealogy says born in the City of Middletown, Orange Co., NY other records show Middletown, Delaware Co., NY)

Matthew Mott was 69 years old at his death.  "His delight was in the law of the Lord." is inscribed on the monument on his grave, which is located in the Mott/McCraney Cemetery on the southside of Towanda Creek in LeRoy, PA.  This is a private fenched-in cemetery, located in a field, down a dirt road.

Knickerbocker Family Page  http://www.knic.com/

****Subj: email list Date:6/16/03 4:31:25 PM Eastern Daylight Time

From:dbarber@houston.rr.com To:knic@knic.com Hello!

I am of the Zeddock P. Mott family lineage. My 3rd great grandfather, Matthew Mott married Mary Ann Knickerbocker in the mid 1800s. This line was brought to Texas in the late 1800s and lives now in the Houston/Galveston/San Antonio area. Thanks so much for the hard work on your website, it was a wonderful surprise to see.  Sincerely, Patti Mott Barber

Children of Matthew-Mathew Mott and Mary Knickerbocker are:

       5              i.   Sophi-Sophia Elizabeth Mott, born February 15, 1848 in Hamden, Delaware Co, New York; died April 26, 1909 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; married Pierson Alonzo Holcomb Holcombe, Sergeant August 24, 1864 in Alba, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Knick-Uncle Nick-Knickerbocker N Mott, born April 04, 1836 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died April 08, 1885 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Lucina Holcomb Holcombe June 16, 1858 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born November 03, 1839 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died 1930 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: April 11, 1885, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA  Knickerbocker worked as a blacksmith for the Carbon Run Coal Co. on South Mountain.

 http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm 1902 Troy Register Local News Troy PA Twenty-first Year, #1020, Thursday, August 14, 1902 Charles Mott of Bernice, has been spending a few days past with his mother, Mrs. K. N. Mott at LeRoy.

 http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Granville Center NEWS The Troy Register Troy, PA  Twenty-second Year, #104123, (As is) Thursday, August 27, 1903 Mrs. Clarissa Lindley and Mrs. Lucina Mott of Leroy, visited their sister, Mrs. S. A. Rockwell recently.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Troy Register, Troy PA Twenty-second Year, #104132, Thursday, October 29, 1903 (Leroy News)  Mrs. Samuel Kitchen, died at her home Oct. 13th from paralysis.  She leaves to mourn her loss a husband three sons and one daughter.  Funeral services were held Thursday in the church of Christ in LeRoy.  Rev. G. P. Morse spoke ver pathetically to the bereaved parents.  Emery Kitchen and wife and Robt. Kitchen of Cameron Co., came to attend the funeral, also Mr. and Mrs. Barden and Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell of Mansfield were in attendance.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm LeRoy News Troy Register Volume LI, #14, Friday, April 10, 1914 John Crawn and bride (nee Laura Bellows) of Wysox have been visiting the bride’s sister, Mrs. David Percival and her grandmother, Mrs. S. C. Kitchen

iii.    Hiram Knickerbocker Mott, Justice, born May 18, 1838 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York;

       died May 05, 1914 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Mattie-Mary E Whipple July 01, 1859 in

       Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born February 24, 1838 in New York; died February 11, 1917 in

       Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Census: 1850, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Residence: 1914, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Hiram was known as a devoted Christian  Occupation: 1900, Sold Farm Implements

Political Party: 1878, Justice of the Peace until his death, known as the "Marrying Justice" and tax assessor Service Organization: 1868, Charter member of Leroy Lodge No 843 I.O.O.F.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm The Troy Register  Volume LI, #19, Friday, May 15, 1914

Sam Mott and wife were called here from Harford Mills, N. Y., by the sudden death of his half brother, the late H. K. Mott.

        Those from a distance in attendance at the funeral of the late H. K. Mott, Friday afternoon were:  Omar Mott, wife and daughter of Edinburgh, PA.; John Mott and wife of Elmira; Editor and Mrs. Kiah C. Mott of Meshoppen; Andrew Mott and wife of Franklindale; Mrs. C. S. Holcombe and  three children of Monroeton; Karl Krum and wife ot Towanda; Mrs. George Mott of Elmira; Sam Mott and wife of Harford Mills, N. Y.;  V. B. Holcomb and wife of Dushore:  Sarah Holcomb of Bernice; Frank Holcomb of Laquin; Mrs. Mathew Holcomb of Alba; Irvin Comfort and wife of Troy; Sheriff McCraney and James McCabe of Towanda;  Harry Stevens and wife of Franklindale.  This funeral was one of the largest ever held in LeRoy.  The church was filled to overflowing with sorrowing relatives and friends.  Rev. Porter of Alba officiated, assisted by the Rev. Kunzman of Sayles.  Burial in LeRoy cemetery in charge of I. O. O. F.

Linda,   His Aunt is not listed as a Knickerbocker, so maybe she was a Mott.

March 10, 1904 The Troy Register.

H. K. Mott of LeRoy, has just received a handsome silk head dress from his aunt, Mrs. Eliza Boise of Fish Creek, N.Y.  Mrs. Boise is 87 years of age, and did the work herself during the past few weeks. From Pat Mott Gobea 3/6/2002

Troy Register Volume LI, #18, Friday, May 8, 1914 (Granville Center News) While H. K. Mott of LeRoy, was attending the Baptist quarterly meeting at Bailey Corners on Sunday he was stricken with an apoplectic shock. He was taken to the home of Milton VanNoy, where he lay unconscious until Tuesday morning, when death released him from his suffering

Subj: Hiram K. Mott

Date: 4/14/02 8:34:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time

From: hinnieop@msn.com (Corinne Oplinger)

To:    knic@knic.com

I just found Hiram K. Mott's b. 5/19/1838 wife Mary E. Whipple b. 2/24/1838 buried in the same cemetery as Hiram.  They give her birthrate as 2/24/1838. I also found Knickerbocker Mott in the 1880 Census in LeRoy Township, Bradford County, PA.  They give the following information...

9297 Mott K. W.44M hus blacksmith NYNYNY

9297 Lucina40FwifehousekeeperPAMAMA

9297 William18Msonmine driverPANYPA

9297 Alonzo15Msonat homePANYPA

9297 Lodema8Fdau PANYPA

9297 Augusta7Fdau PANYPA

9297 Infant9mFdau PANYPA

This information was found at Tri-Counties Genealogy & History Sites by Joyce M. Tice, Bradford County Townships, PA.

Thank You, Corinne Oplinger

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm1900 Bradford County Directory Standing Stone Township Transcribed and Submitted by Patty DECKER Shumway LeRoy Township  

Crayton, Thomas R., rfd 72 Canton Fertilizer

Griswold, Mrs. E. W., rfd 72 Canton Groceries

Holcomb, E. A. and Son, LeRoy General Merchandise

Holcomb, Mrs. W. D., LeRoy General Merchandise

Manley, Ray B. and Co., LeRoy General Merchandise

Meeker, A. L., LeRoy Jewelry

Morse, R. K., LeRoy Feed

Mott, H. K., LeRoy Farm Implements

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  LeRoy News Troy Register Volume LI, #19, Friday, May 15, 1914 Mrs. C. S. Holcombe of Monroeton is staying for a time with her mother, Mrs. Mary Mott.

LeRoy News Troy Register Volume LI, #21, Friday, May 29, 1914 Mrs. Ethel Krum of Towanda has been staying with her grandmother, Mrs. H. K. Mott.

                      iv.   Phebe-Phoebe C Mott, born December 06, 1840 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died May 07, 1931 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Servelon Servellan Bannen Morse, Justice October 10, 1858 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born April 08, 1838 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 15, 1909 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Service Organization: 1872, Golden Rod Rebekah Lodge No 567 IOOF of Granville Center, PA.  Founding Member in 1874 of Rebekah Lodge of LeRoy, PA when it disbanded she joined Golden Seal No 381 of West Franklin, PA.  Oct 19, 1922 Charter Member of White Dove No 538 at LeRoy, PA Census 1850, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Servelon served as Justice of the Peace for 20 years  Homestead of his birthplace - The Old Morse Tavern of his father Service Organization: 1869, Member of the LeRoy Odd Fellows Lodge No 843 until his death

"I also want to record the fact that it was my privilege to call upon your great great grandmother Phoebe Mott Morse about 1931 a year before your grandmother and I were married. The two of us took a ride one-day to the Morse homestead when Phoebe was about 92. She was a very tiny person."  Except from notes by Ralph Ellsworth Fudge on 20APR1988 for Elaine Grayson (Plumlee). "I have kept the original spellings and structure." David N Grayson

Newspaper article written on the occasion of the celebration of Phoebe's 90th Birthday Dec 6, 1930

"Granville Center Woman Member of Rebekah Lodge For More Than 50 Years"

  The members of Golden Rod Rebekah Lodge No 567 IOOF of Granville Center extended an invitation to the members of the various lodges to meet with them on Saturday, December 6th, in the annex of the Church of Christ at Granville Center to celebrate the 90th birthday of one who is considered the oldest active Rebekah in the county of Bradford if not in the state.  A goodly number responded.

  Mrs. Pheobe C Morse, an active member of White Dove Rebekah Lodge No 538 of LeRoy, PA was the honoree.

  Amid a continuous rain the guests arrived for a picnic dinner at noon, with well filled baskets that all Rebekahs know how to prepare.  In the center of the table was a large birthday cake with the words "Mother" and "90 Years" and in the center, the emblem of the order, the three links, surrounded with numerous pink candles.  After the guests were seated the blessing was asked and everybody sang the following:

  "Grandma Morse, how we love her.

  And how faithful she has been.

  Always at her post of duty,

  Always been Rebekah's friend.

  So we're glad to have her with us.

  Glad she is our honored guest;

  Now we all say welcome, Grandma;

  Welcome, Welcome to our guest."

  There was a card attached to a very pretty plant which was presented by the Granville Center Rebekah Lodge with the following:  "The Granville Rebekahs are a loyal bunch for they love Grandma Morse very much, a life well spent is the very best test, and we honor you for doing your best.  Our wishes for you at this happy hour are the best that friendship and love an inspire.  We hope you'll accept this as a token, that our love for you will never be broken."

  Mrs. Matie Bailey then read the following tribute to Grandma Morse.

  "Some times I think we wait too

        long, the kind thing to say ---

  About the ones we love the best,

  And so I thought to-day

  I'd just sit down and think of

        things

  I'd really like to say

  Of my good Sister, Auntie Morse

  On her 90th birthday.

  The years now number ninety ---

  A very rainy day

  I heard her cheery "How-de-do",

  And felt with delay.

  I'd have some one to be my

        friend

  With olds ones far away.

  She has laughed with me

  And laughed at me

  And cried when things were sad

  And tried to make the best of

        things

  If they were good or bad

  And this same kindly Christian

        friend

  She's been to most of you

  Let's wish her many more birthdays

  With old friends tried and true."

  The Misses Louise Bailey and Mary Manley sang two selections after which all joined in singing various hymns and old time songs.

  Following is a little sketch of a life well spent in Odd Fellowship:

  Phoebe C Morse united with the Rebekah Lodge at Granville Center (PA) in the year 1872.  LeRoy being her home town she helped to institute a Rebekah Lodge at LeRoy and became a member in 1874.  A number of years later the old LeRoy Rebekah Lodge disbanded and later she united with Golden Seal Rebakah Lodge No 381 at West Franklin (PA).  On October 19th, 1922 she became a Charter Member of White Dove Rebekah Lodge No 538 at LeRoy, (PA) where she is now an active member.

  Grandma Morse as she is always known, is willing at all times to do her bit in the welfare of the order and with her witty mind how often we have heard her at various installations and Past Grand meetings given her good advice and testimony of the order she loves so dearly.  Her husband, S B Morse, was a member of the Odd Fellows from 1869 to the time of his death in 1909.  The whole family seemed to be enthused over Odd Fellowship for at intervals her three sons, two daughters, four grandsons, two granddaughters, and one great grandson were members of this great order, twelve being members of the LeRoy Odd Fellows and Rebekah Lodge and at the present time there are three generations of her family members of LeRoy Lodge No 843, the oldest member being her son, Rancy K Morse, who will be entitled to a 50 year Vet Jewel in October, 1931."

                      v.   Pratt-Uncle Zeb-Zeddock Pratt Mott, Sr, born February 01, 1844 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died July 15, 1926 in Galveston, Galveston Co, Texas; married Lina-Lena-Philene M Combs January 07, 1877; born August 14, 1851 in Locust Corner, Milford, Ohio; died April 19, 1918 in Galveston, Galveston Co, TX. Zed's burial: July 16, 1926, Evergreen Cemetery, Galveston, Galveston Co, Texas  Her Burial: April 26, 1918, Galveston Oddfellow's Rest, Galveston, Galveston

                              Co, Texas  Census: 1900, Galveston, Galveston Co, TX  Occupation: Owned and operated The Galveston Creamery, prior to that employed as a Clerk for the Railroad that ran from Houston to Galveston TX per Pat Mott Gobea 

                              Galveston, Sept. 11, 1900

"Dear father and mother:  This is from Rudolph.  Frank and myself are all that are left.  Belle and Louise are no more.  There is not a house standing in Galveston Island.  Frank and myself were both away from home when the flood came and not get home.  Charley Juneman, and Frank and myself tried to get home together.  Charley lost his buggy, Frank lost his milk wagon and one of the horses.  I lost my cart and we barely saved our lives.

  Belle and the baby and Ella Anderson and about 100 other people were in Pam Cleary's big white house and when the house went to pieces, everybody was lost except Cleary and his little boy.

  I found Belle's body yesterday about 12 o'clock and wrapped her up in canvas, then I went to the police station for help and they told me that I must either bury her where she lies or they would throw her overboard.  So I went back and buried her; two men helped me.  Just think of it.  I had to bury my own dear wife --it's just terrible.

Frank buried Louise in Cobb's field.  If we had been at home we could at least have died with them.  I did not find the baby or Ella

Anderson, altough I searched everywhere.  I came very near getting drowned again yesterday.  I had to throw away my coat and swim; all I have is and undershirt and a pair of trousers but I expect to get some clothers as soon as the stores are opened.  I am almost unable to walk as my feet are full of nail holes and my bones are very stiff.

  When I think of my lost wife, baby, my sister Tillie, her four children, and my brother Ernest, I could just as well be dead too.

Frank is so brave.  He doesn't even cry but I know his heart is breaking and bleeding.  His wife had four men with her and they could not save her.  All Frank has in the world is a cow and horse and the clothes he wears on his back.

  Don't let this sad news break your hearts, for some one had to tell you.  Frank is going to try to telegraph so I thought it best for me to write.  If you get this letter pray for my poor wife.  She was so

good and true and did not deserve the death she had.  You can thank God you were not here, for nothing in this world would have saved you.

  August Sharper is the luckiest man on the island.  He and his family drifted a mile and three-quarters on the roof of their house, others are all lost with the exception of one or two out of every family. Juneman and Burgess gone, in fact everybody is gone.  In town they are hauling bodies in sand wagons piled up, black and white all mixed, and are dumping them overboard at sea.  I will write again soon.  God bless my poor Belle.

                           Your son,

                             Rudolph."

In view of the peculiarly sad calamity that has overtaken Mr. Mott's family it seems very appropriate that money should be sent them, and all contributions should be sent to Z. P. Mott, LeRoy, PA.

                A COPY from Pat Mott Gobea

Uncle Zeb was visiting his family in LeRoy, PA at the time of the worst hurricane of the century, which occured on Sept 8, 1900 in Galveston, Texas.  Grandma Goldie Comfort was told that Belle was found because her hair had tangled around a fence and that kept her body from washing out to sea.  In the year 2005, this hurricane is still a major topic on the Weather Channel as each hurricane season begins and again on and around the Sept date.  The city of Galveston built a sea wall as a result of the 1900 hurricane, that has since that time been a major protection of the citizens of Galveston.  To this date, any hint of a hurricane in Galveston results in a major evauation of the area - what happened in 1900 continues to impact the year 2005.  Per Linda Mutzer

Tri Co http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm

The Troy Register  Nineteenth Year, #950, Wednesday, September 19, 1900

Victims of Galveston. Bradford County People Meet Death In the Great Flood.

Mr. and Mrs. Z. P. Mott and son of Galveston, Texas, are visiting his brother H. K. Mott, Esq., at LeRoy, and other friends in this section, having been in the North several weeks. Since the awful disaster at Galveston they have been greatly worried over the safety of the other members of their family, two children both married, a son B. F. Mott and daughter, Mrs. R. M. Hermann, and a child of Mrs. Hermann. They had been unable to get any word from them until Monday, when in Troy at the REGISTER office, in looking over a list of the victims names of his son and daughter and child among the list of known dead, and he fears that the other two are among the unknown dead. Their residences were in the path of greatest destruction. Although Mr. Mott had feared the worst had happened to his loved ones, yet when his fears were confirmed by the list the knowledge was almost more than he could bear and the blow a crushing one.

Besides the loss of half of his family, practically all of his extensive property is a total loss, everything being swept away in the great rush of water. Besides his city property he had also a fine dairy and milk farm on the island in the suburbs of Galveston. Now, everything is gone, the land swept clean, a family and a fortune taken in a hour. None but those who have suffered by it can realize the awfulness of this great calamity.

Mr. Mott will return to Galveston soon, but has not decided whether he will remain there or not.

Tri Co http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm

Nineteenth Year, #951, Wednesday, September 26, 1900

The friends of Z. P. Mott have started a movement at LeRoy to raise a fund for his benefit to enable home to return to Galveston and again start in business on a small scale and reunite his family. It is believed that the people of Bradford County are always ready to respond to an appeal for aid in a worthy cause, and that Mr. Mott’s loss will appeal especially to them, have made arrangements to receive and forward any amount of money that may be sent in. Should the donor prefer the money may be sent to R. K. Morse, LeRoy, Pa.

9/25/2001 Just noticed in the last Rootsweb newsletter that there is a Galveston Storm of the Century site - on my Mott side, Uncle Zeb had a daughter, daughter-in-law and grandchildren who died in the Sep 8, 1900 storm - so I found this of interest and decided to check it out.  The site says that between 7,000 and 10,000 people died in that hurricane - the worst disaster in our country's history.  It's interesting to note some of the similarities between the 2 major disasters of that and the WTC. Linda Mutzer

From: Patricia Gobea  Sent: Friday, September 21, 2001 8:34 AM Subject: Galveston

Linda, I sent him a copy of the letter and the family group sheet for Z. Pratt Mott with a request for any contact with a descendant of that line. Pat

From: Patricia Gobea To: mic@barnettesbooks.com Sent: Friday, September 21, 2001 2:57 AM

Subject: Galveston Flood  Sir: I have a copy of a letter written to Pratt Mott from his son who was in the Galveston Flood that may help identify some of the people who died in the flood.  If you do not have it as it was published in a Towanda, PA newspaper, I will send it. 

Patricia Mott Gobea  pmmgo@npacc.net

From: Mic Barnette  To: Patricia Gobea Sent: Friday, September 21, 2001 11:34 AM

Subject: Re: Galveston Flood  Hi Patricia:

Thanks for sending a copy of the letter.

I will be looking everyone up on the City directory and then the census.

I will be gleaning information from everything I can.

This letter and your notes help place a couple families together. When the names are alphabetical it takes extended families out of context. The letter help put them back together.

At this point I know no one else working on the Motts. 

I will be putting the information you and others offer with the names. If I see anyone else working on the Motts I will notify you.  Thanks, Very Much. MIC

Mic Barnette wrote a weekly genealogy column in the Houston Chronicle from 1992 through 1994, when it was discontinued.

Visit Barnette's Family Tree Online Bookstore http://http://micbarnette.bravepages.com/

Visit My Galveston 1900 Storm website at

http://http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barnette/

Welcome to the Great Galveston Storm Website

On September 11, 2001 terrorists struck America and the World by hijacking four airliners and using them as loaded guided missles to destroy the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC. The days after the terrorist strikes were probably much like the days in September 1900 when one of the worst storms covered Galveston Island with between 8 and 15 feet of water and killing between 7,000 and 10,000 people.

This website is a precursor to an envisioned future publication dedicated to knowing something of the people who died in the Great Galveston Storm. The people who died in the Great Galveston Storm were live, vibrant, breathing people. In many cases more than one person in a family perished. In other cases, whole families died. The world has moved on, but, they should not be forgotten.

The Great Galveston Storm of 1900 occurred prior to the time when hurricanes had names. It had winds clocked at over 100 miles per hour when the wind gauge broke. The whole Island of Galveston was covered by at least 6 to 8 feet of water from a storm surge and it is estimated that between 7,000 and 10,000 died. This storm remains the highest death toll from a natural disaster in American history.

Much has been written about the Galveston Storm. Most of what has been written, however, has been the stories of those who survived the Storm. This website on the other hand is an attempt to identify as many as possible of those who died during the Storm. The newspapers published the names of about 5,000 persons. In many cases it says Mr. Jones, his wife and three children died. A goal of the project is to identify which Mr. Jones and give names, ages and other information to his wife and his children.

The website will be a work in progress. Initially it will list the names listed in the newspaper. By perusing the city directory it is hoped some information can be obtained and place the family in their respective census enumeration district neighborhoods. By using the 1900 census it is hoped even more information can be discovered. By having the information on a website it is hoped descendants or relatives of the deceased will visit the site and offer even more information to help give life to those who died. When all the work has been completed a book may be in order.

Anyone visiting the website is urged to contact Mic Barnette at mic@barnettesbooks.com  with information on anyone who perished in the Storm. If you have photographs of people who died or places affected by the Storm they may be considered  for inclusion on this website. You will be duly credited for the information you provide.

In addition to the names of those who died, the website has a list of the people, cities, churches, companies and other entities that contributed to relief funds to help the survivors of Galveston try to recover from the Storm and begin a new life.

Be sure to read the story of the Storm in the Before the Storm, The Approaching Storm, During the Storm and After the Storm segments. Links to other websites relating to the Storm and a listing of sources, books and the like will also be on the website.

Date: Sun, 28 Apr 2002 20:32:44 -0400 Subject: Croak-Mott

Dear Linda, I finally heard from the Mott side of the family. I've had no luck with it. MY first cousin, twice removed was Mary Croak, b.Feb 5, 1896, Towanda, Pa d. Dec 1978, Endicott, NY. She was the oldest of 6 children born to John Croak & Rose Deegan. She married Zed Mott on Jan 17, 1925. I know Zed was the son of Alonzo P. Mott & Minnie A. Morse & Zed's G--Grandparents were Matthew Mott & Mary Ann Knickerbocker. I know nothing about Zed & Mary's children or even if they had any. I have a lot info on the Croak family and other relatives I can send you. By the way, I noticed you spell Zed as Zeb, Just wondering which is the correct spelling. Look forward to hearing from you. Thank You very much.  Sincerely, Paul Croak pmclimo@bytheshore.com

4/28/2002 Paul,  It's great to hear from another Mott connection!  You're right, they are few and far between. Zeb goes back to my Grandmother Goldie Comfort's Uncle Zeb Mott, everyone in my family knew him as Uncle Zeb where he is actually Zeddock Pratt Mott, whose sister, Sophi Mott Holcomb referred to as Pratt.        Figuring that one out was a challenge, thankfully Pat Mott Gobea saw my question on the Knickerbocker site and contacted me with the answer.

The husband of Mary Croak is indeed Zed I understand that Zed and Mary had a son who died in 1990 and he had a son Joe Mott who lived in Endicott, NY and that John and Rose are buried in St Basils in Dushore PA.  That is where Sophi's son, Vell Holcombe is also buried.  Linda

From: "Dwain Barber" <dbarber@houston.rr.com>

To: "Patricia Gobea" <pmmgo@npacc.net>, "Linda Mutzer" <treekeeper@verizonmail.com>

Subject: Galveston mott's Date: Wed, 4 Jun 2003 15:14:10 -0500

 First, I think I have the occurrence that inspired ZP Sr. to write that letter in 1925.  This was the letter about the girls walking around "half naked", and the crowds that watched.  I've found that beginning in the early 1920s, Galveston had "Bathing Girl Revues".  These were held annually on the seawall and beach.  They began as something that local girls took part in, but it grew to an international event, and evolved into today's Miss Universe Pageant.  I first read about the pageants and their becoming the Miss Universe Pageant in a book called Galveston, A History of the Island, by Gary Cartwright.

I found an old Bible of ZP Sr's.  Inside were a note written by Sophie and a newspaper clipping about a 50th wedding anniversary.  The note Sophie wrote is very hard to read, and I haven't begun to discern who all the folks are that are mentioned in the news clipping. I've also got a copy of the 1920 census from Galveston City. with ZP Jr's family listed.  It's a big family!  And by this time, he's listed as widowed . . . and the baby's only 3, I think.  Patti

1920 CENSUS - Galveston County, Texas Recorded of 5 Jan 1920

                            STATUS  AGE  MARITAL  Birthplace Fathers BP    Mothers BP     Occupation

Mott, Zeddock P. Jr.     Head      35      Widowed   Texas   New York    Ohio       Milk Dealer

Mott, LeRoy B.            Son       16      Single    Texas   Texas     England

Mott, Louis                 Son        14      Single    Texas     Texas    England

Mott, Claudie               Son      13       Single    Texas    Texas    England 

Mott, Zeddock              Son    12           Single    Texas               Texas               England

Mott, Belle                 Dau          10       Single  Texas                  Texas     England

Mott, Jesse               Son         8          Single   Texas                 Texas   England

Mott, Wilbur                 Son      3 3/12    Single   Texas              Texas               England

It also lists at this address:

Stoddard, Sue E.          Housekeeper (White) 37 yrs, Divorced

Farris, Alma Sue          Adopted Child (White) 14 yrs. Single         

      both born in Texas

**** The birthplaces for Benjamin and Lena Belle are taken from census records.  It shows that Z.P. Sr. didn't move directly from Pennsylvania to Galveston, but rather went to Ohio, then Tennessee, to San Antonio, and finally to Galveston.  I can find no record so far of Z.P. or any other family member serving in the Spanish American War, although he did live in the area at the time the Rough Riders were training in Texas.  The San Antonio City Directories of the time show him to be employed as a clerk.

When this family moved to Galveston in the mid to late 1890s, Z.P. Sr. continued to work as a clerk, for the railroad that ran from the island to Houston.  Benjamin, though, began to build the family business "5 miles west of the city".  The Galveston Creamery would be a viable part of Galveston for the next twenty years and would employ several generations of Motts.  They specialized in butter, buttermilk and cream cheese.  In future years, Z.P. Jr. would take over the creamery when B.F. and his family moved to nearby Brazoria County to farm.  Z.P. Jr. ran the creamery until the late 1920s when they closed, perhaps because of the growth/competition of other creameries on the island, like the Sanitary Creamery.  Sanitary Creamery was a large creamery there, eventually employing members of the Mott family.  L.B. Mott Sr. even worked there as the manager at one time per Patti Barber 7/2003

I have some other little Bibles also.  I have one marked on the inside "Mount Pilgrim Sunday school Book" June 6, 1890.  It's actually a book of hymns. I also have  an old book of hymns/poems  I'm guessing it's ZP Srs wife, Philena's.  It's marked on the inside -- "1894  This book was the present to us from Father and Mother Combs.  Olive Branch, Ohio. "   Patti 6/5/2003

                      vi.   John Watson Twin To Matthew Burr Mott, born May 30, 1850 in Delaware Co, New York; died August 26, 1851 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: August 29, 1851, Mott Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

                     vii.   Matt-Matthew Burr Twin To John Watson Mott, born May 30, 1850 in Delaware Co, New York; died March 20, 1904 in Liberty, Tioga Co, Pennsylvania; married Matilda C Root Roupp December 24, 1876 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born September 01, 1858 in Liberty, Tioga Co, Pennsylvania; died July 20, 1918 in Liberty, Tioga Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: Liberty, Tioga Co, PA

Matthew B. and Matilda had no children.  He kept a machine shop with Roy Miller and had a printing press on the second floor of Royal Miller's building in Liberty Boro, just east of the Lutheran Church.

LeRoy Heritage Museum's Industry in LeRoy 2002  leroymuseum@yahoo.com

Tannery  "The first tannery in the village was operated by Matthew Mott on his farm (now owned by the Jim Jennings family) on the southern side of the Towanda Creek.  People came from miles around with their hides to have them tanned.  Then they were taken to the village shoemaker who made them into boots and shoes."

 

      12.  Conrad Koch Cook, born 1817; died November 14, 1902 in Cherry Mills, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  He married 13. Matilda-Mechtunde Baumgartner Abt. 1842.

      13.  Matilda-Mechtunde Baumgartner, born April 12, 1822; died 1900.  She was the daughter of 26. Joseph Baumgartner and 27. Ursula-Maria Ursula Kani.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/  Conrad Cook

  Author: Tina Pastusic  Date: 27 Nov 2001 1:54 AM GMT 

  Surnames: Cook

  Classification: Obituary

The Sullivan Review November 20, 1902

Conrad Cook, one of the oldest residents of Cherry Township, died at his residence near Cherry Mills, November 14, aged 85 years.

Funeral and Interment at St. Basil's in this place November 15.

He is survived by four sons, William, of Dushore, John and Charles, of Cherry, and Frank of Owego, N.Y. and one daughter, Mary, who remains at home. Death was caused by paralysis.

Children of Conrad Cook and Matilda-Mechtunde Baumgartner are:

                       i.   William L Koch Cook, born October 09, 1847; died January 04, 1921.

                      ii.   Two Infant Koch Cook, born Abt. 1848.

                     iii.   Maria Koch Cook, born 1850; married John Frenndal Abt. 1870; born Abt. 1848.

       6             iv.   Joseph C Koch Cook, born 1852 in Cherry Mills, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died July 22, 1893; married Hanna-Hannah Sick September 15, 1873 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                      v.   Amanda Koch Cook, born Abt. 1854.

                      vi.   Mary Koch Cook, born Abt. 1856.

                     vii.   Frank Koch Cook, born Abt. 1858.

                    viii.   Charles Koch Cook, born Abt. 1859.

                     ix.   John Koch Cook, born Abt. 1860.

      14.  Frantz-Francis Charles-Franz Karl Sick, born April 01, 1815 in Worzsock, Baden, Germany; died July 21, 1872 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 28. Joseph Sick, Sr and 29. Joseph Sick Wife Rinebold.  He married 15. Hannah Rheinfried Reinfried 1840.

      15.  Hannah Rheinfried Reinfried, born May 18, 1820 in Germany; died May 02, 1864 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 30. Charles Reinfried. Burial:  He in Peace Cemetery, Sullivan Co, PA and she in the German Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan Co, PA Occupation: shoemaker.

Francis Charles (called Franz) Sick was born on Apr 1 1815 in Worzsock, Baden, near Rhine R.. He immigrated on Jun 14 1836 to New York City. He was naturalized on Sep 14 1846 in Towanda, PA. He died on Jul 21 1872 in Dushore, PA. Francis Charles Sick came from Germany to New York City, arriving on June 14, 1836. (From naturalization record). Per Bob Sweeney

Children of Frantz-Francis Sick and Hannah Reinfried are:

       7              i.   Hanna-Hannah Sick, born May 10, 1853; died March 14, 1924; married Joseph C Koch Cook September 15, 1873 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Charles S Sick, born February 13, 1841 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died December 12, 1930 in Cherry Mills, Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Hannah Yonkin Yonklin 1866; born 1846; died 1915.  Interment was made in the family plot in Peace cemetery.

                       iii.   Caroline Sick, born August 20, 1842; died December 12, 1920 in Cherry Mills, Sullivan Co,  PA;

                              married Henry Stahl February 05, 1866; born July 04, 1842; died April 22, 1914.

Interment in Fairview cemetery Served In: Civil War Union Army 141st Reg Co R PA Vol War

                      iv.   Joseph Sick, born July 26, 1844; died April 28, 1929; married Emma Graifley August 28, 1866; born Abt. 1846. Served In: Civil War in the Union Army 207th Reg Co C PA Vol

                      v.   Lydia Sick, born January 22, 1846; died January 07, 1929; married Ralph-Raphael Litzelman 1868; born 1844 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died April 1940 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                      vi.   Leo Sick, born February 18, 1848; died June 02, 1896; married Elizabeth Yonkin Yonklin Abt. 1874; born 1854; died 1926.

                     vii.   Wendell Sick, born September 11, 1849 in Overton, Pennsylvania; died October 04, 1940; married Sarah McDonald 1873; born 1851 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died October 10, 1927 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, PA. Burial: St Basil's Church Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan Co, PA

                    viii.   Mary Sick, born June 16, 1851; died July 07, 1923 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married John Baptist Litzelman 1872 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; born October 24, 1847; died 1925 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania.

                     ix.   Augustine Sick, born March 1855; died November 1857.

                      x.   Rosina-Rosanna Sick, born March 15, 1857; died April 28, 1938; married Edward J Weisbrod 1876; born 1849; died 1928.

                     xi.   Anna-Ann-Sarah Annie Sick, born January 03, 1859; died April 24, 1906; married John Weisbrod Abt. 1892; born May 18, 1854; died December 19, 1916.  Burial: Peace Cemetery

                    xii.   Julius John Sick, born December 30, 1861; died August 15, 1946; married Dora-Eudora Speary September 02, 1889; born 1868; died 1951.  Caroline also raised her brother Julius J. Sick

Residence: 1920, Nordmont, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania

                    xiii.   Bill-William Sick, born November 28, 1863 in Cherry Twp, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; died July 29, 1938 in New Albany, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Kate-Catherine Kelly Kelley July 08, 1886 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; born 1865 in Overton, Pennsylvania; died August 28, 1910 in Overton, Pennsylvania.  Burial:  St Francis Church Cemetery, Overton, PA

 

Generation No. 5

 

      16.  Hugh H Holcomb Holcombe, born October 14, 1774 in Granby, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died July 27, 1843 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 32. Eli Holcomb Holcombe, Corporal and 33. Hannah Crofut.  He married 17. Prudence Bailey 1803 in Granville, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

      17.  Prudence Bailey, born October 16, 1784 in Old Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died February 04, 1861 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 34. Oliver Bailey, Sr and 35. Hannah Elizabeth Scoville. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, Rt. 414, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Hugh came with his father Ulster, Bradford Co., PA about the year 1786, and with his brother Sterling cut their way into the wilderness and located lands for their future homes at what is now Leroy.  He built the first grist mill in that section of the county and cleared a large farm. His marriage to Elizabeth Oakley was the first performed in Leroy, PA.  He died of sunstroke.  per Pat Mott Gobea

LeRoy Heritage Museum's Industry in LeRoy  leroymuseum@yahoo.com

"Lumber Mills  The first sawmill in LeRoy was built in 1808 and operated by Hugh Holcomb at the top of the falls in the Gulf Brook.  This brook flows through the center of LeRoy."

"Gristmills  The first gristmill was also built by Hugh Holcomb in 1820.  A mill stone from this mill can be found at the base of the Elizabeth Oakley Holcomb monument in the LeRoy Cemetery along Rt 414 east of LeRoy."  (Monument built by Rancy K Morse)

6/22/2001  About LeRoy, the little signs the highway dept. posts on village limits spelled it that way, and it is French for "the King."  that was how they taught us to spell it in school; it just always stuck. Lynne B Howell

Book By H. C. Bradsby reads as follows:

LEROY TOWNSHIP. Page 465 - 466  G. OAKLEY is reported to have settled in LeRoy about the year 1800, on Towanda creek, at what is called LeRoy corners. He is regarded as the first settler, though this is not very positive. The brothers Hugh and Sterling Holcomb it is known came about the same time, and some say they were before Oakley ; they came from old Sheshequin, as Ulster was then called, and also settled near the corners on what has always been known as the " Holcomb farms."  in 1850, the following is authentically given as the settlements in LeRoy: At the east end of the township, William Cole, Isaac and David Wooster, Isaac Chaapel and Seeley Crofut, George Head,

From: LeRoy Museum leroymuseum@yahoo.com Subject: HOLCOMBE Info

I was at the Bradford County Historical Society the other day.  They have some pages that came out of Hugh Holcombs 1838 ledger book. They have a booklet that I have not seen before. Its 33 pages and describes the first Holcomb Reunion held in LeRoy in the 1870's and the second one held in New Jersey a few years later.

Just thought you'd like to know!  Matt Carl

Tri Co http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  Heverly

Prudence married, 1803, Hugh Holcomb of LeRoy, hers being the first wedding in Granville. She was the mother of Alonzo, Orator, Harvey, Judson, Emeline (Mrs. Tyrus Himes) and Ezra

Hugh Holcombe and Prudence Bailey's was First wedding in Granville, PA

      Children of Hugh Holcombe and Prudence Bailey are:

       8              i.   Alonzo B Holcomb Holcombe, born April 01, 1808 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; died July 23, 1842 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,  Pennsylvania; married Lemira A Morse December 18, 1838 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Bailey Holcomb Holcombe, born Abt. 1809.

                     iii.   Orator Holcomb Holcombe, born May 29, 1810 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died March 19, 1886 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Sylvia Marie Rockwell February 02, 1836 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born August 02, 1817 in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died March 26, 1896.  Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Orator Holcombe and Sylvia Rockwell Marriage was performed By Justice Luman Putnam

                      iv.   Lura Holcomb Holcombe, born July 03, 1812 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died March 23, 1876 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Calvin W Churchill November 08, 1832 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born July 23, 1809 in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; died February 25, 1899 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Calvin was a farmer in Granville Twp., PA

                      v.   Cyrus Holcomb Holcombe, born July 22, 1814 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Lydia Himes February 21, 1839 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born 1815 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He died in Washington.

                      vi.   Harvey-Harry Holcomb Holcombe, born May 29, 1816 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania, died March 20, 1896 in Franklin Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Diana Rockwell January 23, 1840 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born October 13, 1818 in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died June 12, 1880 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) Perlina Dibble August 26, 1882 in East Smithfield, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born 1834 in New York; died 1898.

Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Education: LeRoy School, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Political Party: Republican served as Assessor, School Director, Road Commissioner  Residence: 1884, Franklin, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  Bradsby

HARVEY HOLCOMB, farmer, of Franklin Township, P. O. Franklindale, was born in LeRoy, this county, May 29, 1816, is the son of Hugh and Prudence (Bailey) Holcomb, the former a native of Connecticut, the latter of Massachusetts. Hugh and his brother, Sterling, when they came from the East, located in Ulster, from which place they removed about 1796, locating in LeRoy, each purchasing 400 acres on both sides of the Towanda creek. Hugh Holcomb had nine children—seven sons and two daughters—all of whom grew to maturity. Harvey, who is the sixth in the family, was reared and educated at LeRoy, and always worked on a farm. On January 23, 1840, he married Miss Diana, daughter of Samuel and Betsey Rockwell, and to them were born nine children, eight of whom are now living; the other son was killed in the army at the battle of Spottsylvania after a service of nearly three years. Mr. Holcomb moved from LeRoy to Franklin, his present home, in 1884; his wife died June 10, 1880, and he married (for his second) at Smithfield, August 26, 1882, Mrs. Perlina Pierce, widow of William Henry Pierce, and daughter of Mrs. Selina (Holcomb) Dibble, who came from Broome county, N. Y. In 1844 she removed to this county, where she now resides at the advanced age of ninety-five years, and is able to work about the house; she began and completed a quilt of 3,000 pieces after she was ninety-three years of age. Mr. Holcomb as a farmer confines himself to raising grain and hay; he has been honored with the offices of assessor, school director (twelve years) and road commissioner; is a member of the Church of Christ, and is a Republican, politically.

                     vii.   Judson Holcomb Holcombe, Hon, born July 25, 1819 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1901; married Maria Nobles Noble December 25, 1845 in Standing Stone, Bradford Co, PA; born March 1823 in Cattaragus Co, New York; died April 06, 1903.  Judson was a Republican who served in the State Legislature and seven as a clerk in the House of Representative and Senate.  He was an author and the Editor of the Bradford Republican Newspaper, which he established.

Residence: August 13, 1871, Towanda, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

August 13, 1871 Philadelphia Newspaper Account  "Holcombe Reunion

A large gathering in Hunterdon Co, NJ Of the Descendants of John and Jacob Holcombe, Early Settlers of PA and NJ Lambertville, NJ Aug 12

The Holcombe reunion took place in a beautiful grove four miles from this place today, near a little village called Mount Airy.  Excellent music was furnished by the Doylestown PA Vocal Union, led by Webster Grim, Esq. Prayer was offered by Rev A Westover.

  The opening address was by Colonel F S Holcombe, who referred to the reunion of five years ago, and said that almost all the farms between the grove and Lambertville were occupied by members of the Holcombe family.

  Dr G H Larison, master of ceremonies, gave a valuable genealogical address.  Jacob and John Holcombe were natives of Tiverton, Devonshire, England, and came to America about 1700.  Jacob located in Bucks Co, PA where he owner 1200 acres of land, and John purchased a large tract in NJ; on a part of which Lambertville now stands.  Their descendants were many and became useful in the various walks of life - one a Governor, another a member of Congress, and others clergyment, physicians and professors in colleges.

  The Holcombe generations all told will number near 10, 000, about one-third of whom are the descendants of Jacob and John.  Dr Larison stated that it was proposed to publish a book of the Holcombe family.

  Hon. Judson Holcombe, of Towanda, PA said his ancestors settled in Bradford Co, PA in 1794.  Mr. Holcombe is an editor in Towanda."

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  History of Bradford County, Pennsylvania with Biographical Sketches by H. C. Bradsby, 1891

JUDSON HOLCOMB, one of the proprietors and the editor of the Bradford Republican, Towanda. This gentleman is at present filling the office of index clerk in the Lower House of Congress, Washington, a position to which he was appointed in 1863, and served through five Congresses, and in 1874 returned to Towanda and established his paper, placing it on a prosperous basis; he was again in the XLVIIth Congress, appointed to his old position, and is now in that place, having just served through the LIst Congress. He is a native of Bradford County, born in LeRoy, July 25, 1819, a son of Hugh and Prudence (Bailey) Holcomb. Thomas Holcomb, who came from

Devonshire, England, in 1630, and settled at Dorchester, MA, begat Nathaniel, who had a son, Nathaniel, Jr., who begat David, who begat Eli, the grandfather of our subject. Eli Holcomb was one of the pioneers, who came to Bradford County in 1784, and settled in Sheshequin; he was one of the soldiers in the War of 1812. His son, Hugh Holcomb, built the first grist and saw mill in LeRoy Township, and grew to be a man of wealth, for his day, and died the possessor of 200 acres of valuable land, originally settled by him. His son, Judson Holcomb, grew up on a farm at a time when to plant, and reap were the chief ideas of education, and in this line he is a fine type of the self-made men of our country. At the age of nineteen he went to Standing Stone, in this county, and found employment as a clerk in a store, and was there six years, and then opened a store of his own in Rome; in 1854 he was elected as a Whig to the Legislature, and at the end of his term of office, when the Republican party was just formed, he was elected by that party to the Legislature, and was the first Republican that ever represented Bradford county in that body. As a farmer, newspaperman, lawmaker and office-holder, he has been one of the county’s eminently successful men. He was married at Standing Stone in 1845, to Maria Nobles, daughter of Jonathan Nobles, of Cattaraugus co, NY, and they have two children, as follows: Clara (Mrs. Henry C Porter), and Fannie (Mrs. Charles L Tracy). Mrs. Holcomb is a niece of the late Hon. H W Tracy.

                    viii.   Emeline H Holcomb Holcombe, born December 28, 1822 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died October 28, 1898 in Elma, Washington; married Tyrus Himes May 01, 1843 in Granville, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born April 14, 1818 in Troy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died April 24, 1879 in Olympia, Washington. Residence: 1824, Columbia Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

She grew up in LeRoy, PA and after marrying Tyrus lived in Troy, Bradford County PA.

Emeline and Tyrus removed to Illinois in 1845, where they resided for seven years and then they left with four children to the Washington territory.  In the spring of 1847 they moved to Lafayette Illinois where Tyrus conducted a boot and shoe business.  On March 21, 1853 their family headed across the plains by covered wagon with horse and ox teams for Monmouth, Polk Co., Oregon.  They ended up in Olympia, Thurston Co, Washington Territory at the house of David Chambers on October 21, 1853.  On November 9, 1853 settlement was made on a land claim of 320 acres five miles east of Olympia, Washington.  In September 1855 the family was driven off by Indians and moved into a stockade fort until April 1857, when they returned again to farm their land.  Tyrus died on April 24, 1879 and 2 years later Emeline sold the land and moved in with her daughter, Mrs. Helen Z. Ruddell in Elma, Washington Territory. Tri Co http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm

In June 1884, Emeline made a visit to her girlhood home, after an absence of 37 years.  She traveled on the Northern Pacific Railroad from Portland, Oregon to Elmira, New York.  She then traveled to her hometown of LeRoy, PA another 32 miles south of Elmira.  During her 4-month stay in Bradford Co. PA she met over 300 relatives and more than 50 old acquaintances of her girlhood days.  The time spent amid these scenes and friends were hours of unalloyed pleasure, and she seemed to live her life over again.  She left PA for Illinois for a week of visiting there with family and friends.  She arrived back at her Pacific home in late October 1884.

They had a total of five sons and three daughters. Per Heverly

Tyrus Himes and Emeline Holcombe Marriage officiated by Justice Luman Putman

                     ix.   Ezra Bailey Holcomb Holcombe, born July 15, 1824 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died 1872 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co, Pennsylvania; married Ann Hickok March 03, 1855; born Abt. 1826; died October 12, 1877 in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Ezra and Ann had three children. Ann may be the daughter of Nathaniel and Esther Hickok.

 

      18.  Perley-Purley Morse, born July 12, 1793 in Massachusetts; died February 17, 1871 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 36. Jesse Morse and 37. Percey-Persis-Perris Stone.  He married 19. Lucy B Holcomb Holcombe 1816 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

      19.  Lucy B Holcomb Holcombe, born September 15, 1798 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died February 16, 1855 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of 38. Truman H Holcomb Holcombe, Sr. and 39. Seba Bannen Banning. Burial: February 19, 1855, LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA

He built tavern where Vaughn Jennings lived.  Per PMG Residence: Old Morse Tavern, LeRoy, PA

LeRoy Heritage Museum's Industry in LeRoy 2002  leroymuseum@yahoo.com

"LeRoy Hotel built in 1851 on the corner of Main Street (Rt. 414) and Mill Street where is now Walburns Garage.  This was built by Perley Morse.  It closed in about 1893 after a judge ordered that the hotel was to no longer have a license to sell intoxicating drinks.

Morse Tavern The Morse Tavern was opened by Perley Morse in 1826.  The tavern contained a large stone hearth where many stories were told by travellers passing through the village.  The first flag pole for miles around was hoisted here and this property served as a sports and military training grounds in the 1800's."

Tri Co. http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  1850 LeRoy PA Census

Morse Perley 54 M 3000 Farmer MA 114 71

Morse Lucy 50 F   PA 114 71

Morse Sevellon 12 M   PA 114 71

Kingsbury Lorin H. 65 M  Painter CT 114 71

Holcomb Marion 10 F   PA 114 71

Holcomb Pierson 8 M   PA 114 71

Kitchen Andrew 16 M  Laborer PA 114 71

      Children of Perley-Purley Morse and Lucy Holcombe are:

       9              i.   Lemira A Morse, born November 24, 1817 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 29, 1874 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Alonzo B Holcomb Holcombe December 18, 1838 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) John Mallory Abt. 1843.

                      ii.   Albert-Albern Morse, born September 19, 1819 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died April 19, 1822 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA. Burial: April 22, 1822, LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA

                     iii.   Truman Holcomb Morse, Dr, born October 11, 1821 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died October 17, 1874 in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Laura Chaapel Abt. 1850; born Abt. 1830 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died November 24, 1909. Burial: Park Cemetery, Canton,

Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Truman served in the Civil War as a Surgeon. He was a noted Surgeon, he practiced at Columbia Twp. before the war and then in Canton, PA after the war.

                      iv.   Sidney-Ora Sidney Morse, born September 13, 1824 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died September 11, 1888 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Lovina A Holcomb Holcombe December 04, 1845 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born May 29, 1827 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died May 12, 1902. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  1850 LeRoy PA Census

Morse Sidney 26 M  Farmer PA 113 71

Morse Lovina 23 F   PA 113 71

Morse Helen 3 F   PA 113 71

Morse Chas.  2 M   PA 113 71

Morse Martin 1 M   PA 113 71

Sidney-Ora Morse and Lovina Holcombe Marriage officiated by Justice Orator Holcomb

                      v.   Diantha Morse, born November 12, 1825 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died September 24, 1910; married Reuben R Palmer Abt. 1845; born January 08, 1822 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died September 1895 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

                      vi.   David-Darwin Darvin L Morse, born November 05, 1827 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died July 27, 1894 in Topeka, Shawnee Co, Kansas; married (1) Hattie Watkins Benson Abt. 1864; born December 12, 1833; died January 03, 1918 in Topeka, Shawnee Co, Kansas; married (2) Mary Lelon Leland Abt. 1849 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born 1832 in New York; died July 27, 1853 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Census: 1850, LeRoy Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

He was an Innkeeper and Darwin moved to Topeka, KS after the death of his first wife.

Information varies, have no proof that she was a Benson or a Watkins other than of unofficial statements. per Pat Mott Gobea, 2001

                     vii.   Henry Morse, born July 26, 1829 in Bradford Co, PA died October 06, 1834 in LeRoy, PA.

                    viii.   Bryan Morse, born April 26, 1831 in Bradford Co, PA; died September 08, 1832 in LeRoy, PA.

ix.    Viola Morse, born July 16, 1835 in Bradford Co, PA; died October 03, 1842 in LeRoy, PA.

                       x.   Servelon Servellan Bannen Morse, Justice, born April 08, 1838 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,

                              Pennsylvania; died May 15, 1909 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Phebe-Phoebe C

                              Mott October 10, 1858 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born December 06, 1840 in

                              Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died May 07, 1931 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, PA. Burial:

                              May 18, 1909, LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Census: 1850, LeRoy Twp,

                              Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  1869, Member of the LeRoy Odd Fellows Lodge No 843 until his death

                              Servelon spent his entire life on the homestead of his birth (The old Morse Tavern of his father).  He

                              was a Justice of the Peace for 20 years. per Pat Mott Gobea, 2001

"Incidentally, our daughter, Elaine has a corner shelf that Servellan made (sometime around the Civil War, which he signed and dated on the back. It is a handcut (we would call crude) shelf, which I refinished and repaired because some of the scrollwork was broken." per David N Grayson, 2001

"The following write-up was prepared by Ralph Ellsworth Fudge on 20APR1988 for Elaine Grayson(Plumlee). I have kept the original spellings and structure." David N Grayson 2001

"The farm is situated just east of the intersection of the Towanda road and the road to Sunfish Pond and as of this writing, April 20, 1988 is still owned and operated by descendants of Servelan and Phoebe.  The farm was originally a land grant farm homestead, I believe, by Servellan and Phoebe but might have been by parents of either one of them. I don't recall hearing what was raised (grown) on the farm but they did raise sheep for the wool and hogs for food. As an adjunct to the farm, Servellan and Phoebe also operated what they called a hotel. To the best of my knowledge the "hotel' consisted of one (maybe two, but I doubt it considering that there were five children) room which they rented to overnight guests who travelled that way.

    The foot locker chest that your mother has came from this farm around 1910, the year Mary Louise Morse was born and Emma McCabe & Truman Morse set up housekeeping in Elmira.  I have no knowledge of where Servellan was born but he must have been in his twenties when the civil war began in 1861. My recollecting of your grandfathers account is that Phoebe and Servellan were married at that time. At any rate he was able to buy a replacement for his position in the draft for military service so that he was exempt from military duties. That was legal and practiced quite extensively in those days."

 

      20.  John Mott II, born 1786 in Glasco, England.  He was the son of 40. John Mott I.  He married 21. Elea Minner 1804 in Ulster Co, New York.

      21.  Elea Minner, born Abt. 1788 in Ulster Co, New York. Burial: Cold Brook Cemetery, where the Ulster and Delaware Railroad runs, New York

A letter written by Sophi, the daughter of Matthew "Mathew Mott was borned in Delawer, Ulster County         Nov. 6, 1808.  His father was John II second who was born in Glasco, England, in 1786-came to America in 1799-married Miss Elea Minner of Ulster County, 1804 and lived thare, was berried in Cold Brook cemety whare the Ulster and Delawar Rail Road runs whare they made a farm from once a heavy forest.  Matthews’s father died when he was a lad & his mother married a Mr. Haffry for her second husband, but Mathew lived with his Grand Parents on what is called sofsan creik in NY. " per "Aunt Paulie's Book"

Children of John Mott and Elea Minner are:

       10             i.   Matthew-Mathew Mott, born May 19, 1808 in Middletown, Delaware Co, New York; died March 12, 1877 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Mary Ann Knickerbocker 1834 in New York; married (2) Polly McCraney 1853 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Zeb Mott, born Abt. 1810.

                     iii.   Joel Mott, born Abt. 1812.

                      iv.   Abram I Mott, born Abt. 1826; died April 03, 1856 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

 

      22.  Laurence Lawrence Knickerbocker, born February 02, 1781; died June 19, 1881 in Roxbury, Delaware Co, New York.  He was the son of 44. John-Johannes Knickerbocker and 45. Anis-Annis Ingerham Ingraham.  He married 23. Pheobe Juliana Post Abt. 1810.

      23.  Pheobe Juliana Post, born March 04, 1795 in England; died January 07, 1871 in Roxbury, Delaware Co, New York.  She was the daughter of 46. Adrian-Adrean Post.

A letter written by Sophi, the daughter of Matthew:  "Lawrance Knickerbocker whos mother was Anis Ingerham, of the city of deeds in England. Lawrance married Phoebe J. Post, daughter of Adrean Post, their family names is Hiram, John, Hisskrah who staved in Andersan Vill Prison.  Andrew Jackson who was drummer in 1864-5, he returned & is still living. Mary Ann, Eliza, Catherine, Harriet."

Children of Laurence Knickerbocker and Pheobe Post are:

       11             i.   Mary Ann Knickerbocker, born October 20, 1811 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died March 31, 1853 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Matthew-Mathew Mott 1834 in NY

                      ii.   Andrew Jackson Knickerbocker, born December 22, 1827 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died March 13, 1906 in Oregon Hill, Lycoming Co, Pennsylvania; married Elizabeth Meronius October 25, 1852; born November 12, 1834; died December 09, 1917.

                     iii.   Eliza Ingrahm Knickerbocker, born June 05, 1817 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died February 03, 1906 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; married Peter Boice March 26, 1836; born December 06, 1814; died February 02, 1868 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York.

Burial: Rivenburgh Cemetery, Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York

                      iv.   Catherine Knickerbocker, born January 27, 1823 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died November 20, 1903 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; married Darrian-Darium Chamberlin Chamberlain October 08, 1844 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; born June 07, 1825 in Brattleboro, Vermont; died July 1893 in Binghamton, Broome Co, New York.  Burial: Deyo Cemetery, Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York

                      v.   Hariett Knickerbocker, born 1825 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died January 30, 1844.

                      vi.   Hiram Knickerbocker, born August 25, 1812 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died June 09, 1870 in Pine Plains, Dutchess Co, New York; married Betsey Meade Abt. 1829; born July 11, 1809; died September 18, 1892 in Pine Plains, Dutchess Co, NY. Burial: September 1892, Pine Plains, Dutchess Co, New York

                                      Knickerbocker Family Page  www.knic.com

                              Hiram KNICKERBOCKER and Betsey MEADE had the following children:

 i.   Richard KNICKERBOCKER.

 ii.   Christanna KNICKERBOCKER.

iii.  Henry KNICKERBOCKER was born on 10 Apr 1842 in Pine Plains, Dutchess, NY

iv.  Mary Ann KNICKERBOCKER born 4 Jun 1844 in Pine Plains, Dutchess, NY. She died in 1856.

 v.   Perry KNICKERBOCKER.

 vi.  Harrette KNICKERBOCKER.

vii.  Amanda KNICKERBOCKER was born on 15 Sep 1852 in Pine Plains, Dutchess, NY

viii. Ransom KNICKERBOCKER was born on 7 Jun 1854. (10) He died on 5 Jun 1872.

1850 Pine Plains (Dutchess) NY

Hiram     39   1811    NY   196    Scythe Grinder

Betsy     32   1818    NY

Richard   10   1840    NY

Henry      8   1842    NY

Mary       5   1845    NY

Perry      4   1846    NY

1865 Pine Plains 125/154, Wood house $800

Hiram Knickerbacker, 51, grinder, b. Columbia, 6 chn, 1x md, md now

Betsy, 59, wife, Dutchess, 6chn, 1x md, md now

Richard, 22, child, Dutchess, single

Perry, 18, child, Dutchess

Amanda, 13, child, Dutchess

Jno. ROWE, 23, son-in-law, Dutchess, 1x md, md now

Mary Ann, 20, daughter, Dutchess, 1x md, md now

                     vii.   John Knickerbocker, born October 28, 1820 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York; died February 20, 1906 in Margaretville, New York; married Phoebe Meade Abt. 1842; born April 17, 1822 in Red Kill, New York; died June 21, 1900 in Vega, New York.   Burial: Vega, New York  John played violin and fife, he was a Drummer in the 174th Regiment of Infantry, New York Militia  Capt Jacob Meade Occupation: Mechanic and blacksmith

 xi.  Hezekiah Petit Knickerbocker, born May 17, 1831 in Trout Creek, Delaware Co, NY; died March

       16, 1865; married Susan Augusta Ingraham 1852; born December 18, 1835; died May 29, 1921

                              Knickerbocker Family Page  www.knic.com 

He died on 16 Mar 1865.(10) Age 33 y, 10 mo. He was buried in Coventry, Chenango, NY. Hezekiah served in the Civil War, was in Co.__, 8 Regt., NY Calvary. He was captured and held in Andersonville Prison. He was later released, but his health was so impared due to starvation that He died on his way home. I visited his grave in Coventry, NY 30 Jul 1939 and found it nicely cared for. A new tombstone had been recently erected. However the old one still lay on the ground and I succeeded in reading, beside the name and dates this inscription - "My table mourns when I set down Every thing mourning all around None can fill his empty place Till I shall meet him face to face" ** Chamb Geno **

 

      26.  Joseph Baumgartner, born May 19, 1799 in Nieder-Eichsel, Baden, Germany; died February 16, 1851.  He was the son of 52. Wendelin Baumgartner and 53. Magdalena Brugger.  He married 27. Ursula-Maria Ursula Kani April 17, 1820.

      27.  Ursula-Maria Ursula Kani, born October 04, 1799 in Adelhausen, Germany; died 1870.

  http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/  Joseph Baumgartner

  Author: Marie Baumgartner-Brasington  Date: 7 Aug 2000 12:00 PM GMT 

  Surnames: Baumgartner, Halen

  Classification: Will

Last Will and Testament of

Joseph Baumgartner, Dec’d.

Late of Cherry Twp.

Translation:

In the name of God, Amen, I, Joseph Baumgartner of Cherry Township, Sullivan County, State of Pennsylvania,

Farmer, being weak in body, but of sound mind, memory and understanding, but considering the uncertainty of this life, do make and herewith publish this my last will and testament as follows to wit:

First, I commend my body to the cool bosom of the earth until the day of the resurrection and my soul into the hands of my Redeemer, Jesus Christ, unto everlasting salvation.

Second, I give unto my beloved wife, Ursula, as her property, my farm and piece of land, situated in the aforesaid township and county and also all that belongs thereunto-the same as I had it, so long as she remains my widow.

In witness whereof, I, Joseph Baumgartner, write this my last will and testament upon a half sheet of paper, witness my hand and set my seal this 11th day of February, one thousand eight hundred and fifty,

Undersigned in presence of :

Elias Halen Fred Halen

Joseph Baumgartner (seal)

Probate of the foregoing will taken reference this 8th day of November, A.D., 1851.

 Children of Joseph Baumgartner and Ursula-Maria Kani are:

       13             i.   Matilda-Mechtunde Baumgartner, born April 12, 1822; died 1900; married Conrad Koch Cook Abt. 1842.

                      ii.   Frank-Franz Xavier Baumgartner, born August 13, 1823 in Eichsel, Germany.

                     iii.   Barbara Baumgartner, born February 03, 1825 in Nieder-Eichsel, Baden, Germany.

                      iv.   George-Ignatz Baumgartner, born July 26, 1821 in Eichsel, Germany.

 

      28.  Joseph Sick, Sr, born 1781 in Baden, Germany; died 1832.  He was the son of 56. Son Sick.  He married 29. Joseph Sick Wife Rinebold Abt. 1803.

      29.  Joseph Sick Wife Rinebold, born Abt. 1783.

Joseph Sick was born in 1781 in Baden, Germany. He died in 1832. Joseph Sick and his wife had the two sons and several daughters. One daughter Frances came to America; the other daughters stayed in Germany. Joseph Sick's father was born in Prussia.

The Sick LIneage

  Author: Robert Sweeney  Date: 21 Jul 2000 12:00 PM GMT 

  Surnames: Sick

  Classification: Query

  In Reply to: Charles Sick  by:  C. Sick Hall

I recently posted an entire Settlers Page on this family to the Sullivan County Web Page. The material was provided by Bettyann Goodyear of Dushore, PA.  You might enjoy looking it over. Go to the page at www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/   and scroll down on the left side until you find the Settlers index. This entry is the last one to date.

Children of Joseph Sick and Joseph Rinebold are:

       14             i.   Frantz-Francis Charles-Franz Karl Sick, born April 01, 1815 in Worzsock, Baden, Germany; died July 21, 1872 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Hannah Rheinfried Reinfried 1840.

                      ii.   Joseph Sick, Jr, born 1805.

                      iii.   Frances Sick, born Abt. 1816; married Frances Sick Husband Seifred Abt. 1836; born Abt. 1814.

                      iv.   Daughter Sick, born Abt. 1818; married Daughter Sick Husband Allgeier Abt. 1838; born Abt. 1816.

 

      30.  Charles Reinfried, born Abt. 1800.

Child of Charles Reinfried is:

       15             i.   Hannah Rheinfried Reinfried, born May 18, 1820 in Germany; died May 02, 1864 in Dushore, Sullivan Co, Pennsylvania; married Frantz-Francis Charles-Franz Karl Sick 1840.

 

Generation No. 6

 

      32.  Eli Holcomb Holcombe, Corporal, born February 02, 1741 in Simsbury, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died May 10, 1823 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of David H Holcomb Holcombe, Lieutenant and Mabel-Mehitabel Mehitable Buttles Buttolph.  He married 33. Hannah Crofut March 10, 1764 in Barkhamsted, Litchfield Co, Connecticut. Burial in Ulster Cemetery, Ulster, Bradford Co, PA

      33.  Hannah Crofut, born 1741 in Danbury, Fairfield Co, Connecticut; died June 01, 1825 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of Matthew Crofut and Rebecca Benedict. He erected a saw-mill on Cash Creek, which supplied the lumber for the first plank houses in a large section of the country.  His sawmill and corn-mill were in operation about 1795. Residence: Ulster, Bradford Co, PA/Salmon Brook, Granby, Hartford Co, CT /Danbury, CT  Military: Corporal in Massachusetts Militia- Sheldon's Dragons, CT. BLWt. 6002-100-Pvt Iss War Served In: Revolutionary War - Capt Isaac Colton's Co Burial: Ulster Cemetery, Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

DAR PARTRIOT INDEX - Centennial Edition p1455

HOLCOMB, HOLCOMBE Eli:  b 2-2-1741 CT d 5-10-1823 PA m Hannah Crofut Cpl. MA

The book "Ulster-A View Past and Present" by Madelene Daugherty pg 63 & 64

"Back up on the north side of Bridge St, across the tracks, was a sawmill.  Clem Heverly's "History of Bradford Co" (1615-1924) he says:  "Eli Holcombe, native of Granby, CT emigrated with his family to Ulster in 1793 settling on Cash Creek St.  In or before 1795, he erected a corn mill and sawmill, the later supplying the lumber for the first plank houses in a large section of the country."

     Although it is not known if this is the same mill he built, it is known approximately 1890, it was purchased by Ben Watkins and John Holcombe.  Mr. Holcombe did not stay with the business and sold out to Watkins.

In some places Ulster, Bradford Co, PA states at Webster, PA

History of Bradford County 1770 - 1878 The Reverend Mr. David Craft

Ulster Township,  Eli Holcomb came from Simmsbury, Conn., and in March 1793, settled in Ulster, on the place now occupied by Mr. Walker. The farm lay in the centre of the town, on what is now known as Cash's creek. He was industrious citizen, and raised a large family of sons, some of whom remained in Ulster, while others went into Le Roy, where they were the pioneer settlers. One of the daughters married Seeley Crofut, of Le Roy, and another Ebenezer Shaw, the centenarian of Sheshequin. The Holcomb sawmill, on Cash's creek, was known for a long distance, and lumber, with which most of the houses in Ulster and adjoining towns were built, was sawed there. Eli Holeomb had a sawmill near the mouth of Cash's creek. His son Truman probably built the first sawmill on the creek back from the river. The first framed house built in the town was in 1818, of lumber sawed at Holcomb's mill.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm BRADFORD REPORTER Towanda, Pa., October 18, 1883

ULSTER TOWNSHIP BRIEF SKETCH OF EARLY AND PRESENT HISTORY

EARLY SETTLEMENT  What is now Ulster Township was originally a part of Sheshequin, but the latter town was soon of such importance that it was deemed best for Ulster to separate which it early did. It was settled about 1784, and among the settlers of early date may be mentioned Captain Benjamin Clark, Nathaniel Hovey, Adrial Simons, Solomon Tracy, Eli Holcomb, Isaac Cash, Abram Parmeter, Chester Bingham, Thomas Overton, Elijah Granger, Leonard Westbrook, and Joseph C. Powell. Nearly all of these men, if not all have descendants now living in Bradford County. Sometime about 1822 the Scotch emigration commenced, and the familiar names of Mather, Pollock and Dickson are associated with those of the older settlers of which is now prosperous Ulster.

Since this early settlement in the dangerous days immediately succeeding the Revolutionary war, Ulster has steadily grown and flouished. Since the first framed house was built in 1818 the inhabitants have seen residence after residence go up and first a canal and then a railroad and telegraph were built until the resources of the township have been almost fully developed. From the small beginnings made almost 100 years ago have come the fruitful present to which we briefly advert.

ULSTER OF TODAY.  Whatever Ulster may have been in the long ago it is a very rich township now, considering its size, one in which the pleasant farm houses and rich fields are plenty on every mile of the long road from Milan to the township line always excepting the narrows above and below Ulster village. Our time was so limited that we did not find out where all the good farmers lived nor where all the best cider was kept, neither did we discover all the peach trees and grape vines, but we found enough to test the quality of Ulster’s fruitfulness and the people’s generosity. First of the township officers. Justices of the Peace, G. H. VanDyke Ulster, and J. D. Anthony, Milan; Supervisors, John Howie, and John Dickson, Ulster, and R. S. Edminston, Milan; Constable, Wm. VanDyke, Ulster; Deputy Constable, Burton Loomis, Milan; School Directors, H. Z. Shaw, Abram Minier, Milan, Jas. McCarty, Frank Brooks, Emmett Rockwell and James Barbour, Ulster.

The principal productions of the township are tobacco in the vicinity of Ulster, and oats, corn, wheat and similar crops near Milan. Something like 100 acres of tobacco was raised this year and the crop is generally very good and will bring a good price this year, 18 cents having already been offered.

The town is principally noted for farming but there are two small villages which we will notice briefly.

ULSTER The village of Ulster is a pleasant little town of about 200 inhabitants and situated, as the landlady said, "Eight miles from anywhere" being that distance from the seaport towns of Athens and Towanda and inland Burlington. One would not mind its peculiar situation if the trains stopped there, but they do not. You can get there at seven o’clock in the morning and come away at nearly eleven, but if you miss the eleven you must remain until seven in the evening. Neither the three o’clock going south nor the five o’clock going north notices the town, a slight which arouses the virtuous indignation of the inhabitants who found the five o’clock especially pleasant. A gentleman said the fact that a person coming to Towanda could not get home on No 2, was a source of loss to Towanda merchants, a statement which seems very plausible.  Among the descendants of settlers of "ye olden time" are S. C. Hovey, a descendant of Benjamin Clarke, the third settler at Ulster, who came with General Sullivan in his famous march. James Thomas and William Mather, descendants of the original Mather, who came to Ulster among the early settlers, Uriah and Norman Shaw, Edmund Lockwood, a descendant of Cash, a numerous family of Holcombs, descendants of Truman Holcomb, Sr., who Mr. Hovey (from whom we got most of our information) said was the father of nineteen children. Other old settlers are G. H. VanDyke, the thrifty Justice of the Peace, and Dr. Edward Mills.

Among the old buildings now standing is the Holcomb house, built some sixty years ago by Eli Holcomb, a veracious man who claimed to have pulled a bear down a tree by the tail when the old farms of to-day were new. The Mather house where Thomas and William Mather live on the old homestead of three hundred acres, is an old one built over sixty years ago. Benjamin Ross owns a very old house, which he rents.  The largest farm in Ulster village is that of the Mather estate, although there are many other large handsome farms, and many fine places in the village proper.

In the old well filled churchyard is buried many of the old pioneers who made the early history of this county rich with earnest deeds, and who left as well a legacy of honor as of large estates to descendants. On the old time-worn headstones, we saw the names of Thomas Overton, a grandfather of Col. Overton, of Towanda and one of the early inhabitants; James Mather, several members of the Simons family, besides others whose names we forget. On one stone was the following: "Here lies 2 Sons and daughters of Adrial and Sarah Simmons. Septer died Nov. 20, 1798, aet.15." The other three were given at dates running to 1803, one giving only initial letter P. Going back from the cemetery, we passed up the pleasant street where Postmaster Mather’s cosy home is situated, those of the two physicians, the thrifty place of McKay, and the handsome grove. We notice too, the fine house of Jas. McCarty, that of G. H. VanDyke, and several above the hotel; also the fine mill of G. H. VanDyke.

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  Tri-Counties Genealogy & History Sites by Joyce M. Tice

Troy Township & Borough, Bradford County PA   Organizations of the Tri-Counties  DAR -Troy Pennsylvania 1925-1926 YEAR BOOK of Os-co-hu Chapter Troy Pennsylvania Daughters of the American Revolution -State Number 73 Organized June Fifth, Nineteen Fifteen  This was submitted by Fay TILLER Morgan of Sylvania

* Organizing Members   Ancestor

Rockwell * Edla Reynolds (Mrs Edw A) Corp Eli Holcomb 

      Children of Eli Holcombe and Hannah Crofut are:

       16             i.   Hugh H Holcomb Holcombe, born October 14, 1774 in Granby, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died July 27, 1843 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Elizabeth Oakley 1800 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) Prudence Bailey 1803 in Granville, Bradford Co, PA.

                      ii.   Truman H Holcomb Holcombe, Sr, born August 10, 1769 in Simsbury, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died December 25, 1848 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Seba Bannen Banning 1793; born Abt. 1769 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died December 1809 Seba's ancestoral line is per Neil McDonell in 2000; married (2) Lydia Ladd January 01, 1811 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born October 31, 1787 in Albany, Albany Co, New York; died October 07, 1865.

He had 17 children - 8 by his 1st wife Seba Bannen and 9 by his 2nd wife Lydia Ladd 

First he settled in LeRoy PA, but in 1814 he purchased 121 acres of the farm occupied by his father and located in Ulster, PA permanently   Burial: Ulster Cemetery, Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Occupation: 1814, farmer, purchased 121 acres from his father's farm in Ulster, PA

                     iii.   Eli B Holcomb Holcombe, Jr, born 1766; died 1791. Never married

                      iv.   Selah-Seelah Holcomb Holcombe, Captain, born September 04, 1767 in Granby, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died August 04, 1842 in Litchfield Twp, Herkirmer Co, New York; married Sarah Wilcox November 1790 in Norfolk, Litchfield Co, Connecticut; born Abt. 1770 in CT.

                       v.   Hannah Holcomb Holcombe, born April 03, 1771 in Simsbury, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died

                              January 29, 1850 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Jacob Holcomb Holcombe

                              Abt.1786; born October 27, 1764 in Granby, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died October 15, 1856 in

                              North Granby, Hartford Co, CT; married (2) Seelye Seeley Crofoot Crofut, Justice April 12, 1790

                              in Connecticut; born March 13, 1768 in Connecticut; died June 25, 1849 in LeRoy, Bradford Co,

                              Pennsylvania.  Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, Rt. 414, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  They were

                              founders and he was a deacon of Towanda Creek Baptist Church Occupation: 1812, Justice of the

                              Peace for Bradford Co., operated store

                              http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  Pioneer & Patriot Families of Bradford County PA 1800-1825 Vol. I - Clement F. Heverly - Pages 283-302

Seelye Crofut, a native of Connecticut, born March 13, 1768, with his wife and two children in 1796, emigrated to Towanda creek, settling upon a large tract of land in LeRoy. He was the first man of a family to settle in the town, although his brothers-in-law, Hugh and Sterling Holcomb, had preceded him a year and kept bachelors' hall until their sister arrived, when they made their home with her. Mr. Crofut was a typical pioneer. He was one of the founders of the Towanda Creek Baptist church, a deacon, and for many years the meetings of that denomination were held at his house. He also organized, 1801, the first Sunday school in the town and opened the first store. Taking an active part in all public affairs he was appointed a justice of the peace, 1812, and filled various other positions with credit and honor. The long and useful life of Deacon Crofut came to a close in 1849.

(Page 287)  He had married April 12, 1790, Hannah, daughter of Eli Holcomb (page 229); she was born April 3, 1771, died June 29, 1850. Their four children were:

James S., born March 11, 1791, married June 25, 1812, Phebe Wooster, died February 10, 1823. Children: Minerva (Mrs. John H. Webber), Isaac S., Sarah (Mrs. Josiah F. Stone), Lovica (Mrs. Trout), James. Sarah, born February 12, 1793, died unmarried in LeRoy, November 3, 1809.

Lura, born June 25, 1797, was the first child to see the light in LeRoy (page 51). She married first G. Enos Wooster, by whom she had children: Lucy (Mrs. John Rickey), Lemuel, Malvin; married second Isaac Chaapel, children being Hannah C. (Mrs. Addison Brigham), John R., Frank, Harriet (Mrs. Anson B. Carney), Charles F. Ira, born November 2, 1803, married Maria Merry of Troy, died August 12, 1845. Children: Calpherina, Charles and Alonzo D.

LeRoy Heritage Museum's Industry in LeRoy 2002  leroymuseum@yahoo.com

Whiskey and Tobacco Trade

"Whiskey was an important commodity in LeRoy for many years.  The first distillery was built just west of LeRoy.  The first retailers of whiskey in the community were Dennison Kingsbury, Seeley Crofut, Joseph Wallace, and Henry Mercur."

                      vi.   Sterling Holcomb Holcombe, born October 10, 1776 in Granby, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died March 22, 1850 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Betsey Cline Stone September 16, 1800 in Franklin, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born January 25, 1783 in Dudley, Worcester Co, Massachusetts; died February 01, 1855 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

He and his brother were the first permanent settlers in LeRoy, PA  Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, Rt. 414, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania  Census: 1836, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

                     vii.   Alpheus Holcomb Holcombe, Deacon, born January 10, 1779 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died January 19, 1849 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA; married Hannah Kingsbury October 22, 1801 in Ulster, Bradford Co, PA; born 1783; died 1846. Deacon in the Baptist Church, LeRoy PA

                     viii.   Jared Holcomb Holcombe, Justice, born November 04, 1780; died April 26, 1850 in Ulster,

        Bradford Co, PA; married (1) Hannah Andrews Abt. 1800; born December 1772; died August 01,

        1838 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) Martha-Widow McCarty McCarthy Abt.

        1820; born 1800; died 1865 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: Ulster Cemetery, Ulster,

        Bradford Co, Pennsylvania He and his wife occupied a portion of the homestead in Ulster, PA. For 

        many years he was the Justice of the Peace in Ulster, PA. 

                     ix.   Cinthy-Cynthia Holcomb Holcombe, born March 17, 1783 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died April 10, 1868 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Ebenezer Shaw, Sr Constable February 26, 1801 in Ulster, Bradford Co., Pennsylvania; born September 05, 1771 in Bristol Co, Rhode Island; died December 17, 1871 in Sheshequin, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

.http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Shaw-Holcomb Bible  by James H. Holcombe, CSG #17139 The Bible owned by Ebenezer Shaw is now in possession of the Salmon Brook Historical Society, Granby, CT. http://www.salmonbrookhistorical.org/ It was printed in 1807 by Mathew Carey, No. 122 High Street, Philadelphia, PA. The first seven entries appear to have all been made at the same time, in the same hand, in ink.  The subsequent entries appear to be in the same handwriting but were obviously made separately and at later dates, also in ink. The writer consistently wrote the last three letters of Ebenezer as r with a double underscore. The final four entries were on separate pages, in pencil, using different spelling, for example, Ebenezer is spelled out.

Ebener Shaw was born Sept 5th 1771

Cinthy Holcomb was born March the 17th 1783

Ebener Shaw was married to Cinthy Holcomb Feb the 26th 1801

Laurcy Shaw was born Nov 8th 1801

Harry Shaw was born Dec 28th 1803

Uriah Shaw was born May 13th 1806

Norman Shaw was born August 17th 1808

Hiram Shaw was born Friday the 7th of August 1812

Matilda Shaw was born Wednesday 15th of June 1814

Ellesip Shaw was born Friday the 9th of April 1819

Persivill Shaw was born July 16th 1821 on Monday

Abigal Shaw was Abigal Campbell

Both burried in Sheshequin Cemetery

Father + Mother of Ebenezer

Abigail Shaw died March 19th 1811 in the 64 year of her age

Jerimiah Shaw died May 27th 1815 in his 85 year of his age

Cynthia Holcombe was the daughter of Eli Holcombe and Hannah Crofut.  She was a third great-granddaughter of Thomas Holcombe, the immigrant and Founder of Ancient Windsor. Eli migrated to Cash Creek in Ulster, Bradford County, PA in 1793.  Eli and Hannah had children listed in Simsbury Soldiers, Barbour records, and Barkhamstead records.

Ebenezer Shaw, Sr.  was the second centenarian in his family.

On Sept 5, 1871 he celebrated his 100th birthday with five generations being present to honor him.

"It was his pride and boast that he voted for General Washington at his second election and at every presidential election up to the time of his death.  He was a Freemason 70 years and at his demise, December 17, 1871, is said to have been the oldest in the state."

per Heverly's "Pioneers and Patriots"

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Tri-County Biographies  Ebenezer SHAW of Sheshequin

Submitted by Sherry LAMPMAN Nichols

Elmira Advertiser September 6, 1871 A Centennial Celebration

Mr. Ebenezer Shaw of Sheshequin, Pa., is a centenarian. He became one hundred years old yesterday. The event was celebrated by the gathering together of a party of about five hundred relatives and friends, who will long remember the day both on account of its pleasures and of the rare and unusual event which brought them together.

Ebenezer Shaw was born in Rhode Island, on the 5th of September 1771. His father, Jeremiah Shaw was born February 2, 1730. His grandfather, also named Jeremiah, was born in 1700, and his great-grand father, named Israel, was born in 1663. Mr. Shaw moved to Sheshequin in 1780 and married Cynthia Holcomb in 1801, who died in April 1868, aged eighty-six years. They had nine children, five of whom--four boys and one girl--are still living. Mr. Shaw has had fifty-two grandchildren, and sixty-one great-grand children, and on great-great-grand child; making a total posterity of one hundred and twenty-four, ninety-five of who are still living. Of his ten brothers and sisters nine were represented at the celebration. There were relatives and friends represented at the celebration. There were relatives and friends present from Chicago, Adrian, and several other western cities and from numerous cities and villages in this state and Pennsylvania.

Mr. William Shaw of Towanda, Pa, acted as president of the day, and a very interesting address was delivered by Hon. O.H.P. Kinney, editor of the Waverly Advocate. The Ulster Brass Band furnished the music for the occasion, and the dinner provided was elegant and excellent, a prominent feature of the table being a beautiful pyramid cake, presented by Mrs. W. B. Campbell of Waverly.

An artist was present and took the photograph of Mr. Shaw for the Masonic Lodge at Athens, in which Lodge he was made a Mater Mason at the age of twenty-six years.  A poem written by Judge Bullock of Smithfield, was sung by Mrs. DeLay Montanye of Towanda, Mrs. John McCormick of Elmira and the Messrs. Eddy Brothers. It was entitled

"Day of Auld Lang Syne"

I

Dear friends, while gladly here we meet

To spend some hours of time,

We’ll give a thought to past events,

And days of Auld Lang syne!

II

Our aged ancestor we greet

With feelings warm and kind,

'Tis five score years now since his birth

In days of auld lang syne!

III

His parents left their native land

A residence to find;

In this sweet vale they found their home,

In the days of auld lang syne!

IV

The forest's gloomy, dark expense,

The oak and towering pine,

By steady labor were subdued,

In days of auld lang syne!

V

With plenty blessed, our flocks and herds

In quiet now recline;

Where savage tribes and beasts of prey

Did roam in auld lang syne!

VI

Sheshequin! midst thy hills and da'es

We choicest blessings find-

And here we venerate the scene

And friends of auld lang syne!

VII

And while around the festive board

In friendly chat we join,

We'll not forget fatigues and toils,

And days of auld lang syne!

Mr. Shaw in his declining years is kindly cared for by his daughter, Mr. O. Gore, near his former residence. Ebenezer Shaw, Sr. October 13, 1812, elected Judge, Constable for Ulster, PA

Ebenezer Shaw and Cinthy-Cynthia Holcombe: Celebrated their 67th Anniversary

      34.  Oliver Bailey, Sr., born June 25, 1738 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died October 14, 1822 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of Ephraim Bailey, Sr. and Deborah Dudley Brainerd Brainard.  He married 35. Hannah Elizabeth Scoville May 14, 1761 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut.

      35.  Hannah Elizabeth Scoville, born April 11, 1739 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died April 06, 1815 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of William Scoville and Hannah Shailer. Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Military: 1775, Enlisted, American Army, Private in 5th Battalion, Wadsworth's Brigade, Col. Wm. Douglas

Residence: Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania / Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut

War Served In: June 1776, Revolutionary War - Co Capt. Higgins, Haddam CT & Old French War

1775 he was one of the first to enlist in the Army for America's fight of independence in the Revolutionary War.  He fought in many of the most important battles, including the Battle of Long Island and White Plains under Captain Higgins of Haddam, CT. In Jun 1776 his company was sent to reinforce Washington's army at NY.

He lived in Berkshire, Massachusetts before moving in 1803 where he lived for 19 years, until he died in Granville, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Age 84 yrs at the time of his death.  He is buried in the Granville Center Cemetery, Rt. 514 Granville Center, PA.  Turn next to the red house built in 1819 "oldest house in Granville" his grandson; Jeremiah Taylor (his daughter Martha's son) built this house.  The cemetery is located in back of this house (across from the church).  The original gravestone although in place is illegible and a new stone was erected by H.H. and F.F. Taylor.

"The Settler", published at Towanda at the time of his death says:

"Mr. Bailey was a soldier of two wars.  He served through the whole of the Old French war and was one of the first who asserted our independence in 1775.  He served through the whole of that arduous struggle for liberty and was in many of the most important battles.  He was one of the most respected and first settlers of Franklin (then including part of Granville), having resided in that place 19 years.  He had 12 children, all of whom have lived to have families and to an advanced age."

"Granville Township was organized in 1831, taken from Franklin, Canton, Burlington and Troy. PA. Granville corners, Granville, Granville Center and Granville Summit are villages in the township."

"Its early settlers were: Jeremiah Taylor, John Pratt, David Ross, Lewis Muffett, Scoville Bailey, David Bailey, Erra Bailey, Thomas Baily, Uriah Baxter, Benjamin Saxton, Oliver Nelson, Phillip Packer, Abraham Parkhurst,

Charles Butterfield, John Putman, Alvord Churchill, Josiah Vrooman, Abijah Ayres, Z. Porter, Avery Clark, Nathaniel Clark, Noah Packard, Giles Avery, Simon Chesley, Peter Shomaker, Daniel Ferguson, Oliver Bailey, Hugh Halcom."

From the book History of Bradford County 1770-1878 By the Reverend Mr. David Craft

Oliver Bailey Bailey, a native of Middlesex County, Connecticut was the father-in-law of Mrs. Taylor. He emigrated to Berkshire, Massachusetts and came to Granville in 1803. He and his wife, Hannah Scoville whom he married in their native home wished to settle here to be near their family that was living in the village. Twelve children were born to them: Oliver, Keturah or Katy, Martha, Thomas, Scoville, Timothy, Pheba, Hannah, Polly, Ezra, David and Prudence. All came to this county with their parents except four. Oliver was married in his native home, remaining there and rearing a large family. The daughters, Pheba, Hannah and Polly married and remained at Great Barrington, Massachusetts, spending their lives there. His children who made this settlement their home were Katurah (Mrs. Uriah Baxter), Martha (Mrs. Jeremiah Taylor Sr.), Thomas, Scoville, Timothy, Ezra, David and Prudence.

The first wedding in the settlement was that of Prudence Bailey to Hugh Holcomb. Mr. Holcomb was the first settler in LeRoy

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  Tri Co Heverly

Oliver Bailey, the ancestor of the Baileys of Western Bradford, was the hero of two wars. A son of Ephraim Bailey, he was a native of Haddam, Middlesex county, Conn. And there married Hannah Scoville. He was a private in the Revolutionary war in the company of Captain Higgins of Haddam, Col. Wm. Douglas, 5th battalion Wadsworth's brigade, raised June, 1776, to reinforce Washington's army at New York; he was in the battle of Long Island and also White Plains. Some years after the war, he removed to Berkshire, Mass., and in 1803 came with his wife to Granville Township, Bradford County, where some of the family had already settled. Here he continued to reside until the time of his death, October 4, 1822, aged 84 years. In noting his demise, The Settler, published at Towanda, says: "Mr. Bailey was a soldier of two wars. He served through the whole of the old French war and was one of the first who asserted our independence in 1775. He served through the whole of that arduous struggle for liberty and was in many of the most important battles. He was one of the most respected and first settlers of Franklin (then including part of Granville), having resided in that place 19 years. He had 12 children, all of whom lived to have families and to an advanced age." The children of Oliver and Hannah Bailey were:

Oliver, Phoebe, Hannah and Polly all married and remained at Great Barrington, Mass. The other children, who came to Bradford county were: Keturah ("Katy") married Uriah Baxter and had children, Keturah (Mrs. Elam Parkhurst), Chauncy, Betsy (Mrs. Simon West), Hannah (Mrs. Benj. West), Ezra, Oliver, Roxy Ann (Mrs. John Vroman).

Martha married Jeremiah Taylor (I-325) and was the mother of three sons and a daughter.

Thomas married Esther ____ and had several children. (Page 34)

Scoville married Jerusha Hale of Haddam, Conn. and removed to Granville Township in 1801. Their children were Julius, Jerusha (Mrs. Luman Putnam, Sr.), Eliza (Mrs. John Taylor), Hezekiah, Harry, Amanda (1st Mrs. Ambrose Spencer, 2nd Mrs. Samuel W. Shepard), Robert.

Timothy married Eleanor Harris of Barrington, Mass. and settled in LeRoy Township. Their children were Harriet (Mrs. Eli Holcomb), Electa (Mrs. Marlin Holcomb), Lyman, Alvin, Abigail (Mrs. Jacob Roberts), Jeremie, Mary Ann (Mrs. Richard Benson), Lucinda or Cinderella (Mrs. George Browning), Warren.

Ezra married Lydia Andrus of Great Barrington, Mass. and settled in Granville. Their children were Elisha, Alanson, Elon A., Phoebe (Mrs. Sullivan Morse), Julia A. (Mrs. Henry Saxton), Sophia (Mrs. Salem Stone), Alva.

David married 1st Lucy, daughter of Ezra Spalding and located in Canton; married 2nd Louise Loomis and had one son, William.

Prudence married, 1803, Hugh Holcomb of LeRoy, hers being the first wedding in Granville. She was the mother of Alonzo, Orator, Harvey, Judson, Emeline (Mrs. Tyrus Himes) and Ezra.

      Children of Oliver Bailey and Hannah Scoville are:

       17             i.   Prudence Bailey, born October 16, 1784 in Old Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died February 04, 1861 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Hugh H Holcomb Holcombe 1803 in Granville, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Oliver Bailey, Jr., born March 22, 1762 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; died in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts.  Oliver remained at Great Barrington, MA.

                     iii.   Katy-Kate-Keturah Bailey, born October 04, 1763 in Massachusetts; died 1852 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Uriah Baxter Abt. 1786; born 1766 in Massachusetts; died 1852 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, PA.  Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Uriah came from Hebron, CT to Granville Twp. in 1808.

                      iv.   Thomas Bailey, born February 11, 1765 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; married (1) Esther Smith January 1788 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, CT; born Abt. 1767 in Connecticut; died Aft. 1803 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, PA; married (2) Hannah Hale Aft. 1803; born Abt. 1768.

Thomas lived in Canton and had children by both of his wives. per Pat Mott Gobea

                      v.   Martha Bailey, born May 05, 1767 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died March 04, 1857 in Bradford Co, PA; married Jeremiah Jermiah Taylor, Sr Abt. 1794; born Oct. 08, 1772 in Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; died September 17, 1827 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, PA. Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Jermiah came from Berkshire Co., MA about 1798, first to Sugar Creek and then to Granville Twp. around 1800.

                      vi.   Hannah Bailey, born March 27, 1769 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; married Elisha Harris Abt. 1789; born Abt. 1767 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts. Elijah Harris remained at Great Barrington, MA.

                     vii.   Phoebe Phebe Bailey, born June 16, 1771 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, CT; died in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; married David Wilcox August 31, 1794 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, MA; born Abt. 1769 in MA. David and Phoebe remained at Great Barrington, MA.

                    viii.   Polly-Mary Bailey, born October 10, 1773 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; married Elijah Harris Abt. 1793; born Abt. 1771 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts.

                     ix.   Scofield-Scovil Bailey, born September 24, 1775 in Middletown, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died May 14, 1843 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Jerusha Hale 1798; born March 26, 1776 in Middletown, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died October 19, 1852 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Twp, Bradford Co, PA

                      x.   Timothy Bailey, born November 24, 1777 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died Aft. 1850 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Eleanor-Elliner Harris Abt. 1800; born 1784 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; died Aft. 1830 in Bradford Co, PA. Timothy and his wife's markers in Granville Center Cemetery are broken and unreadable. per Pat Mott Gobea

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm 1850 LeRoy PA Census

Bailey Timothy 73 M  Farmer CT 110 71

Bailey Elliner 66 F   CT 110 71

Bailey Warren 25 M   PA 110 71

Eleanor is probably related to Elijah and Elisha Harris as they all came from Great Barrington, MA.

                     xi.   David Bailey, born October 20, 1779 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Lucy Spalding January 01, 1805 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born March 07, 1782; died February 14, 1814 in Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) Louise Loomis Abt. 1815; born Abt. 1782.

Supposed to have died in Canton, PA. Residence: Canton, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

                    xii.   Ezra Bailey, born August 10, 1781 in Haddam, Middlesex Co, Connecticut; died April 22, 1820 in Granville Center, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Lydia Andrus Abt. 1801; born Abt. 1783 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts; died July 09, 1847 in Granville Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Center, Bradford Co, PA, Lydia's marker destroyed.

Military: Capt. Eliphalet Mason detachment from 144th Regt, 9th Div PA Militia, he served 28 days and received $1.87 per pg. 293 of War of 1812 Militia Accounts, Final Settlements with US 1812-1827, 10th US Military District, RG02 B, War of 1812 War Served In: Revolutionary War

 

      36.  Jesse Morse, born January 08, 1770 in Walpole, Massachusetts; died September 08, 1847 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of Obadiah Morse, Jr. and Mary Willett.  He married 37. Percey-Persis-Perris Stone April 09, 1792 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

      37.  Percey-Persis-Perris Stone, born February 16, 1772 in Walpole, Massachusetts; died June 22, 1848 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  She was the daughter of Benjamin Stone, Sr. and Susannah Buckman. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, Rt 414, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA Occupation: 1805, farmer on Towanda Creek in LeRoy, PA

MORSE: (English), Dweller at, or near, a moor or marshy wasteland; the son of Moor (dark-complexioned man); one who came from North Africa "New Dictionary of American Family Names" by Elsdon C Smith

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm   Heverly

Jesse Morse, a native of Connecticut, born Jany. 8, 1770, immigrated to Towanda Creek, settling in LeRoy Township, 1805. Here he engaged in farming until the time of his death, Sept. 8, 1847. His wife, Perris Stone, b. Feb. 16, 1772, died June 29, 1848. She was a sister of Benjamin Stone, Sr. (I-327) and their brother Reuben was the father of Josiah F., Sepha, Henry B. and Mahala Stone. Susanna Stone of Sturbridge, Mass. died, 1815 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jesse Morse, in LeRoy, aged 86 years. The children of Jesse and Perris Morse, who married as follows, were Perley to Lucy Holcomb; Sallie to Alpha Stone; Sibyl to Philo Wooster; Ziba to 1st Ruth A. Beardslee, 1827, to 2nd Mary Minard, March 11, 1839; Julian to Philo Wooster, being 2nd wife; Susan to David Morse; Sullivan to Phebe Bailey.

      Children of Jesse Morse and Percey-Persis-Perris Stone are:

       18             i.   Perley-Purley Morse, born July 12, 1793 in Massachusetts; died February 17, 1871 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Lucy B Holcomb Holcombe Abt. 1816 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

ii.   Sibyl-Sybyl Morse, born July 27, 1797 in CT; died October 12, 1822; married Philo Twin Of G

      Enos Wooster April 13, 1814; born Abt. 1792 in CT; died April 18, 1837 in Waterford, Erie Co, PA.

iii.     Sally-Sallie Morse, born August 31, 1799 in Massachusetts; died March 19, 1887 in Bradford Co,

      PA; married (1) Alonzo-Alpha-Alpheus Stone Abt. 1818; born November 27, 1788 in Dudley,

      MA; died January 15, 1860 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA; married (2) Sally Morse Second Husband

      Smith Abt. 1861; born Abt. 1797.  Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA

 http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Tri Co 1850 LeRoy PA Census

Stone Alonzo 61 M 1000 Farmer MA 122 72

Stone Sally 51 F   MA 122 72

Stone Norman 27 M  Farmer PA 122 72

Stone Alpha 20 M  Farmer PA 122 72

Stone Chester 18 M  Farmer PA 122 72

Stone Laura 14 F   PA 122 72

Stone Sally 12 F   PA 122 72

Stone Isa L. 8 F   PA 122 72

                      iv.   Susan-Susanna Morse, born November 08, 1801 in Massachusetts; married David Morse, Jr. Abt. 1821; born 1797 in Massachusetts.

 http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm Tri Co 1850 LeRoy PA Census

Morse David 53 M  Farmer MA 104 70

Morse Susanna 47 F   MA 104 71

Morse Ziba 23 M  Laborer PA 104 71

Morse Manlius R. 16 M  Laborer PA 104 71

                      v.   Juliann-Julian Morse, born May 09, 1805 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; died August 04, 1834; married Philo Twin Of G Enos Wooster Abt. 1823; born Abt. 1792 in Connecticut; died April 18, 1837 in Waterford, Erie Co, Pennsylvania.

                      vi.   Ziba-Zeba Morse, born October 17, 1806 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) Ruth A Beardsley Beardslee 1827; born Abt. 1808; died February 16, 1839 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (2) Mary Minard March 11, 1839 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA; born 1820 in New York; died 1890.  Ziba was a farmer in Granville Twp. Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, PA

                     vii.   Sullivan Morse, born November 18, 1810 in Connecticut; died August 15, 1894 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Phoebe Janet Bailey Abt. 1830 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born 1809 in Vermont; died April 15, 1885 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Burial: LeRoy Cemetery, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

                    viii.   Purley Morse, born July 12, 1795.

                     ix.   Sallie Morse, born August 11, 1798.

                      x.   Zeba Morse, born October 10, 1806.

                     xi.   Susanna Morse, born November 18, 1801.

 

      38.  Truman H Holcomb Holcombe, Sr, born August 10, 1769 in Simsbury, Hartford Co, Connecticut; died December 25, 1848 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.  He was the son of 32. Eli Holcomb Holcombe, Corporal and 33. Hannah Crofut.  He married 39. Seba Bannen Banning 1793.

      39.  Seba Bannen Banning, born Abt. 1769 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died December 1809.  She was the daughter of Samuel Banning, Jr. Seba's ancestral line is per Neil McDonell in 2000

He had 17 children - 8 by his 1st wife Seba Bannen and 9 by his 2nd wife Lydia Ladd 

First he settled in LeRoy PA, but in 1814 he purchased 121 acres of the farm occupied by his father and located in Ulster, PA permanently Burial: December 1848, Ulster Cemetery, Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania

Occupation: 1814, farmer, purchased 121 acres from his father's farm in Ulster, PA

      Children of Truman Holcombe and Seba Banning are:

       19             i.   Lucy B Holcomb Holcombe, born September 15, 1798 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died February 16, 1855 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Perley-Purley Morse Abt. 1816 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

                      ii.   Eli Holcomb Holcombe, born October 15, 1794 in Barkhamstead, Connecticut; died September 14, 1885 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Harriet Bailey January 01, 1819 in Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born April 10, 1801 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co, Massachusetts; died January 20, 1884 in LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: Holcombe West Cemetery, Family plot next to his home on southside of Towanda Creek, LeRoy, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Occupation: Farmer in LeRoy, PA, 1827 built the 2nd gristmill in LeRoy area Residence: southside of Towanda Creek, LeRoy, PA

http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm  History of Bradford County, Pennsylvania with Biographical Sketches  By H. C. Bradsby, 1891 Biographical Sketches pp. 885-904

Eli and Harriet (Bailey) Holcomb, who were the first settlers on the south side of Towanda creek. The father was a native of Connecticut and son of Truman Holcomb of New England, who removed to Ulster in the early settlement of the county. Harriet (Bailey) Holcomb was a native of New York. Eli Holcomb located in LeRoy in 1801, taking possession of 200 acres on either side of Towanda creek. In those days their facilities were limited, compelling them to go eighteen miles to mill. Eli built the second gristmill in 1827, and the first on the south side of the creek (Hugh Holcomb built the first); it was a log structure In 1844 Eli Holcomb built a mill which was damaged by the giving way of the dam; it was rebuilt and is now owned and operated by his son LeRoy. Eli was the father of thirteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity.

LeRoy Heritage Museum's Industry in LeRoy   leroymuseum@yahoo.com

Lumber Mills  "Eli Holcomb operated a sawmill on the southern side of Towanda Creek next to the stream which flows near Mitstifer Road.  A mill pond was located in what is now a pasture. (2002) Traces of this pond still exist."

Gristmills 1820  "The following year (1821) Eli Holcomb built one on the southern side of the Towanda Creek and operated it by water from a 40-acre pond he fourmed by damming the outlet of a swamp on South Mountain.  The pond is now (2002) known as Holcombs Pond.  In 1850, after days of rain, the dam gave way, and sent trees, boulders and much of the dam, over the mountainside.  The mill was destroyed but was rebuilt."

                     iii.   Seba Holcomb Holcombe, born October 25, 1796 in Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married (1) James Burk March 10, 1817; born Abt. 1795; married (2) William Scott September 21, 1835; born December 20, 1820 in Pennsylvania; died February 11, 1911 in Towanda, Bradford Co, PA.

                      iv.   Samuel Benedict Holcomb Holcombe, born June 03, 1800.

                      v.   Alfred Holcomb Holcombe, born May 24, 1802.

                      vi.   Minerva Holcomb Holcombe, born May 03, 1804; married Weldon Galop Abt. 1824; born Abt. 1802.

                     vii.   Delight Holcomb Holcombe, born January 30, 1806; died December 03, 1870; married Benjamin Saxton, Jr Abt. 1826; born April 04, 1800 in Vermont; died September 24, 1862 in Granville, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania. Burial: Granville Center Cemetery, Granville Twp, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Residence: Ulster, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania Benjamin Saxton's Occupation: farmer

                    viii.   Lydia Holcomb Holcombe, born Dec. 06, 1809; married Thomas Kitchen Abt. 1829; born Abt. 1807.

 

      40.  John Mott I, born Abt. 1765 in England; died in Sofsan Creek, New York.

Child of John Mott I is:

       20             i.   John Mott II, born 1786 in Glasco, England; married Elea Minner 1804 in Ulster Co, New York.

 

      44.  John-Johannes Knickerbocker, born November 19, 1766 in New Canaan, Litchfield Co, Connecticut.  He was the son of Lawrence Knickerbocker and Catharine Dutcher.  He married 45. Anis-Annis Ingerham Ingraham Abt. 1780.

      45.  Anis-Annis Ingerham Ingraham, born April 25, 1758 in City of Deeds, England; died April 07, 1857.

Burial: April 1857, Rivenburgh Cemetery, Trout Creek, Delaware Co, New York

Children of John-Johannes Knickerbocker and Anis-Annis Ingraham are:

       22             i.   Laurence Lawrence Knickerbocker, born February 02, 1781; died June 19, 1881 in Roxbury, Delaware Co, New York; married Pheobe Juliana Post Abt. 1810.

                      ii.   Katherine Knickerbocker, born 1787.

                     iii.   Experience Knickerbocker, born 1790.

                      iv.   Ruth Knickerbocker, born 1792; married George Murdock Abt. 1812; born Abt. 1790.

                      v.   Lois Knickerbocker, born 1795.

                      vi.   Elizabeth Knickerbocker, born 1797; married John Boice, Sr Abt. 1810; born Abt. 1795.

                     vii.   Polly Knickerbocker, born October 27, 1799; died March 11, 1848; married Jacobus Robinson October 26, 1817; born October 28, 1794 in Marbletown, Ulster Co, New York; died August 16, 1849. Burial: Yates Cemetery, Caroline, Tompkins Co, New York

                    viii.   John Orange Knickerbocker, born 1802 in Goshen, Litchfield Co, Connecticut.

 

      46.  Adrian-Adrean Post, born Abt. 1770; died in Wysox, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania.

Children of Adrian-Adrean Post are:

       23             i.   Pheobe Juliana Post, born March 04, 1795 in England; died January 07, 1871 in Roxbury, Delaware Co, New York; married Laurence Lawrence Knickerbocker Abt. 1810.

                      ii.   Hiram Post, born Abt. 1794.

                     iii.   John Post, born Abt. 1796.

                      iv.   Hisskrah Post, born Abt. 1798.

                      v.   Sarah Post, born Abt. 1800 in Wysox, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; married Daniel Kenyon June 19, 1814 in Wysox, Bradford Co, Pennsylvania; born Abt. 1798.

 

      52.  Wendelin Baumgartner, born October 25, 1761 in Ober-Eichsel, Germany; died 1832.  He was the son of Anton Baumgartner and Maria Bernbach.  He married 53. Magdalena Brugger February 04, 1788.

      53.  Magdalena Brugger, born Abt. 1763.

Child of Wendelin Baumgartner and Magdalena Brugger is:

       26             i.   Joseph Baumgartner, born May 19, 1799 in Nieder-Eichsel, Baden, Germany; died February 16, 1851; married Ursula-Maria Ursula Kani April 17, 1820.

 

Endnotes

By Pauline C Holcombe, Aunt Paulie's Book,  (completed by her niece, Mary Eleanor McCarthy with the help of other nieces and nephews).

Sophia Mott Holcomb, Sophia Mott Holcomb April 6, 1904,  (April 6, 1904 in LeRoy, PA).

Pat Mott Gobea Research.

Linda Mutzer Research.

Mary Irene Tubach, "Mary Irene Holcombe Tubach Family Tree," 1998.

Vickery's records-Pat Mott Gobea.

Beatrice Ludwig interview.

Bernice Shadduck Snell Spencer Response Letter.

Morse-Klease Records.

Clement F Heverly, Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford Co., Pennsylvania 1770-1825,  (Bradford Star Print, Towanda, PA).

By Jesse Seaver, The Holcomb(e) Genealogy,  (American Historical Genealogical Society, Philadelphia, PA in 1925).

Towanda PA Daily Review  www.thedailyreview.com

David A Shadduck Research.

LeRoy Heritage Museum, RR 1 Box 224, LeRoy, PA 17724  LeRoy Heritage Museum   leroymuseum@frontiernet.net

Knickerbocker Family Page  www.knic.com

Shirley Brown Research.

Tombstones.

National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR Patriot Index - Centennial Edition,  (copyright 1994).

Neil McDonell Research.

Index Of Revolutionary War Pension Application,  (National Archives, Washington DC 1976).

Madelene Daugherty, Ulster-A View Past and Present,  (Ulster, Bradford Co, PA).

Clement F Heverly, History and Geography of Bradford Co PA 1615-1924,  (Bradford Co Historical Society).

Index Of Revolutionary War Pension Application,  (National Archives, Washington DC 1976).

David Grayson Research.

Midge Horneff Davis.

James H Holcombe, Jr, Holcombe Genealogy,  http://www.avocadoridge.com/carney/showrepo.php?repoID=R19&tree=tree1

Hannah Elizabeth Weir McPherson, Holcombe-Nation Builders

Salmon Brook Historical Society, 208 Salmon Brook St, Granby, CT 06035  http://www.salmonbrookhistorical.org/

Sullivan Co Genealogy Website. http://www.rootsweb.com/~pasulliv/

Tri Co Genealogy Website. http://www.joycetice.com/jmtindex.htm

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