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ANNUAL REPORT OF FOREMOST DIARIES. INC.

HARRINGTON DIVISION

1957

 

Source: The Frank Snyder Collection

Transcribed by Connie Hembree Gaban

February 2010

 

            Following is a report of some of the activities of the Harrington Division not normally reported during the year.

 

 

1.          MILK PRODUCER ACTIVITIES

 

a.      Advent of Bulk Tanks

 

 

            After considerable delay in securing the A.H. Arnold Road Tank for bulk milk pick-up, the first farm tank milk was picked up July 31, 1957. The delay in getting the road tank and the objections of Lower Merion Township in accepting the 3-A standards for farm tanks enabled competitive buyers to solicit a number of our large milk producers.  Some of the producers who went to competitors had been selling milk to us for over 30 years. There were 15 of these producers, who in 1956 produced over 4,000,000 pounds of milk.

            Since July 31, twenty-six farmers have purchased farm tanks and as of December 31 the daily weight of this milk was about 18,000 pounds.  Should this increase in 1958 as it has during the latter part of 1957, another pick-up tank will be required before spring.

            The general opinion in this area is that bulk pick-up is here to stay and within four or five years practically all the milk in Northeastern Penna. will be handled in this manner.

            The financing of the farm tanks has been pretty well handled by the local banks on the basis of deductions from the milk check using a certain amount per hundred pounds of milk – generally about .20 per cwt. Some banks require a uniform monthly payment.

 

b.      Premium Payments

 

The matter of premiums above the blend price under Order No. 27 continued during 1957, even after August 1st when the comprehensive order was put into effect.

 

            Premiums paid in 1957 were as follows:

 

                                                                        Premium                                            

                        Pounds Milk                      Above Order #27                        Amount

 

Jan.                 4 262 289                                .10                                           $4 262 29

Feb.                 4 127 386                                .10                                             4 127 38

Mar.                5 026 759                                .10                                             5 026 76

April                5 209 183                                .10                                             5 209 18

May                2 674 539                                .10                              

                        3 801 939                                .15                                             8 377 45

June                5 765 592                                .15                                             8 648 39

July                 4 554 372                                .15                                             6 831 56

August                 15 474                                .20                                                 30 95

                        3 798 488                                .10                                           3 798 49

Sept.                   111 556                                .144                                             160 64        

                        3 519 996                                .10                                             3 519 99

Oct.                    206 522                                .144                                              297 39

                        3 649 394                                .10                                             3 649 39

Nov.                   282 342                                .144                                              406 57

                        3 383 118                                .05                                             1 691 56

Dec.                   431 516                                .144                                              621 38

                        3 708 377                                .05                                             1 854 19

 

Total Premiums 1957 - $58 513 56

 

 

            For bulk milk a price of .20 above the blend price in the 201-210 mile zone was used by practically all the milk dealers in this area. This price f.o.b. the farm instead of f.o.b. the milk plant.

 

 

Page 2

 

c.       Farmer Organization Activities

 

The milk strike of February 26 – March 3, 1957 was inaugurated by the Tri-State

Farmer’s Guild of Northern New Jersey.

 

            There were only two incidents of this strike which affected our division.

 

            The first incident was that of halting one of our drivers, George Peterson, who was on his way back from delivering a tank of milk from LeRaysville to Hoboken. He was stopped near the Delaware Milk Plant on Monday evening February 25 and was not allowed to either move the truck or get away himself until Thursday afternoon February 28.

 

            The other incident was that of Bert Heinrich who after being instructed how to go from LeRaysville to Hoboken ignored his instruction and was stopped on Route 22 near West Coplay, N.J. While he and another truck operator were eating lunch, some strikers emptied kerosene into the tank of milk making it unfit for use. The polluted milk was returned to Dushore and dumped in a field. Heinrich was discharged.

 

            Other tanks of milk were sent to Hoboken and arrived and returned unmolested.

 

            Near the end of the strike the local Farmer’s Union group held meetings and threatened to prevent milk from, coming to the Dushore plant and receiving plants, but nothing materialized.

 

            Another milk strike threat was issued in August by the Tri-State Guild and sympathizers. Some milk was withheld in New York but nothing of a serious nature developed in our operating area.

 

            The local chapter of the Farmer’s Union developed some understanding with a small milk dealer in Wyoming, Penna. under which a few of our producers sent their milk to the Wyoming plant for a few weeks in April. The plant was condemned by local health authorities and the producers returned to their original buyers.

 

d.      Fairdale Lease

 

There has always been a difference of opinion as to the expiration date of the Fairdale lease. A few meetings were held with the directors of the Fairdale Creamery Co. during the spring of 1957, and it was mutually agreed that the termination date is August 1, 1958. Each party has the right to notify the other six months in advance of the termination date should he desire to terminate the lease. Otherwise the lease will continue for a periods of three years.

 

e.      Milk Production

 

The loss of fifteen rather large milk producers in 1957 had a bearing on the milk production during the year. This loss of production affected the plants at Rushville and LeRaysville particularly. A comparison of milk production by plants and different years is show on pages 7 & 8. The following table shows the number of producers at the five plants for the last three years.

 

 

                                                Dushore     Lerays.     Rush.     Fair.     Benton     Total

Dec. 31, 1955                         229              110            59           66          415            879

Dec. 31, 1956                         202                97            52           62          384            799

Dec. 31, 1957                         199                88            38           55          360            740

 

 

One of the factors which has had an influence on farmers quitting is the advent of farm tanks. The small producers, and even some of the larger ones, are not sold on the bulk tank idea and hesitate on making the investment for the tank and also the cost of making certain required changes in the milk houses and barns.

 

 

 

Page 3

 

 

2.      PRODUCER PRICES – COMPARISONS

 

The widening of Order No. 27 as of August 1957 to cover areas not previously under the Order helped to boost the blend price. Following is a table showing the prices paid producers under Orders No. 27 and 61 for the past three years – for 3.5% milk.

 

 

 

      Month                         Dushore – Order No. 27                    Benton – Order No. 61

                                         

                                           1955       1956       1957                     1955       1956        1957

 

Jan.                                   4.185      4.085      4.685                    4.555       4.668       5.031

Feb.                                   4.075      4.005      4.595                    4.460       4.506       4.863

March                               3.875      3.695      4.305                    4.241       4.329       4.823

April                                  3.745      3.565      4.085                     3.869       4.021      4.366

May                                  3.455      3.565      3.785                     3.743       3.863      4.088

June                                  3.485      3.535      3.885                     3.787       3.858      4.176

July                                   3.865      3.935      4.255                     4.148       4.176      4.487

Aug.                                  4.165      4.275      4.836                     4.378       4.210      4.630

Sept.                                  4.165      4.415      5.186                     4.494       4.491      5.029

Oct.                                   4.335      4.565      5.226                     4.940       4.950      5.386

Nov.                                  4.345      4.845      5.266                     5.001       5.163      5.507

Dec.                                  4.225      4.695      5.036                     4.955       5.078      5.298

 

 

3.      MILK WASTE TREATMENT STATUS

a.      Dushore Operation

 

The summer and early fall of 1957 were very dry periods. For several months little or no water was evident in the Little Loyalsock Creek at the Dushore plant. Efficient waste treatment was necessary to prevent unpleasant odors in the stream. The treatment plant operated the most efficiently since it was installed. At no time was there any complaint of its operation. A report was made by Prof. Rupert Kountz to the U.S.D.A. of the study made on the pilot plant at Dushore. Copies of this report are on file in the Dushore office.

 

b.      The Benton Treatment Plant was completed and put into operation in the

fall of 1957. It worked fairly well, but was shut off for the winter in the middle of November. It will be operated again in the spring.

           

c.       The LeRaysville plant worked satisfactorily during the operating season. It was also shut down for the winter.

 

d.      Nothing was done in 1957 to the plants at Rushville and Fairdale.

 

 

 

4.      RENEWED LABOR CONTRACT

 

A new 2 year labor contract was negotiated with Local 229 and agreed upon. The general operating conditions were kept on about the same basis as those of the previous contract. An increase of .10 per hour was approved for the period June 26, 1957 to June 26, 1958, with an additional .10 increase for the period June 26, 1958 to June 26, 1959.

 

 

5.      RETIREMENTS

 

Notably among the retirements in 1957 was the one of Edward J. Frawley who retired as of December 1, 1957. Mr. Frawley became affiliated with Harrington and Company on May 1, 1922. He served as branch manager and ice cream sales manager during his employment. The growth of the ice cream sales in this division was due in a large part to his sales efforts.

Several farewell parties were held in his honor at the time of his retirement.

 

 

Page 4

 

 

6.      CHANGES IN ICE CREAM DISTRICTS – REORGANIZATION

 

 

In January 1957, District No. II of Division IV was organized comprising the branches at Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, Dushore, Sayre, Williamsport and Portville. Some slight changes were made in the personnel. Branch accounting for Sayre, Williamsport and Portville was continued at the Dushore office until the end of 1957 when it was transferred to the Scranton office.

 

7.      FUEL COSTS

 

 

Following is a table showing an analysis of coal and oil costs for 1957. As can be seen  from the table the oil boiler is used only to maintain uniform steam except when either one or two of the coal boilers are not in use or undergoing repairs. During the months of March and December both coal boilers were being cleaned and repaired, accounting for the increased amount of oil having been consumed.

 

 

            Tons Coal       Amount      Gals. Oil          Amount      Total Amount

 

Jan.                 658                  1 430 50            3 500             340 80            1 771 30

Feb.                 660                  1 761 00               900               90 72            1 851 72

Mar.                678                  1 197 00          12 200             1 235 73          2 432 73

Apr.                 954                  2 476 00            7 150               763 34           3 239 34

May                1146                3 187 50          10 250             1 094 29          4 281 79

June                1062                3 522 50          8 000               834 96             4 357 46

July                 903                  3 586 25          2 600               261 26             3 847 51

Aug.                766                  2 670 00          3 400               365 05             3 035 05

Sept.                672                  2 022 00          4 100               427 84             2 449 84

Oct.                 738                  1 845 00          3 100               323 52             2 168 52

Nov.                582                  992 24             5 880               623 26             1 615 50

Dec.                702                  1 680 00          15 766             1 682 44          3 362 44

 

                        9521                26 369 99        76 766             8 043 21          34 413 20       

                                               

 

 

8.      ASIATIC FLU PRECAUTIONS

 

As a precautionary action practically all Foremost employees in the Harrington Division were given two flu shots in the fall of 1957. Apparently the shots were effective because the number of lost time illness was at a minimum, throughout the flu epidemic.

 

 

9.      SAFETY COMMITTEE REACTIVATED

 

In October with the assistance of Fred Brown and Russ Reiss the local safety committee was reorganized and instructed as to how to effectively operate. At this meeting representatives were present from the milk receiving plants, ice cream distributing plants, as well as from the Dushore Plant.

 

 

10.   ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE IN 1957

 

The truck operating accident record in 1957 was one of the most fortunate in years.

During 1957 the following table shows the number of vehicle accidents at each branch.

 

                                                                                                            Number

                        Location                      Miles Driven                          of Accidents

                        Dushore                      559 970                                   1

                        Sayre                          119 855                                   0

                        Portville                      90 602                                    0

                        Williamsport               83 694                                    0

                             

 Total              854 121                                   1

 

 

The one accident recorded above was questionable as to the responsibility.

The plant records for time lost accidents was unusually good for the year.

 

11.   Editor's Note: There is no entry for this item number.

 

Page 5

 

12.   ICE CREAM DISTRIBUTING BRANCHES

 

a.      Practically no changes in personnel were made in 1957 with the exception of the retirement of E.J. Frawley whose duties as sales manager were assumed by Ray Peters in the formation of District II.

 

 

b.      Budgets were again set up for branches for various operations. The ice cream advertising amount set up for each branch was more than needed so that as of December 31, 1957 an unused advertising amount of $13 687 92 was credited to P/L.

 

 

c.       With the exception of the Sayre Branch where a much needed extended roof was needed for unloading and loading, practically no changes in either equipment or buildings were made.

 

 

d.      Ice cream sales trends are shown on the following table for 3 yers sales in the Harrington Division.

 

 

Items                           1955                                1956                                    1957

 

Foremost 10’s            670 153                           575 187                               539 224

Foremost 2’s              107 723                           100 835                               91 696

Foremost Pts.             305 815                           267 624                               224 937

Foremost Brick          55 488                               66 990                               79 257

                       

                                    1 139 179 –(35.6%)     1 010 636 –(32.5%)             935 114 –(29.8%)

 

 

 

D.M. 10’s                   254 338                       235 989                       212 855

D.M. 2’s                       66 373                         65 020                         59 584

D.M. Pts.                    101 225                       100 940                          91 712

 

                                    421 936 –(13.1%)       401 858 –(12.9%)       364 151 –(11.6%)

 

Adelphia 2’s               400 301                       459 936                       450 760

Adelphia Pts.                87 142                         90 016                         76 123

 

                                    483 352 –(15.4%)       549 952 –(17.7)           526 883 –(16.8%)

Ice Milk                      29150                                                              29 150 –(9%)

 

Crestmont 2’s 488 614                       522 676                       642 760

Crestmont Pts.           137 581                       133 747                       148 521

Crestmont Brick          27 845                         14 030                         15 793

 

                                    654 040 –(20.5%)       670 453 –(21.5%)       823 934 –(26.4%)

 

 

Novelties and Misc.   493 014 –(15.4%)       481 082 –(15.4%)       460 954  *      

                                   

                                    3 201 521 –(100%)     3 113 981 –(100%)     3 140 186 –(100%)

 

 

e.      Branch Sales Comparisons in Quarts

 

                                    1954                1955                    1956                        1957

 

Dushore                      550 466           686 966               704 486                659 377

Sayre                          768 983        1 014 436            1 013 724             1 157 488

Portville                      681 255           597 524               537 212                509 869

Wmsport                     778 052           902 595               858 559                813 452 

 

                                    2 778 756        3 201 521        3 113 981             3 140 186

 

 

13.     MARKET ADMINISTRATOR PAYMENTS  1956-1957    

 

1956                                                    1957

 

 

January                                               47 281 03                                39 866 18

February                                             46 305 16                                29 541 70

March                                                 30 712 79                                37 965 11

April                                                    24 243 19                                29 472 40

May                                                    26 539 74                                27 209 72

June                                                    26 296 76                                24 201 38

July                                                     28 077 48                                27 479 54

August                                                33 365 13                                39 582 19

September                                          30 712 74                                45 317 23

October                                               35 875 35                                50 002 48

November                                           37 073 69                                47 416 46

December                                           37 163 53                                49 878 10

 

                                                            403 651 59                              447 932 49

* Illegible

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