Estella, Elkland Township
Sullivan County, PA
Main Street 1909
Photo courtesy of Scott W. Tilden
Original old postcard auctioned on eBay in December 2012
Postmarked from Bernice, PA in 1909

   ELKLAND.

ORGANIZATION.

Elkland township was established in 1804, by a decree of the Court of Quarter Sessions of Lycoming county. The territory was taken from Shrewsbury township and originally comprised what is now Elkland, Hillsgrove and Fox townships; also a por­tion of Forks township. It bad been named Elkland by the early settlers because elk were found in that region. It is located in the western section of Sullivan county bordering on Bradford county on the North. On the East it is bounded by Forks town­ship; on the South by Forks and Hillsgrove townships and on the West by Fox township.

The first township election was held at the residence of William Molyneux at Millview, about 1808 or 1809. The following is a list of the taxables in Elkland township at that time:

John Ball,

John Brown,

Jas. Ecroyd,

Jos. Hoagland, Jr.
John Hackett.
Joel McCarty,
Sylvanus Parker,
Wm. Snell,

Francis Ball.
John Coney,
Jos. Hoagland, Sr.
Jesse Hanes,
John Hill,
Chas. Mullen,
A. Parker,
R. Sample,
John Bingley,

Peter Dominick,
John Hoagland,

Ezra Hanes,
Edward Jones,
P. Mullen, Jr.
Joseph Reeves,
Webster Wyman,

Francis Boyles,
Edw. J. Eldred,
A. Hoagland,
Jonathan Hartley,
Wm. King,
Aaron Patterson,
Wm. Russell,
Richard White.

 


SURFACE AND DRAINAGE.

The surface is an elevated plateau, the regularity being broken by the numerous streams and valleys and also by the range of 'mountains’ known as the Bear mountain. The surface is nearly all drained by Elk creek and its tributaries. The Big Loyalsock creek forms a portion of the southern boundary. Elk creek rises in the mountain range just north of Elkland, known as Burnett's Ridge, and flows south-west uniting with the Loyalsock in Hillsgrove township near the Elkland township line. Its tributaries in Elkland township are King's Creek and Lake Run.  Mill Creek, a branch of Lick Creek, in Forks township, drains the north­eastern corner of the township. All of the waters of this town­ship reach the West Branch of the Susquehanna river at Mon­toursville, through the Loyalsock Creek.

 

NATURAL RESOURCES.

The soil is mostly red shale and is well adapted for grazing and stock raising. No mineral resources have ever been devel­oped in paying quantities; a very small vein of coal has been opened on Bear Mountain.

 The primeval forests have for many years furnished a vast amount of hemlock lumber and bark. Most of the lumber has found its way to the markets on the waters of the Loyalsock,  either in the log or in the form of rafts. The bark was nearly all taken to the tannery at Hillsgrove.

 

PRODUCTS AND INDUSTRIES.

Agriculture and stock raising are the leading industries. Elkland township possesses a larger percentage of land that can be tilled than any other township in the county. The cereals, corn, wheat, oats and buckwheat, are grown in large quantities. Stock raising forms the most important industry. The farmers of this township have for years been paying special attention to raising the better grades of cattle and sheep, and the butter made has long been famous in the markets of the State.

Lumbering was for many years carried on extensively, but the supply of timber is nearly exhausted at present. From twenty to twenty-five years ago the farmers in the winter would haul bark to the tannery and lumber and logs to the creek to be floated down when the spring freshets came.

 

EARLY ROADS.

The first road built in Elkland township was known as the Genesee road, which was opened about the year 1800. The road was built for emigrants from southern Pennsylvania, who locat­ed in the valley of the Genesee river in the state of New York. The road started at Muncy, then called Pennsburg, passing the houses of William Ellis on Wolf Run, and Abraham Webster, near Hunterville, over the Allegheny at Highland Lake and down Ogdonia creek to the Loyalsock, and up that stream to the mouth of Elk creek; thence up Elk creek to Lincoln Falls; thence over the ridge to King's Creek and along that stream near El­dredsville; thence north-east over Burnett's Ridge and down Mill­stone Run to Schrader's Branch; thence down that stream to To­wanda creek, where it connected with other roads leading to the Tioga river.

A road was also built a little later leading from the settlement at Forksville to the Genesee road, and another road leading from the Genesee road to the settlement in Fox township.

 

THE PEOPLE.

Joseph Priestly, who owned large quantities of land in Elkland made a special effort to induce English people, who were at that time coming to America in large numbers, to locate in Elkland, and as an inducement to the first twelve settlers, one hundred and fifty acres of land was given to each, free of cost, on the fol­lowing conditions: First, that they would within one year build a substantial log house, and clear and improve ten acres within five years, only one family to locate on a tract of four hundred acres. They were to have the privilege of purchasing the bal­ance of the land at two dollars and fifty cents per acre. Under these conditions the first improvements were made at some distance from each other. As soon as the Genesee road was built a large number of English people located in Elkland township and others followed later on.

About 1850 and soon thereafter a number of Germans located in the township, selecting their farms principally in the north­ern section. The people of Elkland township are therefore prin­cipally of English and German descent.

The liberal inducements offered to the early settlers and the opportunities afforded by the Genesee road to communicate with other sections was the means of bringing more people to Elkland township within the first few years than any other section of the county.

 

EARLY SETTLERS.

The first settlement made in Elkland township was make by Joseph Reeves, at Lincoln Falls, prior to 1800.

James Ecroyd, who had previously located in Hillsgrove town­ship, built a grist-mill and saw-mill one mile north of Eldreds­ville on King's creek in 1800. He took a very active part in the welfare of the early settlers and with David Thomas, Jesse Haines, Ezra Haines and Joel McCarty, was active in building a Friend's meeting house on the lands now owned by M. C. Mer­cur, prior to 1805. The old road leading to the church has been vacated for some time. Timber has grown up around the site, and a stone pile from the fallen chimney still marks the location. A fine spring of water is found near the stone pile.  Some of the descendants of Mr. Ecroyd now live at Muncy, Pa.

Edward J. Eldred located in Elkland in 1800. He was a native of England; he had studied law and had been admitted to the bar in London. He afterward engaged in business as a tea mer­chant, in which he was not successful. In 1798 he came to Amer­ica, staying for some time in New Jersey and at Kingston, Pa. Later he went to Northumberland with letters of introduction to Joseph Priestley, Jr., who induced him to go to Elkland as his agent. Mr. Eldred moved into a log house belonging to William King and soon erected a house on lands he had purchased near Eldredsville, from Mr. Priestly. His residence was located on the Genesee road and he entertained travelers. A memoranda made by Mr. Eldred under date of Nov. 16, 1801, gives the fol­lowing: "Two hundred and eleven travelers, mostly horsemen, have passed by here since the first day of June last." Mr. El­dred later erected another log house joining the first and his tav­ern consisted of a double log house, where he entertained the travelers passing over the Genesee road to and from the West and the North branch of the Susquehanna rivers.

When the first death in Elkland occurred in 1802—the death of Phelix Powell—Mr. Eldred was called on to make an address. In 1808 Mr. Eldred was appointed justice of the peace and from his well kept docket, which is now in the possession of Ulysses Bird, of Estella, many interesting facts bearing on the early history of Elkland township, have been obtained. From these records in a period of 14 years, on the certificates of bounty given on wild an­imals, the following are noted among others: that John Yanus, Joseph Reeves, John Rogers and Samuel Bill, each killed a panther; that George Bird killed seventeen wolves, Joel McCar­ty six wolves, and William Molyneux, Aaron McCarty, John Mc­Carty, Powell Bird and John Snell, each killed one wolf. The Eldred family later moved to Lycoming county.

William Snell came from England with his family and located on the lands later owned by Robert and James Hart. The date of his coming to Elkland is not known but he was among the early settlers. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Snell were:

 John, of Elkland.

            Anthony, of Lockport, N. Y.

William, of Lockport, N., Y.

Joseph, of Lockport, N. Y.

Richard, of Illinois.

Henry, deceased.

Elizabeth, married Jonathan Rogers, Sr., of Forksville.

John Snell married Miss Calflesh, of Philadelphia, and located on the farm now owned by Frank McCarty, later be moved to Hillsgrove township, at the mouth of Elk creek, on the farm now owned by Ezra Little. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Snell were:

Mary, married Owen Danley, of Lycoming county.

William, of Michigan.

John, of Hillsgrove township.

Elizabeth, single.

Maria, married Edward Lippincott, of Hillsgrove township.

Thomas, of Elkland township.

Charles, of Hillsgrove township.

Sarah, single.

Joseph, of Hillsgrove township.

Rachel, married Ezra Little.

Jacob, of Canton, Pa.

Thomas Snell was the only one of the third generation to locate in Elkland township. He married Catharine Bryan. Their children were:

Lucretia, married George Brown, of Elkland.

Rachel, married George Lilley, of Fox township. Sarah, dec'd, married Joseph Morgan, of Hillsgrove.

Francis Boyle and brother John, came from Ireland during the Revolutionary war, when they were 18 and 20 years of age, respectively. They located at Shamokin where John remained and his descendants are numerous in Pennsylvania, being frequently known by the name O'Boyle, and holding many prominent positions.

Francis moved his family, consisting of his wife and two sons, John and Hugh, from Shamokin to Elkland township in an ox cart in 1803, locating on the Barnes farm. Mr. Boyle was married twice, his second wife being Nancy Wilcox. The children by the first wife were:

John, of Elkland.

Hugh, of Elkland.

Hannah, married John C. Little.

Martha, died when a young lady.

By the second wife:

Charles, of Elkland township.              

Gideon S., of Overton, later of Illinois.

Francis R., died at the age of 30 years.

Three children died in infancy.

John Boyle married Avis King, in 1830. She was a daughter of John King. Mr. Boyle located on the farm now owned by his son F. A. Boyle, at Estella, Pa. To Mr. and Mrs. Boyle were born four children:

William W., dec'd, of Estella.

John C., died at the age of 17 years.

Malinda B., married F. B. Glidewell, of Forksville. F. A., who lives on the homestead.

Francis Bull, who was a carpenter, married a daughter of Rob­ert Lambert and located on the Joseph Pardoe farm, now. owned by B. K. Luther, near Eldredsville. David Thomas located near Elk Lake which was then called Thomas Lake.

Charles Mullen located in Elkland township on lands between Eldredsville and the Watson Wright farm. The name Mullan was originally McMullan or McMillan, and there is a pretty romance connected with the changing of the name to Mullan.

Anthony McMullan or McMillan was of Scotch Irish descent. He came to New York City at about 1750 or 1760. He was a sail­or and afterward became the owner and captain of a vessel and was lost on his first voyage. At the time of his death he was the owner of extensive real estate in the central part of the city. The only son, Charles, became infatuated with a country girl and married her against the wish of his mother, who disinherited him in consequence of the marriage.

Charles McMullan left the parental home, changed his name to Charles Mullen to retaliate, and followed his chosen vocation, blacksmithing. The widow McMullan transferred the title of her property to her own people for six shillings, to forever debar her son Charles from coming in possession of any portion of it. Repeated efforts have been made by the heirs of Charles Mullan to get possession of the property which is said to be worth several millions at present, but all efforts have failed.

At the breaking out of the Revolutionary war, Charles McMullan and his wife were living near Boston. Mr. Mullan was through [sic]the war and his son Charles was born while he was in the serspan>vice. After the war he moved to New York State, where the three youngest children were barn. From there he, moved to Shamokin, Pa., where he remained until he came to what is now Sullivan county.

The date that Charles Mullan came to Elkland township cannot be given. One of his descendants, J. L. Hoagland, in writing the early history of the family, fixes the date at about 1796, It is very doubtful whether there was any one living within the present limits of Elkland township at that early date, He may however, have come two or three years later. It is said that when Charles Mullan moved to Elkland township, he came with an oxcart and two cows, in the fall of the year, and that the road across the Allegheny mountain was a mere path cut out through the woods, and that the hay to winter his stock was procured at the Warren farm in Forks township] also that later he went to Muncy to get his grain ground into flour, making the trip in four days. The Genesee road was completed in 1800 and Ecroyd's grist mill was built in that year which would show that Mullan had located in Elkland a little earlier. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mullan were:

Martha, :married Philip Kilmer, of Fox township.   

Charles. Jr., of Elkland township.

Polly, married Robert Fleming, of Sunbury., Pa.

Susan, married Francis Boyle, of Elkland township. Hannah, married Joseph Hoagland, of Elkland township.

Charles Mullan, Jr., came to Elkland township with his father and located on his father's farm, which was later known as the

White farm, now owned by J. Lyman Snyder.  Mr. Mullan married Elizabeth Hoagland. She was a daughter of Joseph Hoagland, one of the first settlers of Fox township. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mullan were:

Hannah, married John Warburton, of Fox township. Charles, of Iowa.

Joseph, deceased, of Elkland.

Martha, married Charles Dieffenbach, of Overton town­ship, Bradford county.

William, dec'd, of Elkland township.

John, of Elkland.       -

Joseph Mullan located near Lincoln Falls on the Nelson McCarty farm. He married Harriet Bedford. Their children were:

Gazette, married A. McIlwain, dec'd, of Eldredsville.
Libbie, married John Frymire, of Elkland, later of Lycoming county;
Dora, married Peter Frye.

William Mullan married Mary Grange, He was sent by the Mullan heirs to New York to look up the Anthony McMullan

property and it is supposed was poisoned. He came home sick and died soon after.

John Mullan was born in Elkland township in4820. He was a son of Charles Mullan, Jr. In 1844 he married Selena Woodhead, who was born in England in 1825. Mr. Mullen purchased a fine farm in Elkland and located thereon, until about two years ago, when he and his wife went to live with their son in-law, J. P. Brenchley, in Elkland, where they are at the present time. To Mr. and Mrs. Mullan have been born:

Malinda A., married James P. Brenchley, of Elkland. Cecelia A., died Dec. 9, 1853.

Hannah L., married F. R. Warburton, of Iowa. Ellen, married Lemuel Yaw, of Elkland.

J. Frank, of Elkland.

Harriet M., married Jasper Fawcett.

Selena J., died in 1863.

Dinah A., married Henry Fawcett, of Elkland:

Henry Melville, of Elkland.

Clara A., dec'd, married Charles Hottenstein, of Kansas.

Charles 0., died April 2. 1888.

Martha Elisabeth, married Porter Higley, of Elkland.

Ada A., married Oscar N. Molyneux, of Millview.

Joseph Hoagland, Jr., was a son of Joseph Hoagland, who lo­cated in Fox township in 1903. His grand-father came from Hol­land, and his mother was of Scotch descent. Mr. Hoagland's father came to Lycoming county at an early date, where he lived until he moved to Fox. Joseph Hoagland, Jr., married Hannah Mullan and located on 200 acres of land near Lincoln Falls, where James P. Brenchley now lives. The tract of land also took in the farms of Ellen Pardoe and Clemmie McCarty. None of the descendants of Mr. Hoagland are now living in Elkland township.

Joseph Woodhead was a native of England and while in Eng­land married Anna Seeker, also a native of England. In 1829 the family came to America, locating in Elkland near the Bethel school house. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Woodhead were:

Anna, married Joel McCarty, of Elkland.

Mary, married Jacob Gilbert.

Vincent, of Elkland.

Selena, married John Mullan, of Elkland. Dinah, married Henry Huckell, or Kansas. Ellen, married John Battin.

Joseph, of Elkland.

Vincent Woodhead was a son of Joseph Woodhead. He was born in England, Oct. 19, 1M23, and came to America with his parents in 182). He married Esther Ellen Molyneux, April 5, 1854. She was a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux, of Forks township. Mr. Woodhead purchased 200 acres of land in Elkland township, now owned by his son, Geo. F Woodhead, where he located. To Mr. and Mrs. Woodhead were born:

Cecelia, married Hudson Bahr, of Monroeton, Pa. George F., of Elkland.

Fred J., of Ontario, Cal.

Henry Irvin, of Forksville.

Charles E , of Delaware.

John Nelson.

Joseph Pardoe was a native of England and came to America, locating at Northumberland, Pa. Later he purchased 200 acres of land in Elkland township, where he located, some time between 1808 and 1819. He married Sarah Roberts, and of this union eight children were born:

William. of Elkland township.

Joseph W., of Elkland township.

John, of Lewisburg, Pa.

George, of Elkland township.

Richard, of Elkland township.

Thomas, of Elkland township.

Elizabeth.

Sarah.

William Pardoe, the oldest son of Joseph Pardoe, located on the McCarty Ridge. He married Jane McCarty, a daughter of Joel McCarty. She was born Feb. 16. 1809, and died April 12, 1869. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Pardoe were:

John, of Forksville.

Albert, of Elkland township.

Joseph, of Elkland township.

Mary E , married Frank R. Barnes, of Elkland township.

Joseph W. Pardoe, was a son of Joseph Pardoe. He was born Aug. 8, 1813, and died Sept. 25, 1890. Mr. Pardoe married Mary

Molyneux, a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux, of Forks township, in 1840, and located near Eldredsville. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Pardoe were:

George M., of Sioux City, Iowa.

James H., of Nebraska.

Benjamin, died May 12, 1845.

Henry C., of Millview.

Rebecca S., married Henry Norton, of Elkland.

Lydia J., dec'd, married D. L. Miller, of Eldredsville.

Mary M., married Levi S. Squires, of Palliby, Pa.

George Pardoe was a son of Joseph Pardoe, he located in the western section of Elkland township. Mr. Pardoe was married twice, his first wife was a daughter of Richard Green, and his second wife was Rebecca Galough, the widow of Dan Galough.

She was a daughter of Jacob Sherman, of Forks township. The children of George Pardoe were:

Mary, of Virginia.

Rachel, deceased.

Delia.

Harriet, married John Landon, of Elkland.

Mariah.

Alvin.

Emma, married Charles Everett.

Able, of Forks township.

Richard Pardoe was a son of Joseph Pardoe, and located in the western section of Elkland township. He married Sarah Brown, who died, and he married Mary Little for his second wife. Mr. Pardoe had one son Wellington, by his first wife, who was drowned in the Loyalsock creek, at the Cape Mill in 1880.

Thomas Pardoe was a son of Joseph Pardoe. He was born in Elkland township, June 12, 1822, and on reaching his majority located on the farm now owned by E. B. Wright. Mr. Pardoe married Margaret Molyneux, June 11, 1846. She was a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux. Mrs. Pardoe died April 15, 1870, and Mr. Pardoe March 11, 1866. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Pardoe were:

David J., died Sept. 22, 1870.

Ellen E., dec'd, married R. Watson Wright.

Nelson, deed, of Elkland township.

Walter T., dec'd. went West.

Clayton Thomas, died April 13, 1857.

Martha E., died March 30, 1861.

John S., died March 23, 1897.

Charles M., of Minneapolis, Minn.

Henry Toland was a native of Dublin, Ireland, and married Ellen McCarty, also of Dublin. They came to America in 1848, locating on the farm now occupied by Frank Bahl. Mr. Toland was engaged in carrying local mails for a number of years. To Mr. and Mrs. Toland were born:

Mary, married Geo. W. Lambert, of Forks township. Lizzie, married Christopher Peale, of Eagles Mere. Catharine, married Frank Bahl, of Elkland township.

Joel McCarty—The McCarty family is probably descended from the ancient family of McCarthy. The name is modernized as McCarty, McCartney, etc. According to family tradition, Silas McCarty, the ancestor of the McCarty family in western Sullivan county, left Scotland when about 14 years of age and settled in Ireland for a few years. He afterwards emigrated to America and settled in Bucks county, Pa. We have no date of his emigration, but on an old map of Bucks county, Pa., dated March 11, 1724, Silas McCarty is represented as the owner of a tract of land in Plumstead township. From this it would appear that the family are of Scotch origin which can be traced back nearly 200 years.

Joel McCarty, the first of that name to reside within the pres­ent limits of Sullivan county, was one of eighteen children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Lancaster) McCarty, who about 1790, moved from Northumberland county to a farm between Muncy and Clarkstown. Thomas McCarty is said to have had the first grist mill in Lycoming county. Joel McCarty married Ellen Roberts. They moved to Elkland township, Sullivan county, about the year 1800. They had eleven children, most of whom built homes for themselves in what was then a wilderness, and whose descendants now form a large portion of the inhabitants of Elkland township. They are as follows:

Aaron, of Elkland township.

Jesse, of Elkland township.

John, born Sept. 15, 1804, died Feb. 19, 1895.

Elizabeth, dec'd, married Joseph Kitely, of Ontario, Can­ada.

Jane, married Wm. Pardoe, of Elkland.

Silas, of Elkland.

Joel, of Elkland.

Joseph, born Aug. 14, 1816, died Jan. 20, 1896.

Mary, born Dec. 22, 1818, died June 9, 1808.

Sarah, died Jan. 14, 1892, married George Schill, of Fox township.

Thomas, of Elkland township.

John, Joseph and Mary, remained single and all lived and died on the farm now owned by Hampton Pardoe.

Aaron McCarty, the oldest child of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty. He was born Nov. 16, 1799, and died March 23, 1874. He
married Elizabeth Pardoe and located in Elkland township. They had nine children:

Sarah, born Dec. 3, 1828, died in May, 1855.

John P., of Elkland township.

Jesse R., of Elkland township.

Abel, of Elkland township.

Joseph C., of Elkland township.

Job, of Elkland township.

Ellen, born Jan. 14, 1842, unmarried, lives with her sis­ter, Mrs. Theodore Heess.

Elizabeth, married Theodore C. Heess, of Elkland twp. Thomas W., of Elkland township.

Jesse McCarty was a son of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty. He was born in Elkland township, Feb. 7, 1802. He married Martha Hoagland and located in Elkland township. They had no children.

Silas McCarty was a son of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty. He was born Dec. 4i, 1811, and died Jan. 24, 1888. He married Sarah Annable and located in Elkland township. To Mr. and Mrs. McCarty were born:

Joshua R., dec'd, of Elkland township.

Elvira M., married Joel Molyneux, of Forks township. Rachel, married twice, John Annable and Jesse Everett, of Eldredsville.

Roselinda, dec'd, married E. G. Rogers, of Lincoln Falls. Francis H., of Elkland township.

Joel McCarty was a son of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty. He was born Oct. 3, 1814, in Elkland township, and died May 17, 1867. He married Ann Woodhead, a daughter of Joseph Woodhead, and located in Elkland township. To Mr. and Mrs. Mc­Carty were born:

Harriet, married John S. Brown, of Lincoln Falls. David, dec'd, of Forks township.

Mary, born Aug. 24, 1843, died April 11, 1864.

Vincent, deceased.

Lewis, of Forks township.

Chester, born Nov: 1848, died Sept. 16, 1876.

Sylvester, of Elkland.

Septer, of Millview.

Welles, of Elkland.

D. Fremont, of Estella.

Rosalinda, dec'd, married John W. Brown, of Elkland.

Thomas McCarty was born June 27, 1827, and died July 3, 1857. He married Chloe Wilcox, a daughter of John D. Wilcox, and located in Elkland township. Their children were:

Frederick 0., of Elkland.

Lucetta J., married Joshua Cott, of Lincoln Falls. Martha E., married Ernest Beebe.

John P. McCarty was a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Pardoe) McCarty. He was born in Elkland, June 5, 1831, and died at Hudson, Iowa, June 12, 1885. In September, 1859, he married Sarah Molyneux, a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux, and located on the farm now owned by his brother, Thos. W. McCarty. Later he moved to Hudson, Iowa. They had. no children.

Jesse R. McCarty was born in Elkland township, March 8, 1833. He was a son of Aaron and Sarah (Pardoe) McCarty. Mr. McCarty located on the farm where he now lives. April 23, 1857, he married Ellen Corbin. She was a daughter of Chancy and Violet (Gaylor) Corbin. The Corbin's came from Warren coun­ty to Wyalusing, Bradford county, and later to Albany town­ship. The children of Mr. and Mrs. McCarty were:

Nellie E., married Walter Battin, of Piatt, Pa.

Lloyd L., of Dushore.

Orrin H., of Eldredsville.

William L.

 Jennie.

Ann S., married Ellsworth Jennings, of Estella. Minnie A., married Joseph D. Gilbert.

George P., of New Albany.

0. Hepburn, of Millview, Pa.

Clinton P., of Eldredsville, Pa.

Abel McCarty was born Aug. 8, 1832, in Elkland township. He was a son of Aaron and Sarah (Pardoe) McCarty. He married Julia A. Black, a daughter of James and Margaret (Bryan) Black, of Forksville, and located on a farm in Elkland township, near

Hatt, Pa. To Mr. and Mrs. McCarty have been born:

Orwell, deceased.

Katharine M., married C. Hampton Pardoe, of Elkland. Julia E., at home.

Joseph C. McCarty was a son of Aaron and Sarah (Pardoe) Mc­Carty. He was born in Elkland township May 22, 1837, and died Oct. 26, 1878. He was married twice, his first wife was Adaline Rundell, who died Jan. 13, 1866; his second wife was Clementine

Little. She still lives on Mr. McCarty's farm near Eldredsville. The children of Mr. McCarty by his first wife were:

Ida M., died at Hudson, Iowa, May 25, 1885. M. Elizabeth, died Dec. 7, 1885.

William H., of Columbia county, Pa. By the second wife:

Clayton A., deceased.

Ruie I., deceased.

Job McCarty was born in Elkland township, Jan. 14, 1842. He was a son of Aaron and Sarah (Pardoe) McCarty. Mr. McCarty purchased the McCarty homestead where he lives. Nov. 13, 1872, he married Georgia E. Molyneux, a daughter of James and Esther (Tomlinson) Molyneux. She was born Oct. 4, 1852, in Overton township, Bradford county. To Mr. and Mrs. McCarty have been born:

James I., died Nov. 25, 1873.

Carlton D., of Forksville.

Gordon L., born Sept. 5, 1877, died May 7, 1901. Nellie L.

John L.

Ralph P.

Rush B.

Francis M.

Grace, born Dec. 18, 1892, died, Feb. 2, 1893. Helen R.

Esther, born May 1, 1897, died June 7, 1897.

William Kay was a native of England and while in his native land married Ann Bedford and came with his family to America in 1849, locating on the farm now owned by Albert Kay. Mr. Kay was a miner and worked in the coal mines at Barclay, Brad&ord county, for some time. Mr. Kay died Dec. 26, 1878, aged 75 years. Mrs. Kay died Aug. 1, 1886. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Kay were:

Joseph, of England.

Henry, of England.

Sarah Ann, deceased.

Elizabeth, deceased.

Harriet, married George C. Bird, of Estella. Mary Ann, dec'd, married Ellis Brown. Jane, deceased, married J. J. Webster.

Carrie, married George Glidewell, of Elkland township. Albert, of Elkland township.

Joseph Whiteley was born in Huntersfield, England, Sept. 4, 1809, and on Dec. 28, 1828, be was married to Mary Hague, who was born at Saddleworth, England, March 31, 1809. Mr. and Mrs. Whitely came to America in 1840, locating at Philadelphia.

In 1846 he came to Elkland township, purchasing 50 acres of land. Mr. Whitely was a weaver by trade, and in the winter months left his family in Elkland township and went to Philadelphia to work at his trade and during the summer months would work on his farm. He added 50 acres more to his farm and still later another 10 acre tract. He accumulated considerable property and for a number of years lived a retired life at Forksville. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Whitely were:

Ann, dec'd, married John G. Wright, dec'd, of Forksville. John, of Elkland township.

William, a veteran of the Civil war, was killed by a falling tree, Feb. 16, 1876.

Hannah E., married W. C. Morrison, of Towanda Martha, married Daniel Bedford, of Iowa.

Mary, married E. W. Snell, of Forksville.

John Warren was born at Millview, Sept. 25, 1801. He was a son of John and Mary (Ward) Warren, who came to America from Liverpool, England, and in 1795 located at Millview, Forks township. John Warren, the subject of this sketch, purchased a farm near the Wesleyan Methodist church in Elkland township. He married Elizabeth Glidewell, Dec. 26, 1821. She was born Sept. 2, 1802. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Warren were:

John, of Millview, born Mar. 25, 1825, died Aug. 5, 1875.
Mary, married twice; Wm. Reifsnyder and Sam'l Lose.
James, born Jan. 3, 1827, of South Branch, Bradford Co.
William, of Elkland, born June 23, 1829.

Sarah, born July 24, 1831, died unmarried.

H. Angeline, born Aug. 19, 1838, married Wm. Norton.

Lucy Jane, born Sept. 13, 1840, married Fred Luke, of Chicago

Henry C., died at the age of 6 years.

Henry Bedford was a native of England and came with his family to America some time after 1820, locating on the farm later owned by Thomas King. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Bedford were:

John, of Elkland.

Ann, married Wm. Kay, of Elkland. Richard, of Lycoming county.

Harriet. married Joseph Mullan. Jonas, of Elkland, later of Minnesota. James, of Towanda, Pa.

Henry, of Elkland township.

John Bedford was born in England, and came to Elkland town­ship with his father. Henry Bedford. He married Ellen Sadler

and located on the farm now owned by Oscar W. Bedford. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Bedford were:

Samuel, of Elkland.

Mary A., married Job  J. Plotts, of Estella, Pa. Henry, of Michigan.

William, of Chicago.

Sarah J., married King Glidewell and later John Smith, of Albany township, Bradford county.

Thomas, dec'd, of Elkland township.

Martha, married John Green, of Hillsgrove, Pa. Zilpha. married Miles Anderson, of Lycoming county.

Jonas Bedford was born Nov. 2, 1820, in England, and came to America with his father, Henry Bedford. Mr. Bedford located on the farm now owned by T. S. Kilmer and lra J. Pardoe. He and his oldest son, Edward, enlisted in the Civil war. Mr. Bedford married Lydia Molyneux, May 25, 1843. She was a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux, of Forks township. About 1870 the family moved West, a number of the children had gone a little earlier. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Bedford were:

Edmund, of Redlands, Cal.

Daniel, of Hudson, Iowa.

Edward D., of Jackson, Minn.

Alfred D., of San Bernardino, Cal.

Lyman N., of San Bernardino, Cal.

Margaret A., married Asbury B. McChord, of Rushmore, Minn.

Wilson J., was drowned while skating on a lake in Minnesota, Dec. 5, 1874.

Salathiel B., of Rushmore, Minn.

Ermina A., married Daniel S. Jordan, of San Bernardino, Cal.

Rebecca E., married Ransom F. Merrick, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Henry Bedford married Martha Ann Vough, a daughter of John Vough, of Lycoming county, for his first wife and his second wife was Mary Hunsinger, a daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Brobst) Hunsinger. of Forks township. Mr. Bedford purchased 200 acres of land in Elkland township near Millview, Pa., and cleared up a farm. The three oldest sons are in the ministry. Mr. Bedford died Feb. 11, 1900, and the first wife, Dec. 15, 1858. The children by the first wife were:

Sylvester, of Houghton, N. Y.

J. Nelson, of Houghton, N. Y.

Oliver C., of Michigan.

L. S., of Elkland township.

By the second wife:

U. Grant, of Elkland township.

Clara, married Frank Black, of California.

John King, Sr., was born in Staffordshire, England, Feb. 29, 1750. In 1775 he was married to Hannah Bishop, of Birmingham, England. Mr. and Mrs. King came with their family to Elkland township in 1801, locating on the farm now owned by George W. Glidewell. Their children were:

John, of Elkland township.

Thomas, Sr.

Sally, married George Bird, of Forks township.

Mary.

Esther.

William, of Elkland township.

John King, Jr., was born near London, England, in 1777 and came to America with his parents in 1800. He married Alice Crosby in 1805, who was also a native of England. John King located first at Northumberland and in 1819 moved with his wife and seven children to Elkland township, locating on the farm now owned by Philander Kinney, where he remained until his death which occurred in 1861. The children of Mr. and Mrs. King were:

Elizabeth, married Hugh Boyle, of Elkland township.
Avis, married John Boyle, of Elkland township.
Mary, married George Rogers.
John C., a physician of Mill Hall, Clinton Co., Pa.

Thomas, of Elkland township.
William, of LaPorte township.
Dinah, married Ephraim Annable.
Job L., of Elkland township.

William King, Sr., who came with his father :from England, located with his father on the Glidewell farm in 1800. He remained single until two years after the death of his mother, which occurred in 1832, when he married Polly Crandall, and lived with her until the time of his death which occurred in 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King had no children.

Thomas King was born in Elkland township, July 4, 1813. He was a son of John Jr. and Alice (Crosby) King. Mr. King mar­ried Mary Bown, a daughter of William and Harriet (Huckell) Bown, of Elkland township. Mr. King located on the farm near Estella, now owned by Fred Shaffer. Mr. King was a man of more than ordinary intelligence. His first wife died in 1870, and three years later he married Mrs. C. S. McIntire, who survives him. Mr. King died Sept. 30, 1895. His children were:

Charles S., died in the Civil war.

Chester B., died in the Civil war.

Harriet and Henrietta, twins.

Jennie, married Cassius Tompkins, of Fox township.

Job L. King, was born in Elkland township. He was a son of John, Jr. and Alice (Crosby) King, and located on his father's farm. He was county surveyor for many years. He married Jane Converse, a daughter of Joseph Converse, who located at Elk Lick, Davidson township, in 1828. The children of Mr. and Mrs. King were:

Alice R., deceased.

Septet, deceased.

Susie Kate, married Albert Kay, of Elkland township. Sadie, married H. W. Osler, of Bernice, Pa.

John Bown was a native of England, and came to America, lo­cating in Elkland township at an early date. His wife died in England. He had one son:

William, of Elkland township.

William Bown married Harriet Huckell, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Lambert) Huckell, one of the pioneer families of Forksville. He was a miller by trade and located first at Wilkes-Barre, later at the Cape Mill in Hillsgrove township and at Millview. He finally located in Elkland on the farm now owned by G. Eugene Bown. Their children were:

Sarah, married Richard Pardoe, of Elkland township.
Mary, married Thomas King, of Elkland township.
Charles L., a minister of the gospel.
John H., of Elkland township.

John H. Bown was a son of William and Harriet (Huckell) Bown. He married Mary E. Wilcox, a daughter of Isaac Wilcox, of the Canton branch of the Wilcox family. The children of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bown were:

G. Eugene, of Elkland township.

Mertie L., married Allen Brown, deceased.

Henry Fawcett was born at Liverpool, England, June 11, 1789. He married Sarah Grange, who was born in England, Oct. 15,

1787. They came to America, locating on the John Kline farm, now owned by Chas. W. Fawcett, about 1817. Mr. Fawcett died Jan. 24, 1867, and Mrs. Fawcett in Dec. 1875. Their children were:

Elizabeth, married Jonathan Lewis, of Hillsgrove. Joseph, of Elkland township.

John, of Elkland township.

William, of Elkland township.

Mary.

Benjamin. of Forksville.

Joseph Fawcett was born Oct. 7, 1814. He married Lydia Bird, a daughter of George and Sally (King) Bird, of Forks township, and located on the farm now owned by his heirs. Joseph Faw>cett died May 10, 1888, and Mrs. Fawcett on May 19, 1899. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Fawcett were:

Roxey, married F. B. Sanders, of Tioga Co. Jasper, of Elkland township.

Silas, died in 1857.

Watson, of Forks township.

Charles W., of Elkland township.

A. L., of New Albany.

William Hart married Linda Fawcett, and located on the farm now owned by his son William. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Hart were:

William, of Elkland township.

Dora A., married J. A. King, of Muncy, Pa.

Leonard, of Michigan, killed accidentally in 1887. Clara B., died July 4, 1881.

John W., of Elkland township.

Jennie F., married Samuel Darby, of Hillsgrove, Pa.
Frank, died in infancy.

Charles Norton was a native of England and came to America and located in Elkland township on the farm now owned by the heirs of John Norton. He married Margaret Clark, also a native of England. Their children were:

Sarah, married John L. Jennings, of Bradford county. John, deceased.

William H., died in the Civil war.

Hannah, dec'd, married David Molyneux, of Forks twp. Alvira, dec'd, married Wallace Snell.

Mary, dec'd, married William Snell.

Frank W., of Liberty Corners, Pa.

George Norton was a native of England and came to America, locating in Elkland township at an early date, on the farm later owned by John W, Norton. He married Tencie Fawcett. Their children were:

Henry, of New Albany.

Francy, married Lloyd Welliver, of Lycoming county. Mary Jane, married George Riley, of Overton.

Ellen, married Albert Pardoe, of Elkland.

Lincoln, of New Albany.

Jonathan Rogers was born at Muncy, Lycoming county, Feb. 10, 1821. He was a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Snell) Rog­ers. Mr. Rogers' father was a native of England, and came to Forksville with his father, Samuel Rogers, in 1800. Jonathan Rogers, Sr. was engaged in the manufacture of woolen goods with his brothers at Forksville, until the big flood of 1816, which destroyed the woolen factory. He then went to Muncy and en­gaged in business with his brother Samuel, in conducting a saw­mill and grist-mill until 1826, when he came back to Forksville and built the Osler Woolen mills. He died in 1830 and the prop­erty passed to other bands.

Jonathan Rogers, the subject of this sketch, lived at home un­til ten years of age, when he went to live with relatives until he was able to care for himself; he learned the millwright trade. On reaching his majority he located at Hillsgrove for a short time and in 1848 moved to Lincoln Falls with his wife and one child. At the falls Mr. Rogers purchased a large tract of land, cleared up a farm and engaged in the lumbering business. He took a very active part in public improvements, and in religious and educational matters. Mr. Rogers married Elizabeth Huckell, who was born at Hillsgrove, Pa. She was a daughter of Benjamin and Margaret (Plotts) Huckell. Her grand-father, Joseph Huckell, was a native of England and married an English lady, a Miss Danley, and located at Hillsgrove at an early date, beingone of the first settlers of Hillsgrove township. Jonathan Rogers died Feb. 12, 1896. Mrs. Rogers is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Rogers were born fourteen children:

Marion W., married N. K. Woodward, dec'd, of Dushore.
Edward G., of Lincoln Falls.

Sarah, at home.

Anna M., married Nelson C. Pardoe, dec'd, of Lincoln Falls.

C. S., of Lincoln Falls.

Louzina, married Frank McCarty, of Elkland twp.
John P., of Estella, Elkland twp.

Benjamin F., who died at the age of 3 years.

Serena D., at home.

Harriet C., married Orrin McCarty, of Elkland.
Rachel
L., a school teacher.

Ella M., married Silas McCarty, of Elkland.

Elizabeth M., married Albert F. Heess, of Dushore.
Jonathan, of Lincoln Falls.

Robinson Barnes was born at Blanford, Mass., Dec. 4, 1808. His father was killed when young Barnes was six years of age and Robinson was bound out until 21 years of age to learn the cabinet maker's trade. The Barnes' are of English descent and are the descendants of Phineas Barnes. whose three sons settled in Connecticut about 1630. Later they moved to Stockbridge, Mass. Of their lineage two men, Benjamin and Jeremiah, were soldiers in the Revolutionary War, Benjamin being a captain, and at the close of the war they located at Blanford, about 20 miles east of Stockbridge. Jeremiah had a son Jere­miah, who was born Sept. 22, 1783. He married Betsy Robinson, who was a native of Connecticut. They had four sons: John Nelson, Robinson, Jeremiah Curtis, and Chancy Wetmore. Robinson Barnes and other relatives of the family moved to Bradford county. Robinson locating at Orville in 1830, where he en­gaged in manufacturing hand rakes until 1855, when he located on the farm now owned by Miles 0. Barnes. Mr. Barnes was married twice, his first wife being Orill S. West, who was born in Bradford county, Jan. 11. 1808. The second wife was Aman­da Dikeman, of Candor, New York. She was born in Caroline township, Tomkins county, N. Y.. Aug. 1822. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Barnes by his first wife were:

Emma, who died in infancy.

By the second wife:

Frank R., of Elkland township.

Miles 0., of Elkland township.

Jay C., of Elkland township.

John Grange was born in England about 1779, and was mar­ried in 1812, to Jane Midgley, who was born in England in 1790. After the birth of the three oldest children, the family came from Yorkshire, England, to America, landing at Philadelphia, May 21, 1818, and locating in Elkland township the same year. They lived with the Fawcett's at first and soon after purchased the farm west of Eldredsville, which is still owned by members of the family. Mr. Grange died Jan. 6, 1859, and Mrs. Grange, Oct. 17, 1R82. To Mr. and Mrs. Grange were born:

Joseph, of Eldredsville.

Dinah, born Mar. 30, 1815, married Sylvanus Hunter, of New York, Sept. 29, 1836, died Mar. 25, 1856.

Faith, born Feb. 3, 1817, married Benjamin Little, of Forksville.

Mary, born May 21, 1819, married William Mullen, of Elkland.

Sarah, born May 14, 1821, lives on the homestead.
John W., of Eldredsville.

Ann E., born Feb. 28, 1825, lives in Illinois.

Jane, born Sept. 27, 1826, married Robert Hunter, of Illi­nois.

Hannah M., born Aug. 29, 1829, lives on homestead.

Joseph Grange was born in England, Nov. 15, 1813, and came with his parents to America in 1818. He married Eunice Hibbard, and had two sons. He was in the mercantile business at Eldredsville for a number of years, and finally moved to Fribly,Lycoming county, where he died Sept. 29, 1894.

John W. Grange was born in Elkland township, July 24, 1823. He was a son of John Grange, Jr. and Jane (Midgley) Grange. He purchased the farm near Eldredsville, recently owned by Lyle Grange. Oct. 30, 1851, he married Eliza Vough, who lives with her sons, in Illinois. Mr. Grange died in Elkland township, Aug. 13, 1896. To Mr. and Mrs. Grange were born:

Almira, deceased.

Della, married Thomas McCarty, of Eldredsville.
Sumner, of Illinois.

Luther, of Illinois.
Bertha, of Illinois.

Hinton, went West in 1903.

Walter. of Delaware.
Lyle, of Forksville.
Arthur, of Illinois.
Ernest, went West.

George C. Bird was born at Millview, Forks township, Feb. 15, 1829. He was a son of George and Sally (King) Bird. George Bird was born at Norfolk. England, and came to America with his parents, Powell and Lydia (Hannant) Bird, in 1793, locating at Northumberland, Pa., and in 1895 moved to Millview, being one of the three first permanent settlers in Sullivan county, George C. Bird purchased a tract of timber land near Estella, Elkland ( township, and cleared up a farm. Mr. Bird married Harriet Kay. Feb. 8, 1856. She was a daughter of William and Ann (Bedford) Kay, who came to America with their family in 1849. To Mr. and Mrs. Bird have been born:

Ulysses, of Estella, Elkland township.

Alma, married W. E. Miller. of Forksville.

Mary, married George Birdsall, of Estella, Elkland twp.
Jennie, married John W. Rogers, of Estella.

Nellie, married Charles Clark.

Dora, married Rush Plotts, of Estella.

Nathan A. Little was born in Monmouth county, N J., Feb. 20, 1804. He was a son of Tobias Little, who was one of the six sons of Theophilus Little, who came from Monmouth county, N. J., to Eagles Mere, about 1804. The Littles are of Scotch Irish descent and came from England to New Jersey about 1700. They took an active part in the Revolutionary war, two of the family being commissioned officers. Mr. Little located first at Eagles Mere and in 1838 moved to Elkland township, near Estella, where he purchased a large tract of land. Mr. Little died in 1880; his children were:

Lydia, married Daniel Van Fleet, of Forksville.
Ellen, located on the homestead.

Anthony H., of Illinois.

Mary, married Richard Pardoe, of Elkland.

Nelson, of Illinois.

Clementine S., married Joseph C. McCarty, of Elkland.

Hester Ann, died Sept. 29, 1859

Elizabeth. married Joseph W. Borton, of Iowa.

Daniel Little was born May 25, 1827, at Forksville. He was a son of Theophilus and Elizabeth (Holmes) Little, Jr., who came from Monmouth county, N. J., to Eagles Mere, about 1804. The­ophilus Little, Jr., locating near Forksville a little later. Daniel Little married Anna Kalis, who was born at Oxfordshire, Eng land. Mr. and Mrs. Little located on a farm on Bear Mountain, Elkland township. Their children were:

Clementine. dec'd, married Ernest Vough, of Forks twp.
David, of Elkland township.

Mariah, married Geo. Woodhead, of Elkland twp.
Grant. of Elkland township.

Benjamin, of Elkland township.

Ella, married A. L. Plotts, of Estella, Elkland twp.
Dora, married David Boyle, of Elkland.

Emma, married George Brown, of Elkland.

Mahlon C. Mercur was born at Towanda, Feb. 6, 1816. He was a son of Henry and Mary (Watts) Mercur. The Mercurs are of German descent. Henry's parents came from Germany and lo­cated in Lancaster county, from where Henry came to Bradford county in 1809-10. Mahlon C. Mercur, during the greater portion of his life has been a citizen of Towanda, Pa. His business in­terests in Sullivan county have been very great and be has been one of the most prominent men who have been instrumental in establishing business interests and shaping the future destiny of the county.

The early part of Mr. Mercur's life was spent as a business man of Towanda, where he engaged in dealing in real estate, lumber­ing and in the mercantile business. After the North Branch canal was sold by the State to an inactive company, Mr. Mercur, in connection with some of his personal friends, purchased a majority of the stock and as secretary and general superintendent of the new company, took charge of the affairs of the company. About 1850 Mr. Mercur commenced purchasing large tracts of timber lands in Sullivan county. On the discovery of coal at Bernice, Mr. Mercur, in company with Col. Welles, George D. Jackson and Michael Meylert, organized a company to develop the Bernice coal fields. An unfortunate contract was made for the building of a railroad from Bernice to Towanda, which was finally thrown back on the hands of the company, who were com­pelled to finish it themselves. The greater portion of the money to finish the road was borrowed from Mr. Mercur or obtained on his endorsement, which eventually cost him property to the amount of $1,050,000. For the last 25 years Mr. Mercur has spent much of his time on his farm near Eldredsville, Elkland town­ship. During the past few years he has been spending his win­ters at Towanda and the summers on his farm. This summers on account of his feeble health and declining years, he has re­mained at Towanda. Mr. Mercur was married twice, his first wife being Helen, a daughter of Col. Joseph Kingsbury. She died in 1841. In 1853 Mr. Mercur married Anna H. Jewett. Mr. Mercur's children by his first wife were:

Mahlon M., who after serving in the Civil War, died in Texas.

By the second wife:

Helen, married Rev. Geo. H. Rosenmuller, of Niagara Falls.

Lillie.

William H., of Pittsburg, Pa.

Hiram T., of the South.

Elsie.

Robert J.

Edward Miller came from Theuringen, Germany, to Amer­ica about 1850, and purchased a large tract of timber land in Elkland township around Elk Lake. He enlisted in the Civil War and was promoted to the rank of Captain, and was commonly known after the war as Captain Miller. About 1880-90, he was engaged in lumbering in Elkland, which did not prove to be a successful venture and he sold out and went to Long Island, where he died in 1904. He married a German lady of New York, who survives. They had no children.

Fred Kobbe came from Hanover, Germany, to America in 1835, locating in Elkland township. Mr. Kobbe purchased a tract of timber land now owned by G. F. Hugo. In 1890 he married Mrs. Fred Knupper, who was also a native of Germany. Mr. Kobbe was a veteran of the Civil War.

Henry Kobbe came from Hanover, Germany, to America, lo­cating near Eldredsville, Elkland township, in 1863. He married Lenea Kopeman, while in Germany. Mr. Kobbe died in 1897 and Mrs. Kobbe in 1899. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Kobbe were:

Henry, of Iowa.

Fred, of Canton, Pa.

Christopher, of Elkland.

George Schill came from Theuringen, Germany, to America, in ]852, and in 1855 he came to Elkland township. Mr. Schill was a carpenter by trade. He married Sarah McCarty, Jan. 29, 1862. She was born in Elkland township Jan. 4, 1822, and was a daugh­ter of Joel and Elizabeth (Roberts) McCarty. She died Jan. 14, 1892. Mr. Schill married for his second wife the widow of Rob­ert Hart, of Elkland township. She was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Bird) Norton, of Forks township. Mr. Schill located on a farm near Piatt and later on the Hart farm in Elkland town­ship. He died in 1903. Mrs. Schill is still living. Mr. Schill had one daughter by his first wife:

Christina, married John Cook, of Downingtown, Pa.


EARLY CHURCHES.

The early settlers of Elkland township were devout Christians and took steps to provide places for religious worship at a very early date.

The first church erected in Elkland was a Friends' meeting house built of logs, on the lands now owned by M. C. Mercur. The building was in use prior to 1805. David Thomas, James Ecroyd, Jesse Haines, Ezra Haines and Joel McCarty were ac­tive in securing, a house of worship. The Friends or Quakers were numerous in Elkland township and at a later date estab­lished a meeting house near Platt.

The Methodist Episcopal church had in 1798 already sent its ministers in the Loyalsock Valley and when the first settlers ar­rived in Elkland township in 1800, the M. E. church was on hand to look after the spiritual welfare of its members. In 1843 the work of the church was thoroughly organized. A parsonage was established at Forksville and several preaching appointments es­tablished in Elkland township.

In 1825 Charles Mullan erected at his own expense a house at Eldredsville, which was used for many years for religious and educational gatherings.

The Wesleyan Methodist church has several preaching appointments in Elkland township. A church has been built in the north-eastern section and also one at Lincoln Falls. Services are also held at some of the school houses of the township. Elkland township furnishes the greater portion of the members of the charge which is known as the Millview charge, the parson­age being located at Millview, in Forks township. The pastor in charge is Rev. James H. Bowen.

The Reformed church established an organization in the north­ern section of the township among the Germans, about 1870, and now has a flourishing congregation and has erected a church.


EARLY SCHOOLS.

The first effort made by the people of Elkland township to es­tablish a school of which there is any record, was in 1816, when Mrs. Sarah Huckell conveyed half an acre of land, where the Forksville school house now stands, to Samuel Rogers, Powell Bird and William King, trustees of the Loyalsock school. A building. was erected and a school opened in December of that year, where the early settlers of Elkland township sent their children to school, several miles from their homes.

The next step of which there is any record was in 1825, when Charles Mullen built the house at Eldredsville for educational and religious gatherings. The first school in the Mullan build­ing was taught by a Miss Zilpha Mason. The next winter James Green, an Englishman, taught, and later Nehemiah Ross, and a Mr. Woodruff, of Monroeton.

ESTELLA.

Estella is the largest town in Elkland township, and although the town is only about fifteen years old, there are three stores, two blacksmith shops, a church, a graded school and a number of residences. D. F. McCarty, Ellsworth Jennings and Charles Plotts, are engaged in the mercantile business. C. J. Fulmer and Homer Benninger each conduct a blacksmith shop. A. L. Mulnix has a planing mill in operation. Ellsworth Jennings is the postmaster.

ELDREDSVILLE.

Eldredsville was named in honor of Edward J. Eldred, who lo­cated in Eldredsville in 1800. The town has never contained more than two stores, post office, blacksmith shop, township building and a few private houses. Repeated changes have been made in the proprietors of the stores, among those who were in business for some length of time, were Joseph Grange and G. A. McIlwain. At present J. Lyman Snyder and H. Norton & Son,are conducting the two stores. Norton's also have the post office.

LINCOLN FALLS.

Lincoln Falls was named in honor of Abraham Lincoln, Presi­dent of the United States during the war. On King's Creek. where it unites with Elk Creek, is a beautiful water fall. The place was known as "The Falls" at an early date, and when the post office was established during the Civil war, the place was named Lincoln Falls. Besides a few dwelling houses, there are the two saw mills of Rogers' Brothers and A. T. Mulnix, and the general store of Augustus Hartung, who is also postmaster. The Wesleyan Methodists have a new church at this place.

SOLDIERS.

The following is a list of the soldiers who served in the Civil War from Elkland township: Jonas Bedford, Wm. Bedford, Ed­mund Bedford, Henry Bedford, George F. Bedford, Wm. K Bed­ford, George Bedford, Joseph Bedford, Chas M. Boyles, Chas. Webster, James H. Pardoe, Chas. Grange, Wm. Boyles, Joseph Black, Henry Grange, Geo. W. Glidewell, John T. Caless, Geo. N. Pardoe, Wm. Norton, Nicholas Snyder, Chas. Merritt, Samuel Gilbert, George Webster, Wm. Whiteley, Vinson McCarty, Dan­iel Vargason, Albert Hess. Ferdinand Hess, Thomas Merritt, Chas. King, Chester King, Henry Jefferson, Edward Boyles, Wm. Huckell, Henry Mulnix, Ellis Mulnix, John C. Warburton, Geo. W. Warburton, William Warren, John Merritt.

D. F. MCCARTY

Was born in Elkland township, April 20, 1857. He was a son of Joel R. and Ann (Woodhead) McCarty, and a grand-son of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty, who located in Elkland town­ship in 1800. The McCarty's are supposed to be the descendants of one McCarty who left Scotland when 14 years of age and settled in Ireland for a few years, and afterward emigrated to America, locating in Bucks county, Pa., where we find a record of them as early as 1724. The Woodheads came from England in 1829, locating in Elkland township. D. F. McCarty entered business at Lincoln Falls in 1883, purchasing at first an interest and later the whole of the saw-mill now owned by A. T. Mulnix. In 1893 he went into the mercantile business at New Albany. In 1899 he moved to Forksville and bought the general store of A. L. Smith. In 1901 he moved to Estella, where he is now conduct­ing a general mercantile business. Mr. McCarty married Jennie Osler, in March, 1887. She was a daughter of J. M. and Julia (Brown) Osler, of Elkland township. After the death of his first wife Mr. McCarty married Bessie Lee, July 3, 1893. She was born in Albany township and was the daughter of Uriah Lee. The Lees came originally from Connecticut. Mr. McCarty has four children by his second wife: Clara S., Emery G., Gladys Maude and Roscoe.

ULYSSES BIRD

Was born in Elkland township, Oct. 3, 1856. He is a son of George C. and Harriet (Kay) Bird. He is a grand son of George Bird and a great-grand-son of Powell Bird, who emigrated from England to Northumberland, Pa., in 1793, and located at Millview in 1795. His grand-parents on the maternal side were Will­iam and Ann (Bedford) Kay, who came to Elkland township from their native land, England, in 1849. Mr. Bird on reaching his majority taught school and took up surveying and civil engi­neering, which he follows in connection with his farming. He purchased a portion of his father's farm. He has been school di­rector and justice of the peace, of Elkland township, and is at present secretary of the Sullivan County Agricultural Society, and president of the Sullivan County Telephone Company. Mr. Bird married Emma Cadden in April, 1885. She was born in England in 1865. To Mr. and Mrs. Bird five children have been born: Carl, LaRue, Victor, Vernie and Mira.

S. S. ROGERS

Was born at Forksville, Sept. 22, 1831. He is a son of Moses and Jane (Sadler) Rogers, and a grand-son of Samuel Rogers, who was born in Barmley, near Leeds, England, in 1760, and came to America in 1801, locating at Forksville. The history of the Rogers family has been traced back to 1031. They are prob­ably Norman French, who went to England with William the Conqueror and settled there. An Englishman, John Rogers, first translated the Bible into the English language. S. S. Rogers, on reaching his majority, learned the carpenter's trade and located at Forksville, working at his trade in the winter. Later he pur­chased 200 acres of timber land in Elkland township near Millview and commenced to clear up a farm; about 1880 he moved to Elkland township on his farm. In 1896 he was elected county commissioner, serving one term. Mr. Rogers was married twice, his first wife was Sarah B. Plotts, who was born Sept. 30, 1833. After the death of his first wife, he married Eliza C. Green, who was born at Hillsgrove, Jan. 1845. She was a daughter of Rich­ard and Mary Ann (Ives) Green. The Greens came from New Jersey, locating at Hillsgrove at an early date. To Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have been born twelve children: Francina, married Wm. Parker, of Hughesville, Pa.; Flora. died Jan. 8, 1858; Dora, dec'd, married Howard Corson, of Hughesville; John C. F., of Athens, Pa.; Catharine J., married H. N. Osler, of Dushore, Pa.; Sarah J., married Wm. Collins, of Canton, Pa.; Alvaretta and Maggie, who died in infancy; Rush G., at home; Hattie, married B. Fra­zier, of Millview; Mollie A., and Sidney, at home.

ADAM BAUMUNK

Was born at Hessen, Darmstadt, Germany, Jan. 3, 1843. While in Germany he married Barbara Bentel, in 1846. She was also a native of Hessen Darmstadt, where she was born May 29, 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Baumunk came to America in 1866, locating in Elkland township, on the farm where they now live. Mr. Bau­munk has held the offices of school director, township commis­sioner, and in 1899 was elected county commissioner, serving three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Baumunk have been born: Chris­tina, married Henry Hugo, dec'd, of Elkland; Carrie, married F. C. Beinlich, of Elkland; Anna, married Arden Day, of Elkland; George, died at the age of 24 years; Elizabeth, married Charles Kilmer; Philip, of Elkland; Charles, of Elkland; Arthur, died at the age of 5 years; Frances, married Harry Day, of Elkland; Walter, Robert, Mira and Curtis, all at home.

GEORGE C. BIRDSALL

Was born at Port Jefferson, N. Y., Oct. 22, 1855. He was a son of Charles 0. and Elizabeth (White) Birdsall. The Birdsalls originally came from France, from where they emigrated to Eng­land, and later to America, locating in New York City, in its early history. Three of seven brothers fought in the Revolu­tionary War. Benjamin Birdsall was a prominent member of the New York Legislature for many years. Mr. Birdsall's grand­father, Aaron Birdsall, married a Miss Betts, and lived at Cold Spring, on the Hudson, where Charles 0. was born. The Whites lived on the Hudson, they were of English descent. George C. Birdsall purchased a portion of the Nathan Little farm near Es­tella, where he is engaged in farming. He married Mary Bird, Jan. 2, 1880. She was a daughter of George C. and Harriet (Kay) Bird, of Estella. To Mr. and Mrs. Birdsall have been born: Nel­lie E., married Lewis Rosbach, of Estella; Powell C., Mollie, Eth­el M., George L., died April 13, 1898; Laura M.

WHEELER PLOTTS

Was born in Lycoming county, Oct. 13, 1840. He was a on of George and Catharine (Bull) Plotts, of Lycoming county, and a grand-son of John Plotts, who came from New Jersey to Ly­coming county at an early date. Wheeler Plotts was a soldier inthe Civil War and at the close of the war located at Bear Creek, Lycoming county. He was a sawyer and was engaged on the saw-mills on the Loyalsock Creek; about 1878 he purchased a farm in Elkland township and moved to that place. Mr. Plotts married Annetta McBride, Oct. 13, 1864, she was born at Hillsgrove. She was a daughter of Samuel R. and Mary (Probst) Mc­Bride, who were early settlers of Hillsgrove township. To Mr. and Mrs. Plotts have been born seven children: Rush B., of Estella; Lyman, died at the age of two years; Viola M., married C. B. Jennings, of Estella, Pa.; Richard, died at the age of 5 years; Clyde, of Norristown, Pa.; Charles, of Estella; Harry S., at home.

JOHN G. PLOTTS

Was born in Lycoming county, Oct. 20, 1834. He was a son of George and Catharine (Bull) Plotts, of Lycoming county. Mr. Plotts is a carpenter and builder by trade and located first at Hillsgrove. In 1876 he purchased a portion of the John Brown farm at Estella and moved there. Mr. Plotts married Mary A. Bedford, Dec. 24, 1847. She was a daughter of John and Ellen (Sadler) Bedford, of Elkland township. John Bedford came from England with his father, Henry Bedford, at an early date. To Mr. and Mrs. Plotts have been born four children: Orthalia, married George Betz, of Williamsport; Walter E., of Washing. ton D. C.; Jennie married E. I. Sturdevant, of Pittsburg, Pa.; Theodosia, of Williamsport.

A. L. PLOTTS

Was born at Hillsgrove, Jan. 5, 1856. He was a son of George and Mercy (Hoffman) Plotts, of Lycoming county, and a grand­son of John Plotts, who came from Trenton, N. J., to Lycoming county. The Plotts' are German descent. Mr. Plotts is a car­penter and builder by trade. He purchased the Nathan Little homestead in Elkland township near Estella. where he lives. Mr. Plotts married Ella Little in 1881. She was a daughter of Daniel and Anna (Kalis) Little, of Elkland township, and a descendant of Theophilus Little, who located at Eagles Mere about 1804. The Kalis family came from Oxfordshire, England. To Mr. and Mrs. Plotts have been born four children: Howard W., Ralph, who died May 6, 1886; Olive C. and Foster.

J. W. MULNIX

Was born in Ulster county, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1851. He was a son of Avery and Almira (Tompkins) Mulnix. His grand-father, Thomas Mulnix, came from England. Mr. Mulnix is a mason and plasterer by trade. When a young man he was located in Kansas, from where he came to Pennsylvania in 1895, locating on a portion of the John Brown property near Estella, which he purchased. While in Kansas Mr. Mulnix married Hester A. Camp, who was born in Overton township, and went to Kansas when a child, with her parents, Reuben and Rosina (Heverly) Camp. She was a grand-daughter of Jonathan Camp, who lo­cated in the western part of Overton township and later went to Kansas. Mrs. Mulnix's mother was a daughter of Henry and Rosina (Kilmer) Heverly, of Forks township. The Heverly's were the pioneers of Overton township, Bradford county, where they located in.1810. To Mr. and Mrs. Mulnix were born five children: Ada R., married Allen Jenisen, deceased; Mary, at home; George W., died Aug. 11, 1881; Clara R., died May 15, 1886; Della, at home.

AVERY T. MULNIX

Was born in Delaware county, N. Y., Dec. 9, 1849. He was a son of Avery and Almira (Tompkins) Mulnix, of Delaware coun­ty, N. Y. Mr. Mulnix came to Elkland township when a young man and engaged in lumbering and working at the car­penter trade. About 1882 he built a sawmill at Lincoln Falls, to which he has since added a shingle mill and planer. He has been dealing extensively in real estate and owns considerable timber land adjacent to his mill; he has also a store room at Es­tella, where he deals in building supplies, in connection with his dressed and rough lumber. Mr. Mulnix married Anna Webster, in 1884. She was born in Elkland township, and was a daughter of John J. and Jane (Kaye) Webster, of Estella. To Mr. and Mrs. Mulnix have been born eight children: Christenia, Rovila, Ada, Walter, Wesley, Mildred, Almira and the baby.

EDWARD G. ROGERS

Was born at Lincoln Falls, Oct. 9, 1849. He was a son of Jon­athan and Elizabeth (Huckell) Rogers, who located at Lincoln Falls in 1848. Mr. Rogers is engaged in farming and is also a member of the firm of Rogers Bros., who are engaged in lumber­ing. In 1900 Mr. Rogers was elected a member of the Pennsyl­vania Legislature, on the Democratic ticket. Mr. Rogers mar­ried Rosalinda McCarty in 1585. She was born in Elkland town­ship, Sept. 24, 1852, and was the daughter of Silas and Sarah (An­nable) McCarty, and a grand-daughter of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty. Mrs. Rogers died Feb. 3, 1896. To Mr. and Mrs. Rogers were born six children: Daisy G., Elizabeth, Frank, Rue, Raymond, Curtis.

C. S. ROGERS

Was born at Lincoln Falls, May 6, 1855. He was a son of Jon­athan and Elizabeth (Huckell) Rogers, and a grand-son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Snell) Rogers, of Forksville. The history of the Rogers family has been traced back to 1031 in England. They are noted for their intelligence and strong religious convictions. They are the descendants of John Rogers, the Martyr, who first translated the Bible into the English language, and was burned at the stake at Smithfield, England, Feb. 4, 1555. There is a family crest or coat of arms. C. S. Rogers with his brother, E. G. Rogers, constitute the firm of Rogers Bros., who are engaged in the hardwood lumber business at Lincoln Falls. Mr. Rogers married Maria A. Williams in 1884. She was born in East Can­ton in 1860, and was a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Annable) Williams. Her grand-father. Thomas Williams, was an early settler in Fox township, and later moved to Canton. The Will­iams' are of English descent. To Mr. and Mrs. Rogers have been born: Jessie D., George Frederick, Paul Jonathan, Mary E., Leland S. and Dortha.

MRS. N. K. WOODWARD

Was born at Hillsgrove, in 1848. She was a daughter of Jona­than and Elizabeth (Huckell) Rogers. Mrs. Woodward was en­gaged in teaching school for a number of years. In 1883 she married N. K. Woodward, of Dushore. Mr. Woodward was born at Fort Wayne, Allen county, Indiana, July 12, 1844. When Mr. Woodward was one year old his father died and when he was four years of age his mother died; he then went to live with his cousin Judge Warren Woodward, of Wilkes-Barre. In 1860 Mr. Woodward came to Dushore, entering the store of J. Jackson & Sons, as a clerk. Later he entered into the mercantile business for himself in which he was very successful, Mr. Woodward was considered one of the leading and most substantial business men of Dushore. Mr. Woodward died June 3, 1888, at the age of forty-four years. At the death of Mr. Woodward, Mrs. Woodward moved to Lincoln Falls, where she erected a handsome residence which she occupies with Edward M. Woodward, a son adopted by Mr. and Mrs. N K. Woodward.

JAMES J. TEEVAN

Was born in Ireland, Nov. 4, 1847. He was a son of James and Catharine (Braken) Teevan. The Teevan's are of French origin and formerly belonged to the French nobility. About 1790 they located in the vicinity of Dublin, Ireland. Two of them are emi­nent doctors in London and several own large land estates in Ireland. Mr. Teevan, the subject of this sketch, was a grocer and spirit merchant in Dublin, Ireland, from 1860 until 1873, when he emigrated to America, locating at Lincoln Falls. Mr. Teevan is a single man. He takes a very active part in public affairs, and has served one term as justice of the peace of Elkland town­ship.

G. EUGENE BOWN

Was born in Elkland township, March 9, 1865. He was a son of John H. and Mary E. (Wilcox) Bown, of Elkland town­ship, and a grand-son of William and Harriet (Huckell) Bown, early settlers of Elkland township. Mr. Bown is located near Lincoln Falls on the farm cleared up by his great-grand-father, John Bown. Mr. Bown married Mary Caseman in 1888. She was born in Fox township March 31. 1867. She was a daughter of Christian and Louisa (Beck) Caseman, both natives of  Ger­many, who came to America in 1853, locating in Fox township in 1855. To Mr. and Mrs. Bown have been born six children: Win­ifred L., Blanche M., Jeneva A., Robert M. and Raymond R., twins; Sylva.

FRED SHAFFER

Was born in Forks township, Feb. 15. 1876. He is a son of Jesse and Isabelle (Locket) Shaffer, and a grand son of George Shaffer, dec'd, of Forks township, formerly of Albany township, Bradford county. Mr. Shaffer purchased the Thomas Bing farm near Estella and located thereon. In 1903 he married Pearl Bennett. She was born in Shrewsbury township in 1882. She is a daughter of Howard and Elfretta (Little) Bennett, descendants of two of the pioneer families of Shrewsbury township, and whose descendants form a large portion of the population of that township.

JOHN W. NORTON

Was born in Elkland township, Dec. 9, 1838. He was a son of George and Dencie (Brown) Norton, of Elkland township. Geo. Norton was a native of England and located in Elkland town­ship at an early date. John W. Norton located on his father's farm. He died Nov. 11, 1898. Mr. Norton married Rachel Bid­dle, Feb. 6, 1863. She was born in Forks township and was a daughter of Richard and Esther (Fawcett) Biddle, of Forks town­ship, later of Hillsgrove. To Mr. and Mrs. Norton were born eight children: Lyman, of Hillsgrove; Anna J., married Ernest Vough, of Forks township; Clara, married Charles Moreau, of Hillsgrove; Ada, married Charles Baumunk, of Elkland; Ira, at home; Charles, of Hillsgrove; Samuel, at home.

CHARLES W. FAWCETT

Was born in Elkland township in 1857. He was a son of Jos­eph and Lydia (Bird) Fawcett, of Elkland township, and a grand­son of Henry and Sarah (Grange) Fawcett, natives of England, who came to America about 1817 and located on the farm, a por­tion of which Chas. W. Fawcett now owns. Mr. Fawcett is en­gaged in truck farming. He married Susie Yaw, in 1885. She was a daughter of Loren and Sarah (Woodley) Yaw, of Hillsgrove township. The Yaw's were among the early settlers of Hillsgrove. Mrs. Yaw was born at Hughesville, Dec. 3, 1827. She was a daughter of Abraham and Ann (Farley) Woodley. Abraham Woodley was born Dec. 9, 1776. Ann Farley was born Dec. 1, 1801. To Mr. and Mrs. Fawcett has been born one daugh­ter, Olive Belle.

J. FRANK MULLAN

Was born in Elkland township, Nov. 22, 1853. He is a son of John and Selena (Woodhead) Mullan, of Elkland township, and a great-grand-son of Charles Mullan, who located in Elkland township about 1800. On the maternal side Mr. Mullan's grand­parents were Joseph and Anna (Sleeker) Woodhead, natives of England, who located in Elk land township in 1829. Mr. Mullan purchased a portion of the original Henry Fawcett farm in Elkland township, near Campbellsville. In 1880 he married Addie Williams. She was a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Lilley) Williams, of Shunk. The Williams are of English descent, and the Lilleys are of Scotch descent. To Mr. and Mrs. Mullan have been born nine children: Bert, of Canada; Joseph, Grover, Clara, Charles J., Hartley, Stella, Freddie and Leonard.

H. M. MULLAN

Was born in Elkland township in 1862. He is a son of John and Selena (Woodhead) Mullan. The Mullans are of Scotch Ir­ish descent. Anthony Mullan or McMullan, located in New York about 1750 or 1760. His son Charles located in Elkland township about 1800, He was the great-grand father of the sub­ject of this sketch. H. M. Mullan purchased the Charles Hotten­stein farm, which was originally a portion of the James Black farm. Mr. Mullan married Mary E. Kline, who was born in Lu­zerne county in 1866. The Klines are German descent. John Kline came from Germany and located in Illinois. He was said to have been one of the best educated men in that State, and was a soldier in the Civil war. He had a son John, who came to Lu­zerne county, Pa, He was the father of Mrs. Mullan and John A. Kline, of Elkland. To Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Mullen has been born one son, Nelson C.

WILLIAM HART

Was born in Elkland township, Sept. 9, 1861. Ho was a son of James and Linda (Fawcett) Hart, who were among the early settlers of Elkland township. Mr. Hart purchased his father's farm to which he has added still more land and now owns and conducts a large stock farm. Mr. Hart is also engaged in selling agricultural implements. In 1880 he married Deborah J. Pack­ard, who was born in Bradford county, Sept. 20, 1860. She was a daughter of Jefferson F. and Lucy (Barnes) Packard. Her grand­father, John Packard, was an early settler of Franklin, Bradford county. To Mr. and Mrs. Hart have been born five children: Cordia L., Minnie, Raymond L., Hazel and Mildred.

JOHN W. HART

Was born in Elkland township in 1871. He Was a son of James and Linda (Fawcett) Hart. The Fawcetts came to Elkland town­ship from England in 1817, locating where Charles W. Fawcett now lives. John W. Hart is a painter and paper hanger by trade. He purchased a portion of the Benjamin Fawcett farm near Campbellsville, where he lives and engages in farming when not working at his trade. Mr. Hart married Eliza Hunsinger in 1893. She was born in Forks township in 1870, and is a daugh­ter of Charles P. and Sarah  (Rinebold) Hunsinger, of Forks, and a great-grand-daughter of George Hunsinger, who settled in Cherry township about 1819. To Mr. and Mrs. Hart have been born three children: Stella, Clancy and Guy.

E. JENNINGS

Was born in Elkland township, Nov. 3, 1861. He is a son of Thomas A. and Essie (Brown) Jennings. His grand-father Jen­nings, with two brothers, came from England and located in Or­ange county, N. Y., from there Mr. Jennings moved to Bradford

county. Mr. Jennings is engaged in the mercantile business at Estella, where he located in 1893; previous to that time he lived on the Mary Mullan farm. Mr. Jennings also lived at Towanda six months and at Fall Brook six months since he moved to Es­tella. He is postmaster at that place. Mr. Jennings married Anna S. McCarty, Nov. 1, 1888. She is a daughter of Jesse and Ellen (Corbin) McCarty. She was born in Elkland township, July 13, 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Jennings have been born three children: Sidney L., Lucy Ellen, and Mollie.

FRANK BAHL

Was born in Cherry township in 1853. He is a son of Michael and Mary Ann (Windhauser) Bahl, of Forks township, and a grand son of John and Elena (Fishwenger) Bahl, who came from Elsets, France, now Germany, to Cherry township, in 1829. Mr. Bahl is a blacksmith by trade. He purchased the Henry Toland farm near Eldredsville, where he is farming and doing a black­smithing business. He recently purchased the Joseph Warbur­ton farm in Forks , on which he expects to move in a short time. Mr. Bahl married Catharine Toland in 1883. She was a daughter of Henry and Ellen (McCarty) Toland, natives of Dublin, Ire­land. To Mr. and Mrs. Bahl have been born four children: Bes­sie M., Victor L., Agnes E., and Leon.

GEORGE L. ROSBACH

Was born in New York in 1852. His father, George L. Ros­bach, was a native of Germany and came to New York about 1852 and in 1855 came to Elk land township. Mr. Rosbach owns two farms in Elkland township He married Henrietta Caseman, Feb. 15, 1877. She was a daughter of Christian and Louisa (Beck) Caseman, and was born in Fox township in 1858. To Mr. and Mrs. Rosbach have been born four children: Louis, of Es­tella; Charles, Violet and Alfred.

JOSEPH PARDOE

Was born in Elkland township in 1854. He was a son of Will­iam and Jane (McCarty) Pardoe, and a grand-son of Joseph Pardoe, a native of England, who came to America, locating in Elkland township among the early settlers. Mr. Pardoe purchased the farm on which he now lives. He was married twice, his first wife was Eliza Ann Molyneux. She was a daughter of John and Martha (Sadler) Molyneux, of Forks township. She died April 13, 1882. In 1883 he married Mary Sabin. She was born at Can­ton, Pa., 1851. She was a daughter of Edward Sabin, who was born in Rensselaer county, New York. On the maternal side, Mrs. Pardoe's mother was Margaret Wood. Her ancestors came from New Jersey. They were French descent. Mrs. Pardoe was married twice; her first husband was Lester Kelder. whom she married in 1869. Mr. Kelder died in 1874. leaving one son, Thaddeus.

DANIEL L. MILLER

Was born in Columbia county, Pa., in 1848. He was a son of Leonard and Elizabeth (Kline) Miller. His grand-father, Ja­cob Miller, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and located in Northumberland county. Daniel L. Miller is a carpenter by trade. He purchased a portion of the Joseph W. Pardoe farm near Eldredsville, where he is engaged in farming. In 1872 Mr. Miller married Lydia J. Pardoe, who was born in Elkland town­ship in 1848. She was a daughter of Joseph W. and Rebecca (Bird) Pardoe. In 1890 Mr. Miller married his second wife, Ly­dia Norton. She was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Bird) Norton, of Forks township. Mr. Norton was born in England in 1808, and came to Forks township in 1830. Mr. Miller was jus­tice of the peace for ten years, assessor, school director and town clerk, each one term. To Mr. Miller was born by his first wife three children: Rena L., Charles L. and Howard B.

IRA J. PARDOE

Was born in Elkland township, Nov. 16, 1867. He is a son of Albert and Susanna (Brenchley) Pardoe and a grand-son of Wm. and Jane (McCarty) Pardoe, of Elkland township. His great­ grandfather, Joseph Pardoe, was a native of England and was one of the early settlers of Elkland township. Mr. Pardoe owns a portion of the Jonas Bedford farm. He is a member of the school board of Elkland township. In 1888 he married Martha Warren, who was born in Elkland township in 1862. She is a daughter of William and Jerusha (Hunsinger) Warren, of Elkland, and a grand-daughter of John Warren, one of the early settlers of Elkland township. To Mr. and Mrs. Pardoe have been born two daughters: Maude E. and Ethel M.

WILLIAM WARREN

Was born in Elkland township, June 25, 1829. He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Glidewell) Warren, of Elkland, and a grand­son of John and Mary (Ward) Warren, who came from Liver­pool, England, in 1795, locating at Millview and being one of the three first permanent settlers in what is now Sullivan county. William Warren purchased and cleared up the farm on which he lives. He was a soldier in the Civil war. Mr. Warren married Jerusha Hunsinger, who was born in Forks township, April 1, 1837. She was a daughter of George and Elizabeth (Haunse) Hunsinger. Mr. and Mrs. Hunsinger moved from Luzerne coun­ty to Cherry township, later to the McCarty Ridge in Elkland township and in 1829 to Forks township. He was a son of Geo. Hunsinger, Sr., who located in Cherry township in 1819. To Mr. and Mrs. Warren have been born four children: Anna C., mar­ried John W. Brown, of Elkland; Martha S., married Ira J. Pardoe, of Elkland; Helen, married George Fenstermacher, of Unity­ville, Pa.; H. Ward, who married Martha Barnes, a daughter of Frank Barnes, and lives with his parents.

S. P. SHOEMAKER

Was born at LeRoy, Bradford county, in 1854. He was a son of Payne Shoemaker, who was born in Luzerne county in 1809. He was of German descent, and moved to Bradford county when 17 years of age; there he married Rachel Pepper, who was born in Bradford county. She was a descendant of the Connecticut people who located in Bradford county. S. P. Shoemaker. is a single man and is a carpenter by trade. He came to Sullivan county in 1873 and lives at Estella. Mrs. George Brown. Mrs. Isaac Brown, Mrs. Ellis Brown, dec'd, and Mrs. Wm. Moore, are sisters of his.

WILLIAM WICK

Was born in the province of Hessen, Germany in 1847. He came to America in 1866, locating in Cherry township. Later he worked in the Bernice mines five years, and in 1875 moved to Elkland township, where he purchased a farm and moved upon it. In the winter he leased the Mercur mines in Forks township, and got out coal for eleven years. In 1875 he married Elizabeth Lemmer, who was born in France in 1848. She was a daughter of George Lemmer, a native of France, who emigrated to Amer­ica with his family, locating at Bernice in 1872. Mrs. Wick died in 1897. To Mr. and Mrs. Wick were born: Mary, deceased; Eliz­abeth, died at the age of eighteen months; and George.

CHARLES C. HEINZE

Was born in New York in 1863. He is a son of Christian Heinze, a native of Germany, who married Miss C. Fleming and emigrated to America, locating first in New York and later in Fox township. Charles C. Heinze is a carpenter by trade, and at present is engaged both in farming near Eldredsville and in working at his trade. Mr. Heinze married Caroline Gleockler, who was born at Lake Run, Elkland township, in 1862. She is a daughter of Anthony Gleockler, a native of Germany, who emi­grated to America , locating first in New York, later at Lake Run, where he was postmaster for many years. At his death the post office was discontinued. To Mr. and Mrs. Heinze have been born three children: Anthony C., Lilly A. and M. Lenora.

MRS. ROSALIE HUGO

Was born in Berlin. Germany. She was a daughter of Fred­erick and Frederica (Vitus) Bowers, of Berlin, Germany, who emigrated to Philadelphia in 1855, remaining a few months, then moving to Merritt's Lake, Elkland township, where Mr. Bowers died in 1867. Mrs. Bowers is still living. May 10. 1864, Mrs. Hu­go was married to Charles Hugo, who was born in Gilson, Ger­many, Dec. 13, 1837. Mr. Hugo came to America in 1850, locat­ing first at Philadelphia and shortly afterward moved to Elkland and purchased the Eldred property. Mr. Hugo accumulated con­siderable property. He was tax collector and constable of Elkland township for many years, and in 1887 was elected county commissioner. He died in 1897. To Mr. and Mrs. Hugo were born: J. Henry, deceased; J. F., of Elkland; Anna M., married Anthony Gleockler; Victor C., of Philadelphia; Geo. F., of Elkland; Charles L., deceased; William W., of Elkland; Emma M., deceased; Mary M., married York Stalford, of Elkland; Albert, Robert and Frank, at home.

G. F. HUGO

Was born in Elkland township in 1866. He was a son of Chas. and Rosalie (Bowers) Hugo, of Elkland township. Mr. Hugo purchased the Kobbe farm near Eldredsville, where he is located. He married Annie Knupper, who was born in Elkland in 1876. She was a daughter of Fred and Josephine (Gleockler) Knupper. Mr. Knupper was a native of Hanover, Germany, and came to America in 1865, locating in Elkland township. Mrs. Knupper was a daughter of Anthony Gleockler, of Lake Run, Elkland township. To Mr. and Mrs. Hugo have been born four children: Blanche M., Pearl R., Rowena, died at the age of three months; Ralph A.

JAMES P. BRENCHLEY

Was born in Forks township in 1839. He was a son of James and Sophia (Powell) Brenchley. James Brenchley was a native of England and came to America in 1837, locating in Elkland township and later in Forks, afterward in Fox and in Elkland again. Mrs. Brenchley was also a native of England. James P. Brenchley, the subject of this sketch, owns a farm near Estella, Elkland township. He is at present tax collector of Elkland township. In 1862 he married Malinda A. Mullan, who was born in Elkland township in 1844. She was a daughter of John and Selena (Woodhead) Mullan, of Elkland township. John Mullan. was a son of Charles Mullan, Jr., who came to Elkland with his father, Charles Mullan, Sr., in 1800. Mrs. Mullan was a daugh­ter of Vincent and Esther (Molyneux) Woodhead, and a grand­daughter of Joseph Woodhead, a native of England, who located in Elkland township in 1829. To Mr. and Mrs. Brenchley have been born six children: Anna S., married D. S. McBride, of Mich­igan; John P., who died in 1876; Jessie M., of Forks; Martha S., of Scranton, Pa.; Winfield Scott and Belle, at home.

F. A. BOYLE

Was born in Elkland township, Aug. 29, 1842. He was a son of John and Avis (King) Boyle, and a grandson of Francis Boyle, who came from Ireland to America during the Revolutionary war, when 18 years of age, locating first at Shamokin, from where he moved to Elkland township in 1803. F. A. Boyle locat­ed on his father's farm near Estella, which he has purchas­ed. He has always taken a very active part in religious and political affairs. Mr. Boyle married Matilda Williams, Oct. 24, 1868. She was born in Ridgeberry township, Bradford county, Oct. 19, 1844. She was a daughter of Henry and Christena (Rightmire) Williams. Mr. Williams was born in Seneca county, N. Y., May 27, 1817. The early part of .his life was spent in Bradford county. In 1850 he moved to Shunk, Sullivan county, where Mrs. Williams died in 1851. Mr. Williams married Ann Shattuck for his second wife. In 1860 he was elected county commissioner. Mr. Williams died in 1890. To Mr. and Mrs. Boyle have been born two children: Avis G., married J. M. Tom­kins; Mabel V., at home.

S. E PARISH

Was born in Wyoming county in 1853. He was a son of T. V. Parish, who was a native of Wyoming county, who lived some time at Forksville and later moved to Elkland township. Mr., Parish purchased a farm on Bear Mountain, Elkland township. He is a blacksmith by trade. Mr. Parish has been married twice. His first wife was Henrietta Porter, who died in 1893; his second wife is Matilda Porter, both are daughters of H. Y. Porter, of Fox, who was a son of L. D. Porter, one of the early settlers of Fox township. Mr. Parish is the father of five children: James H., Edward, died when two years of age; Harvey T., Ralph, died in infancy; and Floyd E.

OSCAR W. BEDFORD

Was born in Elkland township in 1871. He was a son of Sam­uel and Harriet (Norton) Bedford, of Elkland township, and a grand son of John Bedford, who was a native of England, and came to America with his father, Henry Bedford. John Bedford married Ellen Sadler and located on the farm now owned by Os­car W. Bedford. Mr. Bedford owns two farms which he purchased from his father and lives near the Bethel school house. He married Mattie Sabin, July 3, 1893. She was born in 1872. The Sabina came from Rensselaer county, N. Y. To Mr. and Mrs. Bedford have been born three children: Semore, Fern and Alverta.

JOHN J. WEBSTER *

Was born in White Deer Valley, Union county, Pa., in 1836. He was a son of Jonathan and Harriet (Blakesley) Webster, natives of England. Jonathan Webster came from Yorkshire, Eng­land, landing at Philadelphia, where he remained for a short time, then went to Union county, Pa.; from there he moved to Elkland township in 1836, locating on the farm now owned by William Webster. John Webster owns a large farm near Estella. He has been engaged quite extensively in lumbering. In 1893 he was elected county commissioner. Mr. Webster was married twice, his first wife was Jane Kay, dec'd. She was a daughter of William and Ann (Bedford) Kay, natives of England, who lo­cated in Elkland township in 1849. For his second wife he mar­ried Catharine Norton, Jan. 10, 1874. She was born in Elkland township in 1S44, and was a daughter of Samuel and Catharine A. (Bryan) Norton. Mr. Norton was born in England in 1812, and came to America about 1830. He was married in 1834, and located on Bear Mountain, Elkland township. To Mr. Webster were born four children by his first wife: Carrie, married Frank May; Charles G , of Elkland; Walter H., of Forksville; Anna, married A. T. Mulnix, of Lincoln Falls. By his second wife five children were born: M. R., of LaPorte; Georgia, at home; George, died at the age of ten months; Nellie, married Free Rowe, of La Porte, and Samuel H.

* Editor's Note: The biographical sketch below tells us more about the origins and history of the Webster family. There is also a full history at Jonathan Webster: Early Settler of Elkland Township. Many of the Websters are also interred in the Webster Cemetery in Elkland.

WEBSTER, John J. 1836 -

JOHN J. WEBSTER* is one of the largest lumber dealers of Sullivan County and is practically a resident of Estella, Elkland township, Sullivan County, Pa., where he owns a handsome residence, a large and well improved farm and other valuable property; he is temporarily located, however, in Forks township. He is the eldest son of Jonathan and Harriet (Blakeley) Webster, and was born at White Deer Creek, Montour County, Pa., October 8, 1836.
Jonathan Webster was born in England, where he learned the weaver's trade. Coming to this country he located at Philadelphia, where he worked at his trade for a short time. Being a skilled and successful workman he soon obtained a more lucrative situation in a large woolen factory at White Deer Creek. By unceasing labor and close economy he saved a considerable sum of money which he invested in land, which at that time was very cheap. He purchased 100 acres in Elkland township, where his son William now resides. In summer, by patience and great effort, he slowly cleared the timber from the land that he might cultivate the soil. Out of the logs he built a log house, where he and his wife lived in true pioneer fashion. In winter he worked at his trade for Thomas Engham [sic, likely "Ingham"] at Monroeton.
In this way by unceasing toil in both summer and winter he was soon able to build larger and more substantial buildings, the same now standing on the farm. In his house he put up a loom on which, during spare time, he wove cloth for his family, and also for his neighbors. He made a specialty of weaving handsome shawls, which were a source of wonder and delight to all his neighbors and friends; thus he was more prosperous than many in his vicinity and accumulated a nice property, the benefits of which he enjoyed to the day of his death, which occurred on the farm at the age of seventy-three. His religious life was based upon the doctrines of the Anglican Church. He was a Whig in politics and later a Republican. His wife died at the home of our subject in 1896, aged eighty-four years. Their children were: John J., the subject of our sketch; George, now deceased, who served in the Union Army in the Rebellion; Ellen, deceased; William, of Elkland township; Jonathan, who was killed in the War of the Rebellion; James, of Sugar Run; Elizabeth, now deceased; and Marsden of Bradford County.
John J. Webster was brought to Elkland township by his parents when he was six months old. There he was reared as a farmer and at the age of twenty-one bought eighty acres of the George Molyneux tract near what is now Estella, it being at that time an untouched wilderness. There he built a small boarding-house and kept a country tavern, at the same time commencing the work of clearing his farm. This venture was so successful that eighty acres more of the same tract were added to his farm. Being a man of energy and enterprise he was desirous of obtaining the most possible good from the natural resources of his land, so he built a saw-mill on his grounds and manufactured lumber from the timber in his own forest, also sawing for his neighbors who came from miles around bringing logs to his saw-mill. After years of toil and industry he succeeded in improving his farm to his own taste and now enjoys the honor and distinction of being one of the most prominent agriculturists in his section of the state.
One of the noted features of this elegant farm is a fine apple orchard of 150 trees. Mr. Webster has given the care of this splendid farm of 160 acres to a tenant, for he is so busily engaged elsewhere that it is impossible for him to give his personal attention to farming; he realizes, however, that much more money can be made in the lumber business than in farming, consequently he is extensively engaged in lumbering on the large tracts of timber land owned by the Union Tanning Company in Forks township.
Mr. Webster has been twice married. His first wife was Jane Kaye, daughter of William Kaye of Elkland township. She died about the age of twenty-five leaving four children: Carrie, who married Frank May and is the mother of seven children, Bertha, Millie, George, Lloyd, Merton, Dorothy, Lorine; Charles G., who married Ella Brown and has five children, George, John, Seth, Delia, and Blanche; Anna, who married A. F. Molyneux, and also has five children, Tina, Revival, Ada, Walter and Wetsel; and Walter, a carpenter and wagon-maker by trade. Mr. Webster's second wife was Mrs. Catherine Campbell, daughter of Samuel Norton and widow of Henry Campbell. Mrs. Campbell had two children by her first husband, viz.: Jennie, who married George Morton and bore him two children, Essie and Nellie; Irene, who married Lyman Caufer, and also had two children, Katie and Violet.
Our subject and his second wife have been blessed with a family of five children, three sons and two daughters, namely, Merton, who married Rosa Brown, and had a family of seven children, Fanny, May, Helen, Frank and Frances, twins, and Georgie and George, also twins, now deceased; Nellie; and Harry. Few men many years older than our subject can boast of such a numerous family of children and grandchildren. Mr. Webster is a leading spirit in the Methodist Church and has served as a member of the building committee ever since joining the church. Politically lie is a Republican, and has served in many township offices and one term as county commissioner. Socially he is past grand of Sullivan Lodge No. 522, I. O. O. F.; also a member and past president of the Elkland Grange.

Source: Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District,
Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, IL and Buffalo, NY (1899)

CHARLES G. WEBSTER

Was born in Elkland township in 1864. He was a son ,of John J. and Jane (Kay) Webster, of Elkland township. Mr. Webster purchased a portion of the Geo. Brown farm near Estella He married Mary E. Brown. She was born in Elkland township in 1872, and is a daughter of George and Harriet (Shoemaker) Brown, of Estella, and a grand daughter of John Brown, who located on a large tract of land near Estella at an early date. To Mr. and Mrs. Webster have been born six children: George, John, Della, Blanche, Archie and Jessie.

J. A. DAY

Was born in Lycoming county, July 5, 1864. He was a son of Claudius and Ellen (Fulcrod) Day. The grand-father, Edward Day, settled in Lycoming county at an early date. The Fulc­rods were German descent and were early settlers in Lycoming county. In 1893 Mr. Day purchased the W. F. Grange portion of the Joseph Whiteley homestead and in 1894 he purchased in addition a portion of the Wm. Whiteley farm in Elkland town­ship, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Day married Anna Baumunk, May 1, 1889. She was born in Elkland in 1868. She is a daughter of Adam and Barbara (Betital) Baumunk, of Elkland township, who emigrated from Germany in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Day have been born five children: Acley A., Jessie L., Leon H., Ralph C. and Mira E.

J. G. COTT

Was born in Springfield township, Bradford county, Aug. 21, 1854. He was a son of Henry A. and Elizabeth (Shape') Cott. Henry A. Cott was a native of Saxony, Germany. When he was 18 years of age he came to America, locating first at Buffalo, N. Y., and later in Springfield township, Bradford county, and in 1861 purchased a farm in Fox township, where he remained un­til his death. J. G. Cott located on the William Norton farm in Fox township, which he sold, and in 1887 purchased the farm near Lincoln Falls, which he now owns, and to which he has added more land. Mr. Cott has always taken a prominent part in public affairs and in 1901 was elected Sheriff of Sullivan county, when he moved to LaPorte, where he expects to remain during his term of office. Mr. Cott married Lucetta J. McCarty, who was born June 20, 1854. She was a daughter of Thomas and Chloe (Wilcox) McCarty, of Elkland township. Thomas McCar­ty was the youngest son of Joel and Ellen (Roberta) McCarty, who located in Elkland township about 1900. To Mr. and Mrs. Cott have been born six children: Ellen M., married Jacob Greiss, of LaPorte; John H., of Lincoln Falls; Hannah M.., married Har­ry Heess, of Elkland township; Fredrica E., Clarence G. and Miriam, at home.

JOHN H. COTT

Was born in Fox township, March 29, 1878. He is a son of J. G. and Lucetta J. (McCarty) Cott, of Elkland township. Mr. Cott has charge of his father's farm while the latter is serving as sheriff of Sullivan county. John H. Cott married Lizzie McCar­ty in 1900. She is a daughter of Thomas W. and Myrtle V. (Grange) McCarty. Thomas W. McCarty was a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Pardoe) McCarty. Myrtle V. Grange was a daughter of John W. and Eliza (Vough) Grange, of Elkland township. To Mr. and Mrs. John H. Cott has been born one child, Francis.

MILES O. BARNES

Was born in Orville township, Bradford Co., Mar. 15, 1854. He was a son of Robinson and Amanda (Dikeman) Barnes. The history of the Barnes' in America dates back to 1630, when three sons of Phineas Barnes, an Englishman, settled in Connecticut. Later they moved to Stockbridge, Mass. Of this lineage, Robinson Barnes, father of the subject of this sketch, located in Bradford county in 1830 and in 1855 moved to Elkland township, Sullivan county, locating on the farm now owned by his son Miles 0. Barnes. Mr. Barnes, the subject of this sketch, is engaged in farming and stock raising. He has been elected to the office of road commissioner, and school director a number of times. In 1884 he married Phoebe Everett, who was born in Elkland town­ship in 1851. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. U. Z. Everett, who moved from Schuyler county, N. Y., to Elkland township about 1850. To Mr. and Mrs. Barnes has been born one son, Alson M.

JOHN WHITELEY

Was born in Lancastershire, England, Mar. 3, 1838. He was a son of Joseph and Mary (Hague) Whiteley, natives of England, who were married Dec. 28, 1828, and came to America in 1840, locating at Philadelphia and in 1846 moved to Elkland township. where Mr. Whiteley accumulated considerable property and spent his closing years living a retired life at Forksville. John Whiteley, the subject of this sketch, on reaching his majority, purchased a tract of timber land in the Bethel school district of Elkland township, where he has cleared up a farm of 114 acres. Mr. Whiteley has been elected auditor, and held the office of overseer of the poor for many years. Oct. 16, 1858, he married Elsie Dikeman. She was a daughter of Parks Dikeman, of Tomp­kins county, N. Y. The Dikemans are of Scotch Irish descent and located in the New England states at an early date. To Mr. and Mrs. Whiteley have been born five children: Joe R., of West Plains, Mo.; Mary, married Orville Bartoe, of Philadelphia; Ora, married Eugene Avery, of Elkland township; Susie, married Carl McCarty, of Elkland, and Roy, at home.
Editor's Note: Here is a more extensive biography:

JOHN WHITELEY, one of the most progressive residents of Elkland township, Sullivan County, is a man of sterling worth and integrity, and is one who has won his way to a high station in life through his individual efforts. He is a son of Joseph and Mary (Hague) Whiteley, was born in Lancastershire, Eng., March 31, 1838, and was christened in the Olden Episcopal Church.
Joseph Whiteley, the father of our subject, was born in England and was a cotton manufacturer by trade, being an expert in his line. In 1841 he emigrated from his native land to this country, locating in the city of Philadelphia; but, desirous of having a home of his own, he later removed to Sullivan County, where land could be obtained at a reasonable price and where many of his friends had previously located. In 1846 he bought fifty acres of land which had been little changed from its primitive state by the hand of man. After making a partial clearing he purchased an adjoining fifty acres which had been partly cleared by Mr. Ainworth, and upon which had been built a house. Into that he moved with his family and subsequently purchased a third tract of fifty acres, all of which he cleared up and turned into valuable land. On this third tract one of the first clearings in the county had been -made; at the time of its purchase it contained a log house, the floors of which were made of split hewed planks, and it contained the first panel door in the township. Our subject has about four feet of this planking and he prizes it very highly. This land has been divided and is now owned by three persons: J. Barnes, who has the homestead; A. Dey, Esq.; and Mrs. Bryan. Joseph Whiteley was a man of great industry and untiring in his energy. In the summer months he lived upon the farm and cultivated the soil, whilst during the winter he worked at his trade in Philadelphia, following that plan for several years. When he came to Sullivan County he was not very well provided with the world's goods, owning a grey horse, a wagon, and fifty cents, but he led an exemplary life and at the time of his retirement to Forksville, a short time prior to his demise, he was a well-to-do man. The only part remaining of the wagon in which our subject came to Sullivan County is the singletree bolt. Both Joseph and his wife lived to reach an advanced age and lie buried in the Bethel Cemetery. His union with Mary Hague resulted in the following offspring: Ann, wife of John Wright; John, our subject; William, a veteran of the Civil War; Elizabeth, wife of William C. Marsden; Martha, wife of Daniel Bedford; and Mary, wife of E. W. Snell. In religious views he was strongly attached to the established English Church. Politically he was a Whig and later a Republican, serving as school director, supervisor, and in minor township offices. John Whiteley, the subject of this sketch, attended the public schools and farmed with his father for a time, after which he peddled Yankee notions with much success. He next bought a farm near Bethel Church consisting of 114 acres, erected new buildings, and has since followed farming. He is a hustling and energetic man, and in whatever line he has engaged has been very successful. He is a man of strong character, leads an honest life, and has a large circle of acquaintances and friends.
Mr. Whiteley was joined in wedlock with Elsie Dikeman, a daughter of Parks Dikeman of Tompkins County, N. Y., and they have five children: Joe, a stock dealer, who married Ada Walker, and has two children, Renie and Vibert; Mary, who was a school teacher and postmistress for several years and is the wife of Orville Bartow, and has three children, Earl, LaRue, and Brice; Ora, wife of Eugene Avery, who has one child, John Roy, and taught school for three years; Susie, a musician; and Roy, fourteen years old, who lives at home. Mr. Whiteley is a Republican in politics and has served several years as auditor and poormaster.
Source: Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District
Biographical Publishing Company Chicago, IL & Buffalo, NY 1899 Page 578

E. B. WRIGHT

Was born in LeRoy township, Bradford county, Nov. 31, 1875. He was a son of R. Watson and Ellen (Pardoe) Wright. The Wrights came originally from England and located in Connecticut at an early date; from there they moved to New Jersey. Charles Wright, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a minister of the M. E. church and about 65 years ago was sta­tioned at Forksville. His voice gave out and he settled near Canton, Bradford county. R. Watson Wright purchased the Thomas Pardoe farm from his father-in-law's estate. Mr. Wright was accidentally killed by the cars near Philadelphia. Mrs. R. Watson Wright was a daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Moly­neux) Pardoe, and a grand daughter of Joseph Pardoe, a native of England, who located in Elkland township some time between 1808 and 1619. Margaret Molyneux was a daughter of Edward and Rebecca (Bird) Molyneux, of Forks township. Her grand­fathers, William Molyneux and Powell Bird, were two of the three first permanent settlers in Sullivan county. E. B. Wright purchased the homestead of his father's estate, and is engaged in agriculture. He married Nettie Glidewell in 1902. She is a daughter of George W. and Carrie (Kay) Glidewell, of Elkland township. The Glidewells are English descent. William Glidewell, grand-father of Mrs. Wright, was one of the early settlers and influential men of Elkland township.

T. S.  KILMER

Was born in Fox township, Mar. 17, 1859. He is a son of Will­iam and Catharine (Shattuck) Kilmer, of Fox township. The Kilmers are the descendants of Philip Kilmer, who came from Hesse Cassel, Germany to America, in a colony of refugees, in 1710. Philip Kilmer located on the Hudson river in the State of New York; of this lineage, Philip Kilmer, the father of the Sul­livan county branch of the family, was born in the Mohawk Val­ley, New York, in 1781. During the War of 1812, he went to Canada, later he came back to New York, locating at Marcellus; from there he came with his family of nine children to Fox township; he and two of his sons, Anthony and Henry, who were of age, being three of the first ten settlers of Fox township. Anthony Kilmer was the grand-father of the subject of this sketch. T. S. Kilmer purchased the Jonas Bedford farm in Elk land township and located thereon. Ho has held the offices of auditor and road commissioner. Mr. Kilmer married Mary Hunsinger, Dec. 24, 1890 She is a daughter of Charles P. and Sarah (Rinebold) Hunsinger, of Forks township, and a great-grand­daughter of George Hunsinger, who located in Cherry township in 1819. To Mr. and Mrs. Kilmer have been born two children: Nellie Catharine and Dean Edgar.

WILLIAM T. MOORE

Was born in Delaware county, New York, Dec. 25, 1852. He was a son of Alexander Moore, a native of Scotland, who while in his native land married Lydia D. Birch, also a native of Scot­land; they came to America about 60 years ago, landing in Dela­ware county, N. Y. Wm. T. Moore purchased a farm on King's Creek, near Estella. He married Eva Shoemaker, June 18, 1874. She was born in LeRoy township, Bradford county, Jan. 7, 1853. Mrs. Moore was a daughter of Payne P. and Rachel (Pepper) Shoemaker, of LeRoy, Bradford county. The Shoemakers are of German-French descent. They located in the Wyoming Val­ley. The husband of Eliza Shoemaker was killed in the Wyom­ing Massacre, and the widow moved to LeRoy, Bradford county. Four brothers of Mrs. Moore were in the Civil War. To Mr. and Mrs. Moore have been born five children: Mary A., married Ar­chie Adams, of Jenningsville, Wyoming county; George E„ Floyd L., R. W., and Earle C.

ORRIN B. MCCARTY

Was born in Elkland township, July 13, 1861. He is a son of Jesse R. and Ellen H. (Corbin) McCarty, of Elkland township, and a grandson of Aaron and Sarah (Pardoe) McCarty, of Elkland township. The McCarty's are probably the descendants of Silas McCarty, a native of Scotland, who settled in Ireland when 14 years of age and later came to America, locating in Bucks county, Pa. The family history can be traced back nearly 200 years. Orrin H. McCarty married Harriet C. Rogers, who was born at Lincoln Falls, Pa. She was a daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Huckell) Rogers, of Lincoln Falls. Jonathan Rogers was born at Muncy, Pa., Feb. 10, 1821. He was , a son of Jona­than Rogers, a native of England, who came to America with his father, Samuel Rogers and located at Forksville in 1801. Mr. McCarty purchased the farm near Eldredsville on which he lives. He has served as school director two terms. To Mr. and Mrs. McCarty have been horn six daughters: Fanny M., Maude E., Mabel, Donzella, Beulah and Thelma.

CLINTON P. MCCARTY

Was born in Elkland township, Nov. 8, 1876. He is a son of Jesse R. and Ellen H. (Corbin) McCarty, of Elkland township. The McCartys are one of the leading families of Sullivan county. They are the descendants of Joel and Ellen (Roberts) McCarty, who came from Lycoming county, locating in Elkland township, about 1800. They are also descendants of the celebrated Lancas­ter family. Ellen H. Corbin was a daughter of Chancy and Vio­let (Gaylor) Corbin, of Albany township, Bradford county. The Corbins came from Connecticut, locating in Warren county when they first came to Pennsylvania, from there they moved to Wyalusing, later to Albany township. Clinton P. McCarty lives with his father on the farm formerly owned by Aaron McCarty. He is a member of the Elkland township school board. Mr. Mc­Carty married Rachel Collins, who was born in Elkland town­ship. She is a daughter of Scott and Rhoda (Phillips) Collins, of Forksville, Pa. Scott Collins was born in Elkland township; his father, William Collins, was one of the pioneers of Eagles Mere. Rhoda Phillips was born in Davidson township and is a descen­dant of one of the leading families of that township. To Mi. and Mrs. Clinton P. McCarty have been born three daughters: Lena, Hazel and Bessie.

C B. JENNINGS

Was born in Elkland township, April 19, 1866. He was a son of Thomas A. and Effie (Brown) Jennings. His grandfather, Cal Jennings, came from England and located in Orange county, N. Y. From there, Mr. Jennings moved to Bradford county. C. B. Jennings lives at Estella where he owns a house and lot and he also owns a farm near Estella, which he is engaged in tilling. Mr. Jennings married Viola M. Plotts, Nov. 10, 1892. She was born at Bear Creek, Lycoming county, April 10, 1875. • She is a daughter of Wheeler and Annetta (McBride) Plotts, of Estella. Wheeler Plotts was a son of George and Catharine (Bull) Plotts, of Lycoming county, and a grand-son of John Plotts, who came from New Jersey to Lycoming county, at an early date. The McBrides were one of the pioneer families that located in Hillsgrove township. To Mr. and Mrs. Jennings have been born five children: Lester, Beatrice, Grace, Bruce and Donna.

ALBERT KAY

Was born in Yorkshire. England, March 18, 1847. He was a son of William and Ann (Bedford) Kay, who came from Eng­land to America with their family locating on the farm now own­ed by Albert Kay, in 1849. Mr. Kay has served as school direc­tor and road commissioner in Elkland township. In 1878 he mar­ried Susie King, who was born in Elkland township, May 1, 1858. She was a daughter of Job L. and Jane (Conders) King, of Elkland township. Job L. King was born in Elkland township; he was a son of John King, Jr., who was born near London in 1777 and came to America with his parents in 1800. He married Alice Crosby and located at Northumberland and in 1819 moved to Elkland township on the farm now owned by Philander Kinney. John King, Jr. was a son of John King, Sr., who was born at Staffordshire, England, in 1750, and in 1801 located in Elkland township on the farm now owned by George W. Glidewell. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kay have no children.

CHRISTIAN SNYDER

Was born in Cherry township, April 27, 1849. He was a son of Adam L. Snyder, a native of Germany, who came to America with his family in 1835, landing at Baltimore. from there he mov­ed to Harrisburg, then to Pottsville, and came to Sullivan coun­ty in 1839, locating in Cherry township; in 1849 he moved to Dushore, in 1852 he moved to Elkland township, then back to Dushore. In 1865 he purchased the grist-mill property at Camp­bellsville; after remaining there a short time he went to Oregon and California. Christian Snyder owns a farm in the Blackwater Run school district of Elkland township, where he is en­gaged in farming. He has also been engaged in the butchering business. He served as tax collector of Elkland township five years. Mr. Snyder was married twice, his first wife was Alice J. Bahr, a daughter of William Bahr, of New Albany, Bradford county, Pa. She was born March 25, 1847, was married Dec. 25, 1869, and died July 16, 1873. Feb. 6, 1876, Mr. Snyder married his present wife, Susan Dye, of Hillsgrove. She was born at Hillsgrove, .Tune 10, 1852. She was a daughter of Henry and Effie (Woodley) Dye. Effie Woodley was born at Hughesville, Jan. 10, 1823. To Mr. Snyder were born by his first wife two children: J. Lyman, of Eldredsville, and Sarah A., married Fred J. Woodhead, of California.

J. LYMAN SNYDER

Was born in Elkland township in 1873. He is a son of Chris­tian and Alice J. (Bahr) Snyder, of Elkland township. Mr. Sny­der's mother was a daughter of William Bahr, of New Albany, and a grand-daughter of John and Mary M. (Reeser) Bahr, who were of German descent and came from Berks county to Cherry township in 1833. Mr. Snyder taught school for a number of years and is at present engaged in the mercantile business at El­dredsville. In 1896 he married Sarah R. Molyneux, who was born at Millview, Pa., Aug. 21, 1870. She was a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Huckell) Molyneux. She is a descendant of William Molyneux, the first permanent settler of Sullivan coun­ty, who was a native of England and located at Millview in 1794. To Mr. and Mrs. Snyder has been born one son.

F. C. BEINLICH

Was born at Philadelphia. July 10, 1862. He was a son of Francis Beinlich, who was born in Baden, Germany, Sept. 20, 1826. He served four years in the Regular Army in Germany and came to America in 1854, landing at Philadelphia, where he married Ann Stutes in 1860; they came to Elkland town­ship. In 1861 they moved back to Philadelphia. Mr. Beinlich enlisted in the Civil war, serving four years. At the close of the war they moved to Estella, Elkland township, where Mr. Bein­lich purchased the Henry Williams farm, where he remained un­til his death in 1902. Mrs. Beinlich died Dec. 14, 1899. F. C. Beinlich owns what was formerly known as the William Maris­dan farm. In 1888 he married Carrie Baumunk, a daugh­ter of Adam and Barbara (Bentel) Baumunk, of Elkland town­ship, who were both natives of Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, and came to America, locating in Elkland township in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Beinlich have been born three children.

JOHN BROWN, SR.

After an effort of several months to get the biography of this family, whose descendants form a large portion of the inhabitants of Forks and Elkland townships, the writer has succeeded and will give it in the closing of the Elkland township history.

John Brown, Sr., was born near Welton, a suburb of the city of Welton, England, in 1770; he married Mary Walson, who was born the same year. She died in England in 1811. In 1815 Mr. Brown came to America with six of his seven children. Mary, the oldest, remaining in England to care for a grand-mother. At Philadelphia Mr. Brown met Samuel Rogers, Sr., who persuade& him to locate in the valley of the Loyalsock creek. He purchas­ed a tract of land two and one-half miles below Forksville and lo­cated thereon. In 1816 the flood took his house away while the family were at supper. Mr. Brown and the children escaped but saved nothing. Mr. Brown died in 1855, his children were:

Mary, of England.

Ann, remained single.

William, of Forks township.

George W., of Elkland township.

John, of Elkland township.

Elizabeth, married Isaac Warburton, of Bradford coun­ty, Pa.

Thomas, of Elkland township.

William Brown was born in England in 1801 and came to Amer­ica with his father in 1815; he purchased a tract of land two miles below Forksville on the Loyalsock creek, where he engaged in farming and lumbering, running the lumber in rafts down the Loyalsock Creek. Mr. Brown married Mary Clark, a daughter of John Clark, a native of England, who came to America with his family, locating in Forks township in 1830. Mr. Brown died in 1866 and Mrs. Brown in 1885. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born:

Ellen, of Stoneham, Warren county, Pa.

John, deceased.

Ann, died at the age of two and one-half years.

Sarah Ann, married Michael Hall, of Runny, Pa.
William C., dec'd, of Forks township.

Caroline, who died at the age of 28 years.

Mary Ann, married Albert L. Camp, of Missouri.
Margaret Jane, married Andrew Rohe, of Cherry Twp.

George W. Brown was born in England in 1803 and came to America with his father, John Brown, Sr., in 1815. He purchased a tract of land near Lincoln Falls, Elkland township. He con­ducted the woolen mills near Forksville for some years. Mr. Brown married Mary Snyder and of this union nine children were born:

Charles, deceased.

Elizabeth, deceased.

William W., of Glen Elder, Kansas.

Mary. deceased.

Julia Ann, married J. M. Osier, of. Lincoln Falls.
John S., of Lincoln Falls.

Geo. W., of Lincoln Falls.

Effie, married William Lewis, of Bernice.

Margaret, married A. C. Bower, of Eldredsville.

John Brown was a son of John and Mary (Walson) Brown, Sr., of Forks township. He purchased a tract of 400 acres of land near Estella, Elkland township, where he engaged in lumber­ing and farming, until his death. In 1870 he was elected County Commissioner. Mr. Brown married Catharine Klees. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born seven children:

J. Ellis, of Estella.
George, of Estella.
Thomas, deceased.

Catharine, married G. Homestead, of Clearfield Co., Pa.
Isaac. of Hillsgrove.

Jacob, of Athens, Pa.

Thomas Brown was a son of John and Mary (Walson) Brown Sr. He purchased a farm near Estella, where George Brown now lives. Mr. Brown married Phoebe Klees; they had no children.

GEORGE W. BROWN, 2ND.

Was born near Forksville in 1840. He was a son of George W. and Mary (Snyder) Brown, of Elkland township. Mr. Brown lived at Williamsport for some time, he now lives at Lincoln Falls. Mr. Brown was married twice. In 1861 he married Phoebe Jennings. She was a daughter of Dr. C. G. Jennings. of Mace­donia, Pa. To them were born five children: Mary F., married E. S. Miller, of Williamsport, Pa; Clarence E. deceased; Ernest, of Jamison City; Harry L., of Williamsport. By his second wife he had: George W., deceased; J. W., Charles L., and Edwin G.

GEORGE C. VARGASON

Was born in Forks township. He is a son of Uriah and Emily (Vargason) Vargason. Uriah Vargason was a son of Samuel Vargason. The Vargasons came from Connecticut to Bradford county at an early date, and were among the early settlers of Bradford county. Mrs. Uriah Vargason was a daughter of Jesse Vargason of Estella, Elkland township. George Vargason owns a farm near Lincoln Falls. In 1892 he married Edith Shoema­ker. She is a daughter of William Shoemaker, of Fox township. To Mr. and Mrs. Vargason four children have been born: Del­bert, Bertha, Asa and Louisa.

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.

School Directors—Ira Pardoe, F. H. McCarty, Clinton McCar­ty, George D. Bown, Hampton Pardoe, William Burgess.

Road Commissioners—Charles Heess, William Moore and Edward Norton.

Town Clerk—Ulysses Bird.

Assessor—Jesse Everett.

Tax Collector—Harry Heess.

Constable—C. F. Beinlich.

Overseers of the Poor—John White and Job McCarty.

REGISTERED VOTERS.

FORKSVILLE  POSTOFFICE.

Anderson, Fred S.

Anderson, Wm. C.

Annable, John F.

Barnes, Frank

 Barnes, Miles O.

Barnes, J. C.

Bedford, Grant U.

Bedford, L. S.

Bedford, Oscar

 Day, Ardell

 Everett, Jesse
   
Hatch, Joseph A.

Kaye, Albert

Keeney, Philander

 Kilmer, Chas. S.       

Kilmer, Sylvester F.

Kline, John

McCarty, Russell

Mullen, Melville H.

Mock, Daniel

McCarty, Carlton

McCarty, George

Pardoe, Ira J.        

Pardoe, Joseph

Reitmeyer, Alvin

Wright, Edward

Woodhead, Geo. F.

Woodhead, Jos. E.;

Warren, Wm.

Warren, Ward H.

Whiteley, John

Wick, Wm.

 

ELDREDSVILLE.

Brown, John W.

Bower, Delbert

 Chapman, John M.
Davidson, Frank
Everett. Charles D.
Gilbert, Joseph

Gleockler, Edward
Hill, Julius

Hugo,Wm. W.
Higley, Emerson
Kobbe, Fred C.
Luther, B. K.
Miller, Daniel L.
Mulnix, Ellis

Heinze, Chas. C.
Hugo, Gusta
Houck, Frank            
Hardy, Allen G.

Hatch, Chas.
Kobbe, Christian
Miller, Howard     
 Miller, John

Mulnix, Ulysses
Meyers, P. N.
Mulnix, Benj.
McCarty, Frank
McCarty, Orrin
  McCarty, Thom. W.
McCarty, Clinton T.
McCarty, Jesse
McCarty, Job
McCarty, John
Mullan, Josiah

Hugo, George
Hunsinger, Claude
Nichols, Edwin
Pardoe, Carl H.

Pardoe, Albert

Rosbach, L. G.                                                                  

Rosbach, Geo. L.

Reed, Robert

Tompkins, Martin

Tompkins, Thos.

Tompkins, Nathaniel

White, Clinton
Yaw, Lemuel
Yaw, Leslie
Yaw, Asa

ESTELLA.

Brown, John Ellis
Beinlich, Frank C.
Bartow, Roland
Bird, Ulysses
Brenchley, Jas. P.
Duff, Richard

Fuller, C. J.
Griffis, Walter
Jennings, C. B.

Kaye, Roland
Lewis, Wesley
Little, Benjamin
Moore, Wm. T.
Maguire, John R.
May, Warren
Osler, John S.
Plotts, John G.

Plotts, A. L.

Pond, John

Rogers, John P.
Rosbach, John L.
Vargason, Chas.
Vargason, Frank
Vargason, Saml. C.

Vargason, Uriah

Webster, John J.
Wheatley, Edward
Wheatley, Wm.
Wheatley, Chas.
Wheatley, Thos.

Rogers, S. S.
Rosbach, L. L.
Vargason, Arthur

 

LINCOLN FALLS.

 

Baumunk, Philip

Brackman, Geo.
Brown, Wm. H.

Brown, Geo. W.

Brown. C. L.                                                                                 

Brown, John S.           

Brown, Delbert L.

Brown. Leslie             

Cott, John

Harting, Augustus

Heess, John W.

Keating, Win.

Mulnix, A. T.

Osler, J. M.

Pardoe, Ed son

Painter, Wm.
Rogers, Jonathan

Rogers, Edw. G.

Teevan, Jas.,

Vought, Henry
Heess, W. A.
Heess, C. F.
Rogers, C, S

 

CAMPBELLVILLE.

Fawcett, Jasper  
Fawcett, Chas.
Hart, Wm.
Mullan, Frank  
Norton. Ira R.
Wanck, Chas.,

Norton, Edw.
Wanck, Judd
Norton, Wm.
Wilcox, Ellis

 

PIATT.

Baumunk, Adam

Bedford. David

Heess, Robert

Heess, Carl F.           

Heess, Harvey    

Heess, Theodore

Heinze, A.

Heinze, Christian                                   

Pardoe, Chas. P.

 

HILLSGROVE.

Morgan, Joseph