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Chapter History

 

Origin of the Chapter Name

Following the signing of the Treaty of Paris which ended the Revolutionary War in 1783, two treaties were made with six nations, thus relinquishing to the United States all of the Northwest to a line parallel with the southern boundary of New York, then tapering to a point in Springfield Township between four and five miles east of the Ohio line. This tract consisted of 202,187 acres, extending some 40 miles along Lake Erie and 18 miles along the New York boundary.

New York, Massachusetts, and Connecticut, after protracted negotiations and arguments (as each state claimed this tract), released their claims for a total of $151,640.25 to the United States Government. The Federal Government in turn conveyed the tract to Pennsylvania, and a patent, signed by President George Washington and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, was issued on March 3, 1792. The tract was called the "Triangle" due to the shape of the land in question.

Organization of the Triangle Chapter, NSDAR

The Triangle Chapter of the DAR was organized October 13, 1916, with seventeen organizing members. Mrs. George Pierce was the organizing regent. At the organizing meeting, the patriotic work of the chapter began with the voting of $50 to the Philippine Scholarship fund. On October 19, Mrs. Pierce attended the state meeting at Philadelphia. Upon her return, she presented the chapter with their new gavel, made of wood from Valley Forge; this was a matter of sentiment to her, as one of her ancestors had endured the winter of 1777-78 there. This gavel was made of wood from the home of Dr. George de Benneville, who cared for many of the wounded in both armies during the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Pierce at this time also presented the regent's pin, which has been worn by all succeeding chapter regents since then.

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