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Place Names



Factory Hill (Hinchinbrooke)
A hill in the Boyd Settlement, on the Boyd Settlement Road about halfway between Rte 202 and the Rockburn Sideroad. (45.086N/74.111W) Named for the cheese factory that was located on lot 9 belonging to Alfred Moore at that time.
Faille River
A possible old name (c1800) for Ruisseau Faille, a tributary of the Rivière LaTortue that runs north from an area north of St-Édouard-de-Napierville to its mouth at St-Mathieu-de-Laprairie.
Fertile Creek (South Georgetown)
The Fourth and Fifth Concessions or Ranges (South Georgetown) of farm lots. (45.135N/73.880W) It is now part of the municipality of Très-St-Sacrement.
Fertile Creek Road
The road between the Fourth and Fifth Concessions or Ranges (South Georgetown). (45.143N/73.868W) In the 1980s, the name was changed to Rang 4 (Très-St-Sacrement) but in 1999, it was returned to its original, historic name of Fertile Creek Road (Chemin Fertile Creek).
Fertile Creek Outlet
The northeast section of Fertile Creek Road between the concession, where it jogs north and the English River at Riverfield. (45.157N/73.853W)
Fewster Roxham Cemetery
See Roxham Cemetery.
Fifth (Range) Concession (Dundee)
The concession in Dundee Township, on the southeast side of the ridge road between Ste-Agnès-de-Dundee and St-Agnès. (45.014/74.403W)
Fifth Concession (Elgin)
The small concession in the northeast corner of Elgin Township. (45.058N/74.197W)
Fifth Concession (range) (Godmanchester)
The concessions of Godmanchester are confusing. There were two groups of concessions, six to the west and five to the east, with a dividing line just east of the Plank Road. To the west, the Fifth Concession lies on the southwest side of the Fourth Concession. (45.085N/74.221W) In the area between Carr's and White's Sideroads, it border's on the Trout River. East of the Plank Road and the Village of Huntingdon, the Fifth Concession is the concession between the Châteauguay River and the Chemin Connaught. (45.118N/74.118W)
Fifth Concession (Hinchinbrooke)
The range of farms along the west branch of the Outardes River south of the Boyd Settlement and Lost Nation Roads. (45.08N/74.11W)
Fifth Concession (Range) (Ormstown)
The range of lots on the northwest side of Chemin du Cinq (5) that passes through Landreville about 4mi (6.4km) northwest of Ormstown Village. They are now in the municipalities of St-Stanislas-de-Koska (west of Rte 201) and St-Louis-de-Gonzague (east of Rte 201). (45.16N/74.09W, 45.17N/74.03W)
Finn Bridge
An old bridge across Finn Creek on the trail along the west side of the Châteauguay River.
Finn Creek
A tributary of the Châteauguay River between Ormstown and Dewittville. It mouth is located 1.5mi (2.4km) east of Dewittville. (45.119N/74.058W) Named after the settler on the farm at its mouth.
First Concession (Dundee)
The range of lots on the southeast side of Rte 132 in Dundee Township. (45.03N/74.46W)
First Concession (Elgin)
The southernmost concession along the US border in the township of Elgin. (45.00N/74.25W)
First Concession (Godmanchester)
The concession of farms along the Lake St-Francis Shoreline. These lots along the lakeshore were very long and narrow, some as long as 2mi (3.2km). As a result, the First Range (Godmanchester) was settled on both ends. Sellar referred to the northern lakeshore settlements as Lake Front Concession and the rear settlers as First Range-Dundee Road but officially it was all the First Range (Godmanchester). It included the area on the east end known as the Dalhousie Settlement and the area on west side of the LaGuerre Village known as the Scotch Ridge. The First Range (Godmanchester) became the First Range (St-Anicet) when that municipality was created in 1845.
First Concession (Hinchinbrooke)
The southernmost concession along the US border in the township of Hinchinbrooke. (45.00N/74.11W)
First Concession (North Georgetown)
A range of lots running at right angles to the Châteauguay River, from the back of the North Georgetown River Front Concession, NW towards the St-Louis River. (45.22N/73.87W) Now known as Rang 10 (St-Éienne).
First Concession (Ormstown)
The range of lots on the northwest side of the Châteauguay River, from the seigniory line at Dewittville to the North Georgetown boundary line at Point Round. (45.125N/74.020W, 45.13N/73.97W)
First Concession Road
The road that runs parallel to the US border, on the north side of the First Concessions in Elgin (45.006N/74.220W) and Hinchinbrooke (45.008N/74.025W).
First Concession (St-Anicet)
According to Belden Atlas, it was the name of what is now Montée Cooper, running back from the lake. Not to be confused with the First Range or Concession (Godmanchester) which is now First Range (St-Anicet).
First Concession (Williamstown)
The first concession of farms on the NE side of Williamstown. Also the NE boundary of the Seigniory of Beauharnois with the Seigniories of Châteauguay and Lasalle. It is now within the territory of St-Urbain-Premier. (45.21N/73.68W)
First Double Concession (Williamstown)
The Scotch Concession that runs east from Riverfield on the English River. (45.17N/73.79W)
First Range (St-Anicet)
There is some confusion with this name. The lots along the Lake St-Francis shore were very long and narrow. Some as long as 2 mi (3.2km). As a result, the First Range (Godmanchester) was settled on both ends. Sellar referred to the northern lakeshore settlements as Lake Front Concession and the rear settlers as First Range-Dundee Road but officially it was all the First Range (Godmanchester). It included the area on the east end known as the Dalhousie Settlement and the area on west side of the LaGuerre Village known as the Scotch Ridge. The First Range (Godmanchester) became the First Range (St-Anicet) when that municipality was created.
Fisher Boulevard
A old local name for Rte 202 through Hemmingford, named after Martin B. Fisher, MLA, who helped to get it improved in the 1930s.
Fisher Cemetery, James
A private cemetery for the family of James Fisher, the first settler in the Hemmingford area. It is located on James Fisher Road, 2.5mi (4km) east of the corner with Rte 219. (45.019N/73.557W)
Fisher's Mills
A mill of some sort located on Fisher Road (Hemmingford) where the Little Montreal River (Rivière L'Acadie) crosses, close to the corner of the Napper Road. (45.091N/73.559W)
Fisher Road (Hemmingford)
A road in the northeast corner of Hemmingford Township, starting at Rte 219 at Barrington and running south and then east to the Quest Road. (45.096N/73.562W) Named after Finley Fisher, an early settler. Not to be confused with James Fisher Road, previously Fisher Street, in the southeastern corner of the township.
Fisher Street (Hemmingford)
The first road north of the US border, running east from Rte 219/Covey Hill Road corner (Clelland's Corner's). (45.020N/73.594W) It has recently been renamed James Fisher Road, both names in memory of the first permanent settler in the area who took up a lot on this road in 1799. Not to be confused with Fisher Road, located further north in the township.
Fish Island
A small island in the north channel of the St-Lawrence River, between Grande-Île and Coteau-du-Lac. It has now disappeared as part of a road causeway between Île-Léonard.
Fitzwilliam
This name is shown on several old maps (c1830-1860) as a hamlet that was located about 2.3mi (3.6km) west of the present location of St-Louis-de-Gonzague, on the north side of the St-Louis River. One article attributed the name as the original name of St-Louis-de-Gonzague. That does not stand up to scrutiny since the original name is documented as being Rocqueville and the location is not the same. The river in that area seems to have been modified during the construction of the New Beauharnois (Power) Canal in the 1930s, destroying any trace of the location.
Flanaghan's Point
A point on the north shore of the St-Lawrence River near Summerstown, ON.
Flat Rock
See: Blueberry Rock.
Flats, The
See: Russeltown Flats.
Flats Road
An old name for the section of Rte 203 between St-Chrysostome and Russeltown Flats. It is now named Rue Notre Dame.
Foot of Canal (Pied-du-Canal)
An early name for Melocheville because it was at the downstream end of the Old Beauharnois Canal constructed in the mid 1840s. At the upstream end of the canal, the village located there was called "Tete-du-Canal".
Ford's Rapids
A rapids on the Trout River about 1.2mi (1.9km) upstream from its mouth at the Châteauguay River. (45.062N/74.204W)
Forest (NY)
An old hamlet in northern New York State, located 0.9mi (1.5km) south of US RT11 and 9.2mi (14.8km) WSW of Mooers (NY). (44.903N/73.755W) It also had a railway station on the Northern Railroad of New York rail line.
Forêt de Pins Rigides
An ecological reserve located on the southern side of Blueberry Rock. (45.075N/73.90W)
Fort, The (Hemmingford)
A local name for Corbin's Corners. The origin of the name is debatable.
Fort Blunder
A nickname given to Fort Montgomery at Rouses Point (NY), when the original fort constructed by the US was found to be partly in Canada after the border was resurveyed in the late 1790s.
Fort Covington (NY)
A town in New York State, located about 16mi (25km) east of the St-Lawrence River and 0.4mi (0.6km) south of the Canadian border at Dundee, QC. (44.988N/74.500W) Named in 1817 after Brig. Gen. Leonard Covington, who was killed during the War of 1812. It was previously called French Mills.
Fort Covington Center (NY)
A hamlet in northern New York State. It was located at the corner of Coggin Bridge-Bombay Road and Merrick Road, 3.2mi (5.2km) SSE of Fort Covington (NY). (44.948N/74.465W)
Fort Covington Port of Entry
The US Customs Port of Entry at Fort Covington (NY). (44.997/74.510W)
Fort Douglas
Another name for Fort Hickory, used by Gen. Hampton's Northern Army at Chateaugay (NY) in 1813. Named after Peleg Douglas who owned the land.
Fort Hickory
A military encampment located 2.7mi (4.3km) northeast of Chateaugay (NY), used by General Hampton and the American troops during the invasion of Canada in 1813 that resulted in the Battle of Châteauguay. Named after Gen. Hampton's nickname of "Old Hickory". Also called Camp Douglas.
Fort Invincible
An ironic name for the blockhouse at Fort Covington (NY) during the War of 1812. Events proved that it was far from invincible.
Fort Lennox
An old fort on Île-aux-Noix in the Richelieu River. It is now a National Historic Site.
Fort Montgomery
A large fort on the NW corner of Lake Champlain, very close to the Canadian border at Rouses Point (NY). (45.007N/73.354W) When first built, it was found to be partly in Canada due to survey errors. As a result it gained the nickname Fort Blunder.
Fort Road (Hemmingford)
A local name for the Jackson Sideroad because it runs south from Corbin's Corners, locally known as the Fort.
Fort St-Jean
A fort built in 1748 at St-Jean-sur-Richelieu by the old french regime as protection against the indians. It was located in the area on the south side of the city, that was occupied by College Militaire Royale until it closed recently. (45.300N/73.252W) It was named after Jean Frédéric Phélypeaux, Comte de Pontchartrain, French Minister of Marine in 1748.
Fort St-Johns
The english name for Fort St-Jean.
Fort St-Louis
A fort in Kahnawake located at the rear of the Catholic Church, built by the french regime in 1725 to "protect the Iroquois". From whom I wonder, the french! In any case, it was never completed.
Foucault
See: Seigniory of Foucault.
Fourche-à-Brûler (Laguerre)
Possibly? the fork in the Laguerre River between the east and west branches. Or a small forked creek that runs into the west side of the LaGuerre River, a short distance north. That creek is shown on an old map with a blurred name that resembles Fourche-à-Brûler.
Four Corners
The early name for Chateaugay (NY). It is located 4.7mi (7.5km) south of the Herdman Customs. (44.927N/74.080W)
Fourth Avenue (Howick)
The main street in the ill-fated Village of Howick Junction. Now called Chemin de la Junction (Très-St-Sacrement).
Fourth Concession (Elgin)
Most of the area between the Trout River and the Third Concession Road (Elgin). (45.04N/74.21W) Originally it was designated Clergy and Crown Reserves.
Fourth Concession or Range (Godmanchester)
The concessions of Godmanchester are confusing. There were two groups of concessions, six to the west and five to the east, with a dividing line just east of the Plank Road. To the west the Fourth Concession lies between the Chemin Walsh/Curran/Ridge and the Chemin Carr/Back Ridge. (45.080N/74.273W) On the East side of the Plank Road, the Fourth Concession lies between Chemin Teafield/New Erin and the Chemin Connaught. (45.134N/73.140W)
Fourth Concession (Hinchinbrook)
The range of lots on the southeast side of the Châteauguay River, from the Boyd Settlement at the east end county line (45.10N/74.10W) to the east side of the Châteauguay River south of Huntingdon. (45.06N/74.18W)
Fourth Concession (North Georgetown)
A range of lots running at right angles to the Châteauguay River, from the back of the North Georgetown River Front Concession NW towards the St-Louis River. (45.19N/73.95W) Now known as Rang 40 (St-Louis-de-Gonzague).
Fourth Concession or Range (Ormstown)
The range of lots on the south side of the Rang du Cinq (Rang 5) road that passes through Landreville, 3.1mi (5km) northwest of Ormstown Village. (45.17N/74.02W, 45.155N/74.08W) It is now split between St-Louis-de-Gonzague on the east side of Rte 201 and St-Stanislas-de-Koska on the west side.
Fourth Concession (St-Louis-de-Gonzague)
See: Rang 40 (St-Louis-de-Gonzague).
Fourth Concession Bridge (Elgin)
The present bridge across the Trout River at the east end of the Fourth Concession (Elgin). (45.069N/74.190W) It was a railway bridge on the abandoned NY Central Railway line that was converted in the 1980s to highway use to replace the older Murray's Bridge located nearby that was damaged by a heavy truck.
Fourth Concession Bridge, Old (Elgin)
See: Murray's Bridge (Elgin).
Fourth Range (Russelltown)
A range of lots on the south side and length of the Lemieux Rang (Rang-des-Lemieux). (45.065N/73.81W) The tip at the west end (south of Maritana) (45.037N/73.865W) was transferred to Franklin Township in 1857. The remainder of the range was transferred to Franklin Township in 1973.
Franklin Centre
A town in the center of Franklin Township (Huntingdon County) at the junction of modern Rtes 209 and 202. (45.030N/73.923W) It was previously called Russelltown Settlement.
Franklin Centre Post Office
The Franklin Centre Post Office operated from 1868 until preset time.
Franklin Cemetery
A protestant cemetery on the east side of Franklin Centre. It is located on Rte 202 at the junction with Montée Covey Hill, 0.2mi (0.3km) east of the Franklin Centre corner with Rte 209. (45.030N/73.919W)
Franklin County (NY)
A county in northern New York State County comprising the areas south of Hinchinbrook, Elgin and Dundee and the main towns of Chateaugay, Malone and Fort Covington. It was created in 1808 from part of the original Clinton County.
Franklin Township
A township created in 1857 from the westernmost part of Hemmingford Township, parts of Hinchinbrooke Township and parts of Jamestown and Russelltown regions of the Seigniory of Beauharnois. (center 45.04N/73.93W) It was named in honour of Sir John Franklin, famous arctic explorer, who had disappeared on his last trip in the mid 1850s. The concessions or ranges in Franklin Township are confusing. Franklin was formed from parts of Hemmingford Township (parts of First and Second Ranges), Hinchinbrooke (parts of First, Second and Third ranges), Russelltown (parts of all 5 ranges) and Jamestown (Seventh, Eighth and Ninth ranges) The ranges have not been renumbered in Franklin, hence the confusion. In 1973, additional areas were transferred from St-Chrysostome Parish in Châteauguay County to the First, Second, Third and Fourth Russelltown Ranges.
Fraser Creek
A brook that starts close to the US border, SW of Ste-Agnès (45.001N/74.421W) and runs NW past the old Aubrey's Corners to Fraser's Point on Lake St-Francis. (45.041N/74.477W) Originally called Aubrey Creek.
Fraser('s) Point
A point of land on the southwest shore of Lake St-Francis at the mouth of Fraser Creek, 2.3mi (6.6km) west of Dundee Center. (45.041N/74.477W) Named after James Fraser, an early settler in 1818. May have been originally named Gardiner's Point? or Brunsons Point?.
Fraser's Point (hamlet)
A small settlement in the cove, 0.4mi (0.6km) east of Fraser's Point. (45.046N/74.469W)
French Canals
A name given to the four small, now abandoned, canals along the north shore of the St-Lawrence River between Pointe-Cascades and Coteau-Landing in the mistaken belief that they were built during the French regime before 1759. In fact, they were built between 1779 and 1801.
French Island
The old name of an island in the north channel of the St-Lawrence River between Coteau-Landing and Grande-Île. (45.272N/74.188W) It is now named Île-Léonard and the west end of the Mgr-Langlois Bridge and Rte 201 passes over it now.
French Mills
The early name for Fort Covington (NY), located about 16mi (25km) east of the St-Lawrence River and 0.4mi (0.6km) south of the Canadian border. (44.988N/74.500W) It was named for the dozen or so French Canadians who worked in the first sawmill and lived nearby. It was renamed Fort Covington following the War of 1812 in honor of an American general who was killed there.
Frontier
A hamlet that was located in Hemmingford Township, on Covey Hill Road, near the corner of the Jackson Sideroad. (45.021N/73.685W) It was also called Sweet Settlement and possibly the Robson Settlement. Not to be confused with Frontier Lines, south of Franklin Centre.
Frontier (NY)
A hamlet on the US side of the border, where the Clinton Sideroad used to cross the border. It was located 1.5mi (2.4km) west of Franklin Centre Customs. (44.997N/73.969W) It was also called Clinton Frontier.
Frontier Lines
An early name for the Clinton Sideroad border crossing point, located 1.5mi (2.4km) west of the present Franklin Centre Customs Office. (45.000N/73.938W) There was a store and the Frontier US Post Office located on the US side of the border. The nearest Canadian Customs Office in the old days was in Franklin Centre and was called the Port of Russelltown. It was also called O'Neills Lines.
Frontier Post Office (Hemmingford)
The Frontier Post Office located in Hemmingford Township on Covey Hill Road, 0.25mi (0.4km) west of the corner with the Jackson Sideroad. (45.021N/73.693W) It operated from 1877 until 1913. Not to be confused with the Frontier US Post Office shown on the Belden 1881 map, on the US side of the border where the Clinton Sideroad used to cross, west of Franklin Centre.
Frontier Road
A local or common name for the Covey Hill Road.
Frontier Station (Hemmingford)
A telephone or electric network station related to the Champlain Telephone Co. or in the same region as their operations. Location unknown?
Frontier Street (Hemmingford Village)
The main street (Rte 219) running north/south through Hemmingford Village. (45.047N/73.588W) Previously named Main Street North and South as well as North Street and South Street (all relative to the Rte 219/202 corners).
Front Ridge (Huntingdon)
See: Ridge Road (Godmanchester).
Furlong('s) Point
A point on the Châteauguay River between Ormstown and Dewittville. It is located 1.4mi (2.3km) west of Ormstown. (45.122N/74.021W)

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