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Second Rhode Island Regiment (continued):
A Narrative of Military Operations
by Augustus Woodbury; Providence: Valpey, Angell & Co., 1875


p. 417: Private David A. NEWMAN was one of the original members of Company K, and enlisted from Newport.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was seized with typhoid fever in the spring of 1862, and died on the 14th of May at Washington.

p. 403: Sergeant Simeon A. NEWMAN was a resident of Bristol, and one of the original members of Company G.  He was a seaman by occupation, and was thirty-two years of age at the time of entering the service.  He was appointed first corporal, and, on the 12th of August, 1861, first sergeant. He fell sick during the folowing winter, and died in Columbian College Hospital, Washington, March 18th, 1862.  His body was brought to Rhode Island and interred at Bristol.

p. 417 - 418: Private John C. NICHOLSON enlisted from Newport, and was one of the original members of Company K.  He was a plumber by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was killed in the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.

p. 389 - 390: Sergeant James C. NICHOLS enlisted in Company B from Providence, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861, as fourth-sergeant.  He was a machinist by occupation, and twenty-three years old at the time of his enlistment.  He was promoted to first sergeant, December 30th, 1862, in recognition of his faithfulness of service.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.  He was a good soldier.

p. 400-401: Private William H. NICHOLS was one of the first members of Company E, from South Kingstown.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861. He was a weaver by occupation, and at the time of his death was twenty years of age.

p. 383 - 384: First Lieutenant George A. PEARCE, son of Daniel W. and Ruth S. Pearce, was born in North Kingstown, January 13th, 1839.  He was by occupation a carpenter.  He was one of the original members of Company F, having been mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He was promoted to corporal, December 22nd, 1862, reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was discharged on the 28th of April, 1864.  He was examined by the board constituted for the examination of officers, and was commissioned first lieutenant in the 11th United States Colored Heavy Artillery, better known as the Fourteenth Rhode Island, to date from the day of his discharge.  He was in all the engagements with the Second from Bull Run to the Wilderness.  He acted for a time as quartermaster in the 11th, but his assignment was to Company M.  He died in Central Falls, November 19th, 1870, of malarious fever contracted in Louisiana.  He was a man of fine character, whose chief  aim was to do his duty to God and his country.

p. 395: Sergeant Noah A. PECK enlisted from Barrington, and was mustered into Company D, June 6th, 1861.  He was a carpenter, thirty-two years old at the time of enlisting.  He was appointed lance-corporal, February 5th, 1862, lance-sergeant, November 13th, 1862, and sergeant, April 1st, 1863.  He was wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and succeeded in getting off the field.  But he sank beneath the effect of his injuries, and died, June 9th, 1863.  He was a good soldier, and won his successive promotion by faithful service.

p. 416: Corporal Samuel T. PERRY was one of the original members of Company K, and enlisted from Perryville (South Kingstown).  He was a farmer by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  He was appointed corporal, October 5th, 1862, and reenlisted, December 26th, 1863.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.

p. 382: First Lieutenant William H. PERRY (Veterans), a resident of Pawtucket, enlisted as a private in Company I, and was mustered in, June 6th, 1861.  He was promoted to corporal, November 4th, 1861, and to sergeant, June 24th, 1863.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was appointed first sergeant in C.  He was promoted to second lieutenant of A, October 1st, 1864, and to first lieutenant of  F, January 31st, 1865.  He won his way along by his own merit and bravery, and proved himself as efficient in the line as he had been faithful in the ranks.  He fell fighting bravely by the side of Captain Gleason, at the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865.

p. 41: Corporal Joseph A. PHILLIPS was a resident of Georgiaville (Smithfield). He enlisted and was mustered into Company I, August 1st, 1861.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was thirty-four years old at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, November 1st, 1862.  He went safely through the campaigns of 1862 and 1863, but was killed in front of Spottsylvania Court House, May 18th, 1864.

p. 395: Private Charles POWERS enlisted from Providence and was mustered into Company C, December 24th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was nineteen years old at the time of enlistment.  He was killed by a shell at the battle of Gettysburg, July 3rd, 1863.

p. 413: Private David PRUE was a native of Canada, but resided in Woonsocket at the time of the organization of the Regiment.  He was twenty-three years of age, and was an operative by occupation.  He was mustered into Company I, June 6th, 1861, reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was transferred to Company C of the Battalion.  He was mustered out, July 13th, 1865.  He was in all the engagements of the Regiment from the beginning to the end of its service, and passed through all untouched.  'His comrades,' says the notice of his death, 'bear testimony to his faithfulness to duty and to his patriotic courage, and his record was without blemish.'  He died of consumption at Woonsocket, March 11th, 1874, and was buried with military honors by the Woonsocket Guards.

p. 421: (Veteran) Corporal William RAILTON was from Boston, Massachusetts, and was mustered into Company E, September 15th, 1864.  He was a printer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  The date of his appointment as corporal is not on record.  He was severely wounded in the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865, and at the time the Regiment mustered out he was absent, sick in hospital.  He subsequently died.  An account of his exploit in the assault on Petersburg has already been given.  He was a jovial comrade and a brave soldier.

p. 418: Private Isaac C. RANDALL enlisted from Olneyville (Johnston), and was mustered into Company K, December 16th, 1861.  He was a teamster by occupation, and was thirty-three years of age.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was transferred to Company A of the Battalion, and went safely through the campaigns of 1864.  He died at his home in Johnston, while on furlow, March 18th, 1865.

p. 418: Private William H. RANDALL enlisted from Olneyville (Johnston), and was mustered into Company K, November 27th, 1861.  He was a miller by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He was killed, June 25th, 1862, at the battle of Seven Pines.

p. 401: Private William H. RECORDS was mustered into Company E, September 23rd, 1862.  Life in the army soon impaired his health, and he died, March 28th, 1863.  He was a seaman by occupation, and at the time of his death was twenty-eight years of age.

p. 396 - 397: Private William E. REYNOLDS, son of Hazard D. and Sarah E. Reynolds, was born in Providence, February 22nd, 1838.  By occupation he was a jeweller. He was one of the original members of Company D.  He went bravely through the battle of Bull Run and the service of the following autumn and winter. Typhoid fever seized upon him soon after he arrived on the Peninsula, and he died in hospital at Warwick Court House, May 11th, 1862.  He was interred in the Revolutionary burying ground near Yorktown.  Captain Brown writes of him, that his conduct, singularly free from the vices of the camp, 'had endeared him to his company comander and knit him in affection to his comrades.  To do his whole duty in the service, with that moral integrity which nobly characterized him, was his preeminent aim.'

p. 386: Corporal Joel RICE was one of the original members of Company A, and was a resident of Warwick at the time of his enlistment as private.  He was an operative by occupation, a man of cheerful disposition and gallant bearing. He was promoted to corporal, January 17th, 1862, and was a good and faithful soldier.  He was mortally wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, fell into the hands of the enemy, and died soon afterwards.

p. 406: Private John RICE was mustered into Company G, December 26th, 1862.  He was thirty-three years of age, and was an operative by occupation.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.

p. 418: Private John RILEY was one of the original members of Company K.  He enlisted from Valley Falls, was a laborer by occupation, and was thirty years of age.  He was badly wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, was captured and carried to Richmond, and was not heard from afterwards.  He is supposed to have died in the hands of the enemy.

p. 401: Private Isaac C. RODMAN was one of the original members of Company E, from South Kingstown, was a hatter by occupation, and was eighteen years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, and died in the hands of the enemy.

p. 373 - 374: Brigadier-General Isaac Peace RODMAN was born in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, August 18th, 1822.  He was married, June 15th, 1847, to Miss Sally, daughter of Hon. Lemuel H. Arnold.  He was a member of the state senate at the opening of the rebellion, and immediately became deeply interested in the movement for its suppression.  He raised one of the first companies for the Second Regiment, was made its captain, and, in command of Company E, won a high distinction in the battle of Bull Run for his steadiness and bravery. The details of his military career have already been put on record. Mortally wounded at the battle of Antietam, September 17th, 1862, he lingered until the 30th, when he quietly breathed his last, attended through his sufferings by his wife, his aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Benjamin Aborn, and his brother-in-law, Dr. William H. Hazard.  He died in 'calm, conscious, peaceful resignation'.  He was a true Christian gentleman, making the New Testiment his daily companion  His friends found his Bible, stained and clotted with his blood, when they took him to the hospital.  For modest worth, for sustained earnestness of purpose, for conscientious and faithful devotion to duty, General Rodman was not surpassed in the army.  In the spirit of humble fidelity he gained a glorious fame.  'Respected and esteemed in the various relations of life', says General Burnside, in the order announcing his death, 'the army mourns his loss as a pure-hearted patriot and a brave, devoted soldier, and his division will miss a gallant leader, who was always foremost at the post of danger.  He has left a bright record of earnest patriotism, undimmed by one thought of self'.

p. 403:  Corporal Francis T. ROMAIN enlisted from Pawtucket, and was mustered into Company F, June 6th, 1861, and appointed corporal.  He was by occupation a machinist, and was twenty-five years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was mortally wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, and died before the day was past.  He was a promising soldier, and fell with his captain bravely fighting.

p. 419 - 420: (Veteran) Sergeant James SEAMANS was a native of Scituate, where he lived until he was twenty years of age.  He then went to Providence and followed the occupation of a painter.  Interested in military affairs, he became a member of the Mechanic Rifles.  At the breaking out of the rebellion, being then thirty-nine years of age, he enlisted in the First Rhode Island, and was mustered as corporal of Company G, at Washington, May 2nd, 1861.  He was taken prisoner at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, was carried to Richmond, thence to New Orleans, and thence to Salisbury, North Carolina. Exchanged in May, 1862, he returned to Providence and engaged once more in his former occupation.  He enlisted again, and was mustered as sergeant of Company E of the Veterans, September 15th, 1864.  Joining the Regiment in the Shenandoah Valley, he went through the winter campaign in front of St. Petersburg, and was killed in the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865. He was buried near the place where he fell.

p. 418: Private Robert SHANE enlisted from Newport, and was mustered into Company K, June 5th, 1861.  He was a moulder by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862.

p. 376 -377: Captain John  P. SHAW, son of General James Shaw, was born in Providence, January 3rd, 1834.  He was instructed in the common schools of Providence, and became by occupation a jeweller.  He was married, September 13th, 1854, to Amanda O., daughter of William P. Brightman.  At the outset of the rebellion he joined the First Rhode Island, as sergeant-major, and, on the formation of the Second, was appointed second lieutenant of Company F.  He was successively promoted to first lieutenant, July 22nd, 1861, and captain, July 24h, 1862, of Company K.  He was particularly efficient as a drill and recruiting officer, and, while as lieutenant, during the absence of his captain, he received, in special orders, the congratulations and commendation of Colonel Wheaton, for the 'entire success with which he had performed the duties of a higher grade'.  In battle he was known as a brave and gallant officer, and was selected more than once to perform services of a peculiarly difficult kind.  He fell in the bloody battle before Spottsylvania Court House, May 12th, 1864.  The generous words of Colonel Edwards, in his farewell order to the Second, on the departure of the Regiment from Cold Harbor, have already been given.  In a private letter to General Shaw the colonel rendered an additional testimony of his regard: 'Captain Shaw died fighting so bravely, was so conspicuous among the bravest, that I could not help noticing him particularly.  I and all that knew him are fellow mourners.

p. 397: Private Leander R. SHAW was one of the original members of Company D, and enlisted from Providence.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.  At the time of his death he was thirty-two years of age.

p. 421 - 422: (Veteran) Corporal Stephen SHAW enlisted from Providence, and was mustered as corporal into Company F, December 10th, 1864.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  Life in the trenches was too severe for his physical strength.  He was seized with typhoid fever, and died in Baltimore, May 22nd, 1865.

p. 418: Private Walter M. SHELDON was also one of the original members of Company K.  He enlisted from Providence, and was eighteen years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run.

p. 407 - 408: Corporal Benjamin W. SHERMAN was one of the original members of Company H, and enlisted from Coventry.  He was a mechanic by occupation, and was twenty-three years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, August 1st, 1861.  He was wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.  Recovering from his injuries, he returned to the Regiment, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.

p. 375 - 376: Captain Edwin K. SHERMAN leaves an honorable record of his service with the Regiment.  He was appointed second lieutenant of Company C at its organization, and on the 22nd of July, 1861, he was promoted to first lieutenant of E.  His skill and gallantry were conspicuous at Bull Run, and faithfulness was marked in every duty to which he was assigned.  He was promoted to captain of Company K., November 28th, 1861.  The exposures of military service and the hardships of the Penisular campaign proved too much for his physical health.  He fell sick in the early summer of 1862, and died in Bellevue hospital, New York city, July 15th of that year.  He was a good soldier and a brave man, and it is to be regretted, that no particulars of his life are accessible beyond the public record of his military career.

p. 406: Private Edward A. SIMMONS enlisted and was mustered into Company G, August 10th, 1862.  He was by occupation an operative, and was twenty-four years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was wounded and reported missing at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.  As he did not appear afterwards, it is supposed, that he died while a prisoner.

p. 401: Private John H. SLOCUM, son of John and Sarah M. Slocum, was born in Richmond, Rhode Island, March 17th, 1846.  He enlisted and was mustered into Company E, June 6th, 1861, and reenlisted, December 26th, 1863.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864, but a little more than eighteen years of age.  He was a good soldier in every respect.

p. 371 - 372: Colonel John S. SLOCUM was born in the town of Richmond, Rhode Island, November 1st, 1824.  He was instructed in the public schools of Bristol, where he spent most of his early life, in the classical schools of Fruit Hill and Marlborough, Massachusetts, and at the commercial academy in Hartford, Connecticut.  His predilections for a military life were strong in youth, and before he was eighteen years of age he became a member of the National Cadets in Providence.  He afterwards commanded the Mechanic Rifles. At the opening of the Mexican war he offered his services to the government, and received a commission of first lieutenant  in the famous 9th regiment, February 18th, 1847.  He distinguished himself at the battle of Contreras, August 19th, 1847, winning a brevet of captain, and again at Chepultepec, September 12th and 13th, where he won a full captaincy.  At the end of the war his regiment was disbanded, and he returned to civil life.  He was married in 1858 to Miss Abby J., a daughter of Hon. Charles T. James of Providence.  In 1860 he was a member and secretary of  the examing board at West Point.  At the breaking out of the rebellion he was commissioned major of the First Regiment, and greatly endeared himself to the officers and men. As has been related, he was appointed colonel of the Second, and in his brief command won the affection and admiration of the Regiment to a very high degree.  He was a  remarkably gallant, generous and fearless man, and no officer in the army gave greater promise of a brilliant future.  The manner of his fall and death at Bull Run has already been narrated, and the estimate of his character is sufficiently clear to the reader of the foregoing pages.  He died too early for his country, but none too early for his own renown.  'We expect a great deal of Rhode Island troops to-day', said Colonel Hunter, as the Second went into the battle.  'You shall not be disappointed, sir', replied Colonel Slocum in his inimitable way.  Then turning to the Regiment he said: 'Now show them what Rhode Island can do!' and thus he led his men into their first fight.  The spirit of that injunction has made the history of the Regiment.

p. 418 - 419: Private Anson J. SMITH enlisted from Newport, and was mustered into Company K, August 1st, 1861.  He was a painter by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863.  He was killed in front of Cold Harbor, June 3rd, 1864.

p. 399: Corporal Esek B. SMITH enlisted from South Kingstown, was mustered into Company E, June 6th, 1861, and was appointed corporal.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty years old at the time of his enlistment.  Wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, he was carried to Richmond, and there he died.

p. 397: Private George H. SMITH enlisted in Company D from Providence, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He was a jeweller, twenty-two years of age.  He went unhurt through the campaigns of 1861, 1862 and 1863, but was wounded at the opening of the campaign of 1864, and died, June 10th, from the effects of the injuries he had received.

p. 375: Captain Samuel James SMITH was born in Seekonk, Massachusetts, February 14, 1836.  His father. Samuel Smith, was a lieutenant and captain in the war of 1812.  He was instructed in Thetford Academy, Vermont, where he spent a year.  He afterwards learned the business of an apothecary, in which he was engaged at Woonsocket when the war began.  He was a member of the National Cadets, Providence, and of the Guards, Woonsocket, in the latter company holding a commission of first lieutenant.  In December, 1856, he was married to Miss Harriet B. Mason of Providence.  He actively engaged in the service of enlisting men when the call for the Second was made, and as captain of Company I he joined the Regiment.  He fell on the retreat from Bull Run, and the place of his burial is unknown.  'In all the relations of life', says the writer of the sketch of his life in 'Rhode Island Officers', 'Captain Smith bore a character which was unimpeachable.  As an officer he was gentlemanly in his deportment, of unswerving impartiality, and earnestly desirous of promoting the physical and moral welfare of the men under his command, and by them his loss was deeply lamented.  In his first and only conflict he bore himself with unfaltering courage, and sealed his bows of patriotism with his blood.'

p. 379 - 380: Adjutant Thorndike Jameson SMITH (Veteran) was born in Providence, June 15th, 1843, and was instructed in  the public schools of the city and at the Fruit Hill Classical Institute.  He enlisted as a private in Company D, and was mustered in among the original members of the Regiment.  His good conduct in battle and his strict attention to his duties in camp attracted the attention of his officers, and he was accordingly advanced to lance-corporal, February 5th, 1862, to sergeant, August 12th, 1862, to sergeant-major, February 22nd, 1863, to second lieutenant of Company F, September 7th, 1863.  His promotion gave great satisfaction both to officers and men, for his acknowledged bravery had secured their respect, and his genuine kindness of heart and helpfulness had won their admiration. Remaining with the Veterans, he was immediately appointed adjutant of the Battalion, and was promoted to first lieutenant, July 16th, 1864.  On the 18th of June he was severely wounded, in the attack on Petersburg.  Contrary to expectation, he rallied from the wound and was sent north, where he recovered sufficiently to be appointed post adjutant at Elmira, New York. He remained at this point for several months, meanwhile receiving his promotion, as above.  Here also he was brevetted captain, to date from August 1st, 1864.  He returned to the Regiment, April 15th, 1865, and continued with it until it was mustered out of service.  After the war he engaged in business in Providence for a time, and then removed to Webster, Massachusetts, where he died, June 18th, 1869, from the effects of the wound  received five years before.  Brave, cool and steady in action, generous, high-minded, and honorable in all his personal intercourse, he was highly respected by all his comrades and warmly loved by those who knew him well.

p. 389: Private John SPENCER, son of John A. and Jemima Spencer, was born in Brooklyn, Connecticut.  He was by occupation an operative, was nineteen years of age, enlisted in Company A from Warwick, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  He died in hospital in New York city, June 28th, 1862.  He was an excellent soldier, of fearless, impetuous character, and, had he lived, would doubtless have won distinction and promotion.

p. 424: (Veteran) Private Richard A. SPENCER was mustered into Company H on the 19th and died on the 26th of February, 1865, never having joined the Regiment.  he was a farmer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.

p. 398 - 399: Sergeant James STANLEY, the son of Dennis and Abigail E. Stanley, was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, November 10th, 1832.  The family removed to Providence while he was yet a child.  He was instructed in the public schools of Providence, and afterwards learned the trade of an iron moulder. Upon the resignation of his brother Edward, Captain Stanley of Company E, he felt that duty to his country demanded his services.  He left his family, a wife and two children, enlisted and was mustered into Company E, September 15th, 1862.  He immediately attracted the confidence of his officers and secured the attachment of his comrades.  He was appointed sergeant, November 13th, 1862.  At the battle of Salem Heights he was badly wounded in the hand, but refused to leave the field till the end of the fight.  He was taken to Washington, but, notwithstanding all care and attention, tetanus set in, and he died on the 22nd of May, 1863.  He was greatly beloved by his comrades, for his genial, cheerful, joyous disposition, and admired for his coolness and bravery.  He was a gallant and faithful soldier, and would doubtless have won further promotion had his life been spared.

p. 397: Private Albert STETSON enlisted from Providence in Company D, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.   He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.  At the time of his death he was twenty-six years of age.

p. 414: Private Albert H. STONE enlisted from Scituate, and was mustered into Company I, November 19th, 1861.  He was by occupation a laborer, and was seventeen years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was stricken down by typhoid fever on the Peninsula, and died at Portsmouth Grove Hospital, July 15th, 1862.  His body was taken home for burial.

p. 395 - 396: Corporal Frederic W. SWAIN was one of the original members of Company D, and was appointed corporal upon his muster in.  He was a nailer by trade, and was thirty-one years old at the time.  He enlisted from Providence, and passed creditably through the early campaigns of the Regiment.  He was wounded in the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862, and again in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.  The latter injury was very severe, and he died on the 15th from its effects.  Although he remained through the term of his service in the position which he at first occupied, and made no advancement in rank, he was yet a steady, faithful and trustworthy soldier.

p. 409: Private Samuel P. SWEET, Jr., enlisted from Coventry, and was mustered into Company H, June 19th, 1861.  He was a mechanic by occupation, and was twenty years of age at the time of enlistment.  He died at Camp Sprague hospital, September 16th, 1861.

p. 393: Sergeant Henry L. TAFT enlisted from Smithfield in Company C, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  He was a machinist by occupation, and at this time was but eighteen years of age.  He was appointed corporal, August 1st, 1861, and promoted to sergeant, December 22nd, 1862.  He was severely wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, and died on the 11th of May, 1863.  He was a good comrade and a brave soldier.

p. 391: Corporal Job TANNER enlisted and was mustered, August 1st, 1861, and assigned to Company B.  He was a carpenter by occupation, and was twenty-seven years of age at the time.  He passed creditably through the early campaigns of the war, but was  severely wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.  He was transferred as corporal to Company B of the new organization.  At the time, he was absent, sick in  hospital, where he died, July 16th, 1864.

p. 424: (Veteran) Private Benjamin TARBOX enlisted from East Greenwich, and was mustered into Company G, February 6th, 1865.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  He died in hospital, March 3rd, 1865.

p. 415 - 416: Sergeant James TAYLOR was one of the original members of Company K, and enlisted from Newport.  He was by occupation an enameller, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was appointed corporal, November 30th, 1861, and was promoted to sergeant, July 1st, 1863.  He was a good soldier, as shown by his promotions.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.

p. 395: Private John H. TAYLOR enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company C, June 5th, 1861.  He was one of the first victims of the Peninsular campaign, dying of fever, near Warwick Court House, April 16th, 1862.  He is spoken of by Chaplain Jameson as 'a quiet, exemplary man'.  He was a blacksmith by trade, and was, at the time of his death, twenty years of age.

p. 389: Private Alonzo TOURJEE enlisted in Company A from Warwick, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He was by occupation an operative.  He died of erysipelas, near Spottsylvania, May 8th, 1864, at the age of twenty-nine years.

p. 374 - 375: Captain Levi TOWER, son of John C. and Sarah G. Tower, was born in Blackstone (Mendon), Massachusetts, August 18th, 1835.  He went through the classical course of the University Grammar School in Providence, preparatory to entering Brown University.  His college studies were interrupted by ill health, and he left the university to engage in business in Pawtucket, the residence of his father.  Interested in military matters, he became a captain in the Pawtucket Light Guard, and when the rebellion broke out he entered the First Rhode Island as an ensign, to be transferred in due time to the Second, as captain of Company F.  He fell at the very beginning of the battle of Bull Run, while cheering on his men to fight.  He is spoken of as a young man of excellent promise, religious in his tendencies and disposition, and a constant attendant, when at home, of St. Paul's church, Pawtucket.  With a brave and fearless spirit he joined a warm and affectionate heart, and had the rare faculty of attaching closely to himself all who came within the circle of his aquaintanceship.  'The best part of his story', writes one of his friends, 'is his great kindness of heart, and it is this that makes his loss to his family so irreparable.  He was very susceptible to all moral and religious teachings, and was very faithful in all the trusts confided in him.  He never wrote home without requesting our prayers for him.'  His fine qualities, as a man and soldier, endeared him to his comrades of the First and Second Regiments, and they, in common with a bereaved community, sincerely mourned his death.

p. 404: Corporal Robert TOYE enlisted from Bristol, and was mustered into Company G, June 5th, 1861.  He was a mechanic by occupation, and  was twenty-two years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was promoted to corporal, April 21st, 1863.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.

p. 424: (Veteran) Private Charles W. TUCKER was a resident of Oxford, Connecticut, and was mustered into Company G, January 7th, 1865.  He was a shopkeeper by occupation, and was forty-three years of age.  He died, February 1st, 1865, never having joined the Regiment.

p. 419: Private Giuseppe VATELACAICI was a native of Italy.  He was drafted and mustered into Company K, July 8th, 1863.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was thirty years of age.  Transferred to Company A of the Battalion, he went through the Shenandoah campaign, but the hardships of the service were too severe for him, and he sickened and died at Parke Station, December 27th, 1864.

p. 420: (Veteran) Corporal Edward D. VALLETT enlisted from Johnston, and was mustered as corporal of Company D, October 31st, 1864.  He was an operative by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  The winter campaign proved too severe for his strength.  He died, January 12th, 1865, and was buried in Poplar Grove Cemetery.

p. 398: Sergeant Paul VISSER enlisted and was mustered into Company E, July 29th, 1861.  He was by occupation a cigar-maker.  He was appointed corporal, August 1st, 1861, and promoted to sergeant, May 31st, 1863.  He was killed in the fight with the enemy after the battle of the Wilderness, May 8th, 1864.  At the time of his death he was of the age of twenty-six years.

p. 414: Private C. F. VOSE was drafted in the conscription of 1863, and was assigned to Company I.  He died at Brandy Station, December 12th, 1863. There is no record of his age.

p. 384 - 385: Second Lieutenant James A. WADE, the son of Laban C. Wade, was born in Johnston, March 16th, 1841, and was instructed in the common schools of his native town.  He enlisted and was mustered into Company D of the Second, October 8th, 1861.  He passed unhurt through the campaigns of the Regiment, and reenlisted, December 26th, 1863.  He was transferred to Company B of the Battalion, and went through the severe service in the Shenandoah Valley and in front of Petersburg, until the last battle of the war at Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865, where he received a mortal wound, and died two days afterwards.  He was appointed and commissioned second lieutenant in the Third Rhode Island Cavalry, but through some informality he was never discharged from the Second for promotion.  He was a brave soldier, and died in the cheerful performance of patriotic duty.

p. 401: Private Wallace F. WARREN enlisted from Bristol, and was mustered into Company E, March 7th, 1864.  His military life was of short duration.  He was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty years old at the time of his death.

p. 395: Sergeant William C. WEBB enlisted from Barrington and was one of the original members of Company D.  He was a carpenter, and twenty years of age. He was appointed corporal, August 20th, 1861, and sergeant, November 13th, 1862.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, but did not live to enter the new organization.  He was killed at the first fighting in front of Spottsylvania Court House, May 8th, 1864.  His bravery and fidelity are amply attested by his promotions and his reenlistment.

p. 398: Private Ethan WHIPPLE, Jr., the son of Ethan and Sarah Whipple, was born in Providence, March 28th, 1832.  He was a printer by occupation.  He enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company D, September 1st, 1862.  He was wounded in the shoulder at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864. On his recovery he rejoined the Regiment and was transferred to Company B of the Veterans.  He was wounded a second time in front of Petersburg, March 27th, 1865.  He was struck in the leg, suffered amputation, and was carried to Washington.  On the voyage, mortification and gangrene were developed, and the leg was amputated twice in the hospital after his arrival, but without avail.  He rapidly sank under the treatment, and died, April 5th. His body was brought home and interred in Providence.

p. 409: Sergeant Samuel WIGHT enlisted from North Scituate, and was mustered into Company I, June 6th, 1861.  He was by occupation a farmer, and was twenty-one years old at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, August 1st, 1861, and promoted to sergeant, July 25th, 1862.  He was wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, and died of his injuries, May 15th, 1863.

p. 397 - 398: Private Caleb WILCOX enlisted from Providence, was assigned to Company D, and was mustered, September 1st, 1862.  He was a seaman by occupation, and was thirty-two years of age.  He was transferred to Company B of the Battalion at the time of the departure of the Regiment from Cold Harbor.  He was wounded at the battle of Opequan, September 19th, 1864.  He was afterwards prostrated by disease, and died in hospital, June 8th, 1865.

p. 414: Private George W. WILCOX was a resident of Mendon, Massachusetts, and was one of the original members of Company I.  He was by occupation a bootmaker, and was twenty-four years of age.  He was killed by the accidental explosion of a shell, March 12th, 1862, while the Regiment was over in Virginia, soon after the evacuation of Manassas.  The chaplain spoke of him as 'a most exemplary and good man, respected by his officers and beloved by his comrades.  His funeral took place on the 13th with appropriate ceremonics and military honors.'

p. 409: Private John A. WILSON enlisted from Cranston, and was mustered into Company H, September 8th, 1862.  He was a laborer by occupation, and at the time of enlistment was nineteen years of age.  He was killed on the skirmish line in front of Cold Harbor, June 2nd, 1864.

p. 387: Corporal Lewis B. WILSON of Company A enlisted as a private from Warwick, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He was born in Waltham, Massachusetts, May 9th, 1837, and was the son of Asa and Amanda Wilson.  He was an operative by occupation.  He was promoted to corporal, July 8th, 1862, and was always prompt and  efficient.  He was killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864, having gone unwounded through every previous battle in which the Regiment had been engaged.  He was shot in the neck and died instantly.  He had been looking forward to his discharge and his return home, with pleasant anticipation.

p. 414: Private Pitts S. WINSOR enlisted from Scituate, and was mustered into Company I,  January 29th, 1862.  He was by occupation a stone-cutter, and was twenty-four years of age.  He was badly wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and died on the 20th of the same month.

p. 378 - 379: Lieutenant -Colonel Henry H. YOUNG (Veteran) entered the service as one of the original officers of the Second.  He was appointed second lieutenant and assigned to Company B.  His promotion to first lieutenant and captain of the same company soon followed -- the former on the 22nd day of July, the latter on the 12th day of November, 1861.  Deciding to remain in the service after the Regiment returned home, he was the ranking officer in the Battalion of Veterans.  He had been assigned for special duty on several occasions, and both in camp and in field he proved himself an excellent officer -- at all times brave, steady and skillful.  But the service in which he won the greatest distinction was that of scouting, and he successively gained promotion to major and lieutenant-colonel.  He was known throughout the Shenandoah Valley for his remarkable adroitness, fertility of resource, and success.  Friends and enemies testified alike to their admiration of his courage and sagacity.  General Sheridan took a hearty interest in his career, and a warm friendship sprung up between them.  After the close of the war Sheridan was ordered to the Southwest, in command of the military division of the Gulf, to watch the operations and movements of the French troops on the Mexican frontier.  Lieutenant-Colonel Young was appointed aide-de-camp and chief of scouts.  He was as active and successful for a time in this new field of enterprise as he had been in Virginia.  But after a brief term of service he entered into the employment of the Mexican (Patriot) government, and was engaged for a time in raising recruits for service against the troops of Maximillian.  In one of his expeditions in Mexico, in the winter of 1866-67, he and his party were attacked, and while crossing the Rio Grande the daring leader lost his life.  He is supposed to have been shot while in the river, and his body was never recovered.  In every military capacity he was always found faithful.  But, in the peculiar line of service in which he was engaged during the last year of the war, he had no superior in our Eastern armies.  General Sheridan's staff officer, whose description of Young's scouts has been quoted, calls their leader 'an excellent officer, fond of adventure, brave, and a good disciplinarian'.  It would have been a great satisfaction to be able to throw some light upon the mystery which surrounds his fate.



The Veterans - end notes
"The following are reported as missing, and as they have not been heard from they are supposed to have died:

Private John J. BRENNAN of C, missing at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, one of the original members of the company, enlisting from Providence, a machinist by occupation, and nineteen years of age; private John E. DEANE of D, missing at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864, one of the original members of the company, enlisting from Providence, a sailor by occupation, and twenty-eight years of age; privvate James G. JOHNSON of H, whose name was dropped from the rolls August, 1862, -- missing in the Peninsular campaign-- one of the original members of the Company, enlisting from Coventry, a laborer by occupation, and twenty-four years of age.  H. C. TIBBITTS, a conscript in Company D, is reported to have died, June 5th, 1864.  The fate of D. W. THURBER, a conscript in Company G, is unknown.

NOTE: An interesting incident occurred immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, which seems deserving of record.  The Regiment was lying in the road, supporting the sharp-shooters, as mentioned in the text of the narrative.  The enemy's dead where scattered over the field.  One of the men of Company C, learning, in some way, that Captain Foy was a member of the Masonic order, brought to him a diploma, bearing the name of Joseph WASDEN, and issued by Franklin Lodge, Warrenton, Warren county, Georgia.  It had been taken from the body of a colonel of a Georgia regiment, which was lying in the road, at a short distance from the position of the Regiment. Considering it his duty, as a Masonic brother, to see that the last rites were properly and decently performed, Captain Foy took with him Captain Stalker and a detail of two or three men, proceeded to the place, carefully wrapped the body in a blanket, dug a grave in a field near by, under the sharp fire of the enemy's riflemen, and tenderly and reverently deposited the corpse of the fallen brother therein.  A green leaf of corn supplied the place of the customary acacia, and the soul of the departed was commended to God.  It was a graceful and fraternal act, and was well and considerately performed.


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