Rhode Island Reading Room
These documents are made available free to the public by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project

Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892

p. 70.

M. STEINERT & SONS COMPANY, New England Agents for the sale of Steinway & Sons, Weber, Gabler & Bro., Harman, Henning and Weser Bros. Pianos, Foreign and American Sheet Music, Nos. 176 and 178 Westminster Street. -- If New England is to be known as the literary center of our glorious land, is should not be at the expense of her musical reputation; for if the American is cultured he is is artistic, and what art is more pleasing or more grand than piano music.  It therefore follows that he is also musical, and it is a fact that there are more pianos sold in the New England States (in proportion to population) than in any other section of the country.  In this connection a few lines about the oldest and most prominent firm of piano dealers (Messrs. M. Steinert & Sons Company) in New England will not be amiss.  This house was established in New Haven, Conn., in 1857, by the senior member of the present firm, Mr. M. Steinert, and has since steadily grown until it stands without a rival in the trade, admittedly the first. The main seat of the business is now at Boston, where the establishment, at the corner of Boylston and Tremont Streets, is a substantial and pretentious building with a frontage on both streets and a most beautiful and artistic exterior.  The Providence branch is a comparatively recent venture, having been established in 1878, over twenty years after the original opening at New Haven.  Branches are also operated in Bridgeport, where the firm began in 1872; at Springfield, Mass., in 1868; at Boston, 1881, and in Portland, Maine, the latter being the last agency opened, the date of its opening being 1887.  The firm are the largest handlers of pianos in the world and have the sole and exclusive New  England agency for the world-famed Steinway pianos - controling also the Weber, Gabler & Bro., the Hardman, Henning and Weser Bros. pianos; they also deal largely in foreign and American sheet music.  Mr. Edward Steinert, who originally opened the Providence house for the firm, is still in charge, and no fact could demonstrate more fully the thorough success with which he has conducted it than the mere statement that he carries two hundred pianos in stock at all times.  He is yet a young man, having made his initial business effort in Providence fourteen years ago; he is a native of Connecticut.  The various branches are presided over by different sons of the founder, Mr. Albert Steinert being in control at Springfield, Alexander and Wm. at Boston, Henry L. and M. at New Haven, and Fred Steinert at Portland.


p. 70.

CHARLES S. DURFEE, Fire and Marine Insurance Agency, No. 3 Weybosset Street. -  The remarkable development of the insurance interests in our great cities during the last quarter of a century probably has no parallel in the growth of any branch of industry, commerce or trade.  The risks involved in fire, marine and other insurance here in Providence at the present day, represent millions of dollars, while the volume of business transacted grows rapidly and a number of our most solid and sagacious citizens are actively engaged and interested in this line of activity.  One of the oldest, most prominent and responsible houses, is that which has been so long and successfully conducted by Mr. Charles S. Durfee, whose office is centrally located at No. 3 Weybosset Street, and has always maintained the highest of reputations for honorable business methods.  Mr. Durfee is a Providence man by birth and education, and after acquiring a thorough knowledge of this line of industry, he established himself in the business at No. 27 Custom House Street, in 1871, and at once developed a very large and influential patronage, which grew to such proportions, that in order to meet its demands with better facilities he moved to his present address in 1876.  His offices are amply spacious, commodious and handsomely appointed, having every convenience for the transaction of business and comfort of patrons.  He invites consultation upon all matters pertaining to insurance, and is at all times prepared to place risks, for any amount, at minimum rates of premium, in any of the companies he represents and whose policies are incontestable, among which are the following, viz:  the Royal of Liverpool, England; the Pennsylvania, the Mechanics', and the Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania, of Philadelphia; the Germania of New York; the London and Lancashire of Liverpool, England; the Northern of London, England; the Merchants, of Newark, N. J.; the Union of Philadelphia, Pa.; and the Mercantile Fire Insurance Company of Boston, Mass.; while for plate glass, steam boiler, fidelity bonds, and accidents, he represents the Fidelity and Casualty of New York; and for marine risks, the Insurance Company of North America of Philadelphia; and the Providence Washington Insurance Company of this city, and all risks placed through this agency are guaranteed a prompt and liberal adjustment of losses should any occur.  Mr. Durfee is a middle-aged gentleman of superior business ability, an enterprising, honorable and public-spirited citizen, and has served the city's educational interests as a member of its School Committee.


p. 71:

RHODE ISLAND SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, No. 2 Exchange Street. -- Insuperable difficulties do not confound expert knaves who undertake to wreck stong safes in the houses, business offices and banks they elect to plunder.  If the police are not on the alert, their exploits are successful and not infrequently so.  It is to be said of safe deposit institutions, the approved treasuries of the day, that not the first attempt against their integrity has suggested itself for experiment in the quarter century of their existence.  Inspection of the vaults of the Rhode Island Safe Deposit Company, at No. 2 Exchange Street, will demonstrate how absolutely this citadel of safety holds one's effects beyond the reach of any class of meddlers.  The immovable compartment safe, of which, say, you have the only keys, has the environment of colossal steel vault work unparalleled, as well as bars and bolts, combination dial locks, secret safeguards, inviolable privacy, untiring vigilance by day and by night, the most expert management and police service constant and at command.  The $10 or $15 safe will hold a good fortune in stocks and bonds.  It will retain your family jewels, relics and souvenirs, your papers of value, your surplus earnings and your will; and to it you have the freest resort at all business hours.  The department for ladies is separate and exclusive, and in the essentials of comfort, convenience and service to patrons nothing is hear left to be desired.  This company was incorporated in 1869, under the laws of the State of Rhode Island, with a capital of $100,000, and is officered as follows: James S. Phetteplace, president, Samuel H. Field, secretary and treasurer; trustees, James S. Phetteplace, Joshua Wilbour, Henry C. Cranston, Josiah W. Crooker, Samuel P. Colt, Charles H. Atwood, Isaac M. Potter, Charles H. Sheldon, Jr., Wm. H. Ballou, Clifford P. Seagrave, James M. Kimball, Albert L. Calder, Hezekiah Conant, Nicholas Van Slyck.  President Phetteplace was one of the charter members of the corporation, and has filled that responsible position since 1877, with great credit and universal acceptance.  The secretary, Mr. Field, was elected to that office in July, 1891, and is a native of Providence and a young man of large business experience, wide acquaintance and high repute.  Messrs. John R. Oakes, vault keeper, who has been with the company from its commencement, G. P. Nichols, clerk, and C. C. Garceron, day watch, are all well-fitted for the faithful discharge of their respective duties.  With the extensive improvements now in contemplation, this company's facilities will be as complete and perfect as any in the country; while the ability of the management and the personnel of the trustees gives every guarantee of the intelligent conservation of all interests committed to its care.


p. 71.

HENRY T. ROOT & SONS, Stoves, Furnaces and Ranges, Kitchen Furnishings. Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper Work a Specialty, No. 248 High Street. -- A review of the representative merchants and manufacturers of Providence would hardly be complete without more than passing mention of the firm whose name heads this sketch.  It is the very oldest and foremost in the line above indicated in Rhode Island, and its business career, extending over a period of forty-four years, has been an unbroken record of progress.  Messrs. Root are wholesale and retail dealers in all leading makes of stoves, furnaces and ranges; also kitchen furnishings of every description, and do all classes of sheet-metal work.  The trade extends all over the State, and the patronage, which is very large, affords evidence of steady increase.  Mr. Root, Sr., was formerly a member of the firm of Eames & Root, which was established in 1850, the firm-name changing in 1870 to Root & Bennett, and one year later, he assumed sole control, conducting the business alone with uninterrupted success until November 1, 1891, when the firm-name changed to Henry T. Root & Sons.  The premises occupied by them at No. 248 High Street comprise a 52 x 130 foot store and basement, with well-equipped shop in connection, and twenty-five in help are employed.  An exceedingly large and uncommonly fine stock is constantly kept on hand here, and includes magnificent stoves in every design, shape, style and variety; first-class ranges and furnaces of all kinds, stove repairs, tin, sheet-iron, and copper-ware generally, refrigerators, housekeeping specialties and a multifarious assortment of kitchen furnishing goods.  Ranges, heaters and furnaces are repaired and re-set, likewise, in the most superior manner, at short notice, particular attention being given to hot-air, despatch, also all kinds of plumbing work, gas and water piping, this being a specialty. They carry the finest line of heating and plumbing apparatus to be found in the entire State.  Estimates are furnished, and perfect satisfaction is warranted to be absolutely as represented, while the prices charged are of the most reasonable character, being, in fact, distinctly low, everything considered.  Mr. Henry T. Root, who is a gentleman somewhat past the meridian of life, but active and energetic, is a New Yorker by birth.  He is one of the stanchest and most respected citizens of Providence, and takes a lively interest in all matters pertaining to the well-being of the community.  He has served with credit in the Board of Aldermen eleven terms, is a director of the Eagle National Bank, a director of the Mechanics Saving Bank, and of the Roger Williams Savings Fund and Loan Association, and president of the Presby Stove Lining Company.  The copartners, Mr. Hiram G. Root, and Ames B. Root, are sons of the senior member of the firm, and having been born and reared in this city, are well-known in the community, as enterprising, energetic young men, who have assumed the active duties devolving upon the business, with ability and success, and those having relations with this house will find all transactions conducted upon the most honorable and liberal basis.


p. 72.

A. H. KING & CO., Fruiterers and Importers, Nos. 11 to 15 Weybosset Street. -- One of the leading houses in Providence, extensively engaged as dealers in foreign and domestic fruits, confectionery, table delicacies, etc., is that of Messrs. A. H. King & Co., whose store is eligibly located at No. 11 to 15 Weybosset Street, in Providence, and at No. 180 Reade Street, New York City, and also one in Chicago.  This prosperous business was established in 1864, by Messrs. Clapp & King, and was successfully conducted by them until 1888, when Mr. Clapp retired, and Messrs. E. A. Perrin and J. M. Nickerson were admitted to partnership.  These gentlemen have been identified with the house for sixteen and eighteen years respectively, and are familiar with every detail of the trade and the requirements of patrons.  The firm had a place in the old West Washington Market, for over twenty-five years, in connection with their present stores.  This firm have especial facilities and influential connections in Florida for the handling of domestic fruits in large quantities as well as with foreign countries, their importations reaching a handsome figure each year.  The premises occupied by the firm in this city are commodious, measuring 40 x 55 feet in dimensions, and are handsomely furnished and fitted up with every convenience for the handling and preservation of the fine stock constantly carried.  A choice selection of oranges, bananas, lemons, grapes, apples, pears, peaches, apricots, pineapples, pomegranates, figs, dates, berries in season, and in fact, everything in the line of foreign and domestic fruits, will at all times be found here fresh from their groves, and from the hothouses.  A splendid assortment of confectionery and preserved fruits in jars and cans is also carried.  Baskets of fruit are put up in the most artists and attractive manner, at prices ranging from $1.00 to $25.00, and for which there is at all times a large demand, the assortment being at all times varied and perfect and especially acceptable to travelers and as gifts.  This house has been popular with the best classes of trade throughout the city and vicinity from the date of its establishment, owing to the superior grade of goods carried, and the efforts of the firm to please their patrons and give them the choicest and most luscious fruits to be procured from the gardens of the world, at the most reasonable prices, on which they have built up an extensive trade, as substantial as it is permanent, and every attention is paid those favoring the firm with their patronage.  Mr. King is a native of Massachusetts, but has resided in this city for the past thirty years, where he is well-known and highly esteemed as an honorable business man and influential private citizen.  Messrs. E. A. Perrin and J. M. Nickerson are popular young business men, well known in the community as enterprising, energetic young men, who combine with Mr. King to form a firm of energy and substantial worth.  Mr. Nickerson is a member of F. and A. M. and I. O. O. F., and Mr. Perrin is a member of F. and A. M.


p. 72.

COP DYEING COMPANY, Dyers and Bleachers of Fine Cotton Yarns in the Cop, No. 134 Mathewson Street. -- The Cop Dyeing Company was incorporated in 1888, under the laws of the State of Rhode Island, with a capital stock of $75,000, and is officered as follows, viz.:  President, H. F. Lippitt; treasurer, E. B. Chapman; superintendent, T. L. Snow.  The capacity of the works enables the company to turn out from three to four thousand pounds of yarn per day, and the exigencies of the business require the constant services of twenty-five skilled and expert hands.  The house has made rapid and substantial progress.  Manufacturers of woolen, worsted and cotton goods early recognized the beautiful, durable and brilliant work done here, and the patronage has now spread to all parts of the United States.  The company have steadily maintained their representative position as regards the superior character of their work, while in their methods, processes and results they have no rivals and acknowledge no peers.  The dye is given free circulation inside the cop by means of a perforated core, assuring perfect work in all cases.  Orders and commissions are given immediate and careful attention, and goods of this company's dyeing are the standard all over the country.  The president, Mr. Lippitt, is a well-known capitalist of this city and agent for the Manville and other mills in this section.  The treasurer, Mr. Chapman, is a native of Rhode Island, and eminently fitted for the management of the finances; while the superintendent, Mr. Snow, is a Massachusetts man by birth, and an expert dyer of large experience and established reputation.


p. 72.

SMITH & GREENE, Makers of Fine Rolled Plate Chains, No. 185 Eddy Street. -- Messrs. Smith & Greene, makers of fine rolled plate chains, have an active, most desirable trade with jobbers in all parts of the United States, and their goods bear a high standard reputation in the market.  The establishment was founded in 1879 by Messrs. Smith & Tonge, the firm later becoming Smith, Tonge & Co., and still later changing to H. G. Smith & Co. In 1883 the present firm was organized, the copartners being H. G. Smith and A. A. Greene.  The former is a native of Germany, but he has resided in the United States since an early age, having come here forty years ago.  He has lived in Providence the past twenty-eight years, twenty-six of which have found him engaged in the jewelry manufacturing industry.  Mr. Greene was born in Providence.  He also has had sound experience of the jewelry trade, and travels in the interest of the house.  The premises occupied are amply spacious, and are equipped with first-class steam-power machinery, while employment is found for some sixty skilled operatives.  Messrs. Smith & Greene manufacture a superior line of fine rolled plate chains, also charms, bars, lockets, and everything used on chains.  They are constantly introducing new designs and innumerable novel patterns are to be seen in their large stock.  Messrs. Smith & Greene are well known in mercantile circles as honorable, enterprising business men.


p. 73.

GLOBE NATIONAL BANK, No. 48 Weybosset Street.  -- This is one of the oldest-established as it is one of the most prosperous banks in the State. It was chartered in 1831, as the Globe Bank, and from its inception pursued a policy of the utmost value in the development of the commerce and industries of Providence.  It was reorganized under the National Banking Act in 1864, and has since had its charter renewed.  It has a paid up capital of $300,000, and is officered as follows, viz.:  President, B. A. Jackson, vice-president, Gardiner C. Sims; cashier, Geo. C. Noyes; directors, Chas S. Bush, Chas. H. Sheldon, Jr.; John R. Bartlett, Robert Brayton, Henry A. Monroe, Benj. Vaughan, William Gregory.  The bank is one of the most popular depositories in the city to-day.  Its resources are as great as its connections are widespread and influencial.  A general banking business is transacted, including the receiving of deposits, the discounting of commercial paper, the negotiation of loans on approved collateral, the dealing in foreign exchange and first-class securities of all kinds, and the collection of drafts on all available points through its chain of correspondents, which includes the Shawmut National Bank, of Boston; and the Gallatin National Bank, of New York.  This bank is a steady dividend payer, and its stock is held at a high premium as one of the choicest and most desireable of investments.  As a forcible indication of the ability of the present management, reference is made to the annual statement made September 25, 1891, which shows a surplus fund of $60,000, with undivided profits amounting to $173,261.73; individual deposits, $111,893.92; loans and discounts, $595,288.32.  These are figures which alone are sufficient to prove the bank's hold on the business world.  President Jackson is a member of the well-known banking firm of Wilbur, Jackson & Co., being elected to his present position in 1881, and is to be congratulated upon the marked success attending his administration.  The cashier, Mr. Noyes, is one of the most experienced and successful financiers in the city, having been connected with this bank since 1855, and is president of the Bankers' Association; while the board of directors are accounted among our most substantial citizens and successful business men.


p. 73.

PROVIDENCE SCALE COMPANY, J. T. Helah, Proprietor, Nos. 105 and 107 Washington Street. -- The Providence Scale Company, located at Nos. 105 and 107 Washington Street, is about the largest dealer in scales, etc., in Providence, and it is now the center of an extensive and heavy volume of trade reaching throughout the New England States.  The chief lines of goods handled are hay and coal scales, railroad, platform, counter, and abottoir scales, beams, spring balances, alarm money drawers, coffee, mills and butchers' tools; while a separate department is maintained for executing repairs of all kinds with accuracy and dispatch.  The enterprise was established by the present proprietor, Mr. J. T. Helah, four years ago, and now enjoys a high reputation for handling only the most reliable makes of scales, strictly accurate, of true adjustment, durable and of fine finish, the price charged being always fair and reasonable.  The store, 30 x 60 feet, is size, is well ordered and fitted, and contains a large and carefully chosen stock of the several kinds of goods dealt in, from the finest and most delicate letter scales, to those for weighing hay and coal, each line affording ample choice as to styles, sizes, etc.  The shop in the rear is fully equipped with tools and appliances for repairing in general, and for the manufacture of abattoir scales, three skilled assistants finding regular employment there.  The experienced proprietor, Mr. J. T. Helah, is a native of Gardiner, Maine, still a young man, and has been a respected resident here for the past four years.


p. 73.

G. S. MERRIAM & CO., Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Wall Paper and Interior Decorations, No. 295 Westminster Street.  -- One of the largest and most responsible houses engaged in the wholesale and retail wall paper trade in Providence is that of the well and favorably known firm of G. S. Merriam & Co., No. 295 Westminster Street.  The business was established by the present proprietors in 1890, and the volume of trade now transacted stands second to no other house in Rhode Island.  The salesrooms of G. S. Merriam & Co. are recognized headquarters for the selection of rare and artistic patterns in wall paper and interior decorations and the stock carried embraces a large and varied line of goods of the rarest and most artistic designs and colorings.  The sound financial standing of this firm enables it to purchase goods direct from foreign and domestic manufacturers, on the most advantageous terms and the public and trade reap the benefit in the extremely reasonable prices quoted by G. S. Merriam & Co.  The office, sales and storage rooms of the firm comprise the first-floor and basement of No. 295 Westminster Street, the premises being handsomely furnished and admirably arranged for the conduct of the business.  The house makes a specialty of paper-hanging, moldings, fresco, panel and ceiling painting and interior decorating.  Contracts for this class of work are executed in the most artistic and satisfactory manner, and the firm's services are in steady demand with architects, builders and contractors, while from ten to twenty skilled artisans are employed in this department.  The 'Pa Crusta' decoration for ceilings and walls is a patented process of the firm which is becoming popular wherever an exceptionally handsome and rich effect is desired.  The trade of the house extends throughout Rhode Island and adjoining States and the services of a large corps of efficient salesmen is required in the transaction of affairs.  Mr. G. S. Merriam is the active member of the firm and personally supervises the entire business.  His father, F. G. Merriam, of New York, forms the company, but does not take active part in the management.  Mr. G. S. Merriam is a native of Ohio and a young man of superior business qualifications, and his enterprising and progressive methods have gained the house, not only a large and prosperous patronage, but also an excellent reputation throughout commercial circles.


p. 74.

BUTTERWORTH & CO., Manufacturers and Importers of Cotton Goods and Fine Tailors' Trimmings, No. 27 Pine Street. -- Thre is no better way in which the advantages of a city such as Providence can be portrayed than by a brief review of the extent and character of those establishments already located within its limits and in successful operation.  As illustrating some of the advantages of this favored city, the present sketch is devoted to mention of the enterprising firm of Butterworth & Co., No. 27 Pine Street, who are known throughout an extensive trade radius, and whose establishment ranks as one of the leading firms in its special department of trade.  The business was founded by Mr. James C. Butterworth, Jr., in 1882, and in 1887 became known to the trade as Butterworth & Co., Mr. Robert L. Keach being then admitted to the firm.  Since its inception a large and steady growing trade has been developed through the New England and Northern States, two commercial travelers being continually on the road.  The house has been located at its present address for a period of five years, the premises comprising two floors, 20 x 60, which are used as salesrooms, offices and stockrooms.  A heavy stock, comprising importations from Europe is constantly on hand, so that purchases are at all times assured of prompt execution of all orders and speedy delivery.  Mr. Butterworth was born in Rhode Island and was for fourteen years years superintendent of the Rhode Island Bleachery and Dyeing Works.  He is a member of the Order of United Friends.  Mr. Keach was formerly engaged in the jewelry and banking business.  In conclusion it may [be] said that the firm is the largest in the line in Providence.


p. 74.

THE PROVIDENCE MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, Office, No. 45 Westminster Street. -- Ninety-two years of uninterrupted prosperity sums up in brief the history of the widely and favorably known Providence Mutual Fire Insurance Company, whose home office is at No. 45 Westminster Street.  This is one of the oldest institutions of the kind in the country, and has secured a niche in the public confidence vouchsafed to few corporations of the character indicated in New England.  The 'Providence Mutual' was incorporated and commenced business in 1800, and its career, during the entire period since intervening, has been an unbroken record of progress.  The affairs of the company have always been conducted on sound and conservative, albeit liberal and progressive principles, while its management has been characterized by sagacity, energy and ability; and, unless all the signs are greatly at fault, the popularity of this time-tried institution is bound to increase and endure.  Exceptional care is exercised in the selection of risks, more than ninety per cent of the insurance placed, being on dwellings and their contents; and a policy issued by this company, conditions complied with, is as good for its face value as a United States Treasury note.  All losses are paid in full, a special feature being made of the prompt settlement of just claims, while the terms of the policies are distinctly favorable to the insured.  The 'Providence Mutual' insures dwelling houses, household furniture, dwellings with stores therein, schoolhouses and first-class business property at the lowest rates, compatible with absolute security, and certainly no safer or more judicious investment can be made, as assuredly no more liberal inducements are offered by any other.  The gross asserts (sic) now amount to about $250,000; the liabilities, including re-insurance, close upon $100,000, and cash surplus upward of $150,000. There is a substantial surplus for contingencies, the dividends are large, and altogether the condition of the Providence Mutual Fire Insurance Company is of a highly gratifying character, the business affording evidence of steady and material growth.  Mr. H. R. Barker, the president of the company, has filled this office for the past eight years, being connected with the management of the institution altogether some thirty years; and H. C. Waters, the efficient secretary, has occupied his present position twelve years, prior to which he had held a responsible place in the office.  The directors are Messrs. H. A. Howland, A. B. Rice, H. R. Baker, W. G. Nightingale, E. C. Bucklin, Jeffrey Davis, W. G. Roelker, Wm. Gammell and Webster Knight, all of whom are solid citizens and prominent business men, standing high in the community, alike in commercial and financial circles, and in private life.


p. 74.

JAMES ABORN, Real Estate Agent, Room No. 50, No. 87 Weybosset Street. -- Real estate is Rhode Island is booming, and everywhere indications are not wanting that the boom is likely to be steady.  Mr. James Aborn went into business about two years ago, opening an office at No. 87 Weybosset Street, Room No. 50, and with his practical knowledge of every portion of the State, combined with a thorough business acquaintance with all the details of real estate, he has already established for himself a position in the profession. Mr. Aborn was born in Providence, as were also his ancestors for two hundred years back.  Starting in business as a woolen manufacturer, in 1856, he, in common with many others when the war broke out, was seized with the patriotic fever.  He served two years as brigade quartermaster on the staff of General Devins, having recruited in the Second Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry.  After the close of hostilities, his enterprising spirit took him to New Mexico and Colorado, but, after working at gold mining for awhile, eventually returned to and settled in his native city of Providence.  Mr. Aborn's well-known abilities and probity have gained him the position of assessor of the town of Cranston, in which position he displays those qualities of equity and discrimination so manifest to his friends in private life.  Any one acquainted with the rapid development of what a very few years ago were comparatively small places in this State, will readily believe that in a very short space of time Cranston will be well on the way to rival Pawtucket.  Mr. Aborn has property to sell in this desirable locality, also several first-class town lots.  He has also property for sale all over Rhode Island.  Mr. James Aborn devotes the whole of his time to the duties of assessor and the real estate business.


p. 75.

ATLANTIC MILLS, Manufacturers of Worsted Dress Goods, Cottons, Worsteds, Etc., Manton Avenue, off Olneyville Square. --  The determination of the American people to vie with the older countries in arts, science and manufactures, and all the operations of trade, is now recognised as a national characteristic.  In any specialty to which investigation is addressed the truth of this statement will be fully borne out by the perseverance and courage of our manufacturers.  This is well illustrated in Providence by the career and success of the Atlantic Mills, who are widely and deservedly prominent as manufacturers of worsted dress goods, and cottons and worsteds by the piece, and whose plant is located on Manton Avenue off Olneyville Square.  The company was incorporated in 1879, and reogranized in January, 1892, with Geo. S. Bullens, President; Chester A. Braman, Vice-president; T. King, Treasurer; Chas. D Owen, Agent.  There are four mills altogether, constructed of brick and stone, five stories in height and covering 917,008 square feet of ground, while some forty-five tenements are owned by the corporation to accommodate their employees.  The equipment includes 2,048 looms, and 39,296 worsted and 21,920 cotton spindles, together with every modern appliance known to the industry, and steady employment is given to 2,000 operatives.  The most thorough system of organization is enforced, and the mills are a model of their kind, in every respect an embodiment of the best methods and most improved processes. Quality has ever been the first consideration of the management.  Only the best of raw materials are used, and the highest talent is employed in the department of design.  Both as to quality and price, this house offers substantial inducements which cannot be duplicated elsewhere.  Its selling agents are Messrs. A. D. Juilliard & Co. of New York City, while the officers are recognized as sterling exponents of those business principles which alone form the basis of the enduring prosperity and usefulness.


p. 75.

P. S. EDDY, Manufacturing Jeweler, No. 27 Page Street. -- The jewelry manufacturing industry has been developed in this city to an extent of immense magnitude, and Providence has long been the recognized leader in this valuable department of trade.  A prominent exponent of the industry, to whom special mention is due, is Mr. P. S. Eddy, of No. 27 Page Street.  The business now controlled by him was founded in 1872 by Messrs. Coggeshall & Eddy, the firm afterwards becoming Eddy & Blake, and in 1886 Mr. Eddy became sole proprietor.  He commands a thorough knowledge of the trade in which he is engaged, and maintains the output of his establishment at the highest standard of excellence.  The factory is of ample size, having an area of 25 x 100 feet.  The equipment is admirably complete in character, and the machinery is operated by steam power.  The working force consists of twenty skilled hands, and two salesmen constantly travel in the interest of the house.  Mr. Eddy is daily in attendance of the head of affairs, and manufactures a general line of plated jewelry for gentlemen's wear.  He uses only the best materials, selecting them with the greatest care, and gives close personal supervision to all the processes of manufacture, thus ensuring reliability of workmanship and uniform excellence.  Mr. Eddy is a native of Providence, and one of its best known citizens.  He is identified with the Knights of Pythias, and is also a member of the Veteran Firemen's Association.  In the times when he was one of the Volunteer corps of fire fighters he ran with steamer Ocean, No. 7.  Mr. Eddy is an enterprising, thorough-going business man, and a deservedly popular member of the community.


p. 75.

E. L. LOGEE & CO., Manufacturers of Masonic, Odd Fellows', Knights of Pythias, etc., Pins, Charms and Buttons, No. 183 Eddy Street. -- A very significant illustration of the importance and magnitude of the jewelry trade in the city of Providence is afforded in the fact that so many establishments are engaged in special branches of the industry, the annual average of whose transactions bears an important relation to the grand total of the city's commerce.  A very important and rapidly growing branch of this trade during the past few decades is that of manufacturing society emblems, badges, etc., and in this special line will be found many large and flouishing concerns.  Among the number is the representative and responsible house of Messrs. E. L. Logee & Co., centrally located at No. 183 Eddy Street, with branch office at No. 18 Cortlandt Street, New York City.  Mr. Logee is a Rhode Island man by birth and has been a resident of this city for many years, and has had a practical experience in the different branches of this trade since 1862, during which period he was in business for himself in the general trade for twenty-five years, which he relinquished  in 1891 and established himself in this special line under the present firm title. Turning out none but high-class goods, and adhering strictly to reliable business methods, he developed at once a very large and influential patronage among the general trade throughout all parts of the United States, which is constantly increasing and requires the constant services of a travelling salesman to look after its interests.  The premises occupied are very spacious and commodious, and comprise an entire floor, 40 x 125 feet in dimensions, which is admirably arranged for business and manufacturing purposes.  The factory is fully equipped with ample steam-power and the latest improved machinery, tools, and appliances to insure rapid and perfect production, including the services of thirty and more skilled and experienced hands.  The range of products embraces solid gold and gold plate pins, charms, badges, buttons, etc., for all kinds of standard organizations, such as Knight Templars, Masonic, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Order of Red Men, Foresters, Elks, Iron Hall, Grand Army, Legion of Honor, Royal Arcanum, and college societies, etc.  These goods are made of the very best materials, emblematically correct, and are guaranteed to be just as represented, while the prices are such as to invite the attention of the trade.  A specialty is made of lodge jewels of every description, which in elegance of design and fine workmanship are unsurpassed by any other house in the country.


p. 76.

M. L. READ, Manufacturing Jeweler.  Latest Designs in White and Foil Stone Goods.  Gents' Scarf Pins a Specialty, No. 118 Dorrance Street. - -One of the most enterprising and successful among the manufacturing jewelers of this city is the gentleman whose name heads the present sketch.  Although a comparatively young man, he has reached a front rank in his line, and is widely known in the trade.  He was formerly the senior member of the firm of Read, Gardner & Co., established in 1879, who were succeeded in 1886, by M. L. Read & Co., and about a year later he assumed sole control of the business.  Mr. Read manufactures plated jewelry, including lace pins, scarf pins, eardrops and the 'King Separable' collar buttons, etc., and turns out the latest designs in white and foil stone goods.  He makes a specialty of gentlemen's scarf pins, and is manufacturer of the 'King Separable' collar button, an article of exceptional merit, which has secured an enduring hold on popular favor everywhere.  In fact, his productions are noted, alike for beauty of designs, originality, workmanship and finish, and command extensive sale throughout the United States.  The shop is 30 x 90 feet, and is equipped with steam-power, improved machinery, etc., and thirty hands are employed.  A large and fine assortment is constantly kept in stock, and all orders are promptly filled, liberal inducements being offered to the jobbing trade.  Mr. Read, who is about thirty-eight years of age, was born in New Hampshire, and has lived in Providence some twenty years.  He is a man of practical skill as well as of energy and enterprise, and give close personal attention to every detail of the business. He is a member of the Jewelers' Board of Trade and the Manufacturing Jewelers' Association, and is also a member of the Rhode Island Horse Breeders' Association, being owner of the famous bay stallion 'Tantallon', at Tantallon Farm, Riverside, Rhode Island.


p. 76.

A. C. MORSE, Architect, No. 5 Custom House Street.  --  The improvement in architecture has been a distinctly notable feature in the march of progress during the past few decades in this country.  The advance made in the direction indicated is abundantly attested by the magnificent structures that attract the eye on every hand in all our cities and towns to-day.  And in this connection, it may be observed that Providence is well-abreast with the times.  Among the leading architects of this city there are none more worthy of special mention here than A. C. Morse, who has his office at No. 5 Custom House Street, and than whom, not one in his line in the State enjoys a higher reputation for skill and reliability.  He has for years been at the head of his profession, and receives a substantial measure of recognition. Mr. Morse, who is a gentleman somewhat past the meridian of life, but active and energetic, was born in Boston and has resided in Providence forty years. He is a talented portrait painter and artist in oil, as well as an architect of exceptional ability, and when a young man studied for several years in the former branch of his profession under masters of the art in Europe.  On his return home, he opened a studio in his native city, and subsequently became an expert in architectual decorations.  He is a thoroughly competent draughtsman and all around architect, and many noteworthy structures in and around this city attest his skill.  Mr. Morse, who is a prominent member of the American Institute of Architects, being the first president of the Rhode Island chapter of that society, has well-equipped offices on the fourth floor of the Wilcox Building, room No. 42, and employs several capable assistants.  He is prepared to make plans for all kinds of buildings, giving particular attention to high-class dwellings, institutions and business blocks, and guarantees the utmost satisfaction.  Designs, specifications, etc. are furnished at short notice, while construction is personally supervised; and all work undertaken by this gentleman is certain to be performed in a manner to suit the most exacting.  Among the structures designed and built by Mr. Morse may be mentioned the Rhode Island Hospital, the Atlantic Building, the Merchants Bank Building, the Wickendon Station, Sayles Memorial Hall, Brown University;  the handsome residences of Henry Rhodes, Thomas Hopping, Thomas Adams, Thomas Goddard, Edwin Angell, Mr. Sullivan Ames, Mrs. Beckwith, and a number of others equally worthy of note all over the State, doing the interior work of the Boston Music Hall also; George Snell, with whom he was associated, doing the exterior work.


p. 76.

CROCKER HARNESS COMPANY, Manufacturers of Harness of Every Description, and Dealers in Carriages, Carriage Robes, Blankets, Whips, Boots, Etc., W. H. Whittemore, Manager, No. 33 Washington Street. -- A flourishing house in Providence, engaged in the production of first-class harness, and entitled to special mention in this business history of the city, is that of the Crocker Harness Company, whose office and salesroom are at No. 33 Washington Street, while their factory is at Vineyard Haven.  This business was established here eight years ago, and has during the entire time been conducted under the management of Mr. W. H. Whittemore, of the Providence House, who is a native of Massachusetts, and has resided in Providence the past eight years.  He is a thoroughly progressive business man, and has developed a large, superior trade, extending all throughout New England. The two stores and basement occupied are each 16 x 87 feet in dimensions, and carriage-room 32 x 87, and a heavy stock is at all times kept on hand, embracing a complete assortment of harness of every description, also carriage robes, blankets, whips, boots, etc., and a fine line of light carriages and road wagons.  The factory at Vineyard Haven is one of the largest of the kind in New England, is equipped with the latest improved machinery and appliances, and employment is found for a force of one hundred skilled hands.  Both a wholesale and retail demand is supplied and all goods sold by the company are guaranteed to be exactly as represented.  The house has been a prominent factor in promoting the best interests of the commerce of this State, and the reputation it sustains has been fully earned, as it is well merited.


p. 77.

MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK, No. 46 Weybosset Street. -- Not only does Providence maintain preeminence as a city of vast industrial interests, but also as a great financial center.  The extent of the banking and fiscal operations carried on here is something enormous, and the volume of business affords evidence of steady and substantial increase.  Notable among the institutions contributing to the sum of activity in the line indicated in this city, is the stanch and reliable Mechanics National Bank, No. 46 Weybosset Street, which is one of the oldest and strongest corporations of the kind in the State.  It has been in existence nearly seventy years, and has passed through the various seasons of depression and periods of stringency in the money market with credit and usefulness unimpaired and stability unshaken.  The history of the 'Mechanics' has been an unbroken record of progress.  It was incorporated in 1823 as a state bank and re-organized under the national banking laws of 1865.  Its career during the entire period has been marked by uninterrupted prosperity, and all the indications are that the popularity of this time-tried institution is bound to endure.  The bank has always been conducted on sound and conservative business principles and its management characterized by sagacity, energy and ability; and its affairs to-day are in a condition highly gratifying to its officers, directors and stockholders.  The Mechanics National Bank has a capital of $500,000, a surplus fund amounting to upward of $100,000, with $25,000 undivided profits, and the deposits are above $400,000, while the business transacted grows apace.  The banking-offices are commodious, very finely fitted up and well-equipped, and an efficient clerical staff is employed.  Besides deposits, loans and discounts, a general banking business is done, the correspondents being the National Bank of Commerce of Boston and the Central National Bank of New York.  Collections are made on all points; foreign and American exchange is bought and sold, and bills of exchange, letters of credit, etc., are procured.  Drafts on Great Britian and Ireland are issued; commercial paper is negotiated, and in short, all operations comprehended in legitimate banking are engaged in.  The president of the bank is James H. Chace and the cashier, S. H. Tingley, the board of directors being composed of J. H. Chace, Eugene W. Mason, Howard O. Sturges, Rowland G. Hazard, Henry F. Lippitt, John H. Congdon, Charles C. Harrington. The gentlemen above named are all well and favorably known in financial and commercial circles for their integrity and probity of character and are among the most respected citizens of Rhode Island.

Illustration, also on page 77: Federal Street Grammar School


p. 78.

M. DEWING, (Successor to Dewing & Monsell), Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Fish, Oysters, Clams, Scollops, Etc., No. 24 Exchange Place. -- The trade in oysters has steadily increased in magnitude during the past half century, and is now a most important department of American industry.  The oldest and leading house in Providence in this line is that of Mr. M. Dewing, of No. 24 Exchange Place.  This is the most extensive firm of the kind in the State. The enterprise was originally founded in 1849 by David Kelton, who, in 1852, was succeeded by Mr. P. E. Nichols, the firm becoming P. E. Nichols & Co., in 1857, Mr. Dewing being the partner in the firm.  In 1866 the firm changed to Dewing & Monsell, this copartnership lasting for fourteen years, when Mr. Dewing became sole proprietor.  The business has always been carried on at the same address, the premises occupied consisting of a commodious store, 20 x 60 feet in area.  Mr. Dewing employs fourteen hands, owns half a dozen oyster boats, and is proprietor of oyster beds at Nyatt on the Providence River, the same being over one hundred acres in extent.  The oysters produced at these beds are the choicest to be found in the market, and are popularly known as Nyatt Points.  Mr. Dewing handles from 12,000 to 14,000 bushels of oysters every year.  Besides dealing in oysters he is also a wholesale and retail merchant in fish, clams, scollops and seafood of all kinds.  Oysters are put up in the best manner, and sent to any part of the country, all orders being filled in the most satisfactory manner.  Mr. Dewing is a native of Mender, Worcester County, Mass., and has resided in this city since 1857.  He is a prominent member of the Knights Templar, F. and A. M., takes an active interest in everything having for its object the advancement of the community's interest, and is a business man with whom all dealings are conducted upon a basis of fairness and a desire to promote the best interests of his patrons.


p. 78.

H. MIDWOOD & SONS, Wholesalers of Grocers' Sundries, Salt and Smoked Fish; Corner of Crawford Square and Dyer Street. -- An honorable and successful career of nine years has given the well-known grocers' supply house of H. Midwood & Sons a deservedly high standing in the thoroughfares of commerce and trade in Providence.  The firm is composed of Mr. H. Midwood, the senior member, a native of Yorkshire, England, who has been a resident of this city for the past thirty-eight years, and his three sons, Messrs. William H. Midwood, George A. Midwood, Walter Midwood, all young men born in this city. They handle paper, paper bags, beans, dried fruits, canned goods and grocers' sundries generally, but devote their energies mainly and make a specialty of salt and smoked fish.  It is no exaggeration to say that they are the largest dry fish dealers in Rhode Island.  In September, 1891, they moved to their present commodious quarters, where they have a store and basement covering an area of 13,000 square feet.  Their business was always located in the vicinity of their present quarters.  They employ ten experienced men on the  premises to attend to customers, etc., and have five traveling salesmen constantly on the road to look after their extensive out-of-town trade in Rhode Island, Eastern Connecticut and in Southern Massachusetts.  The methods by which this business has been brought to its present dimensions, have been a close attention to detail, and a sterling honesty of purpose.  The firm's chief aim has ever been the welfare of its patrons; prices are always the lowest consistent with quality.  The annual sales now reach a handsome total and are rising each year.  Houses of this kind go far toward buiding up the wholesale trade of a great center of trade as Providence admittedly is.


p. 78.

STEPHEN D. ANDREWS, Foreign and Domestic Salt, Baled Hay and Straw, No. 148 Dyer Street.  -- The oldest and largest house in Providence engaged in the salt trade is that of Mr. Stephen D. Andrews, located at No. 148 Dyer Street.  This representative house was founded in 1842, by Mr. Ebenezer Andrews, who was succeeded in 1848 by his son, the present proprietor.  He handles both foreign and domestic salt in vast quantities, and is especially prominent in the trade, as agent for the Retsolf Salt Mine, of New York, the only operative salt mine in the United States, operating an 1,120-foot shaft, and having a capacity of producing 3,000 tons of salt daily.  The Retsolf Natural Mineral Salt is sold in lumps for horses and cattle, and crushed for ice cream, hides, refrigerators, manufacturing purposes, removing ice and snow, salting ships and seines, soapmakers, etc.  Mr. Andrews also handles the celebrated Genesee Natural Crystal Salt, the best in the world for butter and cheese, including the 'Velvet Grain' table salt, in three-pound cartons, and two to fourteen-pound packets, and loose in barrels.  He also carries pure salt crystals, Diamond Crystal Salt, ground beef scraps and ground oyster shells for poultry; pure Canada hardwood ashes, unleached and sifted; and Ames' Animal Fertilizer and ground bone; also bailed hay and straw.  The buildings occupied for trade and storage purposes are situated on the river front, and the premises are connected by side track with the railway system of the city; so that boats and cars are unloaded into the storehouses, and there is ample storage capacity for 8,000 tons of salt.  Salt comes in cargo lots, from the West Indies and Mediterranean ports, while domestic salt comes in car lots from New York and Michigan.  Cargoes of one thousand tons are received at a time, boats arriving every two months from foreign ports, while over one thousand carloads of domestic salt were handled by this house last year.  The salt sold by Mr. Andrews may be considered as unexcelled, if equaled, for dairy, table and culinary purposes, while the prices quoted are always regulated by the market.  His house is the leading source of supply in this line in Rhode Island, and enjoys a large and permanent trade.  Mr. Andrews is a Massachusetts man by birth, who came to this city, in 1837, when fifteen years of age, and is still active in business affairs, the recognized authority in the salt trade, and enjoying the esteem and confidence of this community, for his long, honorable and successful business career.


p. 79.

BROWNELL, FIELD & CO., successors to S. H. Brownell & Co., Wholesale Grocers and Spice Millers, Importers and Jobbers of Teas and Coffees, Nos. 41 to 51 Canal Street. -- The house of Messrs. Brownell, Field & Co., the wholesale grocers and spice millers, at Nos. 41 to 51 Canal Street, is one of those well-established and substantial concerns that do credit to the city.  It was founded in 1857, by Messrs. S. and W. Foster, who were succeeded in turn by the firms of Foster, Speer & Fisher;  Foster, Fisher & Co.; Parsons, Bugbee & Co.; Bugbee & Brownell and S. H. Brownell & Co., until 1890, when the present firm was organized.  It long ago took rank with the strongest and most successful of local enterprises.  The business premises comprise an entire six-story building, 50 x 125 feet in dimensions, the spicemills being fully equipped with improved machinery and ample steam-power, while employment is given in all departments to thirty skilled hands.  The firm are extensive importers and jobbers of teas and coffees, and they always carry in stock full supplies of fresh crop Oolong, Japan, Gunpowder, Imperial, Young Hyson, English Breakfast and China green teas; the choicest Mocha and Java coffees, sugars, syrups and molasses; flour, cereals, and farinaceous goods; foreign and domestic dried fruits, nuts, raisins and prunes; preserved fruits in glass and domestic canned goods, olives and olive oil, maccaroni and vermicelli, chocolates and cocoas, mustards and catsups, capers and sauces, preserves and pickles, jams and jellies, condiments and table delicacies.  The trade can at all times select here with perfect confidence, a first-class, salable and appreciated stock. The firm put up coffee in one and two pound cans for family use, and are especially prominent as manufacturers of the Bugbee & Brownell brand of pure spices, mustards, extracts, salad-dressing and cream of tartar.  All these goods are absolutely pure, and, with the processes used, the full strength, flavor and excellence of the spices and extracts are preserved unimpaired. The reliability and superiority of the products are so thoroughly understood and appreciated that they practically supplant all rival productions wherever introduced.  The house commands every favorable opportunity of the market for the purchase of raw materials and consequently can offer unsurpassed inducements to buyers.  The spices made here are in great and growing demand all through the New England, Middle and Southern States, while the firm's wholesale grocery trade is especially heavy and permanent in the States of Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut.  A corps of eight traveling men represent the house to the trade, and all orders receive immediate and careful attention.  This firm is accounted among the most responsible and successful wholesale grocery houses in the city, while as spice millers they have built up an establishment that is prepared to battle on even terms with its most formidable competitors in any part of the country.


p. 79.

RHODE ISLAND COUPLING COMPANY, J. N. Gardner, Treasurer and Manager, Nos. 112 and 114 Dorrance Street.  -- The leading headquarters in this section of the country for supplies and equipments of every kind for fire extinguishment is the establishment of the Rhode Island Coupling Company, located at Nos. 112 and 114 Dorrance Street.  This company made a specialty of fire and mill hose of all grades, while repairs are an important feature, and estimates are promptly furnished and satisfaction guaranteed.  The business was originally established in 1870, by Wm. A. Caswell, who gave place to E. M. Waldron in 1873, and in 1890 Mr. J. N. Gardner succeeded to the management of the present company.  The premises occupied for manufacturing and sales purposes are spacious in size, thoroughly equipped with improved machinery and ample steam-power, and every modern facility is at hand for insuring rapid and perfect production.  An important specialty of this company is the Waldron controlling nozzle, which has the following advantages:  It closes gradually, requires three full turns to open or close, using from two to three seconds of time, takes less time to operate than is required to start many of the quick-closing nozzles under pressure, is just slow, yet positive enough  in its action to prevent water hammer or bursting of hose when time is valuable, each half-turn of the screw relieving the pressure and saving the doubling and trebling up of pressure that the sudden jerk of handles or levers or quick shut-offs cause and which form such a disastrous feature at a great many fires, especially when the hose has been in service a few years.  This nozzle is almost a new creation in every particular and a necessary appliance in fire-fighting.  In a number of instances these nozzles have been manipulated for hours with the thermometer below zero, and at the great Aldrich House fire in this city, February 15 and 16, 1888, when the whole business portion of Providence was threatened, they were used for twenty-four hours with the thermometer ranging from 12* to 18* below zero, and the water froze as it struck the building, crystalizing two city blocks of ruins.  In this and other large cities, dozens of these nozzles have been in service twelve to fifteen years, and are good for as many more.  These nozzles are not an experiment, as is shown not only from the increasing orders received, but from the high endorsement buyers and users give them.  The Waldron flexible flay pipe is made of the strongest treated fabric, with which nickeled brass wire is interwoven, and the whole lined with the best Para rubber and fitted with patent-bronze metal mountings; is flexible and always bends straight of itself.  These and other specialties are in great and growing demand in the United States, South America, Mexico and other foreign countries.  Orders receive immediate attention, and terms and prices are fair and equitable. Mr. Gardner is a native of New Jersey, a resident of this city for the past twenty years, and a successful manufacturer, thoroughly enterprising and reliable.  The company is getting ready for publication a complete catalogue of the goods made and sold by them, which will be an encyclopedia of fire appliances in the largest sense.  It will be handsomely bound in cloth and worthy of a place in any office library.  It will comprise about 300 pages, with about the same number of illustrations.


p. 80.

THIRD NATIONAL BANK, No. 137 Westminster Street. -- As a natural result of the great industrial and commercial interests of Providence, aggregating so many tens of millions in capital and plant, her manufacturers and merchants have need of the most extended financial facilities, and it is a matter for congratulations that the Third National Bank has so long, so ably and so satisfactorily afforded such a safe, convenient and reliable depository to the business men of Providence and vicinity.  This bank has had an honorable and successful career.  It was duly incorporated in 1865, and has ever proved a tower of strength to this community.  The Board of Directors includes the president, Mr. Oliver A. Washburn, Jr., the vice-president, A. L. Sayles, Esq., and Messrs. Wm. F. Sayles, Wm. P. Chapin, John Eddy, Wm. H. Perry and Edward H. Mason.  These names are synonymouse with stability and integrity and their sound discretion and administrative capacity have become generally recognized.  President Washburn, a wealthy capitalist and useful, public-spirited citizen of Providence, has been at the head of this institution from its inception, giving it the benefit of his personal attention and guidance, and knows the bank's depositors and patrons personally.  The cashier, Mr. F. W. Gale, has been connected with the bank for the past seventeen years, being promoted to his present responsible post in 1880, and is a young man of large experience as a financier, and of wide acquaintance and eminent popularity in business and social life.  The Third National transacts a general banking business, making collections through its chain of correspondents, which includes the Bank of New York, New York City; and the National Bank of Redemption, Boston; buying and selling bills of exchange, issuing drafts, and in every way legitimately advancing its customers' best interests; while it is able to and does handle commercial paper in large amounts and also loans extensively on approved collateral, its loans and discounts averaging over $1,500,000.  It will thus be seen that its earning power is very great, and its capital stock is held at a high premium as one of the safest and most desirable investments in the city, while its operations have been so satisfactory that a snug surplus of $100,000 has been accumulated, with undivided profits of $10,000, and individual deposits averaging $750,000.  It is well worthy of its ever-increasing measure of strength and usefulness and justly regarded as one of the financial bulwarks of the city and State.


p. 80.

COLLER & NEWHALL, Dealers in Saddlery Hardware, Leather and Shoe Findings, Nos. 28, 30 and 32 Washington Street. --  The trade in saddlery hardware and carriage materials of all kinds has its largest and one of its most reliable exponents in the celebrated house of Coller & Newhall, the largest manufacturers in this line in Rhode Island.  The business was founded in 1840, by F. M. Rose, who retired in 1884.  Mr. C. E. Coller came to the house as an employee, in 1878, and filled the position of manager, from 1879, until the year he became a partner in the firm.  He has had forty years' experience in the business, and Chas. C. Newhall has had twenty. They occupy three large stores, with basements, the former containing 17,000 square feet, three stores fronting on Washington Street, and two on Eddy Street.  All are finely fitted up, and afford a complete and comprehensive display of everything in the line.  An immense stock is constantly on hand, comprising every article comprehended under the heads of saddlery hardware, leather and shoe findings.  Their trade, which is wholesale and retail, extends through the northeast section of the country.  The firm's name has become a veritable trade-mark for all goods leaving their establishments, and secures to Providence a most valuable factor of mercantile activity. They have four traveling men on the road, and keep twenty-five skilled workmen constantly employed.  Mr. Newhall is a member of the F. and A. M., the Palmer Club and Board of Trade, while Mr. Coller is also connected with the first-mentioned of these organizations.


p. 80.

WILLIAM H. HALL, Broker, Real Estate and Investment Securities Bought and Sold, Etc., No. 49 Weybosset Street, Hall's Building. -- As it is scarcely necessary to remark, the real estate interest of the city constitutes a factor of surpassing importance from a commercial point of view.  And it may be observed, also, that the handling of realty and kindred interests is a line of business that engages the attention of some of our stanchest citizens.  Notable among those here indicated is Wm. H. Hall, whose office is at No. 49 Weybosset Street, Hall's Building, and whose transactions in the course of a year represents a very handsome figure.  He has been engaged extensively in the sphere of activity above indicated, at the present location, since 1865, and his career during the entire period has been an unbroken record of progress.  For more than a quarter of a century he has handled millions of dollars worth of property, doing more business than any other man in his line in Providence, and numbers in his substantial clientele many of the wealthiest real estate owners and largest investors in the community.  Mr. Hall, who is proprietor of Hall's Building and also owns a large amount of property besides, is a gentleman of middle-age, active and energetic, and was born in Providence.  He is a man of entire probity of character as well as of business ability and thorough experience, and is president of the Central Real Estate Company.  He is well and favorably known in commercial circles and in public and private life, being an ex-state senator and served in the lower house also for several years, while prior thereto he had been a member of the Town Council and also treasurer at Cranston, R.I.  Mr. Hall is a general real estate broker, buying and selling all classes of city and country property, and gives particular attention also to the management of estates.  He deals in investment securities, likewise, negotiates loans and mortgages, and is prepared to make appraisement for intending purchasers, while insurance is placed with first-class fire companies.


p. 81.

PATT, KETTLETY & KERN, Manufacturing Jewelers, No. 30 Page Street. -- Prominent among the representative and enterprising members of the jewelry manufacturing industry in Providence are Messrs. Patt, Kettlety & Kern, of No. 30 Page Street, who bring not only practical experience to bear, but also an intimate knowledge of the wants of the trade.  This is one of the oldest concerns of the kind in the city, having been founded in 1862 by J. C. Lewis & Co.  In January, 1891, the present proprietors succeeded to the control, the copartners being Messrs. Wm. M. Patt, Geo. H. Kettlety, and Herman Kern.  They have developed the business at a progressive ratio, indicative of their unflagging energy and artistic conceptions of what is striking, original, and beautiful in their field of production.  Mr. Patt, who is a prominent member of the Masonic order, was born in Massachusetts, has resided in this city 28 years, and has had 30 years' experience in the manufacture of tools.  Mr. Kettlety, also a native of the Old Bay State, came here 25 years ago, and has for 18 years been a practical maker of jewelry.  Mr. Kern was born in Providence, and his experience in the jewelry industry extends over fifteen years.  He is an active member of the Knights of Pythias and also of several German organizations.  The factory premises have an area of 25 x 105 feet, and are fitted with all necessary tools and machinery, operated by steam-power.  The firm employ twenty experienced hands, and manufacture a complete line of jewelry, making leading specialties of patent rolled plate chains and novelties.  They use none but the best of materials, selecting them with the greatest care, and give close personal supervision to all the processes of manufacture, thus insuring reliability of workmanship and uniform excellence.  Their trade has developed to proportions of great magnitude, and extends all over the United States, Canada, Mexico, and South America.


p. 81.

THOMAS GRIMES & BRO., Importers and Wholesale Liquor Dealers, Nos. 115 and 117 Pine Street and No. 24 Potter Street. -- No firm engaged in the wholesale liquor line in Providence is more widely or more favorably known than that of Thomas Grimes & Bro., Nos. 115 and 117 Pine Street and No. 24 Potter Street.  The house is an old and thoroughly reliable one, and maintains an A-1 reputation for fine goods and honorable dealing - none better in New England.  The Messrs. Grimes are importers and dealers, and their trade, which is very large and constantly growing, extends throughout Rhode Island and portions of the adjoining States.  They are agents for Frank Jones' ale, Portsmouth, N. H.; also for Highland Spring ale, Boston; the Bay State ale and Stanley's ale, Lawrence, Mass.; and handle only strictly first-class wines and liquors, their leading specialties being 'Finch's Golden Wedding', 'Mt. Vernon', 'Sunny Side', 'Sherwood', 'Ashland', and other select brands of whiskies.  This popular and responsible house was established in 1861 by John Grimes, and in 1863 Thomas Grimes was taken into partnership.  About two years ago Joseph A. Grimes acquired an interest, and the present firm name was adopted.  The business premises occupy an L-shaped building, 25 x 200 feet in dimensions, with entrances on Pine and Potter streets, and an efficient staff is employed. A heavy stock is constantly kept on hand, and includes choice imported and domestic wines, brandies, gins, rums, whiskies, cordials, bitters, case goods, liquors generally, and ales, fine old native whiskey being a specialty.  The firm do a wholesale trade exclusively, selling in any quantity from a bottle or gallon to barrel or cask, and dispose of more than 20,000 barrels of ale a year.  Every article sold by them is warranted to be as represented, and their prices are invariably the lowest figures consistent with quality and quantity purchased, very liberal inducements being offered to dealers, hotels, clubs, etc.  Messrs. Thomas and Joseph A. Grimes are gentlemen of middle age, born at Uxbridge, and have lived in Providence some thirty-five years.  They are men of entire reliability in their dealings, of energy and enterprise, and fully sustain the reputation they enjoy in the trade.


p. 81.

J. H. ROBERTS, Manufacturers of Confectionery, Stores, No. 172 Westminster Street, No. 277 High Street, No. 89 Westminster Street. -- Up to within a comparatively recent period most of the candies produced in this country were of an inferior grade and notoriously impure; of late years, however, notable improvement has been made in these toothsome products.  Some of our Providence manufacturers turn out a very superior class of goods, notably J. H. Roberts, who has three flourishing stores, located as above, with factory at No. 306 Fountain Street.  He is the leader in his line in the city and State, and has an extensive patronage.  The confectionery manufactured by Mr. Roberts is noted for absolute purity, delicious flavor and choice quality, and is maintained at a uniformly high standard of excellence.  He makes upward of a ton of candy per day, and has facilities for producing a gallon of ice-cream per minute.  The manufacturing premises are equipped with ample steam-power, all the latest improved machinery and appliances, and fifty in help, all told, are employed, while eight to ten teams are in service in the summer season.  The three stores are commodious, very neatly fitted up and inviting, and a large stock can always be found at each, including pure and delicious chocolates, caramels, bon-bons, marsh-mallows, wintergreen, molasses candy, peppermint, and fine confectionery of every variety; also wholesome and toothsome ice-creams, all flavors; charlotte russe, water-ices, etc.  Both a wholesale and retail trade is done, families, parties, weddings, balls, and other occasions being supplied in first-class style at very reasonable rates, and all orders receive immediate attention.  Mr. Roberts, the proprietor, is a gentleman of middle age, born at Great Falls, N. H., and has been a resident of this city twenty years. He is a man of energy and enterprise, as well as thorough experience, and has achieved success by deserving it.  He started in business in 1872, in a rather modest way, at No. 32 Westminster Street, and from the first has been highly prosperous.  Mr. Roberts is ably seconded by Chas. H. Hare, his efficient manager, who has been with the house for twelve years.


p. 82.

"B. H. McCABE, Japan Enameler, No. 81 Friendship Street.  -- Enterprising men are quick to observe and act upon the advantages possessed by a location as a point of production, and this centralizing of the forces of particular industries, is a striking feature of the manufacturing operations in the United States.  This is particularly true in Providence, where many leading industries are centered.  One of these is the jewelry manufacturing trade and kindred interests, and a vast amount of capital and labor are represented in these enterprises.  A very important branch of the jewelry manufacturing trade, is the beautiful art known as Japan enameling, which has, within recent years, been brought to a great pitch of perfection in this country.  A leading and progressive house engaged in this special line, in this city, and well worthy of more than passing mention in these pages, is that of Mr. B. H. McCabe, whose concern is centrally located at No. 81 Friendship Street.  Mr. McCabe was born in 1857, and has had a continuous practical experience in this business ever since he was fifteen years of age; and desirous of embarking on his own account, he initiated this enterprise in 1876, on Pine Street, and by close attention to the wants of the trade, turning out none but A-1 productions, and adhereing firmly thereto, he soon developed a very large and permanent patronage that extends throughout the trade in the United States; and as it continued to increase he was compelled to seek more commodious quarters and better facilities, and in 1888 he removed to his present address.  The premises utilized are of ample size, and comprise three rooms on the second-floor which are admirably arranged and fitted up for business and working purposes.  The workshop is fully equipped with all the latest improved tools, devices and appliances known to the trade, including an oven of the most improved pattern, and a force of from twelve to fifteen skilled and experienced artists and workmen are given employment.  He devotes his entire attention to all the details of the business, and is prepared to execute, at the shortest notice, all kinds of Japan enameling of tin, brass, copper and metals of all descriptions, in the most satisfactory manner, while his productions portray that exceeding hard, brilliant and lustrous surface indicative of the skilled and finished artist.  A particular specialty is the enameling of fine jewelry of every description, and in all colors.  Decorating, lettering, etc., receive particular attention, and his prices are always reasonable.  Mr. McCabe is a gentleman of undoubted artistic and business ability, prompt and honorable in his dealings, and justly merits the success he has achieved by his energy and perseverance.


p. 82.

THE PROVIDENCE BRYANT & STRATTON BUSINESS COLLEGE, T. B. Stowell, Principal, No. 283 Westminster Street.  -- The key to success in the commercial and financial world is education of the real practical character. This includes a familiarity with, and a thorough understanding of, the science of accounts, business correspondence and penmanship, mathematics and all accessory accomplishments.  It is therefore essential for the young man or young woman, seeking employment in office or store, to prepare himself or herself thoroughly by a proper course of study and training.  To all who are interested in this matter, we would strongly recommend the Providence Bryant & Stratton Business College and Shorthand School, which has achieved a success in its important field of usefulness seldom, if ever, duplicated by any similar institution.  It is widely recognized as one of the reliable colleges, where each student receives direct tuition under the guidance and instruction of experienced professors, and where diplomas are granted and graduation permitted only upon the manifest proof of proficiency as afforded by severe examinations.  This college was founded in 1863, as one of a chain of commercial schools opened by Messrs. Bryant & Stratton, and on the first of July, 1878, Mr. T. B. Stowell purchased the property and became sole proprietor and principal of the institution.  Aided by a strong corps of teachers, he has built up a large and flourishing school, and achieved the enviable reputation of progressing pupils the most rapidly of any college, and enabling them the soonest to secure the choicest positions offered in the bank, the office and the salesroom.  The location of the college, in the Hoppin Homestead Building, No. 283 Westminster Street, is one of the finest in the city, and the spacious rooms occupied by the school were modeled and arranged for its special purpose.  There are two grand divisions of instruction, known respectively as the Department of Theory and the Department of Practice.  The principal studies of the first department are bookkeeping, business, arithmetic, analysis of words, grammar, rhetoric and composition, commercial law, letter-writing, penmanship, pen-lettering and brush-marking; while in the latter department the student is required to conduct actual business transactions on his own account, entering the great world of trade and buying and selling merchandise of various kinds, opening accounts at the bank, shipping and receiving goods on commission, giving and taking promissory notes, making and handling notes, drafts, invoices, checks, due bills, account sales, manifests, etc., and conducting a great busines in all its ramifications.  After several courses of the most complicated and active business transactions, the student goes into the merchant's emporium, and from thence through the round of duties in the office of the manufacturer, the transportation company, the wholesale and the commission merchant, and finally into the bank, thus acquiring a practical knowledge of every duty he will be called on to discharge, in whole or in part, when he enters the business world.  There are also departments of shorthand and typewriting, the best equipped and best managed of any in New England.  The graduates of this college are preferred by merchants and business men in this city on account of their superior fitness, and a course of study here has proved a short road to success in life by hundreds who have tried it.  Mr. Stowell, the principal and proprietor, is a native of Connecticut, who came here as a teacher in 1872, and has won a deservedly high reputation as an instructor and as a useful, public-spirited citizen.


Continued

These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2000 by Beth Hurd


Mail e-mail