Rhode Island Reading Room
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Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892

p. 83.

BLACKSTONE CANAL NATIONAL BANK, No. 25 Market Square. -- It is a well-known fact that the United States is a country of banks.  Like the seasons, however, banks come and go.  Few there are that stand the rigor of the panics and stringencies, the failures and the difficulties constantly arising on all sides.  When, therefore, any large institution is seen to stand firm and unshaken through the crucial test of abnormal depressions, it exhibits the keenest sagacity of those at the helm.  One of the oldest and strongest banks in Providence is the Blackstone Canal National Bank, whose banking-rooms are eligibly located at No. 25 Market Square.  This bank was incorporated in 1831, and was re-organized under the national banking laws, in 1865.  It has stood steadfastly through all these years, a great monied institution, meeting all the obligations that press heavily upon banks in dark and panicky times.  It has a paid up capital of $500,000, and is officered as follows, viz:  President, Wm. Ames; cashier, Oren Westcott; directors, F. S. Hoppin, Wm. Ames, H. F. Hinkley, C. H. Sprague, Geo. W. Butts, Jr., and W. W. White.  The Blackstone Canal National is a bank of issue, deposit and discount; negotiating loans, handling first-class commercial paper, buying and selling exchange, issuing sight drafts on all the principal cities of the Union, making telegraphic transfers of money, granting letters of credit, and making collections on all available points through its numerous correspondents, who include the National Park Bank and the Mercantile National Bank, of New York; and the First National Bank, of Boston.  A valuable and increasing list of patrons is drawn to its counters, the ability of the management and the high standing of the officers and directors, giving every guarantee of the intelligent conservation of all interests committed to its care.  Commercial and industrial enterprises find in the Blackstone Canal National, a stanch friend and supporter, all its influences being exerted in favor of their extension.  The statement of the bank made March 1, 1892, shows the following facts and figures, to wit: surplus fund, $100,000.00; undivided profits, $12,206.16; individual deposits, $218,755.23; loans and discounts, $670,122.41; total assets, $1,067.061.72.  The president, Mr. Ames, has filled that position since 1876, with infinite honor and credit, and is prominent in the business world as treasurer of the Fletcher Manufacturing Company.  The cashier, Mr. Westcott, came into this bank in 1869, being promoted to his present responsible post in 1876, and is a financier of large experience, wide acquaintance, and eminent popularity.


p. 83.

FRED. I. MARCY & CO., Manufacturing Jewelers, Specialty, The Acme Lever Button, No. 95 Pine Street.  --  Eminently representative of the most progressive and enterprising manufacturers of rich jewelry in Providence is the house of Fred. I. Marcy & Co., located at No. 95 Pine Street.  This firm make a specialty of the 'Acme Lever Button', and also of links, collar buttons and general plate and sterling silver jewelry.  The business was established in 1877, by Mr. Fred. I. Marcy, and in 1878 Mr. Chas H. Smith was admitted to the partnership.  On the death of the latter in 1882, Mr. Marcy again became sole proprietor.  His establishment is very spacious in size, finely equipped for rapid and perfect production and one of those houses that manufactures jewelry of the highest order of merit under conditions which permit it to compete with its rivals with a balance of advantages in its favor.  These it secures through its command of the best opportunities to the market for procuring the raw material as well as by conducting at its factory various operations connected with the trade often done outside by contrast, in the case of lesser firms, and by the creation of many of the most beautiful designs it offers.  Its development to its present high rank in the jewelry industry of the country has been a process of steady and persistent growth, unmarked by a single faux pas, or any deviation from its rigid rule of combining high-class workmanship with high-minded business dealings.  Sixty thoroughly trained artisans are here employed, and the operations here conducted are supervised with a zealous regard to the high prestige of the house, nothing being permitted to pass inspection which is not in the highest degree creditable.  The business has reached important dimensions, both in point of money value and in the extent of its connections. which spread out to all parts of the United States. Jobbers are supplied in quantities to suit at short notice, on terms that are favorable and just, and a fine salesroom is operated at No. 198 Broadway, New York.  Mr. Marcy is a manufacturer whose length of experience is not less notable than its range.  He was born in Hartland, Vt., and came to this city in 1867, having previously been in local and political affairs, having served for eight years as a member of the City Council, and thirteen years as a member of the School Committee; a delegate at large to the Republican National Convention of 1888, and chairman of the Rhode Island delegation; nine years a director of the Rhode Island National Bank and now president of the Society of the Sons of Vermont, and a director of the Old Man's Home.  His office manager, Mr. O. E. Case, has been with him for twelve years as confidential bookkeeper, and both gentlemen are worthy scions of the state of Collamer, Edmunds and Proctor.


p. 84.

J. H. PRESTON & CO., Commission Merchants and Wholesale Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Country Produce, Etc., Nos. 13 and 15 Dyer Street.  - In connection with the trade relating to dealing in country produce on commission, the firm of which Mr. J. H. Preston is the directing head is one which commands the very best trade in the produce line.  The firm was first established by Mr. J. H. Preston in the year 1863, the business house being at the time located on North Main Street, where it continued to flourish until 1872, when, owing to the extraordinary growth of trade, it was found necessary to remove to a more commodious building, with more extensive storage-rooms, where sufficient stock might be held to meet the ever-increasing demand for the fruit and general produce handled by this enterprising firm.  So extensive is the business of Messrs. J. H. Preston & Co., that to-day the firm is known as one of the largest and most representative in the country.  The new building is situated at Nos. 13 and 15 Dyer Street, Providence, R.I., and occupies an area of 60 x 100 feet, the five spacious floors of storage-rooms utilized to their fullest capacity for the reception of every description of country produce, domestic fruits, etc., affording substantial evidence of the extensive operations of this house, and especially when the celerity with which the constant reshipment of merchandise by a staff of busy employees is taken into account. Consignments of produce of varying kinds are received with great regularity and in enormous total bulk from clients in almost every section of the country, in consequence of the every-ready market this well-known house has at its command, and as a tribute to its consistently honorable treatment of all who are brought into business relations with it; while its connection among dealers is scarcely less far-reaching, inasmuch as this house frequently receives consignments of fruit from Cuba, the Southern States, Bahamas, and Scotland.  Mr. J. H. Preston is from Connecticut, but has lived in Providence for forty years, where he is respected alike both in business and social circles; and being very popular with both consignors and patrons, is held in the very highest esteem for his honorable and straightforward methods of doing business.  Possessed of a very thorough and general acquaintance with various descriptions of merchandise and their market value, as well as a great commercial aptitude, Mr. Preston has inspired unbounded confidence in the firm, both with domestic and foreign houses.  His two sons, Julius H. and Walter L. Preston, who were both born in Providence, were admitted to partnership five years ago, and together with their father, are building up a reputation for sterling business qualifications which makes them a credit to the trade in general.  In addition to attending to the enormous demands made upon his time by his ever-increasing business, Mr. J. H. Preston also fulfills the position of director in the Rhode Island National Bank.


p. 84.

GEORGE E. PERKINS, Analytical and Consulting Chemist, State Assayer, Etc., No. 31 Market Square.  -- As is generally known hereabouts, the State Assayer for Rhode Island is Mr. George E. Perkins, following the profession of analytical and consulting chemist, at No. 31 Market Square.  Mr. Perkins has been practising here since 1874, and the success with which he has met cannot but be regarded as a true index of his sound ability, wide practical knowledge and deep learning.  As an analytical and consulting chemist, Mr. Perkins undertakes all matters appertaining thereto, for clients and patrons all over the United States, and he devotes particular attention to the anlysis of commercial drugs and chemicals, water, ores, iron, steel, and to the thorough investigation of all questions involving chemical principles; while he makes special yearly contracts with print works, bleacheries, and other manufacturing establishments for the analysis of chemicals and drugs; the examination of new processes and the investigation of all questions arising in the process of manufacture.  Mr. Perkins was created State Assayer by Governor Davis, one year ago, and as city analyst he tests the milk, water and general line of edibles for the authorities.  A suite of rooms is maintained on the third floor at the address named, and every appliance and facility is there furnished for ensuring the most accurate results.  Mr. Perkins' wide range of practical experience extends over a period of eighteen years; and in all the departments of his business he displays a ready grasp of the details and intricacies of chemistry, analysis and essaying, respectively; clearly demonstrating that beyond his profound study he is possessed of a fecundity of intuitive talent.  He is a native of this city, still a young man, and is a member of the American Chemical Society.


p. 84.

ARTHUR O'LEARY, Insurance, No. 54 Westminster Street.  -- In this thriving city few men are so well to the front in business matters as Mr. Arthur O'Leary, insurance and real estate agent, No. 54 Westminster Street.  The insurance agency covers the Hamberg Bremen Company, the Trades Insurance Company, Phenix Insurance Company, the Michigan Fire and Marine Insurance Company, the People's Fire Insurance Company, and the Buffalo German Insurance Company, with over $14,000,000 representing the total assets.  Mr. O'Leary places insurance of any amount and all kinds in none but strictly first-class companies, and though but a young man, his large experience in insurance matters places him in the front rank on any matter concerned therewith.  Loans are also negotiated on the most satisfactory terms possible.  The real estate business also claims Mr. O'Leary's attention. The intimate knowledge he possesses of every part of Rhode Island, combined with a character for integrity and uprightness, has resulted in a large connection with investors and others.  Mr. O'Leary was born in Paris, and was brought to Providence when an infant.  He has been here altogether twenty-four years, having had eight years' experience in this line of business in New York, Boston and this city.  Mr. O'Leary is a member of the Board of Fire Underwriters and also takes an active interest in the Metropole, Home and Columbia Clubs, of which he is a member.


p. 85.

WM. L. BALLOU, Manufacturer of Sterling Silver Novelties, Importer of Diamonds, No. 74 Chestnut Street; also Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry, Silverware, Leather Goods, Fans, etc., at Nos. 222 - 226 Westminster Street. --  There are few industries which this work will record which require a most refined taste in their operations than the manufacturer of sterling silver novelties; but the success which has attended the the establishment and conduct of this branch of trade by Mr. Wm. L. Ballou is a sufficient evidence of his thorough adaptation to its requirements.  This business was founded by Mr. Ballou fifteen years ago.  He afterward admitted a partner, the firm name becoming Ballou & Smith, and on the retirement of the latter changing to Wm. L. Ballou & Co.  Five years ago the suffix '& Co.' was dropped from the firm style.  Mr. Ballou is a native of Rhode Island, and has had a very extended experience in business life.  His first employment was as a boy in a grocery store, but he left that to learn the engraver's art, which he mastered thoroughly, and followed for the period of twenty-one years, or up to the time when he started his present enterprise.  The premises occupied comprise a floor 45 x 100 feet in dimensions, and the place is admirably complete in its equipment of fine machinery driven by steam-power.  Employment is afforded to from fifty to eighty-five skilled hands in the several departments, and a splendid line of sterling silver novelites is turned out.  New designs are constantly being introduced, and the goods are marvels of elegance and skilled workmanship.  Mr. Ballou sells direct to the retail trade, and was the first in Providence to introduce this mode of disposing of goods.  At his splendid store, Nos. 222, 224 and 226 Westminster Street, he keeps in stock a splendid line of watches, diamonds, jewelry, silverware, leather goods, and a beautiful assortment of fine fans.  He is also a direct importer of diamonds, and a fine lot of stones both set and loose are always kept on hand, and customers will always find everything that is choice, unique, and elegant at this popular store. Repairing of fine watches is also give special attention and done in the best manner.  The trade extends to all part of the United States and is steadily increasing in volume.


p. 85.

F. J. SKUCE & CO., Enamelers, Gold, Silver, and Plated Jewelry Enameled in all Colors, Emblem Work a Specialty, No. 27 Page Street. -- One of the ablest exponents of the art of enameling in the city of Providence is the responsible firm of F. J. Skuce & Co., located at No. 27 Page Street, whose operations have all along been characterized by the adoption of all the latest improved scientific processes and appliances as they have been introduced from time to time; as also in keeping well abreast of the progressive spirit of the age in all other respects.  Thus the methods in use some few years back, whereby the enamel would often crack, fade, or come off bodily, have been discarded in favor of those now in vogue, obviating these unsatisfactory results and producing an enamel of uniform excellence, in permanent colors, that will stand any ordinary usage for many years. Thus the firm's productions are freely recognized as a standard make, and the house is now the centre of a trade of considerable volume and importance, reaching all over the United States, and furnishing regular employment for eighteen skilled workers.  Gold, silver, and plated jewelry and silverware of every description are enameled in all colors, a specialty being made of emblem work for societies, and each order is fulfilled promptly and accurately under the close scrutiny of the proprietors.  They also manufacture and have for sale a full line of enamels, both transparent and opaque; also emery stones of all grades.  The enterprise was founded in 1870 by Messrs. R. and F. J. Skuce, and in 1889 the present firm was formed, the copartners being Mr. Frank J. Skuce and Mr. John T. King, who have a practical experience in this line at their command of thirty years and twenty years respectively.  The third floor, 50 x 100 feet in superficial area, is occupied, and is provided with four ovens, all necessary machines, appliances, and accessories pertaining to the industry, steam-power being the motive force used.  Of the able proprietors, Mr. Skuce was born in Massachusetts and came to Providence in 1861, while Mr. King is a native of this city.


p. 85.

HEARN & BRAITSCH, Manufacturers of Gold-headed Canes, Umbrella Mountings, and Novelties in Gold and Silver; Works, Nos. 2 to 12 Melrose Street; Office, No. 376 Postters Avenue; New York Office, No. 415 Broadway.  -- The review of the leading manufacturing interests of Providence includes the house of Messrs. Hearn  & Braitsch, who are the largest and leading manufacturers in the United States, in the lines of gold-headed canes, umbrella mountings, and novelties in gold and silver, and whose main office is located at No. 376 Potters Avenue, with works at Nos. 2 to 12 Melrose Street.  This firm established their business here in 1887, and have built up a prestige and a patronage unequalled by any of their comtemporaries in the country.  The works comprise a three-story structure, measuring 40 x 175 feet, and supplied with machinery made especially for this purpose, operated by a Corliss steam-engine of 60 horse-power, and steady employment is given to a force of 135 skilled hands.  There are twelve different departments represented here, from designing to finishing, all ably manned, and under expert supervision.  The firm receive the gold and silver in bullion or bulk, and fashion it into any form desired for adorning canes, umbrellas, and various other purposes.  Their latest designs and novelties embody every modern improvement and device, including the important features of strength and lightness in canes and umbrellas, while the products are made of the best materials, with special reference to durability, and are furnished to the trade throughout all parts of the United States, in quantities to suit, at short notice, and at terms and prices which cannot be afforded by rival concerns.  A corps of talented salesmen represent the interests of the house upon the road, and a branch salesroom is operated at No. 415 Broadway, N. Y. The copartners, Messrs. John Hearn and William J. Braitsch, are natives of New York, expert and practical manufacturers of fifteen years' experience, and young men of tried ability, eminent popularity, and sterling worth.


p. 86.

RICHMOND & TIFFANY, Cotton, Office, No. 17 South Water Street.  -- Prominent in the handling of cotton in this city is the responsible firm of Richmond & Tiffany, located at No. 17 South Water Street, who, as brokers and dealers, control an extensive connection in this section of the New England States.  The business was established in May, 1886, by the present copartners, Mr. John M. Richmond and Mr. Henry L. Tiffany, whose practical experience in the handling of cotton range over a period of twenty-five years and twelve years respectively.  The firm's success in mainly attributable to the complete facilities they possess for obtaining domestic cotton direct from growers and placing it upon this market upon the most favorable terms, and for these purposes they have correspondents all over the Southern and Southwestern States, wherever cotton is grown.  The firm's main business consists in the purchase of cotton of any grade and in any quantities, on order, for mills and manufactories, whose confidence and perpetual support have been gained by the firm's systematic methods in filling orders and by a rigid adherence to a high code of business principles.  The office, on the first floor at the address named, is provided with every facility for the efficient conduct of affairs; being connected by long distance telephone to all cities.  Mr. Richmond, now of middle-age, and Mr. Tiffany, still a young man, are both natives of Rhode Island and are respected members of the Board of Trade.

photograph, also on page 86: Cathedral Square.


p. 87 - 88.

THE J. B. BARNABY COMPANY, (Incorporated), Manufacturers, Jobbers and Retailers of Men's, Youth's, Boys' and Children's Clothing, Special Department for Ladies', Misses' and Children's Ready-made Suits and Outside Garments, Nos. 122 to 130 Westminster Street.  --  One of the colossal and representative emporiums of trade in Providence is the famous establishment of the J. B. Barnaby Company, the well-known manufacturers, jobbers and retailers of men's, youth's, boys' and children's clothing, and ladies', misses' and children's ready-made suits and outside garments, located at Nos. 122 to 130 Westminster Street.  This house is not only a splendid monument to the intelligent enterprise of its management, but is also one of those public institutions whose great and honorable success reflects luster upon the name and fame of the city.  The foundation of this great business was laid in 1852 by Mr. J. B. Barnaby, the firm of J. B. Barnaby & Co. being organized in 1869, and in 1889 the present company was incorporated, with ample capital, and with Colonel Henry B. Winship, president; Albert L. Anthony, vice-president and treasurer.  On the 13th of December, 1890, the establishment occupied by this company was destroyed by fire; but, with characteristic enterprise and pluck, its officers at once set about rebuilding upon a larger and grander scale, and in October, 1891, the present palatial structure was completed.  It is four stories in height, with a floor space equal to three-fourths of an acre, and divided into different departments for the retail trade, the wholesale trade, the ladies' salesroom, the cutting-room, etc.  On entering the house from the noble marble facade, on Westminster Street, the most striking feature is the grand stairway, designed after the famous staircase of the Grand Opera House in Paris; while on every hand are evidence of a master-hand in planning the various improvements and conveniences for which the establishment is noted. The house is provided with steam-heat, electric-lights, burglar alarms, railway cash system, electric annunciators, speaking-tubes, elegant furniture and furnishings, and magnificent show-windows that form a leading attraction of this fashionable thoroughfare.  In the retail department on the ground-floor is shown a truly grand stock of choice garments, suited to the wants of men, youth, boys and children.  The management pays special attention to the cut and style of all clothing handled, and is bound to have the cheaper grades fit as well upon the form, and have as correct style as the higher-priced goods.  The managers take a personal pride in this matter, and the company are not ashamed to put their name upon all clothing sold here and let everybody know where it was bought.  They have learned that a good name, a name that stands for honorable dealings, square business methods and just prices, is something that counts side by side with the capital that backs a business.  In fact, it is part of the capital, and a part that is most valuable.  When it comes to materials, they have an array of qualities and patterns that will satisfy the most fastidious buyer. Prices are moderate and the aim is to give in every case the very best value possible for the money received.  They believe that it pays to have a large trade with small profits, rather than a small trade with large profits. This enables them also to keep their stock always fresh, and they are not obliged to work off old patterns and last year's styles among their new goods.  Their knowledge of the colors that wear best, the dyes that do not fade and the materials that do not become shiny and shabby, are all put into their buying and selling and count for something to the customer.  Here is shown that indispensable garment of society, the swallow-tail coat, now as always, the correct thing for evening dress; the popular Prince Albert, which still retains the lead for half-dress suits; the dress sackcoat, for a dressy, stylish neglige; cutaway frock suits, sack suits, fall and winter overcoats, storm overcoats and ulsters, and extra sizes in garments for tall and stout men.  In all these goods this house challenges comparison as to quality and fit and defies competition as to price.  In its special department for ladies this company has facilities enjoyed by no other house; its aim and policy has every been to attain a still higher standard of perfection in every article made and sold; to render their stock absolutely comprehensive of everything desirable both in foreign and domestic products, and as designers and manufacturers to make good their claim as leaders, by originating exclusive new styles accepted by the 'elite' of the fair sex as 'en regle', and to which the homage of the trade is rendered by a close imitation.  The patrons of this department include the leading families of Providence, Newport, Pawtucket, Woonsocket and other cities and towns throughout this section of the country, for whom the company are prepared to make every description of costume and outside garment.  Those who rely upon the good taste and sound judgment of this house are sure of being perfectly suited and in every detail well and fashionably dressed. Walking-costumes, cloaks, jackets, riding-habits and wraps are specialties and satisfaction is guaranteed in every case, both as to style, cut, trimmings, workmanship and fit.  As manufacturers and jobbers of clothing, the J. B. Barnaby Company carries on a great business with branch houses in Kansas City, Boston, Fall River and New Haven.  They employ one hundred and fifty skilled hands in the house and some four hundred outside, by whom, all the year round, the words 'hard times and dull season' are never heard, and to whom every favorable consideration in the way of wages is accorded as a matter of simple right and propriety.  In respect of operations in strictly fine goods, this company is not surpassed by any other in America.  The great Scotch mills on the Tweed and Yarrow, and the Dee and Don, and the equally celebrated looms in the west of England and in France and Germany, contribute their standard coatings and suitings; while the best home mills are called upon for their leading specialties.  More people wear ready-made goods than formerly, in proportion of ten to one, and they dress better, too, in proportion, simply as they take pains in finding the best stores. It is only a matter of little discernment and discrimination.  A house like the J. B. Barnaby Company keeps the standard advanced so high that all trade novelties and betterments gravitate naturally to its quarters in search of recognition and illustration.  Its reputation gives immediate character and circulation to the meritorious devices in loom work, while its goods are standard the country over.  A word as to its personnel:  Colonel Winship, the president, is one of the best-known men in the State.  He was born in this city, September 14, 1843, and came into the employ of Mr. Barnaby in 1868.  The ensuing year he was admitted to partnership, and in September, 1889, on the death of the honored founder of the house, he was advanced to his present position.  In 1878 he was elected colonel of the United Train of Artillery, one of the most famous military organizations in the Union, and he has also held various offices in the gift of his fellow-citizens, having been a member of the Board of Aldermen, commissioner of public parks, and a member of the School Committee; while he is a director of the Industrial Trust Company, and prominent in numerous sporting and social organizations. He excels both as a buyer and a salesman; is an enterprising and judicious advertiser, and a true type of that Yankee pluck and perseverance which has made New England the industrial empire in America.  The vice-president and treasurer, Mr. Anthony, is a native of Somerset, Bristol Co., Mass., who came into the employ of J. B. Barnaby & Co., as bookkeeper, in 1874.  In 1884 he became a partner in the firm and in June 1889, on the organization of this company, was elected secretary and treasurer, and upon the death of Mr. Barnaby was also made vice-president.  He is one of the trustees of the J. B. Barnaby estate, a director of the Barnaby Manufacturing Company, of Fall River, Mass.; auditor of the Roger Williams Loan and Savings Association, and one of the appraisers of the Providence branch of the National Mutual Building and Loan Association of New York; while he is also prominent as a Mason, Odd Fellow, Good Templar, Knight of Honor and as a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Royal Society of Good Fellows and the Iron Hall; having attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite and been at the head of his chapter, council and commandery; served as grand master of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of Rhode Island, representative of the Grand Council of Pennsylvania, Grand King of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Rhode Island, representative of the Grand Chapters of Illinois and Connecticut, and was first regent of Unity Council of the Royal Arcanum, grand regent of the Grand Council of Rhode Island, etc.  He is a thoroughly self-made man and eminently popular in both social and business circles.  The directors of the company, in addition to the two executive officers names, are Messrs. Walter A. Scott, George H. Grant and Jacob Kern, each of whom is at the head of a department in the house, and is promoting its interests with energy, discrimination and brilliant success. Under such favoring auspices this company has gone on from year to year, gaining strength and popularity as a conservator of correct business principles, and with a widespread reputation for producing the best clothing at prices proportioned to intrinsic values, and therefore, upon a scale fairly adjusted as between buyer and seller.  Its outlook for a great business bounded by no local lines, was never fairer than it is to-day.


p. 88.

W. H. LELAND & CO., Designers and Engravers on Wood, Photographing, Process Engraving and Electrotyping, No. 62 Westminster Street.  -- One of the leading and best-known concerns, devoted to the useful and important art of engraving on wood, is that of Messrs. W. H. Leland & Co., located at No. 62 Westminster Street.  The business was first established in 1883, by B. P. Sperry, the present proprietor succeeding to the control in 1889.  The premises occupied are ample and well equipped, being supplied with the latest improved appliances and general appurtenances, and employment is furnished to ten expert assistants.  Everything in the line of designing and engraving on wood is done here in the most expeditious and excellent manner, original designs being executed for illustrated catalogues, journals, etc. The patronage is large in this city and extends to all parts of New England. Only the finest work is turned out, and all orders are promptly filled.  Mr. W. H. Leland, the active member of the firm, is a native of Vermont, but has resided in this city for three years.  He is a practical and expert designer and engraver, and is a thorough master of his art in all its branches.


p. 88.

EDMUND CARPENTER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in All Kinds of Eastern, Western and Whitewood Lumber, No. 270 Dyer Street.  -- Viewed from a commercial standpoint, the importance of the lumber interest in Providence can scarcely be overestimated.  It constitutes one of the most extensive branches of trade in this city, and the volume of business grows steadily apace.  Prominent among our representative merchants in this line is Edmund Carpenter, whose office and yards are at No. 270 Dyer Street.  He is a general retail dealer in all kinds of Eastern, Western and whitewood lumber, and handles over 5,000,000 feet, all told, a year; his annual sales of spruce being about 2,000,000 feet.  He receives supplies from various points by rail and water, and has ample and excellent wharf facilities, boats unloading into the yard.  Mr. Carpenter, who is a young man, and a native of this State, is a man of energy and thorough business experience, standing high in the community, both as a citizen and a merchant.  He is a member of the Rhode Island Lumbermen's Association and also of the Polham Club, and is deservedly esteemed in commercial circles and in social life.  Mr. Carpenter was formerly of the firm of C. H. & E. Carpenter, established in 1884, and about seven years ago succeeded the same as sole proprietor, conducting the business along since with eminent success.  The yard, which is conveniently situated, is 400 x 500 feet in dimensions, and there are capacious sheds in connection therewith, likewise.  A carefully selected and heavy stock is constantly kept on hand, including, besides rough and dressed lumber of every description, mouldings and builders' supplies generally, and a number of hands are employed, while several teams deliver all over the city and vicinity.  All orders receive prompt attention, and the very lowest consistent prices prevail always, special inducements being offered to the building trades.


p. 89.

REMINGTON & HENTHORN, Consulting and Mechanical  Engineers, and Solicitors of Patents, No. 146 Westminster Street. --  In the domain of the arts and sciences there is, perhaps, no distinct sphere in which such notable progress has been made during the past quarter of a century, as in engineering.  And these remarks apply equally to the civil and mechanical branches of the profession.  The advance in steam and naval engineering, too, of late years, has been steady and marked, and is especially worthy of note.  A Providence firm, sustaining a high reputation for skill and reliability in the line indicated, is that of Remington & Henthorn, whose office is at No. 146 Westminster Street.  They rank among the leading consulting and mechanical engineers in New England, and are widely and favorably known.  They have long been at the head of their profession, and receive a substantial measure of recognition.  Messrs. Remington & Henthorn give particular attention to the designing and erection of electric-light plants, factories, big manufacturing concerns, and also do a large amount of naval work, yacht and pleasure craft being a specialty.  Mr. Geo. H. Remington, the senior member of the firm, is a gentleman of middle-age, and a native of Coventry, R.I.; and Mr. John T. Henthorn, his partner, who is also a man in the meridian of life, was born in Massachusetts.  They are both thoroughly experienced and expert engineers, master of their art in all its branches, and are prominent members of the Mechanical Engineers' Society of America, and the Civil Engineers' Society of America.  Messrs. Remington & Henthorn were each established on his own account for some fifteen years, and in 1885 formed the present copartnership.  They occupy a commodious, and a well-appointed office, connected by telephone and employ a very efficient staff, including competent draughtsmen and skilled mechanics.  The firm, who are agents for the Reynolds-Corliss Engine, are prepared to engage in all classes of work in the above indicated, furnishing designs, specifications, etc., at short notice.  Special attention is given to consultations, while construction is personally supervised, and all work undertaken by this well-known and responsible firm is certain to be performed in the most careful, skilful and trustworthy manner. - In addition to the foregoing, these gentlemen have established an enviable reputation as solicitors of patents, including Canadian and foreign countries.


p. 89.

JOHN HOWE, Civil Engineer, No. 70 Weybosset Street.  -- Mr. John Howe, located in this city at No. 70 Weybosset Street, besides being the oldest business man on the street, is without doubt, the oldest established civil engineer in Rhode Island, he having been practising here at the same location for the past thirty-eight years.  Mr. Howe's operations, extending throughout the State, are, and all along have been, of the most important and significant character.  For the past ten years he has been entrusted with the lion's share of the city work, outlining, planning, etc., and one of his main achievements of late was the laying out of the new factory, at Elmwood, of the Gorham Manufacturing Company, the largest silversmiths in the country; a work on which he was engaged for two years.  Mr. Howe possesses a protracted experience of forty years as a civil engineer; he started in Lowell, on the railroad there, in 1852, and was engaged in taking elevations, grading, etc.  Afterward he worked on the Medway Branch, Massachusetts, and afterward on the Hampshire and Hampton Railroad, and he has since rendered valuable aid in the construction of railroads.  Although undertaking equally all branches of civil engineering, Mr. Howe devotes his attention largely to the planning of efficient drainage systems for the whole districts, water supply, and the various other matters relative to the improvement of property.  Mr. Howe is a native of Vermont, whence he first came to Providence thirty-eight years ago, and is an old member of the Masonic Fraternity.  During his sojourn here, he has identified himself from time to time, with several schemes for advancement of the city's prosperity. Since 1879 he has held the position of Brigade Engineer on General Rhode's staff, Rhode Island Militia, with rank of captain, and has been detailed by the Governor as Inspector of Rifle Practice.


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GEO. H. HOLMES & CO., Manufacturing Jewelers, No. 183 Eddy Street.  -- In that branch of the great jewelry industry of Providence assigned to the manufacture of ladies' gold plate jewelry, a prominent place is occupied by the responsible firm of George H. Holmes & Co., carrying on their operations at No. 183 Eddy Street, who make a specialty of that kind of goods, although manufacturing several other lines.  This important enterprise was established in 1886, by Messrs. Smith & Holmes, and on the retirement of the former, one year later, the present sole proprietor assumed control of affairs.  The house in the center of an important and extensive trade conducted largely with jobbers all over the United States; and two active travelers are retained, through whose medium the promptest effect is given to customers' orders and instructions.  Although manufacturing a general line of gold and silver plated jewelry, the firm devote more particular attention to ladies' fine plated goods, such as rings, earrings, pins, brooches, lockets, pendants, bracelets, hair, neck and dress ornaments, charms, etc., and to maintaining these at an uniformly high standard of excellence.  The manufacturing department is 60 x 150 feet in dimensions, and is on the fourth floor at the location named; is well lighted and ventilated, conveniently arranged, and contains a complete modern equipment of improved machines, appliances, tools and accessories pertaining to fine jewelry making, steam-power being the motive force used, and about fifty workmen there regularly employed, all skilled in their respective departments of manufacture.  The experienced proprietor, Mr. George H. Holmes, is a native of this city, a member of the Masonic Order; and has been identified with the political interests of the city, having been a member of the School Committee for three years.


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FIRST NATIONAL BANK, United States Depository. -- This bank was duly-organized in 1863, and was the first to take advantage of the national banking laws in this city.  It has ever proved one of the financial bulwarks of the city, and has always been guided by the soundest and most conservative policy.  It has ever been a prime favorite with the business world, and its extended line of deposits are largely those of active merchants, while it discounts much of the most desirable commercial paper on the market.  It has a paid up capital of $500,000, held by leading citizens as a safe and remunerative investment, while its surplus fund of $91,000, with undivided profits of $81,037.42, furnishes an eloquent commentary upon the ability and prudence of the management.  It is a United States Depository and transacts a general banking business, receiving the accounts of banks, bankers, corporations, firms and individuals upon the most favorable terms; buying and selling foreign exchange, handling first-class commercial paper, negotiating loans on approved collateral, and making collections on all points at the lowest ratees, through its chain of correspondents, which include the First National Bank and the National Park Bank, of New York City; and the National Bank of the Republic, of Boston. Its loans and discounts average over $1,350,000, and its individual deposits aggregate nearly $1,000,000.  It numbers among its permanent depositors many of the leading merchants and manufacturers of the city and State, and there is no fiscal institution here which enjoys greater confidence on whose management is more signally prudent and sagacious.  The officers and directors are as follows, viz.:  President, G. L. Littlefield;
vice-president, G. H. Dart; cashier, C. E. Lapham; directors, G. L. Littlefield, G. H. Dart, B. B. Knight, S. A. Jenks, Edwin Barrows, W. B. Waterman and Zachariah Chaffee.  The president is an able, clear-headed financier, who has won the esteem and respect of the commercial world, and is closely identified with the bank since 1874, being promoted to his present position in 1881, and has every qualification at command, including large practical experience and perfected methods of conducting the vast volume of business offered; while the board of directors comprises much of the solid business of the city.


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J. H. PERKINS, Counselor-at-Law and Pension Attorney, Room No. 24, No. 269 Westminster Street. --  There is no department in professional life, in which experience counts for so much, as in the law, long and varied practice in the legal profession being an unfailing criterion of learning, popularity and reliability.  Especially does this apply to that branch devoted to claims for pensions and all the complete features kindred thereto, where are involved technical questions upon which depend very important interests to the client.  In procuring pensions, the services of an experienced attorney are not only of inestimable service, but may be justly considered as absolutely essential to a successful prosecution of an application, and the pushing of a claim.  A well-known, popular and reliable counselor-at-law and pension attorney in Providence, is Mr. J. H. Perkins, whose office is centrally located at No. 269 Westminster Street, room No. 24, and who has always maintained the highest of reputations for efficiency and upright, liberal business methods.  Mr. Perkins is a native of Maine, and has been a member of the bar since 1862, having commenced practice during that year, in the city of Bangor, and at the close of the War of the Rebellion, in 1865, made a specialty of pension claims.  In 1874, he moved to this city, and from the start has enjoyed a very large and influential practice.  His office is centrally located, amply spacious and very appropriately fitted up.  Being well fitted by his many years of experience and practice in the several courts, and in the Pension Bureau at Washington, and thoroughly familiar with all the laws relating to pensions, bounties, back pay, claims for allowances to soldiers and sailors, dependent widows and orphans, the rerating, revision and rules, for reopening old claims, etc., and devotes his personal attention to all cases placed in his hands.  His applications, affidavits and other papers filed in the interests of clients, are models of accuracy, wisdom and a thorough understanding of the case in hand, while his fees are very moderate.  Mr. Perkins is a very popular, reliable and honorable gentleman in all his dealings, and is held in the highest estimation in social, financial and professional circles.


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AMERICAN RING TRAVELER COMPANY, Nos. 7 and 9 Eddy Street.  --  This company are widely and deservedly prominent as manufacturers of the Wilson round pointed and American square pointed spinning and bronze twisting travelers, and have been established in the business here since 1882.  Their factory contains 6,000 square feet of floor space, and is equipped with their own special automatic machinery, operated by steam-power, and every facility is at hand for producing the best goods at the minimum of cost.  The average output is a million ring travelers per day, while the company also manufacture a line of rawhide spinning-frame saddles, steel and composition twister travelers, belt hooks, weavers' combs, reed hooks, loom forks, and all kinds of wire specialties for weavers' use.  These productions are now used by a majority of the best mills throughout the country, and are universally commended by all who have used them, as the acme of perfection in this line of goods.  A full and complete stock is kept constantly on hand, and the largest orders are promptly filled, on the most favorable terms.  The goods are in demand in all parts of the United States, and a fine growing export trade has been built up with numerous foreign countries. The business is managed by Mr. A. Curtis Tingley, agent, with Mr. Chas. W. North as superintendent.  Mr. Tingley is a Rhode Island man by birth and training, and a gentleman of experience and reliability, with whom it will be found both pleasant and profitable to deal.


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GEO. HAWES & SONS, Wholesale Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Fruit and Produce, General Commission Merchants, Peaches, Berries, and Bananas a Specialty in Their Season, Nos. 23 and 25 Dyer Street.  --  It seems within reason to believe that a house with an experience of over thirty years must have facilities and connections, and be in a position to offer inducements, unknown to firms of later date.  Certainly, they have the time and opportunity to become familiar with the best sources of supply, learn the wishes and requirements of their patrons, and carry the precise class of goods necessary for their trade.  Of such establishments in Providence, that of Geo. Hawes & Sons, at Nos. 23 and 25 Dyer Street, is an eminent representative.  As wholesale dealers in foreign and domestic fruit and produce, and general commission merchants, this house has long held a foremost position in its line of trade.  The business was founded in 1859, by Mr. Geo. Hawes, who had been engaged as a farmer and producer, since 1817, and who subsequently admitted his sons to partnership.  The honored founder of the business died in 1867, after an active and honorable business career covering half a century, and his sons have since continued the enterprise without change in the firm-name.  They occupy an entire four-story building, 25 x 150 feet in dimensions, giving ample accommodations for the prosecution of a large and active trade.  They make a specialty of handling peaches, berries and bananas in their season, and are enabled to command all those advantages naturally accumulated by long years of identification with a special branch of trade, and to advance in the highest degree the interests of both producer and dealer.  They make daily shipments to all parts of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and all orders by telephone, telegraph or mail receive immediate and careful attention.  This firm are also manufacturers and owners of Hawes' Steam Trap, which has been on the market since 1881, and is recognized as superior to all others wherever used.  Its superiority consists of great economy in fuel, absolute circulation without air valves, avoiding snapping noises in pipes.  When cold or at rest, the outlet is open, avoiding great damage by freezing.  They occupy a very small space, and will not freeze at low temperature if used in the open air.  These great improvements make it the most perfect, reliable, durable and cheapest steam trap, ever offered to the public.  It is used and highly endorsed by such well-known houses as the Walworth Manufacturing Co., Braman, Dow & Co., Geo. K. Paul & Co., and Sumner & Goodwin, Boston; L. B. Darling & Co., Pawtucket, R.I.; American Worsted Co., Woonsocket, R.I.; Abbott Downing Co., Concord, N. H.; East Hartford Manufacturing Co., Burnside, Conn.; Monitor Carpet Mills, Philadelphia, Pa.; Wm. S. Smith, chief-engineer U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C.; among many others.  The copartners, Messrs. J. M., E. C. and R. G. Hawes, have been trained in the produce commission business from their youth up, and stand deservedly high in commercial and trade circles.


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C. FARNUM'S SON, Harness Manufacturer, No. 38 Exchange Place.  --  Among the most important of the industrial arts, a prominent position is occupied by that of the manufacture of harness.  An old-established, foremost house in this city, occupying a representative position in the trade, is that of C. Farnum's Son, located at No. 38 Exchange Place.  The business was founded in 1864, by Farnum & Sherman, who entered upon the harness-making industry. The firm afterward became C. Farnum & Co., and in 1882, Mr. C. Farnum's son, Mr. Henry W. Farnum, the present proprietor, came into the control, adopting the firm-title of C. Farnum's Son.  He entered the house twenty-four years ago, and has, therefore had thorough experience in all the branches of trade in which he is engaged.  The premises occupied comprise a store and basement, each 25 x 100 feet in dimensions.  The basement is equipped as a work-shop, and is provided with all requisite appliances for turning out the best line of goods.  Employment is found for a staff of skilled workmen, and the products of the house consist of high-grade class of harness of all kinds, collars and saddles, etc.  The well-appointed salesroom contains a heavy stock of these superior goods, also of leather, horse blankets, carriage robes, and horse furnishings of every description.  Both a wholesale and retail demand is met, and the trade supplied extends to all sections of the New England States.  All goods are guaranteed to be exactly as represented, while in prices, those quoted will compare favorably with those of any other establishment in this department of trade.  Mr. Farnum is a native of Providence, has a host of friends in both business and social circles, and in all transactions had with him, he will be found upright, straightforward and equitable.


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WILLIAM SWEENEY & CO., Manufacturers and Dealers in all Kinds of Mattresses, Feathers, Brass and Iron Beds, Bedding, Spring Beds, Etc., Feathers Renovated and Mattresses Made Over; Telephone Connection; Wayland Building, No. 122 North Main Street.  --  The largest wholesale and retail house engaged in the manufacture of those useful articles of household furniture known as mattresses and general bedding in Providence is that of Messrs. William Sweeney & Co.  This reliable firm was established by Mr. Sweeney in 1858, and was successfully promoted from year to year until 1889, when its founder died, the wife of the deceased and Mr. F. B. Burt continuing the enterprise, the name of the house being then changed to that under which it is now known to the trade.  The store, which possesses an imposing frontage, and includes a very commodious basement, is 25 x 100 feet in area, in addition to which the company use 9,000 feet of floor space for storage and workroom purposes.  A force of twenty skilled assistants is employed, manufacturing everything in the line of mattresses to order, as well as for the trade, the amount of which commanded by this enterprising house reaches to every city and town in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  In addition to manufacturing mattresses, the house deals in all kinds of bedding, feathers (for bedding), brass and iron beds, spring beds and upholstering supplies.


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GAS STOVE STORE, George M. Ashley, Mgr.; Gas Stoves, Gas Heaters, Gas Ranges, Corner North Main Street and Market Square.  -- One of the handsomest places of business for a thoroughly useful purpose is the Gas Stove Store, corner of North Main Street and Market Square.  The premises are 20 x 50 and contain a large assortment of gas ranges, gas stoves, gas heaters, and gas apparatus of every variety.  The business is carried on by the Providence Gas Company, whose extensive operations in the city and vicinity afford every guarantee that the wants of intending purchasers will be efficiently attended to.  The manager, Mr. George M. Ashley, has had an extensive experience in various lines of trade, becoming a manufacturer four years ago; since which period he has devoted his entire attention to the gas stove business, possessing every qualification for making it a complete success.  The company's goods are unsurpassed for beautiful ornamentation, excellence of finish, symmetrical proportions and perfect operation, fully meeting the requirements of the most critical customers.  These splendid stoves, ranges and heaters, are admirably adapted to the wants of any section of the city and suburbs, while the prices quoted for them in all cases are exceedingly just and moderate.  These gas stoves have latterly attained great popularity and are the most practical, original, safe and desirable apparatus of this class, having no leakage or bad odor, while they are unsurpassed for economy, capacity, utility and durability.  The heaters and ranges are also in large and increasing demand, the proved excellence of both in their different capacities having been thoroughly demonstrated.  The company are agents for all kinds of gas stoves, heaters and ranges, and are quick to perceive and take advantage of any improvement that is placed on the market.



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WM. S. SPOFFORD & SON, Tubing Manufacturers, Office and Factory, No. 14 Page Street.  --  The Messrs. Spofford are manufacturers of a very superior class of tubing, both in German silver, brass and other metals, and their productions are shipped to all parts of the country.  They make a leading specialty of spinning tubes and atomizer tubing, and their facilities for turning out any kind of work in this line is unsurpassed.  The quarters occupied by them as office and factory, at No. 14 Page Street, are commodious and perfectly equipped, being provided with the latest improved machinery and all needed appliances, while a number of skilled hands are employed.  The firm are prepared to execute orders for anything in their line, and guarantee the utmost satisfaction, all work being done under their immediate supervision.  Orders for spinning tubes and atomizer tubing receive particular attention, and the prices charged by this firm are of the most reasonable in character likewise.  Mr. Wm. S. Spofford is a gentleman of middle-age, born in England, and has been in this country a quarter of a century, settling in Providence in 1879.  Mr. E. E. Spofford, his son and partner, is a young man and takes a lively interest in the business of the firm.  The Messrs. Spofford are both men of practical skill and are thoroughly conversant with every detail of the business, Mr. Spofford, the elder, having had thirty-three years' experience in this line.  They have been established about seven years, and were formerly located on Point Street, moving to the present place in 1890.


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BROWN BROS. & CO., General Mill Furnishers; Works, No. 131 Dorrance Street; Salesrooms, No. 37 Exchange Place.  --  This representative house was originally established some forty years ago, by Cyrus White, who was succeeded in 1870 by Messrs. Butler, Brown & Co., and in 1877 the present firm was organized.  The salesrooms of the firm comprise three floors, 30 x 120 feet each, all of which splendid floor-space is utilized in the disposal of the immense and varied stock here constantly carried.  This stock embraces leather, rawhide, cotton and rubber beltings; lace, picker and belt leather; ring travelers, belt hooks, wire goods, roll coverers' stock and tools, and in fact, everything used in a mill, save oils and greases.  The firm manufacture at their works a line of valuable specialties for cotton and other mills using looms, including Shaw's United States ring travelers, which they sell all over the world.  At the present day, when the friction of competition rules more closely than ever, it is only those houses that have full confidence in their resources that can possibly come to the front. Unquestionably the foundation of the success of this firm lies in the complete knowledge of all details of the business and requirements of the trade which the partners possess.  Being expert and practical men, endowed with a genius for invention and an ambition to excel, they have devoted themselves with praiseworthy ardor to the production and sale of a class of specialties which should not only vie in excellence with both foreign and domestic wares, but should, when once introduced, be preferred by the consumer over all other similar productions.  That they have succeeded in this laudable endeavor there is no longer any doubt, as the superiority of their goods is such as to have created a permanent and increasing demand, not only in all parts of the United States, but also in many foreign countries.  The individual members of the firm are Messrs D. Russell Brown, H. Martin Brown and Charles H. Child.  The honored senior partner is the present Governor of Rhode Island, elected in April, 1892.  He was born in Bolton, Conn., in 1848, graduating at the academies of Manchester and Hartford, and came to this city in 1870, entering the supply house of Cyrus White as manager, and in April of that year became one of the principals of in the new firm of Butler, Brown & Co.  From 1880 to 1884, he served as a member of the Common Council, was a Presidential Elector in 1888, and has for years been prominent in the councils of the Republican party in the city and State.  He is president of the Home Investment Company, vice-president of the City Savings Bank, a director of the Old National Bank, and closely identified with the commercial growth and financial prosperity of the community.  Mr. H. Martin Brown, a brother of the proceeding, is a native of Connecticut, while Mr. Child was born in this city; and both are experienced and popular business men.


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THOMAS EVANS, Engineer, No. 65 Westminster Street.  -  Mr. Thomas Evans, the well-known consulting and constructing steam engineer, whose offices are located at No. 65 Westminster Street, has permanently maintained the lead in his profession since he established himself here ten years ago, and has constantly received a measure of recognition of the most flattering character.  He devotes his time and talents to examinations of steam plants for the economizing of fuel; the preparation of specifications and drawings of new steam plants, or for the improvement of old ones; the indication of steam engines to ascertain the power developed and cost of same; the testing of boilers to ascertain their efficiency, or the amount of water they would convert into steam with different kinds of coal, and under various conditions; the examination of bleacheries and dyehouses with a view of economizing in fuel, the weighing of shafting in cotton and woolen mills to ascertain the per cent of friction; and the testing of water wheels to compare results with maker's rating.  Among the prominent firms he has served in this vicinity may be mentioned the Providence Worsted Mills, National Worsted Mills, Valley Worsted Mills, Geneva Worsted Mills, Weybosset Worsted Mills, Manton Worsted Mills, Lymansville Worsted Mills, Lorraine Worsted Mills, Thornton Worsted Mills, American Fabric Company, Nottingham Mills, Lorraine Mills, Valley Falls Company, Rhode Island Tool Company, Rhode Island Bleachery, Bolton Bleachery, Valley Bleachery, Saylesville Bleachery, Davol Rubber Works, Providence Lithographic Company, Harrison Boiler Works, S. B. Champlin & Son, M. Fitzgerald & Co., Horace Remington & Son, among many others; while his services are in constant and important requisition throughout New England.  All work entrusted to him is certain to be performed in a manner calculated to satisfy the most exacting. Mr. Evans is also prominent as the inventor of a patent grate-bar, the chief feature of which is a uniform air space, free from sharp angles and curves. The air flowing through this bar meets with the least possible resistance, enabling a large amount of air to pass through with minimum amount of draught.  The very large amount of air necessary to perform combustion under ordinary conditions in burning coal, demands a carefully designed grate-bar, one that will allow free access of air or oxygen to the incandescent fuel, and at the same time allow the refuse ashes to fall through freely.  This bar contains from forty-six to sixty-five per cent air space, according to nature of fuel used.  To all parties using grate-bars, it is worthy of their serious consideration, while it is in large and increasing demand in all parts of the United States.  Mr. Evans is a native of England, a resident of this city for the past twenty-five years, and still in the prime of life; a member of the Association of Mechanical Engieneers of the United States, and honored and esteemed for his genius, skill and professional attainments.


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AMERICAN TUBING AND WEBBING COMPANY, Nos. 141 and 159 Aborn Street.  -- The American Tubing and Webbing Co. was incorporated in 1890, and is the largest institution of its kind in Providence.  It already enjoys a national reputation as manufactures of flexible gas-tight tubing for droplights on elevators, gas stoves, etc.; also, wicks for oil stoves, and elastic webbing for garters, etc., etc.  It has a capital stock of $30,000, and is officered as follows, viz.:  President, James M. Ripley; treasurer, L. M. Cook; general manager, Alfred Caldwell.  The works of the company are spacious in size, thoroughly equipped with machinery especially designed by the manager for this purpose, operated by steam-power, and give steady employment to fifty skilled workpeople.  The best of materials only are used in the manufacture, specially selected by the manager.  The management of this company early gave the subject a thorough investigation and have, as a result, with the extraordinary facilities at their command, produced a quality of tubing and webbing which is unequaled for practical utility, thorough reliability and durability, in this or any other country.  The trade will best consult their own interests by giving this company a sample order.  Their wishes and demands will be given due attention, and terms and prices will be found invariably satisfactory.  The officers of the company are well-known business men of Providence, who give this corporation the benefit of their large practical experience and close personal attention. The general manager, Mr. Caldwell, founded the business originally in 1883, under the name of the American Tubing and Manufacturing Co., and his well-directed efforts have greatly tended render this corporation the foremost manufacturers in their special field.


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O. S. CRESSY & CO., Dealers in Pianos, Manufacturers of Packing-cases, No. 91 Westminster Street.  -- The well-known house of O. S. Cressy & Co., was founded on Custom House Street, in 1874, by the senior member of the firm, Mr. O. S. Cressy, and six years ago he admitted to partnership his son, Mr. Geo. P. Cressy, when the present trade name of O. S. Cressy & Co. was adopted.  For the past four years the business has been carried on at the present quarters.  Messrs. Cressy & Co. are general dealers in all first-class pianos, and special agents for the Swick & Kelso pianos, and the Geo. M. Guild pianos, of Boston.  They at all times carry a large stock on hand, of both new and second-hand instruments, and sell the same for spot cash or on easy time payments.  The firm also carry on a heavy business as manufacturers of packing-cases for shipping purposes, and boards for rolling cloth on.  These goods they supply to the large mills throughout New England. The goods are manufactured in New York and New Hampshire, and at Pawtucket and Clyde Point, Rhode Island, and an idea of the extent of the industry may be formed when we state that 5,000,000 feet of lumber are consumed annually in the production of the output.  Mr. O. S. Cressy is a native of Massachusetts, and has resided in Providence since 1874.  He is a thoroughly progressive business man, and through his enterprise has done much to promote the prosperity of this community.  His son, Mr. Geo. P. Cressy, was born in California, and came here in 1874, and is a young man of excellent business ability.


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A. SAUGY, Corner Smith and Canal Streets.  --  The trade in food products is undoubtedly one of the most important of the industries of any locality, and Providence is well represented in this respect by a number of responsible houses devoted to this branch of business.  A leading house engaged in the manufacture of bologna and sausage, ham bologna and pressed ham, is that very successfully conducted by Mr. A. Saugy, whose office and works are conveniently located at the corner of Smith and Canal Streets. The business was established in 1869, and a substantial trade has been  established with the leading dealers throughout Rhode Island.  The premises occupied comprise two floors, 25 x 60 feet in dimensions, fully equipped with the latest improved machinery and all appliances necessary for the successful prosecution of affairs.  Only the best stock is handled and the greatest care and attention is given the beef and pork in all the stages through which it passes while being prepared for market.  Special attention is given to cutting meat and making sausage in English sheep casings, and the productions of this popular and reliable house are everywhere recognized and appreciated by the trade as standard productions, and have acquired an excellent reputation for their uniform good quality, and are absolutely unsurpassed by those of any other first-class house.  Twelve assistants are employed and all orders are promptly filled.  Mr. Saugy is a native of New York, but has been for twenty-five years a resident of this city, and is highly respected in commercial circles for his strict rectitude and honor, and enjoys the fullest confidence of his numerous patrons.


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THOMAS CARROLL, Fire, Marine, Plate-glass, Casualty and Life Insurance Agent, Real Estate and Mortgage Broker, No. 9 Weybosset Street, Providence, No. 9 Warren Avenue, East Providence.  --  Few features of modern progress have secured such a strong hold on the popular support as insurance, and it, like all other progressive innovations, was compelled to pass through various stages of ridicule, argument and censure before belief in its correctness was finally established.  Among the ablest and most successful exponents of the insurance business in Providence and vicinity is Mr. Thomas Carroll, fire, marine, plate-glass, casualty and life insurance agent, also real estate and mortgage broker, etc., whose offices are located at No. 9 Weybosset Street, telephone call, Providence, No. 1067, and at No. 9 Warren Avenue, telephone call, East Providence, No. 1439-5.  Mr. Carroll is a native of this city, and having a wide range of experience in this line of business, he established this enterprise in 1877, at East Providence, and at once developed a very large and influential patronage, and in 1890 he opened his office in this portion of the city, which has become the center of a very large business.  His offices are spacious, commodious, neatly appointed, and provided with every convenience for the transaction of business and the comfort of patrons.  He represents some of the leading foreign and home fire, marine, plate-glass, casualty and life insurance companies, among which are the Mutual Life, of New York, the German American Insurance Company, the Westchester Insurance Company, of New York, the Hamburg Bremen, New Hampshire Insurance Company, Providence-Washington Insurance Company, National Fire Insurance Company, New York Plate-Glass and the Lloyds Plate-glass Insurance Companies.  He invites consultation at his office upon insurance contracts of any character, and is at all times prepared to effect risks to any amount on desirable risks at the lowest rates of premium in companies whose policies are incontestable.  He also conducts a general real estate business, buying, selling, exchanging and renting all kinds of realty, collecting rents, securing responsible tenants, and makes a specialty of negotiating loans on bond and mortgage on all kinds of real and personal property upon the the most favorable terms.  He does a very extensive business as steamship agent for such first-class lines as the White Star, Inman, State and Anchor, and is prepared to furnish cabin, intermediate and steerage passage to and from all parts of the Old World at the companies' lowest rates.  Drafts payable in any of the large cities in Europe and letters of credit are issued at the lowest rates.  Mr. Carroll is a middle-aged gentleman, pleasant, courteous and enterprising, and is highly respected in social and commercial life.  He is an active and prominent member of several organizations, among which are the Order of Red Men, Foresters, also of the Board of Underwriters, of this city.


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F. F. KENDALL, Commission Merchant and Wholesale Dealer in Fruits and Produce, Nos. 201 and 203 Canal Street. --  The facilities enjoyed by Providence as a distributing point for food supplies and staple agricultural products have been such as to greatly promote the shipment to this market of fruits and produce and the prosecution of the commission business.  The enterprise of F. F. Kendall in this direction is a prominent one, and he has an established trade extending throughout Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and large consignments are received from the South and West. The concern was established in 1887 under the above name, and has since become widely known throughout the producing sections of the country as one of the most enterprising and reliable commission houses in Providence.  Mr. Kendall handles every description of early produce, and special attention is given to fruits and early vegetables.  These goods are received direct from producers and sold in wholesale lots only, and the facilities of the house are such that orders are filled with dispatch; and consignments of goods, however large, are quickly placed and prompt returns are made.  Goods are also shipped direct from producers, on orders, inducements being offered in this direction unsurpassed by those of any other house in the trade.  A leading specialty is made of all kinds of salt fish in cold weather, the sales of this article alone amounting to over $1,000 per month.  Mr. Kendall is a native of Maine, but has been a resident of this city for fifteen years.  He is a prominent member of the F. and A. M., the I. O. O. F. and the Good Fellows.  His house is one to be commended to shippers and others as one with which they will find it to their interest to form enduring business relations.


Continued

These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2000 by Beth Hurd


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