Rhode Island Reading Room
These documents are made available free to the public by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project

Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892

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CENTRAL FALLS

Like all the other New England colonists, the people of Rhode Island for many years devoted themselves almost entirely to agricultural and maritime pursuits.  This was true especially as to commerce, inasmuch as it led more rapidly to the acquirement of wealth, and also involved less personal labor.

'Farming the sea' was long the chief occupation of Rhode Islanders, the peculiar situation of the State and the commodiousness of its harbors being prime factors in turning the attention of the early settlers upon these shores to commercial pursuits.  An extensive coasting and foreign trade was developed, and whaling and fishing were at one time quite important industries.  These have all declined of late years, however.

Within the life-time of a generation the manufacturing industries in and around Providence have grown from comparatively limited extent to vast magnitude, and energy and capital are constantly seeking new fields to develop.  In the past few decades many flourishing towns and villages have sprung up hereabouts, and to-day Providence County is one of great hive of industry.  Some of these places that now fairly hum with human activity are of quite recent origin.  One of the most important among the latter is Central Falls, whose corporate existence extends but a few years back.  This thriving and prosperous village, which is situated in the town of Lincoln, is virtually part of the city of Pawtucket, as Pawtucket is practically part of Providence, the boundaries being scarcely more than arbitrary lines, invisible to the observer's eye.  The town of Lincoln was formerly an integral part of the old town of Smithfield, from which it was formed in 1871.  Although young in years, Lincoln has become one of the most important manufacturing centers in the State.

The village of Central Falls lies in the southeasterly section of the town of Lincoln, and forms the chief portion thereof, the population having almost doubled in the decade 1880-1890.  Although within the corporate town limits of Lincoln, Central Falls enjoys complete autonomy.  It is a distinct and separate bailiwick, with absolute control of its local affairs.  The village was incorporated by a special act of the Legislature under the name of the 'Central Falls Fire District'.  Speaking of this somewhat unique state of affairs, a writer, referring to the town of Lincoln, says:  'The principal, if not the only peculiarity of this town in its government, as distinguished from other towns of this State, is, that while it is governed by a town council, as other towns are, yet the southeasterly portion of it, embracing the most thickly settled part, is specially incorporated by the Legislature under the name of the Central Falls Fire District, with power to elect a moderator, clerk, treasurer, three assessors, and a collector of taxes; to elect fire-wards and presidents of fire-wards; to order, assess and collect taxes on persons and property within such district for fire-extinguishing apparatus, and keeping the same in order, and using it; to prescribe the duties of fire-wards and of citizens of said district in case of conflagration; to provide for suppressing disorder and tumult; for the lighting of streets, and the maintaining of such a police force as they may deem necessary.'

The Blackstone River flows through the village, and affords abundant water-power facilities along its banks, and the situation of the place is peculiarly adapted to the successful prosecution of manufacturing upon an extensive scale.  During the past ten or a dozen years the growth and development of manufacturers along the Blackstone have been especially notable, and there is every indication that the tide of prosperity throughout the valley is bound to increase.

Central Falls is an excellent type of the progressive New England manufacturing village.  The peculiarity of its civil and local government has given the district an independence, in addition to that bestowed upon the community by capital, enterprise and well-directed effort, which give to the place all the advantages of a municipality, without many of the disadvantages that may pertain to a city.

And it is a village of homes, as well as a great industrial center, most of the families in the district owning the houses in which they reside.  The situation, too, is pleasant and healthful, there is an abundant supply of pure water, and the sanitary condition of the place is above the average in point of excellence.  The streets are well kept, the district is well lighted, and the affairs of the community are efficiently administered.

Central Falls is provided with a splendid system of water-works, direct from the reservoir at Pawtucket, the water being obtained from Abbot's Run, which has a watershed of over twenty-six miles.  The taxes and assessments are low, the protection afforded to life and property admirable, and, altogether, the citizens of Central Falls may consider themselves exceptionally favored.

The Boston & Providence Railroad runs through the center of the town, and there is a handsome depot eligibly located here.  The facilities afforded for freight and passenger traffic are excellent, and all points of interest, as well as the business centers all around are easy of access.

In the summer season ample opportunities are presented for visiting the various shore-resorts throughout the State.  There are numerous excursions in all directions, both by rail and water, while enjoyable trips may be made to the suburbs of Pawtucket and Providence in the open horse cars.

A ride by rail from the latter city of a little more than an hour brings one to Narragansett Pier, while Mount Hope, the ancient seat of King Philip, the famous Indian chief, can be reached in a short time by boats from Providence on the Fall River line.

Then there is Rocky Point, with its mammoth dining-rooms for shore dinners, its lofty tower, summer theater, groves and other attractions scarcely an hour's ride from the last-named city, while Oakland Beach, Bullock's Point, Riverside, Buttonwood, Silver Spring and various other pleasant watering-places are quickly and easily reached from there.

In respect of educational facilities, Central Falls is certainly well abreast with the times.  The district schools offer unsurpassed advantages to the young for obtaining a sound and thorough education to fit them for any sphere of life.

The district also possesses a free public library, containing over one thousand five hundred volumes, with a circulation of upward of ten thousand.  This institution is under the management of an experienced librarian, and its influence for good cannot be overestimated.

The various religious denominations are represented in the community, each with its place of worship, and there are several fine church edifices in the district.

Some of the largest plants devoted to the manufacture of cotton and woolen fabrics, files, castings, etc., in Rhode Island, are located in Central Falls.  Among the most important industrial enterprises in the district may be named the Stafford Cotton Manufacturing Company, the United States Cotton Company, the Central Falls Woolen Mill, the Pawtucket Hair Cloth Company, the New American File Company, the Eagle Dye Works, Collins Bros.' Iron Foundry, Robert Plews & Co., manufacturers of tin cylinders, Weatherhead, Thompson & Co., manufacturers of belting and thread spools, and a number of other big concerns.

In the pages that follow will be found brief sketches of many of the noteworthy business establishments of Central Falls.



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STAFFORD MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Manufacturers of Soft Enameled Spool Cotton, Also Yarns of the Different Numbers in Cops, Skeins, or on Beams, Chain Warps a Specialty, Mill Street.  --  In the entire range of manufactured articles there is no one thing that is of more universal use, or as cheap to the consumer, as spool cotton, while the companies making a first-class article of cotton thread are very few.  Such great corporations as the Stafford Manufacturing Company of Pawtucket, however, employ exclusively skilled labor and use only the very best of raw materials, resulting in a product superior to all others for hand or machine sewing.  They manufacture soft enameled spool cotton, put up on 200- and 500- foot spools for domestic use; also, yarns of the different numbers in cops, skeins, or on beams, while they make a specialty of chain warps.  The company was incorporated in May, 1864, with a capital stock of $300,000, succeeding to the business of Stafford Brothers as manufacturers of  'Stafford Cotton'.  The original mill was built in 1824, by John Kennedy, and, after some changes, became the property of Wood & Adams in 1860, and in 1863 Rufus J. Stafford and Henry B. Wood succeeded to the control.  The firm of Stafford Brothers was soon after organized, and on the death of Rufus J. Stafford the present company was incorporated.  The plant now comprises a four-story and basement building, 200 x 45 feet, with a four-story wing measuring 70 x 40 feet, all splendidly equipped with new and improved machinery, steam- and water-power, operating 12,550 spindles and 5,000 twister spindles, and giving steady employment to 125 skilled hands. The output averages 13,000 pounds of yarn per week, and the products are sold largely in New York and Philadelphia.  By the use of improved machinery, this company is enabled to produce goods far superior to those formerly in use at a price commensurate with other home manufactured articles, and now every seamstress can afford to use Stafford's soft enameled spool cotton, while manufacturers requiring fine work consider it just as essential to the enduring quality of their products as to use the best fabrics.   The selling agent in Philadelphia is R. A. Blythe.  Such companies as this are of incalculable benefit to the community, and give character to the industrial interests of the country.  The executive officers are as follows, viz.: J. A. Adams, S. L. Adams, F. A. Horton, W. F. Sayles and J. E. Goldsworthy.  President Adams was born at North Kingston (sic), R. I., January 20, 1815, and is the most experienced manufacturer in the business.  He entered a cotton factory in Franklin, Mass., at the age of eighteen, and acquired a thorough knowledge of the business.  In 1837 he came to Central Falls, and in 1842 became a member of the firm of Willard & Adams, and established the business which became merged with that of Stafford Brothers to form the present company.  Mr. Adams was the first treasurer of the corporation, and in 1889 became its president. He is a trustee of Franklin Savings Bank and director of Slater National Bank, of Pawtucket, and prominently identified with the commercial growth and financial prosperity of the city and State.  Mr. Stephen L. Adams, a son of the preceding, was born in Central Falls, November 25, 1849, and entered this company's office in 1882 as bookkeeper, being promoted to the treasurership in March, 1889.  Mr. Horton, the secretary, is a native of Central Falls, agent for Cumberland Mills, and connected with various local enterprises.



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HECTOR SCHILLER, Union Cash Store, Dealer in Meats, Imported Groceries and Provisions, Also Tin, Wooden, and Earthen Ware, No. 297 Broad Street.  --  The largest as well as the leading representative mercantile house of Central Falls is the Union Cash Store, located at No. 297 Broad Street. This prosperous business was established by Fournier & Schiller in 1874, and in 1892 Mr. Fournier retired leaving Mr. Schiller sole proprietor.  The commodious store occupied in 50 x 100 feet in dimensions, admirably fitted up for the business.  It has a large ice house having a capacity for storing six tons of ice and ten head of cattle, and none but the best qualities of meats are ever kept on hand.  A complete stock is carried of groceries, canned goods and table delicacies, including the best teas and coffees and the strongest spices.  Fruits and vegetables in their season are also kept, and the most reasonable prices at all time prevail.  A stock of tin, wooden, and earthen ware is also carried and a specialty is made of patent medicines.  The trade of the house is large and its patronage is from the best class of citizens principally.  The stock of goods found here can not be excelled in quality and the reputation of the house is of the highest owing to the strict adherence to a policy of liberality and fair dealing that has characterized all the transactions of Mr. Schiller.  Mr. Hector Schiller is a native of Canada, but has been a resident of the United States for twenty-five years.  He was councilman of the town of Lincoln in 1891, a member of the Board of Fire Commissioners in 1890 and '91, and is also a prominent member of several fraternal orders.  He has every facility at hand for supplying his patrons promptly, employing twelve men and several teams; and possessing the confidence of the community in a high degree, his large and influential trade has followed as  a natural result.



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A. P. CARPENTER, Registered Pharmacist, Corner High and Cross Streets.  --  Mr. A. P. Carpenter established his business here in 1865, and his career from the beginning has been prosperous and successful.  His store is spacious in size and a very large stock is carried of pure drugs, chemicals and fancy articles, cigars and confectionery, druggists' sundries, and everything kept in a first-class establishment devoted to this trade. The proprietor makes his purchases from the most reputable sources, approaching first hands only, which is appreciated by all who have their wants supplied at this house.  A specialty is made of the prescription department, which is in charge of experienced compounders.  Mr. Carpenter is a Massachusetts man by birth and education, and is prominent in local affairs.



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THE BON MARCHE STORE, Lazarus Herschcovitz, Proprietor, Clothing, Hats and Caps, Boots, Shoes, Gents' Furnishings, Etc., Nos. 277 and 279 Broad Street.  --  A house maintaining the highest of reputations for handling only high-class goods and honorable dealings is The Bon Marche Store, Mr. Lazarus Herschcovitz, proprietor.  The enterprising proprietor of this popular house is a native of Roumania (sic), and has been a resident of the United States since 1885.  Having a wide range of experience in this line of trade he established this enterprise in 1887. The premises are commodious, very neatly and appropriately furnished and provided with every convenience for the advantageous display of his large and valuable assortment of goods.  The goods in this establishment embrace a full and complete line of ready-made clothing, suitable for gentlemen, youths and boys, all of which is made up from the finest productions of foreign and domestic looms by skillful designers and workmen, and they are made in every particular with the same skill, care and attention which are bestowed upon the same class of goods when made to order.  He also carries a full line of fine silk and Derby, also soft felt, fur and wool hats, straw hats, fur and cloth caps of all the latest styles and shapes; a splendid assortment of gents' furnishing goods, including the latest novelties in shirts, neckwear, hosiery, etc.; also a full and complete stock of fine and medium grades of boots, shoes, gaiters, etc., for gentlemen, youths and boys.  Mr. Herschcovitz is proprietor of the Huot Building and a prominent member of several societies.



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LULL BROTHERS, Proprietors of the Follett & Steere Express Company, Hack, Livery and Boarding Stable, Hacks and Carriages Furnished for Funerals, Weddings and Parties at Short Notice, Carriages, Harnesses, Horse Clothing, Whips, Brushes, and Robes for Sale, No. 27 Cross Street.  --  This prosperous business was established in 1850 by Mr. Baker, and after several changes the present proprietors succeeded to the control and also bought out all interest in the Follett & Steere Express Company which runs between Central Falls, Pawtucket and Providence.  They run four teams in connection with the Providence line of steamboats and do a general line of teaming and jobbing of all kinds.  The stable occupied is 75 x 100 feet in dimension and is equipped with every modern convenience applicable to the business. The stalls are models of cleanliness and order, and a suitable force of experienced grooms and stablemen is kept constantly employed.  There are ample accommodations for fifty horses.  The firm own thirty horses and a full line of hacks, buggies, surreys and other vehicles is kept constantly on hand, and orders for weddings, entertainments, funerals, and other occasions are filled in the most satisfactory manner at the very lowest prices.  The firm have on hand, for sale or exchange, a fine line of carriages, harness, horse clothing, whips, brushes, and robes.  Mr. Proctor C. Lull, the senior member of the firm, is an experienced concrete paver of walks, street crossings, driveways, etc., making of specialty of cellar bottoms.  In this business he employs from twenty to twenty-five men, and all work is promptly and satisfactorily executed.  Mr. P. C. Lull is a native of New Hampshire, but now resides at No. 18 Kossuth Street, Pawtucket. He is a prominent member of the F. and A. M. and other societies, and is highly esteemed in the business and social circles of the city.  Mr. Wm. H. Lull is a native of New Hampshire, a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. and other societies.



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WILLIAM McALLISTER, Pharmacist, Corner Dexter and Central Streets.  --  In 1872 Mr. McAllister first embarked in this business for himself at Lonsdale, this State, but in 1886 he removed to this city, taking up his position at his present desirable location, and from the outset he has enjoyed a most successful and highly gratifying career.  The commodious and handsomely fitted up store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is equipped with all the modern adjuncts of convenience and attractiveness.  A large and complete assortment is carried, embracing pure and fresh drugs and chemicals, proprietary medicines of standard merit, pharmaceutical preparations, toilet and fancy articles, druggists' sundries, etc., in short, the usual complement of the first-class pharmacy, together with a choice line of candies and cigars of all kinds.  A specialty is here made of compounding physicians' prescriptions and family recipes, and the laboratory is supplied with every facility and device known to secure accuracy and precision in their preparation.  Mr. McAllister is a practical, skillful and responsible pharmacist of long experience in the business, and he is the recipient of a large and influential patronage throughout this city. He was born in the old town of Smithfield, and is a popular member of the F. and A. M., Knights of Pythias and other fraternal orders.



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THOMAS P. STEERE, Wholesale Dealer in Paints and Varnishes, No. 326 Mill Street.  --  This house has been in successful operation since 1867.  The proprietor deals at wholesale in both dry and mixed paints, white lead, varnishes, linseed and other oils, brushes and other painters' supplies, also wall papers and artists' materials of every description. The goods handled are fully equal to any similar specialties in the market, and their reputation for quality, reliability and general excellence is firmly established in this community.  The proprietor is deservedly prominent as a painter, glazier and paper-hanger, giving particular attention to sign and ornamental painting and to art decorations of all kinds.  Contracts are entered into for all kinds of paintings and the same are executed in the highest style of the art and at fair and equitable prices.  The patronage is large and active in Central Falls and Pawtucket.  Mr. Steere is a Rhode Island man by birth, and served in the late war from 1862 to 1865 as a member of the light Artillery, Battery A.  He is still in the prime of life, a member of Ballou Post No. 3, G. A. R., and other organizations.



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DR. A. Z. FALCON, Registered Pharmacist, Corner Broad and Foundry Streets.  --  The elegantly appointed and liberally patronized pharmacy of Dr. A. Z. Falcon, located at the corner of Broad and Foundry Streets, was established by the present proprietor in 1887, and is in all respects, a well-ordered, first-class drugstore, where physicians' prescriptions and family recipes are prepared in the most careful and trustworthy manner in every instance, from absolutely pure and fresh ingredients, by experienced pharmacists, while the most reasonable prices at all times prevail. The store, which is desirably located, is handsomely furnished in mahogany, has an elegant soda fountain, large plate-glass show cases and windows, and presents at all times a neat and attractive appearance, being, in fact, the most handsomely fitted store in its line in Central Falls.  The stock, which is at once large and complete, includes besides everything comprehended in drugs, medicines and chemicals, all the standard proprietary remedies, acids, essences, extracts and pharmaceutical specialities, herbs, barks, roots, etc., also a choice assortment of perfumery, soaps, brushes, combs, toilet articles in great variety, sponges, chamois, sanitary preparations, confectionery and cigars, prescriptions being a leading specialty.  Mr. Abraham Z. Falcon is a native of St. Jacques, Canada, but has been a resident of the United States for fifteen years.  He was educated in Montreal, graduating from the Victoria University in 1879, as an M. D.  He is a member of the Rhode Island Medical Society, a registered pharmacist, and a gentleman of courteous manners.  He is a trustee of the school in the town of Lincoln, and is highly esteemed by his hosts of patrons, and the community at large. He is a practicing physician of high reputation, and is patronized by our most influential citizens.



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E. L. FREEMAN & SON, Printers, Publishers and Stationers, No. 3 Westminster Street, Providence, R. I., Printing Office at Central Falls, R. I.  --  This firm of Messrs. E. L. Freeman & Son, the well-known printers, publishers and stationers, at Central Falls, with offices at No. 3 Westminster Street, Providence, and No. 191 Main Street, Pawtucket, are the recognized leaders in their line to Rhode Island.  The foundation of this extensive business was laid in 1863, by Mr. E. L. Freeman, in a modest and unpretentious way, in the same building now occupied by the firm in Central Falls. In 1869, he enlarged his facilities and began the publication of the Central Falls Weekly Visitor.  This became the leading newspaper of the town, and was recently consolidated with the Pawtucket Record.  In 1873, Mr. John E. Goldsworthy was admitted to partnership, as E. L. Freeman & Co., and on the 24th of November, 1885, Mr. William C. Freeman, a son of the honored founder and head of the house, purchased Mr. Goldsworthy's interest and formed the present firm.  In 1888, the Artogravure Company was incorporated, with Mr. Wm. C. Freeman as treasurer and manager, for reproducing portraits, buildings, scenery, machinery and pictures of all kinds by the gelatine process.  This company finds a ready market for its work with jobbers and picture dealers throughout the United States.  The printing office at Central Falls comprises an entire four-story building, 40 x 100 feet in dimensions, splendidly fitted up and equipped with the latest improved presses, machinery and appliances, with ample steam-power, and steady employment is given therein to from fifty to seventy-five skilled hands.  Every modern facility is here possessed for the execution  of contracts and commissions for printing of every description; no small order is slighted, no large job refused, while clean, quick work is assured in all cases.  The skill of the firm in the fine printing is unsurpassed.  Since 1877, they have been State printers, and since 1881, they have printed and published the Freemason's Repository, a leading organ of the Masonic order. In 1877, this house became the owner of the bookstore at No. 3 Westminster Street, Providence, formerly operated by Valpey, Angell & Co., where they carry a large line of blank books and stationery; and in 1888 they opened their store at No. 191 Main Street, Pawtucket, where they do a large business in books, periodicals and stationery.  Hon. E. L. Freeman, the senior partner, is one of the best-known men in Rhode Island.  He was born in Waterville, Me., September 10, 1835, and in 1851 became apprenticed to A. W. Pearce of Pawtucket, to learn the printer's trade.  At the close of his apprenticeship, in 1853, he was employed for eight years by Hammond, Angell & Co., of Providence, and for the last two years was a partner. In 1863, he started in business for himself.  His success was rapid, and his popularity became pronounced.  In 1868 he was elected a senator, and was the first senator from the new town of Lincoln, serving until 1872.  In 1874 he was again returned to the House, and was made its speaker, filling that responsible position for two terms, and wears to-day a valued souvenir, presented by the members of the House, in the shape of a fine gold watch.  He remained in the House until 1877, and was again elected, in 1879, and served continuously up to and including the session of 1889.  Mr. Freeman has also been Railroad Commissioner of the State for the last three years and has been re-appointed for another term. He was for a period of nineteen years one of the fire wardens of Central Falls, which body has entire charge of the police, water-works, street lighting, fire department and public library.  He has also long been prominent in the Masonic Order, joining Union Lodge No. 10 of Pawtucket in 1864, and was Master of that lodge in 1869 and 1870; Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island in 1879 and 1880; Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Rhode Island in 1885; Commander of Holy Sepulchre Commandery of Knights of Templar in 1870, 1871 and 1873; and Grand Commander of that order for Massachusetts and Rhode Island in 1889.  He is also a member of the I. O. O. F., and various other organizations, and is held in high esteem by a wide circle of friends in both social, political and business life.  Mr. Wm. C. Freeman is making a success of the Artogravure Company, now having over 400 subjects and using five sizes of plates in producing works of art.



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CENTRAL FALLS WOOLEN MILLS, Manufacturers of Fancy Cassimeres and Doeskins, No. 339 Mill Street.  --  The Central Falls Woolen Mills, No. 339 Mill Street, of which James F. Phetteplace is president, and Frank E. Seagrave, treasurer, were incorporated in 1870, with a capital of $150,000.  The enterprise from its inception has been a signally successful one, and the business has been growing  apace with years.  The productions include fancy cassimeres and doeskins, of an excellent quality, and are maintained at a uniformly high standard.  They are, in fact, goods of a distinctly superior character and command extensive sale throughout the country. The mill is a five-story building, 50 x 150 feet in dimensions and a two-story addition 100 feet square, and is equipped with steam and water-power, thirty-nine broad looms and all the latest improved appliances, while employment is given to from one hundred to one hundred and seventy-five hands.  The company makes a specialty of high-grade fabrics, and turns out fancy cassimeres and doeskins in a great variety of styles and patterns.  The selling agents for these goods are Messrs. Whitman & Phelps, New York, and the demand for the productions affords evidence of steady and substantial increase. Messrs. Phetteplace and Seagrave are both young gentlemen and natives of this State, and men of many years' practical experience in this line.



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J. E. BALLOU, Furniture, Carpets, Stoves and Furnishing Goods, Nos. 216 and 218 Dexter Street.  --  One of the very largest and most successful mercantile establishments of its kind in Central Falls is that of Mr. J. E. Ballou, dealer in furniture, carpets, stoves, etc.  The business of this house is one of comparatively recent origin, having been founded in 1891 by the present proprietor.  The premises occupied comprise a double store, having the dimensions of 34 x 36 feet, and this is admirably arranged for the purposes of the business, while it is stocked to repletion with a comprehensive and first-class assortment of goods. Besides this salesroom Mr. Ballou has two storehouses, each two stories in height, and having the dimensions of 25 x 50 feet and 30 x 70 feet respectively, completely filled with furniture.  A fine display is at all times made, including parlor and chamber suits in great variety, hatracks, chairs, tables, couches, cabinets, dining-room and library furniture of all kinds, stoves for both heating and cooking purposes, and an endless assortment of house-furnishing goods of every description.  In the carpet department will be found all the newest designs and styles in all kinds and grades of floor covering, and so great is the extent and variety the most fastidious taste cannot fail to make suitable selections here.  The entire stock is representative of the most fashionable goods that are manufactured, and they are offered for sale at the lowest cash prices in the market, or on easy weekly or monthly instalments.  From four to six courteous and efficient salesmen are in constant attendance, and all customers receive prompt and polite treatment in every instance, while two teams are required in constant service for delivering goods throughout this city, Pawtucket, Valley Falls and Lonsdale, in which places the large and substantial trade developed by this house extends. Mr. Ballou, who is a native of this State, is a man of entire probity in all his dealings, and his past success in this line of trade gives the fullest assurance of continued prosperity and permanence in the future.  He is a popular member of several social societies.



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COLLINS BROTHERS, Manufacturers of Cotton and Woolen Twisters, Cotton and Woolen Spinning Frames, Patent Stop Motion Drum Doubling Machines, Patent Filling Winding Frames; also Drum Winders to wind from skeins, North Main Street.  --  This house was founded twenty-seven years ago by Messrs. W. W. and J. W. Collins, under the firm-name of Collins Brothers.  In 1885 it became Collins & Son, J. W. Collins retiring, and Mr. W. W. Collins admitting to partnership his son, Mr. Henry Collins.  Later on in the same year Mr. W. W. Collins retired, Mr. J. W. Collins re-entering the firm, and the trade title of Collins Brothers was resumed.  The works are comprised in a four-story building, 38 x 200 feet in dimensions, and fully equipped with a 40-horse power engine, planers, lathes, drills, and all requisite mechanical appliances.  Sixty hands are given employment, and the firm manufacture a general line of cotton and woolen twisters, cotton and woolen spinning frames, patent stop motion drum doubling machines, patent filling winding frames; also, drum winders to wind from skeins. All the products of the house are of the most durable and servable character.  Special attention is paid to repairing, work being executed in a first-class manner at reasonable charges.  The trade extends to all parts of the United States.  The Messrs. Collins are natives of England, but have resided in the United States since 1859 and are practical machinists of thorough skill and experience.



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W. E. DENNIS, Commercial Job Printer, No. 213 Broad Street.  --  Mr. Dennis is a native and highly respected resident of this city, and a practical and experienced printer of the highest reputation in the trade, who inaugurated the present concern on his own responsibility in 1890. The premises utilized for business purposes are 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, and are fully supplied with all the latest improved jobbing presses, machines and other appliances, besides a plentiful supply of plain and the latest designs in ornamental type.  Mr. Dennis devotes his entire attention to the business, and is prepared to execute all kinds of printing in the most artistic manner, his range including commercial work of every description, such as letter, note, bill and statement of account heads, business and visiting cards, invitations, programmes, tickets, legal work, envelopes, etc., in fact everything comprised under the generic term of job printing.  Estimates are furnished and all orders are filled promptly.  Mr. Dennis is an energetic, reliable business man, and his trade extends throughout Central Falls and Pawtucket.



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FRED E. NEWELL, Brass Founder, Brass Finisher, Manufacturer of Gas Fittings for Mills, Shops, Gas Stoves, Etc., No. 319 High Street.  --  This highly prosperous enterprise was founded in 1845, by William Newell, and shortly afterward the firm became Newell & Son.  On January 1, 1885, Mr. Fred E. Newell became sole proprietor.  He learned his trade under the direction of his father, and possesses a thorough practical knowledge of the same.  In 1889 he enlarged his factory, and added the brass finishing department.  The premises now occupied comprise the foundry, a two-story building, 70 x 70 feet in dimensions, and the finishing-shop, which has two floors, 35 x 35 feet in area.  Both places are equipped with the finest improved machinery, driven by a 20-horse power engine, and employment is found for a force of experienced workmen. Mr. Newell carries on a general business as a brass founder and brass finisher, and manufacturer of gas fittings for mills, shops, gas stoves, etc., also plumbers' and gas fitters' supplies.  He is ready to fill orders from any part of the United States, at shortest notice, and he commands a large trade in New England and the Middle States.  Estimates, illustrated circulars, etc., are furnished free on application, and the finest goods in this line of trade are furnished at lowest prices.  Mr. Newell is a native of Central Falls, is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and several other organizations, and is favorably known in business and social circles.



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R. A. BUTLER, Manufacturer of Oak Tanned Leather, Worsted Apron Leather, Lace and Picker Leather, Oak Belting and Lace Leather, High Street, Corner of Blackstone Street.  --  This business was established in 1882, by Mr. Butler.  The factory, which is one of the largest of its kind in this part of New England, comprises a large three-story building, 42 x 120 feet in dimensions, with an annex 20 x 89 feet, and an engine and boiler house, 40 x 40 feet, where the motive power is located. A massive smokestack, 100 feet high, is an outward indication of the powerful equipment of the factory, which includes two boilers, each of 50-horse power, and an engine of 75-horse power.  The output of the factory consumes an average of seventy-five hides per day, and the different departments of the business furnish profitable employment to from twenty to twenty-five hands.  The product includes the finest oak belting, worsted apron leather, and lace and picker leather, all of which is of the very finest grade, and a specialty is made of the worsted apron and lace leather, for which there is a particularly good demand.  The trade extends all over the United States, and is mainly by order.  A large stock of manufactured goods is always carried to supply the immediate demands of the trade, and prompt attention is given to all orders, whether by mail or telegraph.  The telegraph address of the house is Pawtucket, R.I.   Mr. Butler, the founder, and for many years the sole proprietor of this business, is a native of Massachusetts, but has lived here so long that is well known in Rhode Island.  He is a member of the Business Men's Association, and is known as one of the leading manufacturers in this line. He is a practical tanner, and a great deal of his success is due to his intimate knowledge of the business and his care to produce only first-class work.



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J. H. FAIRBANKS & CO., Manufacturers and Dealers in Carriages, Sleighs, Harnesses, Robes, Whips, Etc., Salesrooms, Nos. 332 and 334 Mill Street.  --  A Prominent and old-established firm engaged in Central Falls as manufacturers of and dealers in carriages, sleighs and horse equipments, is that of Messrs. J. H. Fairbanks & Co.    Here is to be seen a handsome assortment of phaetons, buggies and sleighs, carriages of all kinds, light wagons, both new and second-hand, and light and heavy, single and double harnesses, robes, blankets, carriage rugs, whips, brushes and a full line of requisites for the stable, coach-house and harness-room.  In addition, any kind of vehicle is made to order in the latest styles, and satisfaction ensured, alike as to fair prices, good workmanship and the best materials. The firm enjoy a high reputation for dealing in only such carriages, wagons, harness, etc., as are most reliable in all respects, and they now control a large trade all over this town and Pawtucket.  The warerooms comprise two well-fitted floors, each 40 x 50 feet in area, besides which a storeroom, 23 x 40 feet in size, is maintained in connection.  The enterprise was established in 1868, by Mr. J. H. Fairbanks, who four years later, admitted his brother, Mr. C. M. Fairbanks, into partnership.  Both gentlemen were born in the old town of Smithfield, and are members of several of our leading societies.



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J. E. MAXCY & SON, Dealers in Meats, Fruits, Vegetables, Canned Goods, Etc., No. 324 Mill Street.  --  The business of this house has been in successful operation since 1869, at which time it was originally founded by Mr. J. E. Maxcy, who carried it on alone up to 1885, when his son was taken into the partnership, under the above style.  The premises occupied comprise a neatly appointed and commodious store, 20 x 50 feet in dimensions, which is admirably fitted up with all the necessary conveniences and facilities for the handling and preservation of the stock, and as many as from six or seven assistants and two delivery teams are required in constant service to meet the demands of customers. The primest cuts of beef, veal, lamb, mutton, pork, salted, corned and smoked meats of all kinds, etc., is at all times carried, also a complete assortment of all kinds of fruits and vegetables in their respective seasons, and everything in the line of canned goods, lard, butter, eggs, etc., all of which have been obtained from the most reputable sources of supply, and all orders are satisfactorily delivered at any given residence throughout the town, free of charge.  The telephone call is No. 4421-5.  The trade extends throughout Central Falls, Pawtucket and Attleborough.  Both members of this firm are practical and experienced business men, and are popular members of the Business Men's Association.  Mr. Maxcy was born in Massachusetts, while his son is a native of Pawtucket.

Transcriber's Notes: For more info on this family, and pictures of their gravestones in Oak Grove Cemetery, Pawtucket, see this URL:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~masscemeteries/Homepage.html



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W. H. GLIDDEN & CO., Painters and Paper-Hangers, No. 93 Central Street.  --  Among the foremost exponents of the painting and decorating art in this section may be mentioned the firm of W. H. Glidden & Co., who have won a reputation for skill and reliability second to none in this line.  The business which they control is an old-established one, having originally been founded, in 1869, by Mr. A. W. Crowell, who conducted it most successfully up to 1890, when he sold out to Mr. Glidden, the active member of this firm.  The store, 20 x 42 feet in dimensions, is attractively appointed and well ordered throughout, and stocked to repletion with a full assortment of all kinds of paints, oils, varnishes, glass, putty, and everything in the line of painters' supplies and artists' materials, while a specialty is made of plain and artistic wall papers in the greatest variety of fashionable designs and patterns, from which the most fastidious may make suitable selections.  House, sign and decorative painting of every description is done in the most excellent and expeditious manner at reasonable rates, a force of from ten to twelve experienced hands being constantly employed; also paper-hanging, graining, varnishing, staining and inside work of this character generally; indeed, some of the most prominent houses in this and adjoining towns owe much of their beauty to the skill of this firm. First-class work is guaranteed in every instance, the large and substantial trade developed extending throughout this city as well as Pawtucket.  Mr. Glidden, who is a carpenter by trade, is a practical and experienced business man, of the strictest honor and reliability in all his dealings.  Born in Canada, he has resided  in this country for the past six years, and is a well-known member of several fraternal orders.



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GEORGE H. FALES, Dealers in Furniture, Stoves, Bedding, Etc., No. 81 Central Street.  --  An old-established mercantile house of Central Falls is that so ably conducted by Mr. George H. Fales.  Its foundation dates back to 1876, the business having originally been inaugurated in a small way by Mr. Allen, but within the past two years the present proprietor bought him out.  The warerooms are comprised in a four-story building, 46 x 75 feet in area, and throughout are finely and appropriately fitted up neatly kept, while from three to five competent assistants and two teams are required in constant service.  In the comprehensive stock carried the assortment embraces everything in both plain and artistic furniture of every description, including elegant parlor and chamber suits, hall, library, dining-room and kitchen furniture of all kinds, chairs, tables, mirrors, cabinets, etc.; besides stoves in great variety for heating and cooking; mattresses, bedding, pillows, etc.  In each department of the store the stock handled represents the products of the best and most popular makers in the country, and these goods are sold for cash or on easy weekly or monthly instalments. A specialty is made of second-hand furniture, which is here bought and sold on the most favorable terms.  A substantial trade has been developed, which extends throughout this city, Pawtucket and a considerable portion of the New England States.  Mr. Fales was born in Ohio, but has resided in Central Falls for the past seventeen years.



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S. S. BEATTIE, Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables, Canned Goods, Etc., No. 203 Central Street.  --  A reliable and first-class family supply store of Central Falls devoted to the trade in groceries of all kinds is that of S. S. Beattie, of No. 203 Central Street.  In 1880 this thriving business was inaugurated here by the present proprietor.  The large and commodious store occupied has the dimensions of 50 x 60 feet, and is admirably appointed in all the departments with every appliance, convenience and appurtenance requisite for the systematic conduct of the business, while a spacious storehouse and stable are located in the rear.  The working force includes five competent assistants, and five teams. The heavy stock carried embraces a superior assortment of foreign and domestic staple and fancy groceries, including the purest and choicest teas, coffees, sugars, spices, condiments, table delicacies, sauces, canned goods of all kinds in great variety, the best grades of family flour, prime butter, cheese, eggs, household specialties, the different assortment of fruits and vegetables in their respective seasons, etc., etc.  No inferior articles whatever are here handled, while full weight, honest value and the lowest ruling market prices are guaranteed.  Mr. Beattie is a native of Cranston, this State.



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PHILLIPS & SMITH, Newsdealers, Booksellers and Stationers, Confectionery and Cigars, No. 61 Central Street.  --  Among the time-honored and successful establishments of Central Falls, that of the well-known firm of Phillips & Smith, newsdealers, booksellers, stationers, etc., is particularly worthy of more than passing recognition.  Its foundation dates way back to 1867, at which time it was originally established by the firm of Allen & Fales, who conducted it up to 1873, when they were succeeded by Hammond & Co., and they, in turn, during the past year, gave place to the present proprietors.  The store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is attractively and tastefully appointed throughout, being fitted up with plate-glass show windows, ornamental fixtures, etc., for the handling and display of the large and varied stock, and from three to five competent assistants are required in constant employment. In the comprehensive assortment carried will be found books of all kinds, standard works, novels, light literature, modern fictions, magazines, periodicals, reviews, all the daily and weekly papers published, etc., also everything in the line of fashionable stationery, fancy goods, novelties in holiday presents and cards, besides the choicest and purest confectionery and cigars manufacture in the trade, and in each department of the store the goods have been most carefully selected, while they are sold at such low prices as to defy successful competition.  This firm control as many as eight paper routes, extending throughout Central Falls, Valley Falls and Pawtucket.  Mr. Phillips is a native of Central Falls, while his partner, Mr. Smith, was also born in this State.



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A. P. MARTIN & CO., Dealers in All Kinds of Hardware, Agricultural Implements and Carpenters' and Machinists' Tools and Findings, No. 57 Central Street.  --  This thriving business was established here in 1888 by Mr. Martin, under the above style, the 'Co.' being silent.  The commodious store, 20 x 50 feet in dimensions, is neatly and tastefully fitted up in the most appropriate manner for the purposes of the business, and from two to three courteous and efficient assistants are employed.  The stock handled embraces a comprehensive assortment of everything in the line of hardware, agricultural implements of all kinds, mill supplies, carpenters' and machinists' tools and findings, shelf goods, etc.   In every instance these goods are representative of the best foreign and domestic manufacture, and nothing but strictly reliable merchandise is handled. A large, permanent and substantial trade has been developed throughout this city and Pawtucket, and the store is connected by telephone.  Born in this State, for the past decade Mr. Martin has been a highly esteemed resident of this community, and he is a popular member of the Business Men's and Firemen's Associations.



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JOHN W. PERRY, Builder of All Kinds of Express Wagons, Nos. 306 to 312 Mill Street.  --  The oldest established and largest carriage and wagon building, iron and wood-working shop in Central Falls is that owned and conducted by Mr. John W. Perry.  This veteran undertaking was founded as far back as 1832 by Mr. Stephen Perry, and was successfully conducted by him up to 1867, when he retired in favor of his son, the present proprietor, in whose skillful and experienced hands the trade and reputation of the house has been since steadily and continuously augmented with each succeeding year. All kinds of light and heavy wagons and carriages - particularly express wagons - are built to order, from the best procurable materials, upon the latest improved principals of construction, to any pattern or style; particular care and attention are devoted to the shoeing of lame and interfering horses, wheelwrighting and blacksmithing of every description are undertaken, as well as a general line of machinist work and wood and iron working, iron turning, planing, boring, finishing, etc., while jobbing and repairing in all branches of the trade constitute an important item of the business.  The trade controlled reaches throughout Central Falls, Pawtucket, Southern Massachusetts, and its volume furnishes regular employment for twenty skilled workers.  The works comprise three floors, each 30 x 70 feet in size, and a wing of two floors, each 40 feet square, the whole being furnished throughout with an elaborate plant of improved wood and iron working machinery, tools and appliances pertaining to the trade, a 25-horse power steam-engine being the motive force used.  The ground-floor of the main building is used for blacksmithing, horse-shoeing and machine work, the second-floor for wood-working and the third-floor for painting, varnishing, drying, etc., the wing being employed as a machine shop. Mr. John W. Perry was born on the site of the present works and is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and other leading societies.



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B. A. REYNOLDS & SON, Dealers in Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Hosiery, Etc., No. 48 Central Street.  --  This popular and enterprising concern was founded originally by Mr. B. A. Reynolds, who is a native of Exeter, this State, and came here in 1866 to establish this business, and from the start developed a very large and substantial trade, and in 1870, his son, Charles A., who was born in the old town of Smithfield, was admitted as a partner under the present firm-title, since which date the volume of trade and the scope of the establishment, along with its popularity, have been greatly extended.  The premises utilized are amply spacious and provided with every convenience for the transaction of business.  The stock carried embraces a full line of fine and medium grades of boots, shoes, gaiters, slippers, etc., for men, youths and boys, and everything that is new and desirable in the line of footwear for ladies, misses and children; also a fine assortment of rubber goods for all ages, sexes and sizes. In their stock of headwear will be found the very latest styles and shapes in fine silk and Derby hats, soft felt, fur and wool hats in all styles, also straw hats and cloth caps in their season.  In addition to this splendid assortment they also carry a fine assortment of gentlemen's hosiery, underwear, fine white and fancy colored dress shirts, the latest novelties in neckwear, gloves, etc.  These goods have been selected with the greatest care and are offered at the very lowest prices.  The firm also does a very extensive business as agents for the Troy Laundry, and all orders left with them in this line receive prompt attention.  Messrs. Reynolds & Son are enterprising and honorable merchants.  The father is an active and prominent member of the Masons and K. of P., and the son is also a member of several societies.



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ALBERT FROST, Paper Box Manufacturer, No. 242 High Street.  -- One of the most prominent men in Central Falls is Mr. Albert Frost whose paper box factory is one of the leading manufacturing establishments, and the only concern of this kind in the village.  Mr. Frost established this business in 1868, and has conducted it with such skill and energy that it now ranks among the most important manufacturing concerns is this part of the State. It employs from eighteen to twenty hands and its output is 3,000 boxes per day.  A specialty is made of plain boxes, which are used for various purposes, and boxes of all descriptions are made for the thread and hosiery trade.  The premises occupied include three floors, each of the spacious dimensions of 40 x 70 feet, and these premises are fully equipped with every facility for the manufacture of a wide variety of boxes for different purposes and have every convenience for the handling of the large product of the house.  Mr. Frost practically controls the trade in his line in Central Falls, Pawtucket and Valley Falls, and has a growing business all over New England.  Mr. Frost is a native of Walpole, Mass., and came to Central Falls fifty years ago.  He is a prominent citizen of this town and an active member of the Masonic Order and other societies.


Continued

These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2001 by Beth Hurd,


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