Rhode Island Reading Room
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Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892


CITY OF NEWPORT

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Even the closest observer to-day would fail to discover any evidence to indicate that Newport once held a proud position in the maritime commerce of the western world.  Yet such was the case.  There was a time when this place was the seat of great commercial activity, being for years a more important port of entry than New York, and second only to Boston.  This was previous to the War of Independence.  'For over one hundred and fifty years from the arrival of the first emigrants', says Benjamin B. Howland, the historian, 'Newport and Boston were the chief cities of New England, and their commerce rendered each of them superior to New York.'  The Revolution, which gave birth to the Republic of the United States, gave the deathblow to the commercial supremacy of Newport.  The close of the struggle found the merchants of this city impoverished and their trade utterly destroyed. Having a safe and convenient harbor, easy of ingress and egress, and possessing all advantages for navigation, it is difficult to understand why Newport never regained its lost prestige on the sea.  It did not, however. The commerce of the city steadily declined, until it became reduced to insignificant proportions, as may be inferred from the fact that the exports and imports now aggregate less than $20,000 annually.  But though the glory of Newport as a centre of commerce and trade has probably passed away forever, this city has gained the distinction of being the most fashionable and most noted watering-place in the country.  Situated on the west coast of the island from which the State of Rhode Island derives its name, on the isthmus of the southern peninsula, it is exceptionally favored as a summer resort.  In front lies an excellent harbor, opening into Narragansett Bay, with a fine anchorage in thirty feet of water, between the great miliary post Fort Adams and Goat Island, the headquarters of the torpedo division of the United States Navy, and allowing vessels of eighteen feet draught to reach the piers at low water.  By rail it is 19 miles south-south-west of Fall River, and by steamer 162 miles from New York.  The natural scenery is romantic and beautiful, the climate is salubrious and equable, and the country round about is exceedingly productive.  Speaking of the island of Aquidneck, on which Newport is situated, a writer many years ago said: 'It is deservedly esteemed the paradise of New England for the fruitfulness of the soil and the temperateness of the climate.  Though it is not above sixty miles from Boston, it is a coat warmer in winter, and being surrounded by the ocean, is not so much affected in summer with the hot land-breezes as the towns on the continent.'

The history of Newport extends back to the year 1639.  The first settlers were Puritans from Massachusetts Bay colony, who were forced to leave that province owing to the intolerance prevailing there.  Having taken part in what is known as the 'Hutchinson dispute,' and being in the minority, they suffered the fate of Roger Williams and his associates a few years before. Banished from the territory of Massachusetts, the little party, to whom this city owes its origin, had intended to seek a home in Delaware, whither they had sent their worldly possessions.  Before leaving they resolved to pay a visit to the little colony at Providence established by Roger Williams. Becoming impressed with the appearance of things on the shores of Narragansett Bay, these exiles determined to abandon the idea of going to Delaware.  Accordingly, with a view of settling hereabouts, they purchased from the Indians the island of Aquidneck, with the right to the grass on the neighboring islands, for forty fathoms of white peage, ten coats, twenty hoes, and five fathoms of wampum.  A civil compact to this effect was entered into on March 7, 1638, and the new-comers planted themselves on the north-eastern part of the island and founded the town of Portsmouth. The signers of the compact, and presumably the first settlers, were William Coddington, John Clarke, William Hutchinson, John Coggeshall, William Aspinwall, Samuel Wilbore, John Porter, John Sanford, Edward Hutchinson, jr., Thomas Savage, William Dyre (sic), William Freeborne, Philip Shearman, John Walker, Richard Carder, William Baulstone, Edward Hutchinson, sr., and Henry Bull.  The witnesses to the agreement were Roger Williams and Randall Holden.  The pioneer settlement in the island grew so rapidly, that in  the following spring a new colony was projected on the shores of the Aquidneck. With this end in view three of the settlers, Nicholas Easton, William Brenton, and Thomas Hazard, set out in search of a suitable spot for the purpose, and selected the site where now stands the city of Newport.  They entered into a contract with the natives to clear the 'swamp', the price paid for the work being a coat with brass buttons.  In a short time the Indians had effected a clearing, and then the place was filled up with sand and gravel, and rendered fit for building upon.  So rapid was the progress made, that in May, 1639, the town was created and settled.  The settlement was named Newport, and the first town officials were:  William Coddington, Judge; William Dyre, Clerk; Nicholas Easton, William Brenton, Thomas Hazard, John Coggeshall, John Clarke, Jeremiah Clarke, and Henry Bull, Elders.  Four acres were assigned for each house-lot, and William Coddington, who was afterwards Governor of the State, had six acres allotted to him for an orchard.  This was the second orchard laid out in New England.  The first buildings here were erected at a point in the rear of the site of the State House, around a spring where the fountain now stands.  The stone house built by Henry Bull, one of the original settlers and one of the early governors of the colony, who died in 1693, is still standing on the east side of Spring Street.  Thames Street, now the leading business thoroughfare, was the first street laid out by the early settlers.  Most of the old landmarks have disappeared with the march of progress in late years, but there still remain many historic features to remind one of what Newport once was.  The names of the more prominent among the old settlers are preserved in the street nomenclature.  In the older section of the city the streets are narrow and the buildings quaint and ancient looking, but in the modern portion of Newport the thoroughfares are broad and excellently kept, and are lined with elegant villas and handsome cottages, the homes of luxury, wealth, and fashion.

illustration on page 295: photograph of Thames Street
illustration on page 296: drawing - Washington Square

As has been intimated, trade and commerce flourished here as they did nowhere else on the American continent prior to the Revolution.  Many of those who settled in Newport in the early days of its history were men of stamp, learned and refined, and the society of this place was polite and literary, notwithstanding that the people were nearly all engaged in commercial pursuits.  The streets of the town were thronged with the intelligent and enterprising merchants of distant lands, and the canvas on the ships of different nations whitened the harbor.  There were several large oil and candle factories, sugar-refineries, rope-manufactories, breweries, distilleries, and numerous other industries here at the time of which we speak, and the wharves and warehouses were insufficient to accommodate the commerce of the port.  There were at one period fully two hundred vessels connected with this port engaged in foreign commerce, and about four hundred craft in the coasting trade, while a line of packets plied between Newport and London.  There was an extensive business carried on with the Indies, and when it was considered reputable to buy and sell human beings there was a very large trade in slaves.  The lower stories of some of the warehouses still in existence served as slave-pens; and here on the wharves, almost within the recollection of men yet in the flesh, merchants and traders bartered and dickered over the purchase and sale of men, women, and children.  It is said that in the early part of the eighteenth century the street leading to the State House from Thames Street was paved out of profits made in traffic in negro slaves.

Formerly there was a very considerable Hebrew element in this city, and the Jews were a highly important factor in the development of the trade of the port.  They were mostly of Dutch extraction from Curacoa, and from Spain and Portugal, and it was during their commercial sway that Newport reached the zenith of its prosperity.  The place had then a population of ten thousand, or about half of what it is to-day.  During the War of Independence the population dwindled down to five thousand, and when again the War of 1812 broke out Newport received another severe blow at its prosperity.  About 1830, however, the town began to assume something of its former liveliness and activity, but it was not until 1850 that Newport regained the population it had in 1775.

Newport is the semi-capital of Rhode Island, Providence dividing with it the honors of the State, and it is also the seat of justice for Newport County. The city is built upon a gentle declivity, looking towards the southwest, and presents an attractive appearance as it is approached by water.  The harbor is considered one of the finest on the Atlantic coast, and in the summer season it is studded all over with the white sails of pleasure craft, presenting an exceedingly gay and animated scene.

Newport was chartered as a city June 1, 1784, but on March 27, 1787, the charter was surrendered.  From the last-mentioned period until 1853 it remained under a town form of government, and then once more took on the dignity of a municipality.  Among the more noteworthy buildings of the city are the State House, erected in 1742; the City Hall, which was built in 1763; the Jewish Synagogue, erected in 1763; the Redwood Library and Athenaeum, bearing date of 1750; the Market House or Granary, which was put up in 1762; the Custom House, Masonic Hall, Armory Hall and the Channing Memorial Church.  Newport is well supplied with first-class hotels.  Many of the summer hotels in and around the city are very imposing in their architectural ornamentation, and magnificently appointed.  In its surroundings the city has many beautiful and interesting spots, with attractions for persons of all tastes.  Touro Park, the Cliffs, Conrad's Cave, Spouting Rock, Forty Steps, and Ochre Point are all worth a visit from the sojourner at Newport.  Narragansett Pier in the summer months, with its superb hotels and elegant cottages, is famous all over the country.  To the antiquary, to the lover of the curious in nature, and to the seeker after repose, health, and pleasure, Newport abounds in charms and attractions.  As a summer resort it is growing in popularity every year, and its summer houses and cottages are increasing in number notably each season.



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FIRST NATIONAL BANK, No. 231 Thames Street.  --  There is no more unfailing barometer of the spirit of progress and enterprise prevailing in any community than the bank, sustaining as it does such close and important relations to all interests, mercantile, industrial, and agricultural, as well as financial.  One of the oldest and largest institutions of this kind in Newport is the First National Bank, whose banking rooms are eligibly located at No. 231 Thames Street.  This bank was chartered originally in 1836, as the Traders' Bank, and was reorganized under the national banking laws in 1865.  It has a cash capital of $120,000, and the following board of officers and directors, viz.: President, T. Mumford Seabury; cashier, N. R. Swinburne; directors: T. M. Seabury, H. H. Hay, L. Brown, P. Rider, John S. Langley, G. C. Carr, Wm. L. Sisson. This institution has ever proved, during its long and honorable career, one of the financial bulwarks of the city, and one ever guided by the soundest and most conservative policy.  It has ever been a favorite with the business world; its extended line of deposits are largely those of active merchants, while it discounts much of the most desirable commercial paper on the market.  Its stock is held by leading citizens as one of the choicest and most remunerative of investments, while it does a general banking business in deposits, loans, collections, and exchange, numbering among its permanent customers many of our leading corporations, largest mercantile houses, and wealthiest citizens.  It is a thoroughly popular bank; its methods, though conservative, are such as to aid customers in all legitimate ways, and its reliable business system is greatly appreciated. Collections are made on all available points through its numerous correspondents, who include the United States National Bank of New York, and the National Bank of Commerce of Boston.  The bank's last statement is one of the most gratifying character.  It shows a surplus and undivided profits of $83,000, with individual deposits of $110,000, and government deposits of $53,000. Out-of-town banks and business men will find it to their advantage, when requiring Newport connections and accounts, to open the same here, where such perfect facilities are afforded.  President Seabury is one of the best-known citizens of Newport, and has faithfully and efficiently held the helm in the management of this institution since 1865.  The cashier, Mr. Swinburne, came into the bank in 1866, being promoted to  his present responsible post in 1882, and is an able and successful financier. The board of directors are representative business men, under whose guidance this bank is making rapid and substantial progress.



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THE E. READ GOODRIDGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Perry Mill, Manufacturers of Woven and Braided Elastic Fabrics, Salesrooms, No. 273 Church Street, New York.  --  The most interesting record of business success and progressive development in Newport, solely on the basis of ability, equity, and integrity, is that afforded by the E. Read Goodridge Manufacturing Company, who operate Perry Mill for the manufacture of woven and braided elastic fabrics on a grand scale.  This company was incorporated in 1886, under the laws of the State of New York, with a capital stock of $75,000, and with Mr. E. Read Goodridge treasurer and manager.  The mill is a substantial four-story structure, 50 x 250 feet in dimensions, and supplied with 48 looms, 400 braiders, and other improved machinery, operated by steam-power, and employment is given to 150 skilled hands. The output comprises suspenders, arm bands, elastic braids, elastic corset laces, elastic garter webs, and elastic cloth for manufacturing purposes; in fact, everything in elastic woven goods.  Quality has ever been the first consideration with this house, and the management is not only able and experienced, but the most progressive of any in the industry, studying upon new and fresh novelties at all times, and constantly introducing to the trade and public something novel and valuable in this line.  The goods are shipped in immense quantities, not only to all parts of the United States, but also to South America and Europe, where they quickly take precedence over all similar productions, and commend their own superior merits to the confidence and patronage of critical and discriminating buyers. The company, therefore, has before it a trade of great and growing magnitude, indicating the permanent retention to Newport of the supremacy in this important branch of skilled industry.  Mr. Goodridge, the moving spirit of this enterprise, is a native of New York City, where he is a member of the firm of Nealon, Goodridge & Dresser, manufacturers' agents and commission merchants in small wares and notions, at No. 273 Church Street.  Since 1886 he has resided in Newport, and by his energy and ability has built up an enterprise here that is prepared to battle on even terms with its most formidable competitors in any part of the world.



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F. W. MARSHALL, Book and Job Printer, over No. 202 Thames Street.  --  A well-known and very successful book and job printer engaged in this city is Mr. F. W. Marshall, carrying on his operations over No. 202 Thames Street, who controls a liberal share of the best private, commercial and society work in and around Newport.  The business was established in March, 1878, by Messrs. Marshall & Flynn, and since the retirement of the latter in 1884 the present proprietor has had sole control of affairs, he having twenty years' practical experience at his command. All kinds of book, mercantile, and job printing are undertaken, in the best styles, either plain or richly illuminated - some of the work turned out being of the most exquisite description, some quite plain, while that in each line is characterized by its high finish, accuracy, and correct taste. In proof of the ability of the house to execute the finest work, it may be noted that the 'Newport Convocation Journal' is printed as this office, it being a monthly organ circulating among church people and high society generally, and being in all respects well got up.  The office, 20 x 30 feet in size, on the second floor, is provided with two job presses, a large number of fonts of new type of the latest styles, and every facility for meeting all orders promptly and satisfactorily.  Mr. F. W. Marshall was born in Providence in 1856, but has resided in Newport for the past thirty years, and is a member of the American Mechanics and the United States Savings and Loan Association.



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KING & McLEOD, Boston Store, Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, Nos. 153 to 157 Thames Street.  --  The leading representative of the dry-goods trade in Newport is the house of Messrs. King & McLeod, known as the "Boston Store", and eligibly located at Nos. 153, 155, and 157 Thames Street.  This is an emporium of the fashions, new materials, the high-class novelties, notions and bijouteries of the world's markets.  It has been in successful operation since 1878, always under the management of the present proprietors, who introduced at the outset the most enlightened business methods, and early became noted for their alertness in securing the latest novelties and most correct styles from the markets of Europe.  Their enterprising efforts met with a natural result, and they now have a large jobbing and mail order trade all through New England and the adjoining States, besides the largest retail patronage in this section of the State. Here are twenty different departments, all completely stocked and ably managed.  The main floor in its coup d'oeil affords one of the most refined and complete types of the modern dry-goods store on the continent.  The splendid and handy arrangement of goods, rich cabinet work and ornamentation, and special facilities  for shopping, all delight and gratify the eye of the visitor.  All the modern improvements have been introduced, and a corps of fifty skilled hands contribute to the successful operations of the house.  Customers can here inspect goods without being importuned to purchase.  The store is at all times replete with everything fresh and desirable from every quarter of the globe.  The firm have lately opened the largest and most complete line of high-grade novelties ever brought to this city.  They are in all the choice combinations of all wool and silk and wool, from both the French, German, and English manufacturers; including all the newest styles and weaves in stripes, plaids, diagonal weaves, and polka-dot effects; silk warp Henriettas, silk and wool lansdowne, camel's hair, Bedford cords, India twills and serges, all-wool crepe de chine, colored grenadines, English mohairs and brilliantines, albatross, nun's veiling, wool crepon grenadines, and all kinds of dress goods for evening wear.  Among other prominent features are black and colored silks of the most famous makes, including original patterns and newest effects in shades; mourning dress goods of Priestly's and Lupin's famous makes; velvets and velveteens, satins and plushes, cashmeres and prints.  Other departments include cloaks and suits of the choicest productions of the fashion leaders of London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin, in newmarkets, plush sacques, cloth wraps, walking jackets, peasant coats, London-dyed seal sacques, Jerseys and Jersey waists; millinery merchandise, including everything stylish and seasonable in straw, chip, and felt hats, both trimmed and untrimmed, bonnets and bonnet frames, embodying the prevailing fashions from the most celebrated modistes of Paris and London; besides laces, crapes and mourning goods, flowers and feathers, ostrich plumes and tips, ribbons and ornaments, together with blankets, flannels, and housekeeping goods; linens, ginghams, and white goods; hosiery, gloves, and underwear; corsets, dress trimmings and embroideries, notions, small wares and fancy goods in great variety and profusion.  The elite of society are regular customers here, as are all classes, where a dollar goes farther and gives better value than anywhere else in town.  The copartners, Messrs. Peter King and Angus McLeod, are natives of Scotland, who came to this country twenty years ago, and who have made a careful study of every phase and feature of the dry-goods business.  They are now recognized as progressive and sagacious merchants, who have won a distinguished and deserved success.



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WILLIAM J. SWINBURNE, Anthracite and Bituminous Coal, also Wood of All Kinds; Office, No. 173 Thames Street.  --  Mr. William J. Swinburne is one of our leading merchants and most prominent citizens, and stands high in the community, both in commercial circles and in public and private life, and takes a lively interest in all matters pertaining to municipal and state affairs.  He has been mayor of the city for two years, is an efficient member of the Legislature and the school committee, and is a trustee of the Coddington Savings Bank.  He is also a trustee of the Channing Memorial Church, and is a veteran of the Mexican War. The business conducted by him was established in 1835 by Frank Peckham, and in 1852 came into control of Mr. Swinburne, who has since continued it with uninterrupted success.  The yards and wharf are conveniently situated, and the office is connected by telephone.  A large and carefully selected stock is constantly kept on hand, and includes best grades of anthracite and bituminous coal, for domestic use, all thoroughly cleaned; also superior quality hickory, pine and other varieties of wood, sawed and split in lengths for kindling.  A number of hands are employed, and four wagons deliver throughout the city and vicinity.  Family trade is a specialty, and all orders are promptly attended to, while the lowest consistent prices prevail, customers being assured of standard weight and a first-class article in every instance.



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J. M. K. SOUTHWICK, House Furnishing Goods, Sportsmen's Goods, Powder, Shot, Cartridges, Etc., No. 185 Thames Street, Old No. 117.  --  The house of J. M. K. Southwick is by far the largest establishment in its line in the city.  It was established as a tin shop in 1832, and has been under the control of the present proprietor since 1874. It is conveniently located at No. 185 Thames Street, and enjoys a liberal wide-spread patronage, which is constantly increasing.  The premises utilized for the business comprise three floors of a building 28 x 165 feet in dimensions, and an immense stock in all departments is constantly carried, which embraces house-furnishing goods, sportmen's goods, powder, shot, cartridges, etc., fishing tackle, rods, reels, hooks, lines, netting and twines, ship chandlery, yacht and boat hardware, cordage, bunting and flages.  The stock of stoves, ranges, and tin ware is not to be excelled in this city.  Goods of every description usually found in a metropolitan hardware store will be found here.  Four experienced assistants are employed, and a general line of tin and sheet iron work is executed; furnaces and ranges are set, and everything in this line is promptly executed.  Jobbing of all kinds and repairing also receive prompt attention.  Mr. Southwick is a native of Newport.  He is a prominent member of the Historical Society, the National Historical Society, and is trustee of the Red Men's Library.



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CHAS. F. FRASCH, Confectioner, No. 170 Thames Street.  --  The largest and most deservedly popular establishment in Newport engaged in the manufacture of ice-cream and cake is that of Mr. Chas. F. Frasch, located at No. 170 Thames Street, with a branch store at Jamestown for the last four years. The business was established in 1867, and has pursued a career of unvarying success up to the present time.  The premises occupied comprise a store with rooms in the rear used for manufacturing purposes, which are supplied with the latest improved machinery operated by steam power, having the capacity for making thirty quarts of ice-cream every twenty minutes.  Mr. Frasch is favorably known throughout the city as a manufacturer and wholesale dealer in ice-cream and confectionery, and has gained a high reputation for the superiority of his products. He gives employment to eight skilled and experienced hands, and his methods of manufacture are the personification of enterprise and reliability.  Mr. Frasch has had thirty years' experience as a candy manufacturer, and his cake is in great demand.  Only the purest and best ingredients being used, the productions of this house cannot be surpassed in this or any other city.  The prices are always as low as first-class goods can be produced and Mr. Frasch's methods of dealing are thoroughly honorable.  Mr. Frasch is a native of Germany, but has been a resident of this city for thirty-five years, and esteemed by all with whom he has business connections. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, a charter member of the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of Honor, and is also a prominent member of the Business Men's Association.



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OCEAN HOUSE, J. G. Weaver, Proprietor, J. G. Weaver, Jr., Manager.  --  It is generally admitted in the best circles of Newport society that the greatest consummation of hospitable ideas with practical business methods and marked ability of management is embodied in the Ocean House above and beyond any other hotel at this noted watering-place.  It was opened to the public in 1845, by Mr. J. G. Weaver, who is widely known as proprietor of the Everett House, New York, and who has conducted this house during all these years, with the assistance of his son, Mr. J. G. Weaver, Jr., as manager, with marked ability and steadily increasing success. The house early proved a magnet to the best people of the land, and its success has been unprecedented in the history of hotel enterprises in this city.  It is five stories in height, and contains 300 rooms, with first-class accommodations for 350 guests.  Fronting the broad expanse of Bellevue Avenue, adjacent to the polo grounds and tennis court, and directly central to the best business houses, churches, and places of amusement, it is the best house alike for the summer tourist, the commercial traveler and the transient guest.  It is thoroughly attractive in all its appointments, and fitted with all modern improvements, including passengers elevators, electric lights, open fire-places, and steam heat, while a livery is connected which embraces ninety horses and every mode of conveyance. During the season such a hotel as the Ocean House has the population of a small village.  Yet its guests have extraordinary fare, and every comfort. Humanity is catered for by wholesale, yet at the same time each individual guest receives as much attention as if he had one entire hotel to himself. It is this combination of large general figures with the closest attention to minute details which forms the chief problem of the hotel-keeper, and constitutes the real mystery of modern hotel-keeping.  The Ocean House has few superiors as a summer hotel on the continent, as regards either size, fire-proof qualities, sanitary conditions, shade, air or ventilation.  The kitchens are entirely detached from the main building, while the air is nowhere tainted with sewer gas or other disagreeable odor.  The management are noted for their liberality as caterers, believing in the best and plenty of it, and their table is unexcelled in the country. With boating, bathing, yachting and fishing facilities at command, and with every advantage of the telegraph, telephone, coaching, country pleasures and city conveniences, the proprietors of the Ocean House undertake to do everything for the summer tourist that will materially add to his comfort and pleasure while sojourning here.



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GEO. P. LAWTON, Park Stables, Livery, Sale and Boarding Stable, and Carriage Repository, Spring Street, corner Touro;  A. I. Easton, Manager. --  This is in all respects an admirably conducted, strictly first-class establishment - one of the finest and best equipped in the State - and receives a substantial and influential patronage.  It is also one of the oldest, and has been in existence for the past sixty-seven years. It is at once a livery, sale and boarding stable and carriage repository, and everything is of the very best that money could purchase or experience suggest.  The stable building is a two and three story structure, and covers half an acre of ground.  It is perfectly ventilated and well lighted, and is provided with all conveniences.  The place is very cleanly kept, the sanitary arrangements being of a superior character, and there are stalls for seventy horses and accommodations for one hundred and twenty-five vehicles.  A large force of help, including competent drivers, hostlers, etc., are employed, and the efficient managers of the establishment, the proprietor and son, exercise close personal supervision over every detail. Horses are received on livery and for sale, and are boarded by the day, week or month, at most reasonable rates, baiting and boarding a specialty. Elegant 'rigs' of every description are furnished for hire also, at very moderate terms, there being sixty-five horses and over one hundred handsome carriages in service here.  The Park Stables are open at all hours, day and night, and first-class 'turnouts' - coaches, phaetons, surreys, victorias, coupes, buggies, gigs, etc., can be furnished for all occasions and at all times, all orders receiving immediate attention. This flourishing business was established in 1825 by Nicholas Hazard, and in 1884 came into control of the present proprietor, who has since conducted it with eminent success. Mr. Lawton, who is a gentleman of middle age, born in this city, is a man of thorough experience in this line, being engaged in the business for nearly a quarter of a century, and also kept the Lawton House at Stanbridge for a number of years.  He bears a creditable war record, too, and is a member of the G. A. R., Chas. E. Lawton Post; also of the F. and A. M., being a Knight Templar; and belongs to the K. of H., the Royal Arcanum, the A. O. U. W., and other societies.



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CARRY BROTHERS, Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fish, Foreign and Domestic Fruit, Early Produce, etc., Nos. 257 and 259 Thames Street.  --  Compared to the old-time grocery, with its limited and ill-assorted stock, the first-class modern establishment in the line indicated, with its extensive and choice assortment of food products, delicacies and luxuries from all corners of the earth, is truly a model of completeness and excellence. And in this connection special attention is naturally directed in a review of Newport's leading business houses to the spacious and well-ordered store of Carry Brothers, the largest in the city, Nos. 257 and 259 Thames Street, where can always be found an exceedingly fine stock of staple and fancy groceries, sea-food, fruits, vegetables, etc., and where purchasers are assured of getting full weight as well as a superior article in every instance.  Only thoroughly reliable, select goods are handled by the firm, quality and quantity being guaranteed, while the prices charged here are of the most reasonable character.  The patronage of this deservedly popular establishment is at once large and influential, and the trade of the place gives evidence of constant increase.  The business premises occupy a 40 x 80 foot store and basement, and are very neatly kept and admirably arranged. An efficient staff of clerks attend to the wants of customers, and several teams are in steady service, all orders receiving prompt attention. The stock, which is extensive, complete and carefully selected, comprises pure, fresh teas and coffees of all kinds, fine spices, condiments and table delicacies in great variety; crackers and biscuit, foreign and domestic fruits, and every kind of early produce in season; primest creamery butter, cheese, lard, fresh eggs, best brands family flour, rice, meal, beans, peas, sugar, molasses and syrups, canned goods, dried fruit, pickles, preserves and general groceries.  This flourishing business was established at the present location over a quarter of a century ago by Messrs. John and William Carry, and under the firm name that heads this sketch has since been conducted with uninterrupted success, although some changes have taken place in the personnel of the copartnership.  Mr. William Carry was removed by death in 1880, and about one year ago A. S. Burlingame, son-in-law of Mr. John Carry, became a member of the firm.  They are all men of energy and good business qualities, well and favorably known in the community, alike in commercial circles and in social life.  The senior partner is one of Newport's solid citizens, and is a prominent merchant. He is a member of the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Honor, and several other associations, and was a member of the General Assembly for two years, where he served with credit to himself.  Mr. William Carry the younger is a member of the K. and L. of H., and Mr. Burlingame belongs to the F. and A. M.



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JOSEPH MAYER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass, Etc.; Also Paper Hangings, Lincrusta-Walton; Artist Materials, Etc., Nos. 68 and 70 Spring Street.  --  An old established and popular mercantile house of Newport, enjoying an enviable reputation throughout the trade, is that of Joseph Mayer, wholesale and retail dealer in paints, oils, artists' materials, etc.,  which is eligibly located at Nos. 68 and 70 Spring Street. This business was originally founded by the present proprietor eighteen years ago, and has since been conducted by him with steadily increasing success and prosperity.  The premises occupied for the past six years, at the above address, comprise a large and commodious store, 30 x 60 feet in dimensions, which is perfect in convenience of arrangement for the purposes of the business, and it is completely stocked with a large and first-class assortment of all kinds of paints, oils, varnishes, glass, putty, artists' materials, photographers' supplies, etc., together with all the latest patterns and styles in wall paper of every description, a specialty being made of Lincrusta-Walton.  Painting in all its branches, together with paper-hanging, frescoing, kalsomining and interior decorations of all kinds, is executed here in the most excellent and prompt manner, all work being performed in the highest style of the art, under the personal supervision of the proprietor, while employment is afforded to from five to ten expert assistants.  Mr. Mayer has had many years of practical experience in this business, and for promptness and reliability in its conduct no one in the trade enjoys a higher reputation than he, while his large and substantial patronage comes from far and near, and keeps steadily increasing in magnitude yearly.  Born in Germany, he has resided in this contry for the past twenty-eight years, and is a member of the Royal Arcanum.



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J. B. TITCOMB, Practical Wood Turner, Curtain Rods and Rings, Perrin Mill Building, Thames Street.  --  A very successful and reliable practical wood-worker engaged in this city is Mr. J. B. Titcomb, carrying on his operations in the Perrin Mill Building on Thames Street, who is well known for turning out the best and most accurate work, and for charging fair and reasonable prices.  This flourishing enterprise was established nine years ago by the present proprietor, who possesses a wide range of practical experience in the trade, extending over a period of thirteen years, and takes active part in the execution of all orders, thereby ensuring promptitude and an exact interpretation of detailed instructions. Sawing, planing, turning and wood working in all branches are equally undertaken; from the plainest work to the most artistic and elaborate, including curtain rods, ends and rings, band and scroll sawing,  ornamental wood work, grooving, tenoning, paneling, etc., and as a specialty, novelty goods turning to any design.  A heavy volume of trade is controlled among builders, carpenters, joiners, cabinet makers, furniture manufacturers and others throughout Newport and the adjacent districts, its volume furnishing regular employment for nine skilled mechanics.  The workshop, 50 x 100 feet in area, on the first floor of the address named, is furnished with an elaborate plant of improved wood-working machinery and appliances incidental to the trade, a 50 horse-power steam-engine being the motive force used; and thus every facility is possessed for meeting all orders promptly, and for ensuring the most satisfactory results.  Mr. J. B. Titcomb, who is a native of Maine and still a young man, has resided in this city for the past nineteen years, and is a member of the A. O. U. W.



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McLENNAN BROS., Fine Custom Tailors, and Dealers in Men's Furnishing Goods, No. 184 Thames Street.  --  Foremost among the practical and most proficient merchant-tailors of this city, who have acquired a first-class reputation not only as skilled cutters and designers of clothing, but also as having marked good taste when selecting stock as to quality of material, etc., stands the well-known firm of Messrs. McLennan Bros. Five years ago these gentlemen first embarked in business for themselves, and under their efficient management and direction this establishment has since become one of the largest concerns of the kind in the city, while their trade extends throughout the entire State.  The large and commodious premises occupied are 25 x 80 feet in dimensions, handsomely and attractively fitted up, and perfect in convenience of arrangement for the successful prosecution of the business in every department, while thirty-five experienced and skilful tailors and cutters are employed in constant service. All orders for everything in the line of fine custom-made clothing receive immediate attention, and the garments here turned out are guaranteed to give entire satisfaction in every instance, being pronounced perfect in fashionable cut, style, fit, finish, and workmanship, while the prices quoted are always placed at the very lowest figures consistent with first-class productions and fair and equitable dealings.  In the neatly-appointed and well ordered salesroom a fine display is made of elegant suitings and fine woollen and cloth cassimeres, etc., of both Eurpean and American production, in everything seasonable and desirable, suitable for all kinds and styles of garments, and the specialties of this house are fine dress suits, liveries, and ladies' gowns.  The firm also handle all the latest novelties in gentlemen's furnishing goods of every description, and are also agents for the Troy Laundry.  They are both natives of Canada, but have resided here several years, and are highly regarded as reliable young merchants.



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JOHN S. LANGLEY, Furniture of all Descriptions; also Furnishing Undertaker, Caskets, Coffins, Robes, Etc., No. 16 Franklin Street.  --  One of the oldest and most popular houses in Newport, engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, is that of John S. Langley.  This well-known concern was established as a furniture house in 1847, by Messrs. Langley & Bennett, the latter of whom retired in 1881, leaving the entire interest of the place in the hands of Mr. Langley, who has had fifty-two years' practical experience as a cabinet maker. The undertaking department was added in 1862, and has proved a great success in respect to the large and influential patronage commanded by the house.  The premises occupied comprise two floors, 40 x 80 feet in dimensions, situated in the building at No. 16 Franklin Street, which is the property of the proprietor.  He always has a large and comprehensive stock of upholstering furniture, caskets, coffins and robes on hand, and quotes the lowest prices.  Mr. Langley is a native of the city, where he is very popular, and a member of the F. & A. M.



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G. FREEBORN GILMORE, Trunk Maker; Trunks, Traveling-bags, Extension Cases, Straps, Pocket Books, and Leather Novelties; Wholesale and Retail Dealer in all Kinds of Rubber Goods; No. 154 Thames Street.  --  A very successful trunk maker and dealer in leather and rubber goods in Mr. G. Freeborn Gilmore. In the leather department trunks, traveling bags, extension cases, straps, purses, grips, pocket books, cigar, cigarette and match cases and leather novelties are dealt in; and trunks, sample cases, etc., are made by order to any special size, style or pattern, on short notice; while special attention is given to repairing in all its branches.  In the rubber department, rubber goods of all kinds are dealt in at both wholesale and retail, and the trade is supplied at the lowest prices; the chief lines being rubber coats, boots, hats, arctics and other clothing, rubber belting, packing, and mechanical rubber goods, hose complete with fittings, figures, toys, mats, balls, surgical appliances and novelties.  The business was established  three and a half years ago by the present proprietor, who possesses twelve years' practical experience in the trade, and learned trunk, etc., making in Providence. The store, shop, etc., 20 x 80 feet in size, are well fitted and fully equipped; and contain a large stock of leather and rubber goods of all kinds, three competent assistants being there regularly employed.  Mr. G. Freeborn Gilmore is a native of Providence, a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.



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A. C. LANDERS, Headquarters for Out-door Games and Sports, No. 167 Thames Street, Covell's Block.  --  An old established and reliable fancy goods bazaar in Newport is that of Mr. A. C. Landers, situated at No. 167 Thames Street, now well known as headquarters for out-door games and sports of all kinds and makes, at closely-cut prices.  The business was founded at the same location by the present proprietor, twenty years ago; and since that time each succeeding year was witnessed a marked development in the volume and scope of its operations, owing largely to the honorable methods upon which it is conducted, and to the fact that each article purchased represents a substantial quid pro quo for the price paid. Of the several kinds of goods dealt in, the chief are toys of all sorts, dolls, novelties and notions, fancy articles, lamps and a general line of small household goods.  Baby carriages, express wagons, velocipedes, etc.; imported flower seeds, bulbs and English lawn grass, and out-door games and sports, such as croquet and lawn-tennis sets, base-ball requisites, foot-balls, fishing tackle, cricket stumps, bats and balls, etc.; and of the whole of these a heavy and carefully selected stock is always on hand.  Tents of all sizes are also rented, lighted or decorated; piazzas enclosed, camp chairs rented; reflecting lights, fine vase lamps and chandeliers rented, and also sidewalk canopies.  The store, 20 x 100 feet in area, is finely fitted and well ordered; and customers - hailing from all over the city and vicinity - are served promptly and intelligently by three competent and courteous assistants.  Mr. A. C. Landers is a native of Rhode Island, and is a member of the Merchants' Club, the Order of Elks, the Royal Arcanum, the Good Fellows, the I. O. of O. F., and other of our leading societies.



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JOSEPH S. NUSS, Carriage Manufacturer, Wheelwrighting and Blacksmithing in all its branches, No. 7 Sherman Street.  --  Although established as recently as the early part of 1891, Mr. Joseph S. Nuss has already succeeded in building up a large and flourishing trade, reaching throughout the city and adjacent districts, as a carriage manufacturer, as well as for upholstering, trimming, repainting, all kinds of repairing and wheelwrighting and blacksmithing in all branches.  Mr. Nuss only delivers to his patrons such work as is best calculated to reflect credit upon himself and at the same time give the greatest measure of satisfaction to the user or customer. Contracts are accepted for the manufacturer of anything in the line of a vehicle; and estimates are cheerfully furnished upon application for general carriage repairs; and in each branch the prices charged will comare favorably with those of any other reliable house.  The shop, etc., 20 x 60 feet in area, are well fitted and equipped, and all orders left or sent there are sure of prompt and accurate fulfillment.  Mr. Joseph S. Nuss is a native of this city, now twenty-two years of age, and possesses a practical experience in this line of eight years.



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M. BROTHERSON, Carpenter and joiner, No. 128 Spring Street.  --  An old established and reliable carpenter and joiner engaged in this city is Mr. M. Brotherson.  While undertaking a general line of carpentering and joining, a specialty is made of the repairing of furniture, interior wood-work, cabinets, etc.; furniture being also carefully packed and shipped, and jobbing in all branches of the trade is promptly attended to. The business was established twenty years ago by the present proprietor, who possesses a wide range of practical knowledge in this line, and takes active part in the accurate fulfillment of each job undertaken.  The trade controlled consists in working on residences and for private families in this neighborhood, largely for repairing, packing and shipping furniture of all kinds.  The store, workshop, etc., 20 x 30 feet in area, are well fitted and equipped, and contain a large stock of furniture, etc., from two to five competent assistants being engaged.  He was born in New Bedford, Mass., came to this city in 1867, and served in the late war from 1861 to 1863 in the navy, as carpenter's mate on board the frigate 'Congress', having taken active part in the 'Merrimac' flight.



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GEORGE NASON, Upholstery and Cabinet Work, at the new shop, No. 30 Mill Street.  --  The enterprise, so successfully conducted by Mr. George Nason, was established by him in 1862. After a time the firm name of Nason Bros. was adopted, but since 1877 the business has been conducted under the above name and style.  The premises occupied comprise a store with a shop in the rear, located at No. 30 Mill Street; they were, however, for many years located on John Street.  Mr. Nason is a thoroughly practical workman of thirty-five years' experience, and is extensively engaged in cabinet work and a general line of upholstery.  He makes a specialty of manufacturing upholstered parlor furniture, makes awnings and mattresses, also repairs and restores old furniture, making it equal to new in appearance.  Five skilled workmen are constantly employed, while the most reasonable prices at all times prevail.  The large stock of parlor furniture, elegantly upholstered, which is displayed here, is absolutely unrivalled in this city.  Mr. Nason is a native of Newport. He is a prominent member of the Golden Cross and the Northern Mutual Relief Association.



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LOMMEL & MOLDEN, Pharmacists, No. 106 Broadway.  --  Although a new enterprise, this establishment, which was founded within the current year, has suddenly bounded into popular favor and confidence.  The store, 25 x 40 feet in dimensions, is a model of attractive and convenient appointment, and everything about the salesroom betokens thorough system and good practical management, while the stock of drugs, chemicals, proprietary and special family medicines of all kinds, perfumery, toilet and fancy articles, etc., is of the very highest standard quality, and first-class in every respect. The laboratory is neatly fitted up and provided with every necessary facility to insure accuracy and dispatch in filling prescriptions of physicians, and compounding and dispensing medicines, of which a leading specialty is here made. The proprietors also put up a general line of pharmaceutical compounds, and make their own tinctures, tonics, lotions, fluid extracts, etc., and altogether they transact an extensive business already, which gives the fullest assurance of permanent success and prosperity in the future.  Mr. Lommel is a native of Germany, but for the past twenty years he has been a resident of this country, while his partner, Mr. Molden, was born and brought up in this city, and is a notary public for the State of Rhode Island.



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GEORGE H. CHASE, Photographic Supplies, Optical Lanterns, Slides, Etc., Over No. 201 Thames Street.  --  One of the largest houses - if not the largest - in Newport engaged in the handling of photographic supplies, etc., is that of Mr. George H. Chase.  Photographic supplies of all kinds are largely dealt in; including cameras, stands, lenses, negative plates, cards, paper - particularly the 'Iota' paper, celluloid transparency films and printing-out plates manufactured by the house, - chemicals, utensils, etc.; while every description of out-door photography is prepared to order and negatives, etc., supplied. Moreover, optical lanterns and slides, objectives, etc., are dealt it, and a general line of photography is undertaken for amateurs and trade houses, such as developing, printing, toning, burnishing, enlarging, etc.  The enterprise was established by the present proprietor six years ago, and the business now controlled reaches among regular patrons throughout Rhode Island, necessitating the regular employment of four skilled assistants.  A well-furnished suite of rooms is maintained on the second floor, and a full equipment of the latest improved appliances and accessories is at hand for ensuring the finest results in the work turned out.  Mr. George H. Chase is a native of this city, and has at his command eight years' practical experience.



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NEW U. S. HOTEL, L. F. Attleton, Manager.  --  The New U. S. Hotel in Newport fills a niche in the esteem of this community and of the traveling public peculiarly its own, while its wide-open door reveals all the tasteful comforts of a home. The present manager, Mr. L. F. Attleton, succeeded to the control in March, 1892, and has succeeded in making an entirely new hotel out of the old, familiar house of days gone by.  He brings to bear an experience of twenty years of hotel life, having been manager of the Aquidneck for sixteen years, and is one of the best-known hotel men in the State.  The New U. S. is three and four stories high, 80 x 150 feet in dimensions, and contains thirty spacious and attractive rooms for guests. No luxury afforded in any hotel in the State, as regards either situation, surroundings, modern conveniences or management, is lacking at the New U. S. It is located in the heart of the town, within easy reach of depots, steamboat landings and the beach, and is convenient alike to the summer visitor, the commercial tourist and the transient guest.  The house in conducted on the American plan, open all the year, and liberally patronized at all seasons. The rooms are elegantly furnished, and the house is heated by steam throughout, provided with bath-rooms on all floors and with electric call-bells communicating with the office.  The cuisine of the house is worthy of special commendation, being under the most experienced management, and kept up to the highest standard of excellence.  The dining-room seats sixty people, while a gentlemen's cafe is situated on the first floor, and a ladies' cafe and parlor on the second, and a well-stocked bar is among the necessities of modern hotel life here supplied for the accommodation of guests.  Terms are placed upon a popular basis, and a stay at this hotel is ever remembered as a pleasant experience.  Mr. Attleton, the manager, is a Massachusetts man by birth, who has resided in this city for twenty years. He is a worthy Knight Templar, a member of the Elks and the Red Men, and a popular and painstaking host, with a wide circle of friends throughout the country.



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JOSEPH HAIRE, Plumber, No. 140 Spring Street.  --  Sanitary plumbing has become a science, and one who has done much to promote the welfare of the general public in this line, by taking advantage of all the most modern improvements known to the trade, is Mr. Joseph Haire. Mr. Haire has been in the business twelve years, having learnt the trade with McAdam & Openshaw of this city.  He was established on his own responsibility in 1884, and met with flattering success.  The store on Spring Street, which has been occupied for two years, is 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, and thoroughly stocked with sanitary appliances of all sorts.  A specialty is made of sanitary plumbing, and contracts are made for residence work.  Mr. Haire is a native of Newport. He is also a member of the Master Plumbers' Association.



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NEW YORK BUTTER HOUSE, No. 158 Thames Street.  --  A first-class and thoroughly reliable establishment of Newport is that known as the New York Butter House, wholesale and retail dealers in butter, cheese and eggs, which is under the efficient management and direction of Mr. E. H. Edes. Although having been established in Newport within the passing year, this establishment at once bounded into popular favor and confidence, and secured a liberal share of patronage, which keeps steadily increasing in magnitude and importance.  The large and commodious store occupied at No. 158 Thames Street is nicely fitted up in the most appropriate manner with special reference to the business, every facility and convenience being provided for the handling and preservation of the stock.  The finest line of dairy products is found here, embracing the best products of the Western States, New York State and local creameries, received direct from the producer, all orders for which are promptly and reliably filled at short notice.  Daily new invoices of these supplies are brought to this house to meet the demands of customers; and for freshness, superior quality and uniform excellence of these products, no establishment can excel those found here. The proprietor, who is a native of New York City, is an experienced, enterprising, and reliable young business man, who devotes his entire attention to making this house the largest and most popular one of its kind in Newport, and that his efforts will not prove in vain is demonstrated by the phenomenal success already enjoyed, which gives the fullest assurance of permanent prosperity and maintenance in the future.  This house is one of the branch stores of the oldest and largest retail butter, cheese and egg houses in New England, and it is doubted if their sales are exceeded by any wholesale house, having twelve branch stores in the principal cities.  The ones that Mr. Edes is interested in, in connection with C. H. Russell, are located at No. 383 Main Street, Hartford, Ct., No. 223 Tremont Street; and No. 1391 Washington Street, Boston, Mass.; No. 51 South Main Street, Fall River. The house was originally established in New York by Mr. C. Russell, over fifty-five years ago, who soon after established a branch in New Haven, Ct.  The business was until 1873 conducted as a wholesale business.  At that time Mr. C. Russell retired from business, and it was continued by his four sons, who added a retail department, and established the several stores. Mr. Edes, who is the brother-in-law of C. H. Russell, was admitted to partnership in the five stores mentioned in 1887.



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HENRY D. SPOONER, Merchant Tailor, No. 200 Thames Street.  --  One of the most popular merchant tailors in Newport, R.I., who makes a specialty of fine imported goods, is Henry D. Spooner, No. 200 Thames Street. Mr. Spooner is a native of the city and has forty years' experience in the business, in which he has been actively engaged since he was fifteen years of age.  The store at aforementioned address has been occupied for two years, and is 25 x 40 feet in dimensions, well and thoroughly appointed in every respect, and largely stocked with all the latest patterns in domestic and imported cloths, at the lowest consistent prices for custom work.  Mr. Spooner has a large and influential patronage in Rhode Island, and commands a trade which requires the constant employment of eight skilled tailors.  He is a gentleman in the prime of life, and a native of Newport.



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H. J. JONES, Manufacturer and Dealer in Fine Furniture, No. 14 Mill Street. --  A prominent house engaged in the furniture business in Newort, R. I., is that of H. J. Jones, No. 14 Mill Street.  Mr. Jones was established on his own responsibility eight years ago in the furniture manufacturing industry, and about eighteen months ago entered into the auction business, which has been very successful, large consignments of goods arriving daily for the weekly sale held on Wednesdays. Mr. Jones also goes all over this section, and superintends private sales of farms, furniture, cattle, etc.  The store at No. 14 Mill Street is 30 x 40 feet in dimensions, and comprehensively stocked with all kinds of drawing-room, reception-room, bed-room, and library furniture, at prices which will stand competition anywhere else. Mr. Jones is a native of Newport, and a very popular young man in the city.



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GEO. N. LINEHAM, Veterinary Horse Shoer, Surgeon, Dentist, Nos. 29 and 31 West Broadway.  --  For the past fifteen years Mr. Lineham has been engaged in this business on his own responsibility, and with the exception of the first three years has always been found located at the above address.  Here he occupies a two-story building, having the ample dimensions of 30 x 60 feet, cleanly kept, thoroughly ventilated and drained and well lighted, being perfectly equipped in every respect for the purposes to which it is devoted, and can accommodate a dozen or more head of stock.  Sick or lame horses taken to board here, for any length of time, receive the best of food, care and medical treatment possible to be given; and the proprietor, who is an expert in this line of profession, fully understands the requirements demanded of him, and it is rarely that a case intrusted to his keeping is not sooner or later pronounced cured. He also attends to horses at the owner's stable, and in every instance his charges are reasonable. For the past thirty years he has also been known in this section of the city as an experienced and reliable horse-shoer, and at all times he is the recipient of a large, active, and influential patronage.  Born in England, Mr. Lineham has resided in Newport for thirty years.



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JAMES H. SANFORD, Dealer in Meats, Fruits and Vegetables, No. 92 Broadway. --  This flourishing business dates its foundation way back to 1847, at which time it was originally established by Mr. Geo. M. Hazard, and he conducted it with signal success and prosperity up to to August 1891, when the present proprietor, who had been in the employ of the house for nine years previous, became his successor.  The present commodious store has been occupied during this extended period of time, and this covers an area of 25 x 80 feet, while it is neatly and conveniently fitted up with special reference to the business, and two competent assistants and teams are required in constant service to meet the demands of customers. In the large and carefully selected stock will be found the primest beef, veal, lamb, mutton, pork, corned and smoked meats of all kinds, poultry and game, and fruits and vegetables of every variety in their respective seasons, all of which are guaranteed to be the choicest and most desirable class of supplies obtainable in the market, and are in the freshest condition when offered for sale.  All orders are promptly filled and delivered free of charge, to any part of the city, and a large, active and permanent patronage is catered to. No inferior stock is handled in this reliable establishment.  Customers are always assured of getting superior articles, honest weight and satisfactory treatment here.  Mr. Sanford, who is a native of this city, is a young man of experience, ability and enterprise, and he is a popular member of the Provision Dealers' Association of Newport.



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E. F. COOPER, Artist Photographer, No. 195 Thames Street.  --  Mr. E. F. Cooper, photographer, is the recognized leader in this line in the city.  He is an artist of experience, rare skill and judgment, and a thorough master of all the new processes and different methods that have recently been introduced into the art.  In fine portraiture he stands unrivalled, and in making pictures he omits nothing, not even the most trifling detail, and the result is likenesses of artistic finish and superior excellence.  A general photographic business is conducted, and orders for oil, ink, pastel, crayon and water-colors are promptly executed, with commendable skill, in the highest style of the art.  The third floor of a spacious building, 30 x 80 feet in dimensions, is occupied, which affords ample room for the purposes of the business, and the studio is handsomely furnished, and adorned with many beautiful specimens of works of art.  The operating rooms are provided with the latest and best appliances, including scenic backgrounds, etc. This is an old-established gallery, having been in successful operation for the past quarter of a century, and for the past five years has been under the efficient management and direction of Mr. Cooper, its present proprietor, who brings to bear many years of practical experience upon the business.  Born in Massachusetts, he has since his residence in this city become very popular for his attainments as an artist.



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CHAS. M. COLE, Pharmacist, No. 302 Thames Street.  --  A leading pharmacy is Newport that caters to a fine class of trade only is that of Chas. M. Cole.  This well-known establishment was founded in 1881 by J. E. Groff, the present proprietor succeeding in 1885, retaining as well as adding to the large and influential patronage which the house has always had at its command. Mr. Cole is a native of Connecticut, has had fourteen years' experience in the business, and came to this city in 1885.  Notwithstanding the fact that he is a young man, Mr. Cole is one of the most reliable pharmacists in the city, and puts up a general line of pharmaceutical compounds, makes tinctures, etc.  The store is a handsome one, and is 20 x 40 feet in dimensions.  It is fitted up with elegant show-cases and a large soda fountain.  Mr. Cole is very popular in the city, and is a member of the American and Rhode Island Pharmaceutical Associations.



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OTTO RUECKER, Watchmaker and Jeweler, No. 190 Thames Street.  --  Mr. Ruecker founded his present enterprise four years ago at the above address, and has since conducted it with the most gratifying results, from its first inception a large and liberal patronage having been rapidly secured. His salesroom is fitted up in a convenient and attractive style, and in the show windows and cases is found displayed to the best advantage a remarkably fine stock of jewelry, in the greatest variety of useful and ornamental articles, in all the latest novelties of the day; also gold and silver watches of both foreign and domestic manufacture, clocks, sterling silver and plated ware, etc., all of which have been carefully selected in each department from the best makes and newest styles.  These goods represent rare specimens of beauty and merit difficult to be obtained elsewhere, and are guaranteed to be exactly as represented in every instance, while they are offered for sale at the most reasonable prices.  Everything in the line of repairing of all kinds of complicated work is here done in the most skillful and reliable manner at short notice, and the proprietor personally attends to the satisfactory execution of all work intrusted to him.  Mr. Ruecker, who is a practical and experienced watchmaker and jeweler, is highly regarded as one of the most successful representatives of his trade in Newport, in which city he has resided for nearly ten years. He was born in Germany, but emigrated to this country about fifteen years ago, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. and other societies.



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BARKER BROTHERS, Practical Gas and Steam Fitters, and Dealers in Gas Fixtures and Steam Goods; Piping for Gas, City Water, and Steam, Etc., No. 183 Thames Street.  --  One of the best known-practical gas and steam fitters in Newport is the responsible firm of Barker Brothers. They have been entrusted from time to time with the execution of some highly important and significant contracts; such as the whole of the piping, etc., on the Masonic Building, that in Mr. F. Rogers' mansion - the largest job of the kind here; and a general line of fine residential work all over the city and suburbs.  The enterprise was established eleven years ago by the present proprietors, Mr. F. S. Barker and Mr. S. P. Barker, Jr., both of whom possess a long and varied experience in this line, ranging over a period of thirty years.  All kinds of gas and steam fitting are executed by the latest methods, and thoroughly reliable and satisfactory work alone turned out; jobbing and repairing in all branches are undertaken, and a specialty is made of bronzing, brass finishing, nickel and silver plating, while the firm are also dealers in the finest qualities and latest styles of chandeliers, gas brackets, globes, radiators, standards, pipe for gas, city water, and steam, and a full line of gas and steam fitters' supplies are requisites; a heavy and carefully selected assortment being always on hand.  The store, 20 x 60 feet in area, is finely fitted, and is a recognized headquarters for the best grades of goods dealt in, at fair and reasonable prices; regular employment being furnished for twelve skilled workmen.  Mr. F. S. Barker and Mr. S. P. Barker, Jr., are both natives of this city, and are members, respectively, of the Newport Business Men's Association and the Young Men's Christian Association.



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HENRY J. HASS, Florist and Market Gardener; Greenhouses and Gardens, Almy Court; Flower Store, No. 234 Thames Street.  --  A reliable and very successful florist and market gardener in Newport is Mr. Henry J. Hass, whose flower store is situate at No. 234 Thames Street, and is now a well-known headquarters for everything in the floricultural line, and also makes a specialty of fresh vegetables in their season for markets and families.  Extensive and well laid out gardens and five large and fully-equipped greenhouses are maintained at Almy Court, off Bliss Road, near Broadway, so that the stock at the Thames Street store is replenished fresh every day.  Bedding plants, house plants, cut flowers, wreaths, and floral designs are always on hand, special orders being filled at short notice; and contracts are undertaken for the complete floral decorations of churches, ball-rooms, halls, dining-rooms, etc.; rare and choice flowers and plants being provided, and the latest ideas embraced as to grouping and general arrangement.  The greenhouses were established by the present proprietor ten years ago, and early in 1888 the flower store on Thames Street was inaugurated. This latter, 20 x 80 feet in area, is well arranged for preserving and displaying the elegant and fragrant stock it contains, from five to ten competent assistants being employed according to the season of the year.  Mr. Henry J. Hass is a young man of German birth, having come to the United States twenty-four years ago, and is a member of the Independent Order of Red Man, and President of the Maennechor Society.



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A. P. JENNINGS, Dealer in Clothing, Hats, Caps, and Furnishing Goods, Agent for Troy Laundry, No. 136 Thames Street.  --  This thriving business was established by the present proprietor about six years ago, and since been conducted by him with uniform success.  The attractive and commodious store, 25 x 60 feet in dimensions, is most convenient and orderly in its fittings and appointments, while the arrangement is such as to secure every advantage for the handling and display of the fine assortment of goods carried, and two courteous salesmen are employed in constant attendance. In the large and complete stock will be found everything in ready-made clothing suited to the wants of all classes of the community, being of the finest material, best workmanship, and correct in fit and style; also a full and complete line of hats and caps of all the latest and most fashionable shapes and styles in all kinds and sizes; and a comprehensive assortment of gentlemen's furnishing goods of every description, embracing the latest novelties in neckwear, gloves, hosiery, collars and cuffs, shirts, suspenders, underwear, etc.  In each department of the store the stock has been most carefully selected, and the prices quoted are placed at such low figures as to be difficult of duplication elsewhere.  Mr. Jennings is also agent for the Troy Laundry.  Born in Maine, he has resided in this city for the past twenty years.



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WM. H. ARNOLD, Pictures and Engravings, Frames, Etc., No. 12 Broadway.  -- In the line of pictures, engravings and frames the most liberally patronized establishment in this section of the city is that which has been so efficiently conducted by Mr. Wm. H. Arnold for nearly fifteen years.  He is the leading representative dealer in this community in high-class steel engravings, etchings of the highest artistic character, photographs, landscape views, pictures and fine works of art of all kinds, and he caters to every class of the public, being able to meet the views of the critic in these art goods as well as the purses of those desirous of inexpensive pictures and frames.  A fine line of picture moldings is also carried, embracing all the most fashionable materials, styles and designs of the day, and frames of any size and kind are here manufactured at short notice, all orders receiving immediate attention in every instance. The premises occupied, 20 x 80 feet in dimensions, are admirably adapted for the purposes of the business, and fully stocked with a most superior and desirable assortment of goods.  Mr. Arnold brings to bear upon this business twenty years of practical experience, and he is a thoroughly reliable and progressive merchant.  A native of Rhode Island, he has been a resident of this city for the past twenty-seven years, and is a popular member of the F. & A. M.



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W. C. SCOTT, Market and Grocery, No. 313 Thames Street.  --  This flourishing business was originally founded here in 1865 by Mr. H. D. Scott, the father of the present proprietor, who conducted it most successfully alone up to about a year ago, when his son became his successor. The large and commodious store, 40 x 50 feet in dimensions, is neatly and orderly kept, being a model of tasteful and convenient appointment throughout, and very suitably divided into separate departments for the advantageous prosecution of the business.  In the large and comprehensive stock handled will be found everything in the line of foreign and domestic, staple and fancy groceries, such as the finest teas, coffees, sugars, spices, family flour, cereals, canned goods, table delicacies, sauces, butter, cheese, eggs, lard, household specialties, etc.; while in the market is to be had fish of all kinds, the primest beef, veal, lamb, mutton, pork, hams, sausages, smoked, corned, and salted meats in great variety, poultry and game, and all kinds of fruits and vegetables in their respective seasons, and five efficient assistants and two wagons are employed in constant service to meet the demands of the trade.  All orders receive immediate attention. Mr. Scott is an experienced and honorable business man, and previous to assuming control of the affairs of this house himself, was employed by his father for twenty years.  He is a member of the Newport Business Men's Association, and the Royal Arcanum, and for thirty years past has been a resident of this city, coming originally from Massachusetts, his native State.



p. 267.

GEORGE H. CARR, Bookseller and Stationer, No. 172 Thames St. -- Four years ago Mr. Carr embarked in the present enterprise for himself at the above address, and the venture has since proved a most gratifying one. The store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is attractively and orderly appointed throughout, being perfect in convenience of arrangement for the successful prosecution of the business, and three competent assistants are employed in constant attendance.  It is stocked to repletion with a large and comprehensive assortment of goods, embracing school-books, standard works and light literature, modern fiction, historical, scientific, biographical works of all kinds, etc.; also English, French and American stationery of the most fashionable styles of the day; playing cards; pictures in great variety, both framed and unframed; artists materials, wrapping paper, novelties in fancy articles, holiday and birthday cards, etc.  A specialty is here made of receiving subscriptions for all the popular magazines and periodicals published, also of all orders for bookbinding in every conceivable style, and of engraving in the latest fashions of the day.  All the work here performed is invariably executed in the highest style of the art, and is guaranteed to give entire satisfaction in every instance, while the prices charged throughout the entire establishment are always placed at the most reasonable figures.  Mr. Carr is an experienced and strictly honorable young business man. He is a native of this city, and a member of the Business Men's Association and the F. and A. M.



p. 267.

WM. K. COVELL, JR., Stoves, Ranges, Furnaces, and Choice Home Furnishing Goods, No. 163 Thames Street.  --  Among the old-established and prosperous business men of Newport stands Mr. Wm. K. Covell, Jr., dealer in stoves, ranges, furnaces, etc. About twenty years ago Mr. Covell first embarked in this business on his own responsibility, and during this extended period of time he has since enjoyed a most prosperous and successful career.  The large and commodious premises occupied for the past eighteen years comprise a store 30 x 125 feet in dimensions, with a workshop on second floor, and throughout the entire establishment every necessary convenience and facility are provided for the proper conduct of the business. A heavy and comprehensive stock is carried at all times, including stoves, both for heating and cooking purposes, ranges, furnaces, and a choice line of house-furnishing goods of every description, and the proprietor is sole agent in this city for the celebrated "Beebe" ranges.  In each department the assortment here handled embraces the products of the best and most reliable manufacturers in the country, and in every particular these goods are guaranteed to be exactly as represented, while they are offered for sale at the lowest consistent figures.  Mr. Covell employs twelve skilled mechanics, and he devotes special attention to hot air, tin, sheetiron and copper work, also to repairing and setting up furnaces, ranges, etc., and jobbing of every description in this line, all orders for which are promptly and satisfactorily executed in the most superior style. Born and reared in this city, he aims to please all who favor him with their patronage.  He is a member of the Newport Business Men's Association.



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JAMES T. WRIGHT, Pharmacist, No. 22 Washington Square.  --  One of the oldest and best patronized drug-stores in Newport is that of J. T. Wright, Washington Square.  This well-known house was founded way back in 1780, by Charles Teke, and came into the hands of the present proprietor in 1885. Mr. Wright has had twenty-eight years' practical experience in the business, and has lived for fifteen years in Newport, where he is very popular and has a most influential trade, having reorganized, as it were, the entire concern and put new life into the business on his succession. The store has been handsomely furnished and fitted up with all the various appointments and accessories of a first-class pharmacy, while it is 20 x 40 feet in dimensions and heavily stocked with all kinds of drugs, pharmaceutical compounds, patent medicines and chemicals.  Mr. Wright is a graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1872; and a prominent member of the Rhode Island Pharmaceutical Association.  He is a gentleman in the prime of life, and a native of Massachusetts."

Transcriber's Note: The above date in the book does read "1780" - not sure if this is a typo or the correct date.



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WM. C. COZZENS & CO., Carpets, Paper Hangings, Window Shades, Draperies, Etc., No. 138 Thames Street.  --  The largest and oldest house in Newport in the line of carpets, paper hangings, window shades, and draperies, at retail, is that of the firm Wm. C. Cozzens & Co.  This well and favorably known concern was founded by Wm. C. Cozzens way back in 1832, when there was no other house in the same line in the city.  The premises occupied include the second floor of the building, 45 x 100 feet in dimensions; also two floors of another building, 35 x 60 feet, heavily stocked with everything in the line, as above indicated.  The goods are from the best-known makers, of superior quality, and are retailed by this enterprising firm at prices which will stand the keenest competition anywhere. Messrs. Cozzens & Co. enjoy an enviable local patronage, and are well known to be leaders in the trade. Mr. Cozzens is a gentleman in the prime of life, and a native of Newport.

*******End - Newport sketches - Next: Narragansett Pier.********


These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2001 by Beth Hurd


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